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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  October 31, 2018 7:00pm-8:00pm GMT

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you're watching beyond 100 days. six days, 11 rallies, donald trump sets off on an election blitz across the country. as the campaign ripped into the final stretch he shows no sign of toning down the rhetoric. his twitter election pitch is all about it immigration and protecting america's borders. turkey gives its first official account of the murder ofjamal khashoggi. after years of inaction by the international community on the war in yemen and you push the peace them the united states. mike pompeo calls for a ceasefire within 30 days. also on the programme, the man who was completely parallelised but can now walk again thanks to the extraordinary efforts of scientists in switzerland. and on this special halloween evening we will take you to georgetown washington where kathie kay has been telling the neighbours some of myjokes.
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hello and welcome — i'm katty kay in washington, and christian fraser is in london. donald trump is campaigning as if his ownjob depended on it and perhaps it does. if republicans lose next week his conservative agenda will stall. so mister trump is putting himself and the sandal theme of american identity at the very heart of the debate. in the next six days he will hold 11 rallies in eight states to support republican candidates and in some places like florida and indiana for instance where the races will be tight he is going to go twice. let's talk more about all of this with. where do we stand? first of
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all it is a punishing schedule that we see donald trump is about to embark on. he has already held a number of rallies over the past few weeks but as we get to the final stretch he has picked states where there are very close races. here's hoping he can rally his base, his loyal ha rd—core base hoping he can rally his base, his loyal hard—core base to actually turn out and vote and these are states that he won in 2016. but the other thing that is worth noting is that many states including places like florida and georgia, the election is ready under way with early voting and that is why in almost all of his stops that he is going to make in the coming days he won't just be going to make in the coming days he won'tjust be telling voters to vote ina won'tjust be telling voters to vote in a week's time, he will be pledging or imploring them to vote straightaway. and that is the key really. early voting could make a really. early voting could make a real difference in this midterm election. we have been told for example as of this morning more than 3.4 million people have cast an early ballot in the state of florida. that is a much higher
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number than five years ago, four yea rs number than five years ago, four years ago, soi’i’y, number than five years ago, four years ago, sorry, in the mid—term elections. let's look at some of the polls from florida where he is going twice. there is a very tight senate race. the incumbent versus the governor rick scott. can we show the poll? there you go. two points ahead of rick scott. and the current mayor of rick scott. and the current mayor of tallahassee ahead to the governor's race as well. that is perhaps the reason why donald trump is going twice. absolutely. and let's go back 2016 whether polls put hillary clinton and donald trump very close in the state of florida and as you both know i spent a lot of time in florida during the campaign and donald trump out campaigned hillary clinton. his personal appearances at rallies in crucial parts of the state, places like tampa and miami, they really
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tipped the needle over so he won florida. that is why he is spending so much time. but it's worth mentioning the democrats have also got their big hitters out on the trail as well. i was at a rally in the state of nevada where barack 0bama was the star act, and he will be in florida on friday doing the same thing for the democratic party, trying to rally the court base. what is interesting, if you look at some of the results from early voting so far, there are more votes that have been cast across around seven states at least, by republican affiliated voters, which suggests at the moment early voting is favouring the republican party. thank you. yesterday we told you donald trump wa nted yesterday we told you donald trump wanted to end the practice known as birthright citizenship, the constitutional right of anyone born in the us to be an american. he is currently fighting top republicans about that idea. paul ryan said yesterday the president's plan was
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not possible. today mister trump shot back. paul ryan should be focusing on holding the majority rather than giving his opinions on birthright citizenship, the president treated, something he knows nothing about. joining me now is the former us defence secretary. you have been through many midterm elections yourself. that's bat that the president is getting into over the president is getting into over theissue the president is getting into over the issue of immigration, does he just want this to be the conversation or is this a sincere dispute between republicans about theissue dispute between republicans about the issue of citizenship?” dispute between republicans about the issue of citizenship? i think he is sincerely committed to revoking the citizens' rights of people who we re the citizens' rights of people who were born here but whose parents are not here legally. i think he has held the view for along time. but i think what he is doing is now we're nearing the end of the election he is releasing more rabbits, he is asking the media to chase more rabbits more holes, it is the
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caravan, the sister birthright, it is the issue of people who are coming against taking ourjobs, it is about people who have vermin and other illnesses coming over the border, it is fear. and he is really trying to generate more fear and point to people who are not, quote, americans, in the sense that they are not white americans. and that is why he has really sponsored this nationalism. i am an nationalist meaning i am a white nationalists. which is why there is such a provocation and why people are resenting the language that is being used. so i think he's doing what he does best, and that is to stoke fear and rile his base to say they are coming for you. we always call you secretary, you were secretary of defence before that he was an asda and before that you were a congressman. i won't ask you to ask you to count hammy midterm elections you've been through, as a senator
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you've been through, as a senator you went through midterms when president reagan was president. would you have wanted ronald reagan to come up to maine to campaign for you? it would have been useful. any time the president comes on your behalf it is helpful if he is the president of your party. russell reagan by the way were someone who was seen reagan by the way were someone who was seen as more of a reagan by the way were someone who was seen as more of a healer, he was not, even though his rhetoric was conservative commie was very pragmatic commie was somebody who embraced people who had different backgrounds. so he would have been popular in the state of maine, even though he and i may have disagreed ona number of though he and i may have disagreed on a number of issues. i was very much involved, i was prepared to hold him accountable and did for what was taking place by something that was i thought to constitutional. i wrote a book about it saying that the men of steel have to be curtailed. and ifelt that
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it saying that the men of steel have to be curtailed. and i felt that his administration had gotten out of control and he himself actually acknowledged that in terms of who did not acknowledge them to set up this covert off—the—shelf capability, but he said i assume responsibility for it. and that was a major step on his part. i'm not sure president ron's reaction would have been the same. perhaps not. you are also the if you were secretary of defence today and the president said he was sending falls to the sorrow border would would you say? to the sorrow border would would you 7 i to the sorrow border would would you say? i would have had great difficulty in terms of the rationale as to why we are sending military soldiers on the border. number one, under our system there is the concept of military cannot be used for law enforcement purposes. and i would worry, we had a situation during my tenure the national guard was on the border and one of the
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guardsmen shot and killed a young shepherd. across the border. and it was very controversial. and that is the thing i would worry about most. military people are trained to protect our national security, it if someone protect our national security, it if someone fires a shot what might take place with our armed men and women on the border, i would worry very much about that. i would have had difficulty saying do this, there is the national guard, the governors can use the national guard, the president can call on them, i would have had great reservations about sending them. stay with us we want to talk to you about another story coming up. this is interesting. you raise the issue of the troops to the border, we talked about the birthright issue. there was also last week the possibility of tax cut for the middle classes in the next
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week or so. it seems like in this final stretch of the campaign everything is being thrown at the wall to see what sticks in terms of public opinion and media pick up. and that is why i think also we have a president out on the campaign trail so much. he wants to make this election about him and his policies. he is not on the ballot but this is a referendum on him. and if this is what he's doing for a midterm what will he do in 2020? yes, and how does he have the stamina? he is 72 had looked all those stops and rallies he's doing. i would not have the stamina to do that. i think this is also partly to show he is vigorous, he is out there, he is campaigning and has full of energy for 2020 elections. today turkish officials have given the first officials have given the first official statement on how jamal khashoggi was killed. the chief prosecutor in istanbul gave a news conference earlier today he said mister khashoggi was hooded and strangled as soon as he entered the
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consulate and then dismembered. the prosecutor said the murder was planned and has asked his saudi counterpart to give answers as to who gave that order to kill mister khashoggi. a short while ago we spoke to the bbc‘s turkey correspondent mark lohan. 0riginally we we re correspondent mark lohan. 0riginally we were told mister khashoggi had died ina we were told mister khashoggi had died in a fight and this was a rogue operation that had gone wrong full stop this is not what we're hearing today. the saudis have changed their story so many times over the last four weeks. today we had from the first official confirmation from the assembled chief prosecutor that jamal khashoggi was strangled sooner is he entered the consulate behind me. and that his body was dismembered and then destroyed, raising the question of whether his remains will ever really be found. that also backs up what a senior western official has told the bbc, which is when khashoggi entered the building heard was put over his head, he had a very violent blow to
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the head and then he was choked to death. it is so gruesome. but is the feeling amongst turkish officials that the saudis and the saudi prosecutor was really cooperating or other saudis just trying to find out exactly what evidence turkey has?” think the turks are growing increasingly frustrated with the lack of cooperation from the saudis. there was a feeling from the turkish soured that the saudis wanted to get turkish evidence and take it back to riyadh. the extradition request has been refused. there is still no word on who ordered the killing, no word on who ordered the killing, no word on whether remains are, if indeed they were buried somewhere. so that is what i think drove the istanbul prosecutor to make this prosecutor today. the sense of anger at a growing feeling that riyadh is doing a massive cover—up to hide who actually ordered the killing of
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jamal khashoggi almost a month ago. thank you. and pressure on saudi arabia now linked to this story. the white house is winning praise from human rights groups for addressing the war in yemen. mike pompeo has called for an end to bombing in 30 days. specifically he said they must stop bombing obviated areas of the country. the civil war in yemen is now in its third year. it is a conflict that created the world's whilst a humanitarian crisis with millions now at risk of starvation. awarning, millions now at risk of starvation. a warning, this report contains some distressing material. in yemen, it has come to this. more than three years of war have brought the nation to the brink of famine. we filmed these distressing images earlier this month.
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after years of inaction there is a new sense of urgency and from the united states a new push for peace. 30 days from now, we want to see everybody around a peace table based on a ceasefire, based on a pull—back from the border, and then based on ceasing dropping of bombs, that will permit the special envoy, martin griffin, who is very good, he knows what he is doing, to get them together in sweden and end this war. a war that keeps selling new graves. here are 42 schoolboys killed by the saudi led coalition in august. we met survivors of the devastating strike, one more attack which raised concern internationally about the saudi bombing campaign in yemen. but the turning point is coming it may be because of the brutal killing by saudi officials of the dissident saudi journalist, jamal khashoggi. that in turn increased the pressure on key saudi allies and arms suppliers, like the us and britain. the prime minister today emphasising the need for a lasting peace deal.
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and nationwide ceasefire will only have an effect on the ground is underpinned on a political deal by the parties and my right honourable friend the foreign secretary discussed this matter with martin griffiths the un special envoy last night. they agreed the uk will continue to encourage all parties to agree to de—escalation. but will the rebels be willing to come to the negotiating table? on a walkabout this month, this senior leader seems to be in no hurry for talks and was dismissive of peace efforts by the un envoy, martin griffiths. translation: we are always ready for the peace talks but i don't think they will be successful. i have told martin they will not have positive results. for now the rebels have a tight group on the capital and most of the populated areas of the country. it is unclear if they or the saudis will be ready to
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compromise. a recap on the history of this war. the rebels are an insurgent group from the north of the country that have been fighting the government fears. in september 2014 the group with the backing of iran moved into the capital taking large part of the city. by february they have appointed a presidential council to replace the president. in march 2015 the saudi led coalition imposed a blockade and began the arab campaign which has lasted three and a half yea rs. which has lasted three and a half years. what little infrastructure yemen had has since collapsed so much so that injune 2017 there was a outbreak of cholera, over1 million people were infected, more than 2500 people have died so far, and since june this than 2500 people have died so far, and sincejune this year it is the fighting which has cut off
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international aid. some 40 million people are now at risk of starvation. let's go back to the former secretary of defence on this. does the white house have the capacity to pressure the saudis to stop the bombardments and go to the negotiating table, and does mike pompeo's comment yesterday suggest they are about to do this and prepared to do so? i believe we do andl prepared to do so? i believe we do and i think the statement by the secretary of state and secretary of defence is very clear that we want the conflict to stop, that this is a humanitarian disaster on a scale we have not seen in many years. it has been off the news cycle here in the us until now, and i think it is the murder ofjamaal khashoggi us until now, and i think it is the murder of jamaal khashoggi in us until now, and i think it is the murder ofjamaal khashoggi in turkey that has caused the world to look at this much more closely and say it has to stop. i think we have the
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ability to influence the saudi leadership. it takes two to make a peace agreement however. this has beena peace agreement however. this has been a proxy war. in ryan has fostered this as well as the saudis have been reacting as have the uae and others in the gulf region to say will not allow iran to try to take overyemen and will not allow iran to try to take over yemen and therefore pose a threat to the stability of saudi arabia. it is going to take them as well but i think the us is determined to say we have to stop the humanitarian disaster as soon as we can. we have allowed it to go on for a long time, i think you heard the secretary of state and defence say it is enough. thank you very much coming in tojoin us. say it is enough. thank you very much coming in to join us. the former british international development secretary has been to yemen and has been a consistent voice calling for ceasefire in the country. he is with me. let's say in 30 days' time there is not a ceasefire. the mood has shifted in the us. has it shifted in the uk is so the us. has it shifted in the uk is so much so that we would stop supplying the saudis with arms?m
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supplying the saudis with arms?m supplying the saudis with arms is an important issue but it is secretary because they will get the weapons anyway. the real issue is whether or not a ceasefire can be achieved and whether it holds. and whether the international community will back martin griffiths, the british international civil servant who is the special representative on yemen at the united nations. those are the key issues. you have to get peace talks started. it will be extremely difficult but that is the route the world has two support, that is the way it has to go, the sooner we get on with it the better.|j way it has to go, the sooner we get on with it the better. i understand the arms are a secondary issue, but we we have let the saudis do our work in yemen and the shadow foreign secretary said today that the uk has some culpability for the loss of life. i think britain is absolutely complicit in this appalling catastrophe. the humanitarian disaster therein catastrophe. the humanitarian disastertherein yemen, catastrophe. the humanitarian disaster therein yemen, where i saw for myself when i was there, i met parents to children had been
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murdered, i went into a school which had been bombed by the coalition. children were being killed in tents, teenagers radicalised, furious, charge against the british and americans. the whole thing is catastrophe in every level. strategically for britain and the us in the middle line east and a humanitarian catastrophe. with which we are humanitarian catastrophe. with which we a re clearly humanitarian catastrophe. with which we are clearly complicit. you heard secretary: saying that america if it chooses to has the capacity to exert pressure on saudi arabia. there is also the question as to whether the iranians will bow to pressure and get the rebels to accept a ceasefire. who is the counterpart to this, who will put the kind of pressure on iran? let's be clear, the rebels have been driven into the arms of the iranians by the policies pursued by principally i'm afraid britain and america. the houthis
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have been driven into iranians arms and this is country is blockaded by the coalition. so the ability for the coalition. so the ability for the iranians to get weapons of any significance in there is really very slight. so what we have to see is strong support for martin griffiths, the international negotiator, and then everyone has to lean on all the parties and different countries have different influence with the different influence with the different parties to make sure the negotiations actually start. and once they start they will go backwards and forwards, people will walk out, they will come back, you have to bring in as much as possible thatis have to bring in as much as possible that is left of civil society in yemen, but this is a community that has been bombed back to the stone age, the infrastructure is broken throughout yemen, you have medieval diseases reasserting, and as i say it isa diseases reasserting, and as i say it is a terrible position for britain and the us to bn and we have to move the situation on now. and frankly this morning's announcement overnight from the white house is a
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good start, but for britain it is quite something to be behind the moral curve to mock mister trump's white house. plenty of news on this in the coming weeks. thank you for coming in and talking about it again. police are investigating the deaths of two sisters from saudi arabia whose bodies washed up on new york city ‘s waterfront last week. they were discovered bound together with tape on the 24th of october and the bank of the hudson. they lived in virginia where they were first reported missing back in august. that is a complicated story. we will carry on watching and see what the investigation comes up with. a passenger ferry has collided with a played in barcelona causing doc officials to flee to safety. a barbarian seaman managed to film this collision which happened early this collision which happened early this morning in the city. no one was reported injured. the seaside village of essex in
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england has been used by us congressional candidate toward what could happen if voters do not back president trump. the campaign picture which shows rundown homes in the village of jay wick sounds says help president trump keep america on track and thriving. the republican doctor is standing in illinois. it has received an angry response from locals. it is that time of year when we traditionally had to kathie kay's neighbourhood in georgetown to see how we are all coping with the mid—term excitement. how we are all coping with the mid-term excitement. yet. that
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actually means it's halloween. did you know america trick—or—treaters spend on average $86 perfamily you know america trick—or—treaters spend on average $86 per family on halloween? i'm pretty sure my neighbourhood contributes quite a lot of that. the whole decorating seedin lot of that. the whole decorating seed in georgetown is pretty extreme. here we go. a selection of the seriously spooky houses. can you guess who's that is? it's mine. check out this huge figure round the corner from check out this huge figure round the cornerfrom me. and the skeleton check out this huge figure round the corner from me. and the skeleton of a dog walker with his animals. these ghoulish pumpkins. and this is washington. so of course halloween will be political. this is the remains of a man who'd just liked beer. let's bring you a clearer shot. this was poppy, my 12—year—old, she likes to say she goes all out on the decorating scene, so goes all out on the decorating scene, so this is her pumpkins, her skeleton, the red lights, and that little ghoulish figure you can see in the window. tonight though i have
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1412 —year—old girls coming to my house. we did have christian fraser there. he has gone. this is my friend. it's not actually a candle in this, it is my iphone. it is all health and safety. anyway, here's here to tell you a bit about how many pumpkins we consume in britain at this time of year. 10 million, in fa ct. at this time of year. 10 million, in fact. 95% go to lamps like this. and do you know that we throw away around 50% of the stuff that we carve out from inside? not many of us carve out from inside? not many of us eat it. these seeds here that he is spewing out, someone told me tonight there were today that you can fry these. they are full of zinc. mine are rotten by the time they come up. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. some wetter weather on the many
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overnight and the rate will get back into eastern parts but today it has been sunnier and warmer compared with yesterday. trick—or—treaters this evening seeing a bit of rain across the western side of the uk but notice it becomes a bit more widespread for england, wales came into eastern scotland as the night goes on. but with cloud and outbreaks of rain nowhere near as cold as last night. avoiding a frost. frost more limited to some of us frost. frost more limited to some of us in northern ireland in north—west scotland. here temperatures fall below freezing in places as it clears. 0ne below freezing in places as it clears. one of two showers. fog patches as well. the northern ireland some that could be dense and freezing in the morning. elsewhere we have cloud and rain and temperatures well above freezing. the rate will drag its heels before finally clearing away from the easternmost parts of the uk into tomorrow. much of england and wales into eastern scotland it will start cloudy the further east you are
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without breaks of rain. some of that rain may hang on to late afternoon across eastern fringes of eastern england players elsewhere it starts to brighton, sunny spells, fine afternoon, scattered showers were western scotland and other places. north—westerly breeze tomorrow. it may bring back temperatures are little. but if you have sunshine it helps. the last of that rain in the far east will clear on thursday evening. the showers played in the west from all but north—west scotland, where one to continue during the night. on thursday night it is clear skies and widespread frost with one or two fog patches. plenty of sunny weather on friday but things changed by the end of the day, initially the northern ireland, as it turns wetter and windier. that is as hurricane 0scar gets closer to the oscar. uk. the central passed us over the weekend but we are close enough to get windy weather and
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wetter weather. it looks like most of the rain on saturday will be in scotla nd of the rain on saturday will be in scotland and northern ireland. not getting into wales and england until later on. it is milder and windier and those wins could become destructive across northern parts of the uk. some rain in the west on sunday, not as windy, still miles. you're watching beyond 100 days... i'm katty kay in washington, christian fraser is in london. our top stories: with less than a week to go to the midterms we find out why suburban women could be key in deciding whether democrats win back the house. win back the house. donald trump calls again on the thousands of migrants travelling towards america to turn around, as he deploys more troops to the us border. coming up in the next half hour: the british foreign secretary pledges to recruit business leaders as diplomats to help secure trade deals around the world after brexit. britain is set to leave the european union before the current football season ends, but what impact will brexit have on attracting top players to the premier league? as americans go to the polls
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in the midterm elections, it is a truism that every vote counts — but maybe some votes are more sought after than others. next week, suburban women could be key in deciding whether democrats will win back the house. in states like newjersey, they are mobilizing, but will that enthusiasm carry over to the ballot box? the bbc‘s nick bryant has gone to have a look. it's in the suburbs of america's major cities that the battle for the house of representatives is being fought. residential havens like the 11th district of newjersey, where this time of year the houses are festooned with phantoms and the lawns are studded with placards. these ones are really heavy! let's try to lift one. amidst all the pumpkins, an emergent pink wave of female activists who've never before been involved in politics. erin chung used to work for the trump organisation, but now heads up a women's group
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trying to turn this republican seat democrat. across—the—board, democrat and republican women are sick of his misogynistic comments about women, they are sick of the way that he treats women like second—class citizens, and they are ready to do something about it. donald trump remains popular amongst the blue collar voters who helped win him the presidency, but there's a lot of white—collar discontent in the suburbs about his tone and his style amongst more affluent voters, amongst more highly educated voters, and especially amongst female voters. when democrats gathered to campus this neighbourhood, three quarters of the volunteers were women. so there are three people here that we need to talk to. eleanor siegel comes from a republican family, and has voted republican in the past. but not this time. are you saying you're angry? yes, very angry. does trump anger you? does trump anger me?
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i think i've gotten past that. it's beyond anger. he motivates me. before the navy let me fly one of these, i had to pass a lot of tests. the democrats are fielding a record—breaking number of female candidates. here it's mikie sherrill, a former navy helicopter pilot. and at a time when the party is moving to the left, they've tried to field moderates in these republican—held seats. ..get thejob done. but this race, like so many others, is close. and at this republican rally for their congressional candidate, female voters were untroubled by the president's often insulting behaviour towards women. i have no problem with donald trump. i love donald trump, and that's why i'm here today. i support him. i support him, 100%. suburban women are supposed to be deserting donald trump. they're not asking suburban women. they're not asking me. i'm not. i support the president. pink wave or not, this election looks like reinforcing the realignment of american politics — where democratic strength is concentrated in the cities and their suburbs,
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and donald trump's america lies beyond. nick bryant, bbc news, newjersey. if democrats do manage to win the house of representatives — one thing we are bound to hear more about is the investigation into russian interference in the 2016 election. there is debate on whether the meddling impacted the outcome of the race but kathleen halljamieson argues it helped elect donald trump president. in fact, it wasn't just hacking but cyberwar that was carried out against the united states and it demanded a proportional response. professorjamieson joins us now to discuss the findings of her new book. thank you for coming in, professor. let me start on the midterms of all get into 2016, is hacking going on in the mid—term elections to the same degree as 2016? we don't have any evidence there is hacking. it hasn't yet been released from front
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groups, the answer is as far as we know, not. let's get back to 2016. we know the interference happened, the question has always been, did it affect the outcome? in all of your research, did you manage to come to a conclusion? did the russians have an impact on whether donald trump became president of the united states ? became president of the united states? i made the case that they probably did but not certainly. the trolls working in cyberspace being impostors, pretending they were us citizens managed to have a message aligned with donald trump's to reach the constituencies that he needed to mobilise, demobilise and shift and did so in a manner that had lots of sharing. we don't know whether they targeted the right people in the right states. substantially disrupted the clinton campaign and we saw effects inside those weeks in which the hacking was most actively covered by our media on clinton's qualification for president, that is perception and it dropped. in two presidential debates in which hacked
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content presidential debates in which hacked co nte nt was presidential debates in which hacked content was used, people were less likely to think that she was forthright. in both cases, in those debates, that predicted a reduced likelihood to vote. hacking mattered strong. finally, this information may have affected the decisions of james, and if it did, and if that was because of the announcement that was because of the announcement that was made public about the reopening of the anthony wiener server on 0ctober of the anthony wiener server on october 28 with the change in the media agenda substantial in nine days added a drop by 2.5 to three points, the case becomes close to conclusive. we go into great detail about the hacking of the democratic servers “— about the hacking of the democratic servers —— you go into. why was that so servers —— you go into. why was that so crucial? not in terms of what it did and didn't reveal but in terms of the timing? it came so close to the republican convention. the timing of the democratic convention occurred at a time in which hillary clinton needed to mobilise the
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sanders supporters, consolidate her support with the key democratic constituency and effectively it was used to argue to them that the sum had been on the scales against him and hillary clinton's campaign was pa rt and hillary clinton's campaign was part of that equation. second time in which they entered the debate substantially with impact was 0ctober seven when the wikileaks distribution ofjohn 0ctober seven when the wikileaks distribution of john podesta's e—mail content revealed speech segments by secretary clinton, alleged speech sections, that we used to blunt the effect of the access hollywood tape and because our press didn't do a good job of effect of the displacing something else we learned that day, that the russians were behind the hacking. it was also used consequentially in the second and third debate by journalists who mistakenly took material out of context in a way that made it look like her responses in debates were disingenuous when in fa ct in debates were disingenuous when in fact she was actually trying to put that material back in context. we saw a result in the polling data that we pulled out of that election. did that matter? in myjudgment,
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probably. you argued in the book that there wasn't equivalent story is being aimed at the trump campaign that was as disruptive as the hacking stories for hillary clinton. some people would point to the access hollywood takes which could have been far more devastating and they weren't. maybe it was just that hillary clinton, as we now know, was a poor candidate. once you break into your analysis of the things that hillary clinton did wrong, all the things that happened to donald trump and all the things you did right, you only have to explain a shift of 78,000 votes, 0.006% of the votes cast to say there was a change. the question i asked in the book, did the altered media agenda which substantially disadvantaged secretary clinton and the disadvantage in questions into debates and the change and amount of messaging against her both in cyberspace and in our news media have enough effect to account for 78,000 votes? if you don't think we are there yet, allow for the possibility that that 2.5 drop in
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the polls in the james, investigation reopening change the outcome in the decisive states and florida, which would have given her a clear electoral college victory. the book is cyber war, thank you for coming in. we should always remember it was 17,000 votes, almost impossible to tell which people were reached. —— 78,000 votes. the effect of the media narrative is a compelling one. scientists in switzerland have enabled a paralysed man, who was told he would spend the rest of his life in a wheelchair, to walk again. the researchers inserted an electrical device around his spine which boosts the signals from his rain to his legs. incredibly and unexpectedly, damaged nerves also seem to regrow. while it's not a cure, it shows paralysis can be reversed. the scientists hope they will have even better results in the future with patients who are recently paralysed. pallab ghosh has been to switzerland where he had exclusive access to the reasearch and the patients: david's doctor said he'd never work again. now, among the foothills of the alps, he is able to travel
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more than half a mile. an implant around his spine has changed his life. to me it means a lot. i think you've got to try to do the impossible to make the impossible possible. i'm surprised over and over again when we really get there. it's a lot of fun and it feels very good. this is david training with his implant a year ago. stim on means it's turned on. when it's turned off, he can't move. back on and he continues to walk. nerves in the spinal—cord send signals from the brain to the legs. some people are paralysed when they're damaged through injury. in most cases there's still a small signal but it's too weak to create a movement. the implant boosts the signal, enabling david to walk. not only that, the restored movement seems to repair some of the damaged nerves. and here's the result. david walks eight paces with the implant turned off. what was very unexpected
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was the spinal—cord repair that we have observed. and we need to understand the underlying mechanism. what we have observed in animal model, it seems that nerve fibres are growing again, that they are reconnecting the brain to the spinal—cord. david had his implant surgically inserted by one of switzerland's leading neurosurgeons. a chronic case, he was paralysed seven years ago after a sporting accident. i've been working in the neuroscience now for a long time now and i know that when you have a spinal—cord injury, after a while, if there is no progress, it will remain like this, so what i noticed for the first time is a change, even in a chronic state, and that's, for me, something completely new. outside of the lab in the real world it's much harderfor david. without his electrical stimulation he can only walk a few paces so it's far away from being a cure. but the research does demonstrate
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that paralysis can be reversed, at least to some degree. the big question is by how much. sebastien had a cycling accident. before he came to work with the swiss team, he had no movement in his legs. but now, he can ride his bike, which is powered mostly by his hand movements, but also by his legs. such a feeling of freedom. everything is working together and that helps you to be healthy for the rest of the day, the rest of the week and the rest of your life. stem on. robotic voice: 0k, start message send to implant. david and sebastien are the first patients to have benefited from the treatment. they can't keep the stimulation on all the time, because it's too uncomfortable for long periods and the system isn't ready yet for everyday use. researchers say in the journal nature they hope to improve the system and it can be tested in the uk and other parts of the world in three years' time.
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pallab ghosh, bbc news, lausanne. that is remarkable and so exciting for people who have lost the use of their legs. amazing. let's return back to the caravan in mexico. donald trump has reiterated calls for a group of thousands of central american migrants who are making their way to the southern border of the united states to turn around. the government is deploying thousands of troops to the southern border of the united states, to stop the caravan of migrants. some 7,000 migrants, who've been on the road for more than a fortnight, are currently in southern mexico. we understand a large proportion have taken aside in mexico, only about 2500 travelling to the border. 0ur correspondent will grant has been travelling alongside them. so far, they've refused to be blown off course. but the remaining obstacles may prove much greater than the inclement weather. president trump has described these migrants as an invasion and the pentagon has announced more
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than 5,000 troops will be sent to the border to meet them when they arrive. at this rate, that's at least seven weeks away. at least several weeks away. most are adamant it will take more than soldiers standing guard 1,000 miles away to stop them. "if i went home now, i would be a coward", says this man, "because my wife and child are in the us and keep asking me..." daddy, why you not coming? even the mexican migration authorities admit they haven't seen this degree of commitment in the past. translation: in previous years, we have seen other caravans fall apart, but this one appears very strong, very large, and still united. there seems little doubt that with this troop deployment, the trump administration is trying to dissuade these migrants from attempting the rest of their trip. however, they may have underestimated the sheer determination within the group to at least make it to the border and have their cases heard. yet for a minority, the military threat is working. already frustrated at the caravan's slow pace and missing his daughters
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left behind in honduras, the idea of a hostile reception from us soldiers was enough to make him turn back. translation: my family told me all about it. when i asked what was happening, they said the border is full of soldiers, so i figured, why go all the way to the border only to be turned away and told i can't come in? it is a difficult and personal decision to abandon the trip — almost as tough as leaving home in the first place. the remaining migrants believe their strength lies in their numbers and plan to ignore any more messages from washington telling them theirjourney is in vain. will grant, bbc news, mexico. you wonder what they are making of the mid—term election and the debate up the mid—term election and the debate up here. this is beyond 100 days. still to come: we'll be looking at why brexit uncertainty is making the sporting world anxious.
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how much do you know about how the food you eat reaches the table? according to a new survey, most of us believe that the way our food is produced poses a significant threat to our planet. elaine dunkley reports. this is the edwards family from calverley — busy with work, uni, after—school clubs and supporting their football team, bradford city. i should ask what's on the menu tonight. so, we're going to have chicken pesto pasta tonight. when it comes to mealtimes, what is top of the list? i'd say there's a number of things. definitely value — like, i like to get a good bargain. time is always short, and so i always feel like i'm rushing. the kids are hungry, they need feeding, so, "quick, what can we get out on the table so no—one has to wait very long to have it?" the edwards family spend, on average, £450 a month on food. cost and convenience are important, but what about the impact on the environment? when i go shopping, that's not the first thing i'll be thinking of. i don't think the average family
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would ever, like, think about how sustainable something is. we've brought in sustainable eating expert duncan, armed with the family shopping receipts, to see if he can help them eat in a more environmentally friendly way. one of the easiest and simplest things you can do is eat frozen veg. it's affordable, it's nutritious, and there's a lot less waste. most of the family's meals are based around meat. so what advice has duncan got? one of the biggest causes of wildlife loss on the planet is the food we eat, without a doubt. and the biggest contributor to that is the livestock industry. just tell me a bit more about things that i could maybe be thinking about when i'm, you know, putting it together. i mean, some of the greatest cuisines in the world are pla nt—based. whether it's moroccan, thai, chinese, indian, italian, a lot of them are plant—based — it's brilliant. and then, if you do want a bit of meat, nothing wrong with that. a little bit of meat can go in and it's a flavouring — it shouldn't be the centrepiece of every single meal. he's given the family food for thought, and i'll be spending a few days with them to see if they can eat and shop in a way that doesn't cost the earth.
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elaine dunkley, bbc news. the british foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, is setting out plans to recruit 1,000 more diplomatic staff, which he hopes will give the foreign office the necessary shot in the arm, post brexit. mr hunt says it will be "the biggest expansion of britain's diplomatic network for a generation", with new embassies promised in africa and south east asia. mr hunt has also strongly endorsed the demand from washington that the saudi—backed war in yemen be brought to a speedy conclusion. let's get more from our diplomatic correspondent james landale who is at the policy exchange in central london where he has been listening to the foreign secretary's speech tonight. let's talk about this plan to bring in people, captains of industry, james. it's looks a little bit, on the surface, like the us system, which has been criticised in the
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past for its cronyism. it's not going to be like that. it's not going to be like that. it's not going to be party donors, people who have supported the president who end up have supported the president who end up with some nice juicy plum position such as in london or elsewhere. if this happens, this is going to be those people who are from business, the city, maybe can have trade experience, who are the right person in the right place for the rightjob right person in the right place for the right job in right person in the right place for the rightjob in the right country. we are talking about a handful of people at most, i think. that is the ambition of the foreign secretary. there is a degree of scepticism. do businesspeople have the right kind of skills to be diplomats? will they be dissuaded by the lack of money and the poor salaries? will they suddenly realise how diplomats are paid suddenly realise how diplomats are pa id less suddenly realise how diplomats are paid less than rich businessmen? it is experimental it is part of the foreign secretary's plan to say let's think differently about the way we do diplomacy after brexit. let's think differently about the way we do diplomacy after brexitlj guess it is a recognition that what will matter is trade deals. about
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having those qualifications, diplomats can be insensitive positions in south—east asia, there can be some kind of crisis, some conflict and how does the ambassador respond? if only his and her background is only in business and trade and not in conflict resolution or diplomatic negotiation? that's exactly the point is diplomats make to me. they say these days diplomats have to bang the drum for british business but they have to do the other stuff, negotiating with other countries on consumer issues, or dealing with disputes, conflicts or peace negotiations, whatever happens to come their way during their career. that's the scepticism. the foreign secretary's view is, we need to open up british diplomacy and it needs to be more inclusive, diverse and part of that will be saying there is a lot of expertise from the private sector, let's have a look at it. a quick word on the yemen story.
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there has been criticism of britain, some of it from andrew andrew mitchell who was in our story, saying britain has a moral responsibility the british government is aware of that. the problem they have got is that there is huge concern that if too much pressure is put on the saudis, the destabilisation that could potentially happen if the leadership of mohammed bin salman is changed, altered, in any way, that the resulting uncertainty as destabilisation could be almost worse than the situation we currently have. although a leader seen currently have. although a leader seen by his critics as being impulsive, young and taking rash decisions. that is why the foreign secretary is saying on the response to the murder of jamal secretary is saying on the response to the murder ofjamal khashoggi, yes, what happened is as reported, thenit yes, what happened is as reported, then it is utterly shocking and against british values. but let's ta ke against british values. but let's take a considered response to that. equally, on the situation in yemen, the british government has been pushing for some change on this for
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a great deal of time. equally, they don't want to rush some kind of ceasefire that won't be accepted by both sides. james, thanks very much. britain now has less than five months left in the european union, but the uncertainty over the brexit talks is affecting a wide range of businesses, including the world of sport. football clubs and racecourses are among those who rely on overseas talent and easy movement between countries, but that may now be under threat. leaving the eu is, of course, one of the most uncertain issues in the uk, but for football fans, the pressing question remains what is brexit going to mean for those club transfers in the premier league? our sports news correspondent richard conway reports. british football is a sporting success story. and just like every other industry, brexit is set to make its mark. stoke city's roots within its local community stretch back over 150 years, but it's a community that overwhelmingly voted to leave the eu. the owner of the club is at odds with the majority of stoke's fans. if we want to take a european player, we can take him,
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provided the two clubs can agree. whereas, that can all change and we'll have to to seek work permits. and if you get the best talent, you have the best league. and that could be damaged. but there is hope within football of a brexit dividend for home—grown talent that could reap more rewards for the home nations by allowing younger players to get increased playing time. in a post—brexit world, we can say exactly what the quotas are for english footballers, we can go back onto fifa rules, which means we can only sign 18—year—olds, like everybody else in the world, from other countries. and of course that will get much bigger opportunities to home—grown, genuinely, home—grown footballers, and access to the national team. and football is not alone in facing up to the challenges and opportunities that brexit may bring. sport's other big signings are, of course, the four—legged variety. and just like football, horse racing is big business here in newmarket, they can exchange hands for hundreds of thousands of pounds. as an industry, it employs over
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17,000 people directly. many of them from europe. linda, who came here from sweden to follow her passion three years ago, is part of an international workforce that racing relies upon. people from all over the world. it's all here. i mean, all of the big trainers are here in newmarket. in sweden, in czech, and poland, the racing is so small there, so if you actually want to be invested in it, then there's not much for you out there. theyjust don't have the quality as they do in england. there are also concerns over free movement of horses, as well as people. annually, 26,000 move seamlessly between britain, france and ireland. the industry is demanding that continues, post brexit. racing's allure stems, in part, from studying the form and predicting a winning outcome. but, as it stands, for this industry and the wider sporting world, all bets are off.
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we talked about this a few weeks ago in burnley, a big football tan, 66% voted for brexit and at the time of the referendum the exchange rate was 1.3 and now1.1. the referendum the exchange rate was 1.3 and now 1.1. if you were signing foreign players for millions of pounds and you are not as wealthy as the others in the premier league, that matters to burnley football club. it affects our dearest clubs in the premier league. i can imagine how that causes concern. christian, if you were talking about the mid—term elections and our special programme next tuesday night, would you say and me are going to be in the washington studio? —— would you say katty and me? i would say katty andi say katty and me? i would say katty and i we will be in the studio. i have been schools on twitter. xiao ruoteng and i will be in washington
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on tuesday night for a special programme “— on tuesday night for a special programme —— katty and i will be. i will be on a flight to washington tomorrow morning. he will be practising his grammar on the plane on the way over here. especially for you. see you tomorrow. some wetter weather on the many overnight and the rate will get back into eastern parts but today it has been sunnier and warmer compared with yesterday. been sunnier and warmer compared this been sunnier and warmer compared picture from o watchers this picture from one of our weather watchers in soft suffolk. —— in suffolk. trick—or—treaters this evening seeing a bit of rain across the western side of the uk but notice it becomes a bit more widespread for england, wales came into eastern scotland as the night goes on. but with cloud and outbreaks of rain nowhere near as cold as last night. avoiding a frost. frost more limited to some of us in northern ireland and north—west scotland. here temperatures fall below freezing in places as it clears. one of two showers. fog patches as well. for northern ireland some that could be dense and freezing in the morning.
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elsewhere, we have cloud and rain and temperatures well above freezing. the rain will drag its heels before finally clearing away from the easternmost parts of the uk into tomorrow. much of england and wales into eastern scotland it will start cloudy the further east you are with outbreaks of rain. some of that rain may hang on to late afternoon across eastern fringes of england. elsewhere it starts to brighten, sunny spells, fine afternoon, scattered showers in western scotland and other places. north—westerly breeze tomorrow. it may bring back temperatures a little. but if you have sunshine, it helps. the last of that rain in the far east will clear on thursday evening. the showers fade in the west from all but north—west scotland, where one or two continue during the night. on thursday night it is clear skies and widespread frost with one or two fog patches.
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plenty of sunny weather on friday but things change by the end of the day, initially for northern ireland, as it turns wetter and windier. that is as ex—hurricane 0scar gets closer to the uk. the centre will pass us over the weekend but we are close enough to get windy weather and wetter weather. it looks like most of the rain on saturday will be in scotland and northern ireland. not getting into wales and england until later on. it is milder and windier and those winds could become destructive across northern parts of the uk. we will keep you updated. some rain in the west on sunday, not as windy, still mild. this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 8pm: theresa may backs the call from the united states for a ceasefire in yemen within 30 days. the turkish authorities say jamal khashoggi was strangled as soon as he entered the saudi consulate in istanbul. the men who were completely paralysed but can walk again
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thanks to the extraordinary work of scientists in switzerland. the foreign secretary says britian will strengthen other global relationships when britain leaves the eu. today i am announcing the biggest expansion of the semantic network for a generation, including 12 new posts and nearly a thousand more personnel. channel 4 chooses leeds for its new headquarters. the broadcaster chose the city ahead of bids from birmingham
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