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tv   Breakfast  BBCNEWS  November 2, 2018 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay and mega munchetty. our headlines today: hotter, wetter, milder — a new met office report says the uk has experienced more extreme weather in the last ten years than in the previous 30. the row over high street betting machines — after sports minister tracy crouch resigns, the government defends its timetable for cutting the maximum stake from £100 to £2. it might be breakfast in the uk, but the night is only getting started here in memphis, tennessee. i'm live in the birthplace of rock ‘n‘ roll. but you'll find little harmony ahead of next week's crucial mid term elections. the rise of energy debt. three million households now owe money to their gas and electric providers — a jump by almost a quarter in just one year. brilliant biles makes history at the gymnastics world championships. simone has become the first woman to win four all—around titles. it's her 12th world gold overall. it's friday, 2nd november.
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our top story: the uk is experiencing more extreme weather, according to a new study by the met office. it says when comparing the last ten years to the previous 30, the hottest days have become hotter, while the coldest days are not as cold as they were. with the details, here's our news correspondent ben ando. who can forget the long, hot summer of 2018? well, get used to it, because the met office is warm spells of warm weather and individual scorching summer days are both on the rise. the report co m pa res both on the rise. the report compares extreme weather from the 19605, 705, 805, to the period from 2008 and 2017. it found that spells of warm weather have more than doubled, that individual hot days and 0.8 degrees hotter and colder days are called. —— colder. it is not all about the heat. there has
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been a 17% increase in days of heavy rain. and while it may not feel like it at the start of november, research say that the number of tropical nights which averages don't fall below 20 celsius, or 68 fahrenheit, are also on the increase. in the 30 years between 1960 and 1990, there were just eight. where last summer alone there have been two. though tropical nights can have a downside, in periods of very high temperatures they can be a hazard for the elderly, who get no respite from the heat. and though this study has focused on extreme weather conditions, the met office says it is consistent with worldwide trends in global warming, driven primarily by fossil fuels. in global warming, driven primarily by fossilfuels. ben in global warming, driven primarily by fossil fuels. ben ando, in global warming, driven primarily by fossilfuels. ben ando, bbc in global warming, driven primarily by fossil fuels. ben ando, bbc news. the perfect person to talk about this is matt taylor. he will bring us this is matt taylor. he will bring us the latest weather and have some thoughts on that met office report. there's been support across the political spectrum for tracey crouch, who resigned as sports minister because of a row about fixed—odds betting terminals.
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the government was expected to cut the maximum stake from £100 to £2 next april, but this has been postponed until october. ministers say the gambling industry needs more time to adjust. we can speak now to our political correspondent ben wright who is in westminster. ben, what has been the reaction to the resignation? good morning. tracey crouch is respected, was respected, and the view of her resigning has been supported by many. ronnie archbishop of canterbury, to borisjohnson, across parties people have been very surprised and full of regret that she has left her post. she even has support from people like penny mordaunt and the leader of the house, andrea leadsom. there is the degree of surprise in westminster that this has been allowed to happen. it feels today like he will bungle by the government. after all,
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cutting the maximum amount you can bet on these machines from £100 to £2 has crossed it support. everyone agrees it is a good thing to do. somehow it because of implementing the government has managed to infuriating minister who driven this for the past three years, who is passionate about the subject, but feels she has been let down and the government have clearly broken, as far as she is concerned, a promise about when this card, this implementation date would come in. so you have different into predations about what has happened. number 10 saying it is notjust about trying to shore up treasury funds, delaying a notch to their revenue, but tracey crouch is insisting it was a promise, the plan was to introduce this in april and the government have gone against that. it is a really interesting argument. i don't think it is over by any means. there is a good chance that mps will try to amend the budget, the finance bill in a few months time, to try to force this
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through, even if the government is to happen. you're talking about the political impact, there is a human side of this as well. we are talking toa side of this as well. we are talking to a father who signed took his own life after running up huge gambling debts. we will talk about the fixed odds bet in machines. we are talking about another political resignation this morning. former home secretary amber rudd was let down by her own officials, an inquiry into the events leading up to her resignation has concluded. ms rudd stood down in april, saying she had "inadvertently misled" mps investigating the windrush generation of post—war caribbean migrants. the report says ms rudd lost confidence in her officials and was "not supported as she should have been". president trump has suggested that soldiers deployed to the mexican border could shoot migrants who throw stones at them while attempting to cross into the us. mr trump's comments come just days ahead of crucial elections, the result of which will determine the success of the rest of his presidency. he also said he's planning to deny
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asylum to people who enter the united states outside legal ports of entry. anybody throwing stones, rocks, like they did to mexico and the mexican military, mexican police, where they badly hurt police and soldiers of mexico, we will consider that a employees in various cities including san francisco, left their desks to show their anger at the technology firm's treatment of women and ethnic minorities. google staff are demanding an end to pay inequality, as well as greater transparency around how the company deals with allegations of sexual harassment. half of all the people who go to a&e with sports—related injuries are children and teenagers, according to research published in the royal society of medicinejournal. boys aged 1a and girls aged 12 were most at risk of sustaining a sports injury. for boys, playing football, rugby union, and rugby league caused the most fractures while for girls, horse—riding, netball, and trampolining were mainly to blame.
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i don't think many parents would be surprised by those statistics this morning. virgin trains has scrapped all peak—fare restrictions on frday afternoon services from london euston station. the company says it wants to reduce overcrowding on trains to birmingham, manchester, and liverpool. passengers on these routes were often forced to stand in order to avoid paying much higher peak fares. a baker who took the phrase ‘royal icing' to the extreme will have her lifesize cake of the duke and duchess of sussex put on display at an exhibition in birmingham. lara mason spent more than 250 hours crafting the cake ahead of the royal wedding in may. it weighs in at nearly 20 stone, is made from 300 eggs and 50 kilograms of fondant icing. it is covered with chocolate ganache and everything is edible apart from the frames. it must have been a good tweet. 20 stone, it weighs. it has not been touched. everything is edible. but not eaten. apart from the friends.
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look at that. even the cuticles are sugared. i am not surprised it has not been eaten. eating someone's teeth... or their bid. nibbling on someone's beard or their teeth or their fingers. it is incredible. i am no expert, but how long can they keep the kate peck? doesn't it go off? doesn't be icing protected -- keep the cake. the point is it is a display of cake making in birmingham. showing what is possible. indeed. someone else showing what is possible. simone biles. she was part of the abuse case in america, her hard upbringing. by one of the coaches.
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by upbringing. by one of the coaches. by one of the coaches was now in prison. she is still only 21. a kidney stone on the eve of the championship. i was going to mention that. aged 21. and now to become one of the all—time greats up their alongside the gymnast igretsov when i was alongside the gymnast igretsov when iwasa alongside the gymnast igretsov when i was a child, nadia, natch, simone biles is ready gone there. she has become the first woman to win four all—round titles. it's her 12th world gold overall. all this despite being admitted to hospital with a kidney stone, on the eve of the championship. leicester city's premier league winning manager, claudio ranieri, is the latest to pay tribute to the victims of saturdays helicopter crash, at the king power stadium. it's time to move on for usain bolt, as he persues his dream of becoming a professional footballer. two goals in pre season friendlies weren't enough to keep the athletics great at the central coast mariners in sydney.
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his eight—week trial has come to an end. and dina asher—smith has been named as the sunday times, sportswoman of the year for 2018, following an impressive year, which saw her win three gold medals at august's european championships. whatever you're doing, don't go away. we have the burgess brothers on. tom and george are with us. they play in australia. no, new zealand. we promised we would bring you matt taylor. he is in tamworth for us this morning. it is the third anniversary of the bbc weather watchers. something we were not very familiar with, but it has taken in of popularity. any time the whether present a city where the photos you sent into them on display. for years that has been going on. be careful
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what you do when you send in a picture, it can come back to bite you. it certainly could. but we appreciate every single one of them. a very good morning to stop where outside tamworth this morning at one of our breakfast viewers split was gardens. three years as week and since bbc weather watchers launched. —— breakfast viewers clip was gardens. we have had 2.2 million reports in that time. around 1700 each and every day. you may not believe it, but the weather team look at the vast majority of those as well. your pictures are valuable to us, it helps tell the weather story of what is happening and what is to come, as we look at the days ahead and also, to be honest, it is great to see some other parts of the uk as well. in all their splendour. we love your pictures, whether they are of sunrise, sunset, sunny days, 01’ even are of sunrise, sunset, sunny days, or even the cloudy and ready ones,
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so or even the cloudy and ready ones, so long as they help us tell the weather story there could be shown on air. it is easy to sign up as well. just go to the website. your picture could be with me tomorrow morning on breakfast. just outside tamworth this morning, it is pretty chilly. we have a frost on the ground. and it is a cold start uk wide this morning. the great day ahead. let us look at the forecast for today. that frost we have got is widespread. temperatures down to around —5 in a few spots at the moment, probably —1 in tamworth at present. it should be a cracking autumn day. lots of sunshine to come. the reason is the weather front which brought us the rain yesterday across eastern parts of england, a miserable day it was, thatis england, a miserable day it was, that is off towards denmark and norway. a ridge of high pressure buhrer link across the uk will stop that keeps things mostly dry —— building across. isolated showers across western scotland and other western parts of the uk, particular north—west england, north wales, the emphasis is on isolated. foremost
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you will be scraping the frost off the car this morning. —— for most. temporary mister fog patches the car this morning. —— for most. temporary misterfog patches here and there. they were clear. the day will be sunny. changes in northern ireland later when we see in turn increase. maybe some rain into the evening. most will stay dry and sunny. temperatures in the region of around 7— 13 degrees. into tonight, big changes to the north and west of the uk. the winner will pick up. we have the remnants of hurricane oscar between us and also across iceland. that will bring gales to northern and western areas. particularly heavy and western parts of scotland. dry for much of england and wales stockholding plea to the south and east. east anglia, south—east england began to —2 as we start the morning. this is where the frost will be, east anglia, southeast, east midlands, fairly dry and sunny all day long. wet and windy day for scotland, northern ireland, winds up to 60 mph in places in scotland. heavy rain on the western hills. minor flooding heavy rain on the western hills.
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minorflooding possible. into the far west of northern england, north—west wales, we could see some rain. a milder day on saturday. at least by sunday the winds will have easy touch. temperatures will be down a little bit. not a bad day for many. scotland and northern ireland having a better day on sunday with some sunshine. the far south and east may stay dry as well. but across northern and western england and wales expect that and outbreaks of rain. but not as windy on sunday. and that could be crucial, because i think many will be setting off i this wicket. be warned, pretty windy on saturday evening, not as bad on this —— sunday —— fireworks this weekend. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily telegraph leads on the resignation of sports minister tracey crouch over the government's delay in bringing in cuts to fixed—odds betting machines. the times previews a report that is due to be published into the events that led amber rudd to quit as home secretary. the guardian joins several papers
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in featuring a photo of businessman arron banks on the front page following the news he and his leave dot eu campaign are being investigated over alleged funding offences during the 2016 referendum. he denies any wrong—doing. the daily mirror reports the case of a japan airlines pilot arrested at london's heathrow airport after being found to be more than nine times the legal alcohol limit. if the business pages. i'm starting with more detail, as they've applied for more money from investors and creditors trying to get that bailout, which had a bit more information about what exactly went wrong. there is an interesting line, speaking at a meeting to sign of the
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rescue deal yesterday, the executive chairman admitted the company was three hours from going into bankruptcy so just incredible, three hours from going into bankruptcy sojust incredible, to think of a kind of high—stakes manoeuvres going on behind the scenes. hours away from all those shops having to close and all of those people losing theirjobs as a result but that £15 million rescue deal yesterday. a story next press it is based on some research showing britain's high streets, were the high streets are good view about you, right across the uk. we often talk about the health of the high street. this is talking about your health. this is the royal society for public health. they are franked high streets based on the type of businesses that are there, what they are selling, promoting health, social interaction. the unhealthiest high—street in the uk is grimsby. sunderland, stoke—on—trent, i guess
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it's to do with the level of takeaway shops, whether it's to do with the level of high saturated fat content selling shops across those high streets. with spoken so much about the high streets in our communities rely on them. it's tricky. maybe not as many greengrocers. an online shopper, it might be help you buy —— help you if idid might be help you buy —— help you if i did walk into the town centre. two stories on the back page of the mail. you may remembera stories on the back page of the mail. you may remember a couple of weeks ago, manchester united played juventus. a fan ran onto the pitch early in the game. he was arrested. when police searched his bag, they found a toy handgun, they found its alleged he them inside. it means there is going to be a bit of a security review at old trafford. somebody managed to get toy guns in.
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a bit ofa somebody managed to get toy guns in. a bit of a security review going on there. it's the same paper i'm looking out. manchester city beat fulham last night. he was on the bench actually but is agreed a deal to stay with manchester city. the sums are mind—boggling £300,000, but why wouldn't they stay. pep guardiola has really come on, at during the reign of him. thank you very much indeed. on tuesday, americans take to the polls for what they call the mid—term elections. they're voting for new members of congress, and the result will affect how the rest of donald trump's presidency turns out. our north america correspondent chris buckler has travelled across the states for breakfast and is now in memphis tennessee, where he's been meeting everyday americans preparing to cast their ballot. chris — donald trump is in tennessee in just a couple of days time,
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and he's talking tough about immigration, what does memphis think of the president? good morning, chris. it looks so lightly behind you. good evening to you, i suppose. lightly behind you. good evening to you, isuppose. what lightly behind you. good evening to you, i suppose. what about these mid—term elections. you, i suppose. what about these mid-term elections. what is the significance? good morning, it's great to be here in memphis, tennessee. we are standing the famous main street of memphis, the signs coming out of it, the famous beale street, lots of music. the main attraction is the mid—term elections. ultimately, it decides how much power donald trump will actually have. as it is inside congress, the house of representatives and the senate, he
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has republican politicians, member of its own parties in the majority and that makes it much easier for him to pass laws. but the democrats to win one or part of that senate, ultimately it would become difficult. one of the beatings they are talking about is donald trump and just how he appeals to voters. that is particularly true when it comes to women. memphis might call itself home to the blues and the birthplace of rock ini the blues and the birthplace of rock ‘n‘ roll but there is not much harmony here thanks to america's mid—term elections. harmony here thanks to america's mid-term elections. those who have seen us. . . mid-term elections. those who have seen us... the singing frazier sisters are proud republicans in tennessee, a state which has become an unexpected battleground and following some of the controversial comments made by donald trump about
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women, female voters are having to consider whether he is the man to them. i think a lot of the women who don't like him are not hearing what i'm hearing. maybe he isjust find it too aggressive for them or something. the allegations about affairs, the comments about where he might grab someone. those are things that aren't really presidential, are they? they're not, but he wasn't the president then and, you know, i feel like he not being respected for what has accomplished. but polls that suggest many women aren't impressed by donald trump are clearly playing on his mind. we did very well with women. trump calls women beautiful. you're beautiful, you are beautiful.
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i think women like me more now than they did two years ago. not every woman is prepared to return as compliments. i guess as a businessman is good for the country but is very disrespectful and i think is kind of like a loose cannon. he will call when fat, ugly, use really demeaning words. a woman has never represented tennessee in the us senate but that could change this time around. the republican candidate is female and in a straight fight between a man and a woman, you might expect female voters to fall in behind her but it's not that simple and that's because there is a little bad blood. the singer taylor swift blasted marsha blackburn on her voting record on minority and women's rights. as a result, she says she is fighting for the democrats and the mail candidate, phil bredeson. it's
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not about that she is a woman, we are looking for women's candidates who would advocate for equality and the fact that they happen to be a woman is an added benefit, they bring an extra perspective, a unique perspective. there has been a lot of noise during this election campaign. only next week will it become clear to america's voters have been listening to. when you've heard even one of donald trump ‘s own supporters saying specifically that she was concerned and mentioned his aggressive language, that has been continuing. he has talked at length about immigration, taking place in rally after rally and he is here in tennessee on sunday continuing to talk about hardline immigration. he believes that appeals to his voters. whether it appeals to everyone is a much bigger question. it's fascinating. great background. i love the way he says that those people behind him are not talking
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about the mid—term elections. we will be talking about it a lot later on as well. but first, let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. see you in a second. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alex bushill. police are appealing for witnesses after a 15—year—old boy was fatally stabbed at a chicken shop in south london. it happened on randlesdown road in bellingham at teatime yesterday. no arrests have been made. london's high streets have too many unhealthy businesses like betting shops, fast food outlets and off—licences which could significantly shorten the lives of locals, according to a new report. according to the royal society for public health, haringey has the unhealthiest high street on seven sisters road with muswell hill, only 3 miles away, coming out as the healthiest. a council in south london will start a trial that will ban cars from outside some schools during peak times. greenwich council hopes it will encourage more parents to engage in more sustainable ways to travel and discourage car use near schools.
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it's a move welcomed by some local residents. think the ball lives are re; i think the ball lives are really, really good because the parking up here has been absolutely awful. i have people parking outside my house from half past two in the afternoon and when i talk to them, theyjust say, well, i'm fed up at home and i wa nt say, well, i'm fed up at home and i want the prime parking space. cm act, i think it's good. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there is a good service on all lines. on the roads, the a102 pear island is down to a crawl northbound towards the blackwall tunnel. in the west end, on regent street saint james — the one way street is closed towards piccadilly circus for the installation of the christmas lights. and finally in euston,
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aaoo hampstead road remains closed in both directions between a501 euston road and william road for water main repairs. hello, good morning. it is a much nicer day weather today than we saw yesterday but it is a rather cold and frosty start, some of our temperatures last night slipped to just below freezing but it should stay dry and there will be lots of blue sky and sunshine around to enjoy so here is the map. a5 blue sky and sunshine around to enjoy so here is the map. as you can see, not a whole lot going on so it means sparkling blue sky, lots of sunshine through the morning, other to the high clouds coming in from the west as we had with the afternoon and staying dry, the wind is fairly light, the temperature is not as high as they were yesterday but fairly decent between ten and 12 celsius are the most part as we had
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to the end of the afternoon. the sky should stay mostly clear overnight, the crowd spilling and at times, perhaps temperature is not as low as they were last night that some spots could dip below freezing, otherwise holding at around four or five celsius in central london. it is quite chilly start to saturday, the wings are going to start to pick up, a very windy day on saturday but if you are watching fireworks over the weekend, they're in mind it should stay dry, it will feel a touch milder, some sunshine on saturday, cloudy on sunday. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. it is 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: folk musician sam sweeney explores the incredible history of an unfinished violin, part—made by a soldier from leeds who was killed in battle during world war i. she's considered by many to be one of the greatest gymnasts of all time, now american simone biles has made history becoming
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the first woman to win four all—around world titles. # stand by me, o # stand by me, 0 stand by me... gospel singers the kingdom choir shot to fame with a rendition of stand by me at prince harry and meghan markle's wedding. they'll be here to tell us about their new album and uk tour. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the uk is experiencing more extreme weather, according to a new study by the met office. it says when comparing the last ten years to the previous 30, the hottest days have become hotter, while the coldest days are not as cold as they were. with the details, here's our news correspondent ben ando. who can forget the long, hot summer of 2018? well, get used to it,
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because the met office is warm spells of warm weather and individual scorching summer days are both on the rise. the report compares extreme weather from the 19605, 705, and 805, to the period from 2008 to 2017. it found that spells of warm weather have more than doubled, that individual hot days are 0.8 degrees hotter, and colder days are milder. on average 1.7 celsius warmer than in the past. but it's not all about the heat. there has also been a 17% increase in days of heavy rain. and while it may not feel like it at the start of november, researchers say that the number of tropical nights which averages don't fall below 20 celsius, or 68 fahrenheit, are also on the increase. in the 30 years between 1960 and 1990, there were just eight. whereas last summer alone there have been two. though tropical nights can have a downside.
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in periods of very high temperatures they can be a hazard for the elderly, who get no respite from the heat. and though this study has focused on extreme weather conditions, the met office says it's consistent with worldwide trends in global warming, driven primarily by fossil fuels. ben ando, bbc news. there's been support across the political spectrum for tracey crouch who resigned as sports minister because of a row about fixed—odds betting terminals. the government was expected to cut the maximum stake from £100 to £2 next april, but this has been postponed until october. ministers say the gambling industry needs more time to adjust. the former foreign secretary boris johnson said ms crouch deserved "huge credit" and the archbishop of canterbury justin welby, described her decision as "principled and courageous". former home secretary amber rudd was let down by her own officials, an inquiry into the events leading up to her resignation has concluded.
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ms rudd stood down in april, saying she had "inadvertently misled" mps investigating the windrush generation of post—war caribbean migrants. the report says ms rudd lost confidence in her officials and was "not supported as she should have been". president trump has suggested that soldiers deployed to the mexican border could shoot migrants who throw stones at them while attempting to cross into the us. mr trump's comments come just days ahead of crucial mid—term elections, the result of which will determine the success of the rest of his presidency. he also said he's planning to deny asylum to people who enter the united states outside legal ports of entry. the uk's brexit secretary, dominic raab, will visit northern ireland today to discuss the future of the border with business leaders and politicians. avoiding a hard border with the irish republic has become the biggest sticking point in the negotiations on the uk's departure from the eu. brexit will also be discussed at a meeting between british and irish ministers in dublin.
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half of all the people who go to a&e with sports—related injuries are children and teenagers, according to research published in the royal society of medicinejournal. boys aged 1a and girls aged 12 were most at risk of sustaining a sports injury. for boys, playing football, rugby union, and rubgy league caused the most fractures while for girls, horse—riding, netball, and trampolining were mainly to blame. friday afternoon peak—fare restrictions on virgin trains from london euston station will be scrapped from today. services to birmingham, manchester and liverpool are often overcrowded and passengers have been forced to stand in order to avoid paying much higher peakfares. it is at 6:35 a.m.. mike kitty with
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the sport. we are talking, that big smile, and uppermiddle, simone biles. —— mike is here. smile, and uppermiddle, simone biles. -- mike is here. only 21. i suppose in gymnastics terms is not that young. to do it successfully at the top, 12 world titles and four in the top, 12 world titles and four in the all—round, which means you have to be good on the beam, the floor, the vault, and the bars. an incredible test will stop usually there are good at one discipline and go into the team event. but to do it all on your own... she has had incredible tests in her personal life as well. she moved around foster care. she went away taster session at a local gym when she was six years old, and is years later, she won the world title at the age of 13. as you mentioned earlier, the kidney stone on the eve of these championships. sabac and weight. she is tough as well. —— she said that can wait.
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olympic champion simone biles has underlined her status as one of the all time great gymnasts, at the world championships in doha. despite not being at her best, the american's become the first woman, to win four all around titles at the world championships — her first came back in 2013. it takes her tally to 12 world golds overall. this is definitely the scariest one from the ones from the past. i wish i could have put out a better performance. because that is not the guinness that a, that you saw, but we all have mistakes and we all fall. it is how you get up and prove yourself. this year has had its ups and downs. going to therapies and other things, besidesjust going and downs. going to therapies and other things, besides just going to the gym, it has been a little rough. you try to focus on one thing at a time to get through it. plenty more to come. and you can see today's action from doha — including max whitlock defending his title on the pommel horse — on bbc two at one o'clock this afternoon leicester city manager claude puel has called this week one of the hardest in the club's history, following the death of owner, vichai srivaddhanaprabha
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and four others in saturday's helicopter crash. the club's former manager, claudio ranieri, stood alongside vichai's son to lay a wreath at the club's stadium. he led the team to their triumph in the premier league two years ago. the man now in charge said it was the players decision for their game with cardiff to go ahead as planned. their first since the crash. this has been, without doubt, one of the hardest weeks in the history of this football club. the tragic loss of five lives has left us all numb, with nerves and shock. —— sadness and shop. manchester city are through to the quarter—finals of the carabao cup after a 2—0 win over fulham. however, kevin de bruyne did come off late on with an injury. there is good news for city fans though with raheem sterling verbally agreeing a new contract with the champions. the deal, which is reportedly worth around £300,000 per week, and would make sterling one of the highest paid players in the premier league.
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glasgow city were knocked out of the women's champions league following a 3—0 second leg defeat by barcelona. the scottish champions were 5—0 down from the first leg and two goals from england striker toni duggan saw the spanish side progress to the quarter—finals. the dream of becoming a priofessional footbalkl is over for the time being it seems for usain bolt. the athletics great has left his australian club central coats mariners, despite scoring twice in a preseason friendly. the club say they failed to find what they called a "commercial solution" to keep bolt. and he did not actually play in any of the league games. dina asher—smith has been named, the sunday times sports woman of the year for 2018. in august, asher—smith became the first british woman to win triple european championship gold, winning the 100m, 200m and 4x100 metre relay titles in berlin. england's commonwealth games gold medal—winning netball team, won the team of the year award. england co—captain owen farrell will start at fly—half in the first of england's autumn
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internationals against south africa at twickenham tomorrow. quite a few changes from eddiejones, which mean that ben te'o starts at inside centre, despite playing fewer than 30 minutes for worcester this season. brad shields and mark wilson, are among the names in an inexperienced pack. roger federer is one step closer to a 100th career title after reaching the quarter—finals of the paris masters. he played — and won — his first match in paris for three years last night, beating italy's fabio fognini in straight sets. the new world number one novak djokovic also progressed to the last eight. going into this weekend's second test against new zealand. identical twins tom and george burgess played saturday's tense 18—16 victory and they're here with us now. good morning. i know you had your head shaved last year or whatever
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was, earlier this season. there was a story behind that that makes it even harder to you a part. it was his fault i had to shave my hair. he went in and did it with me. we clashed heads. unfortunately i came off the worst when i got the oscar. it is like two conquers coming together —— the oscar. it is like two conquers coming together -- the oscar. so you did it out of sympathy. he was doing it at his house and he was shaving his hair. i had been growing it for18 months. did you let him do yours or did you do your own? we had a friend to do both of us. she says her own has she is good at it. we have not established which one is which. george? and tom. that is only because we told you. you think that, but i know. slightly longer have. together we are torge.
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due to find sitting on this so the couple? have dwarfed the sofa —— do you find. it is not too bad. let us talk about rugby. you play for sydney, alongside sam, the four brothers. it must be great been back in england and field on sunday, hull last weekend. obviously living in australia, sydney, to be more specific, it is great to come back and play in front of an english crowd. it is something we look forward to every year. if the games are in england we get pumped and we wa nt are in england we get pumped and we want to come back and play for the english crowd, because we do miss it, being in australia you get a bit sick of being a pomme in australia. you have to copied from the aussies and the kiwis all the time. —— pom for stoppages as extra motivation to
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beat them. we talk about footballers, when they are going to play in will carson they struggle with altitude and climatology have to readjust in terms of climate? —— world cups. i think growing up here for 18 years you have it built into you. so coming back isjust, you remember the cold. you are just used to it. and when you get back to the grey skies and the west, damp weather, do you think i missed this so weather, do you think i missed this so much, i would love to come back and leave australia behind? -- wet. definitely. you do miss it. would you come back? one day. you get sick of the wan, every now and then. oh shut up! —— warmer. you had the tragedy of your dad passing away when he was 15, that must have bonded you. if that part of why you have stuck together? definitely. when there is a tragedy in a family
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had to come close to get through things like that. and we definitely did as brothers, and a mother as well. she must have been a massive influence. we are all still pretty close lock enough to be living together in australia. do you have like a whatsapp group between the four of you? we have many. one with the family, one would be brothers. who is being ripped at the moment out of the four brothers? imessage them yesterday to see how they are going. it has moved back to australia —— imessage them yesterday. he has had problems with his visa. he placed too much golf. he is his goal. the owner of the syd ney clu b he is his goal. the owner of the sydney club were you play is russell crowe, i know he is very hands—on. once he got to know us, he is quite different ways. in our personalities. he is great. he has
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been a big part of us moving to australia. it was his vision. he has a lwa ys australia. it was his vision. he has always wanted brothers at the club. he has tried with a few different brothers and finally found the right concoction with the birds as brothers. —— burgess. concoction with the birds as brothers. -- burgess. he has been a good family friend, top guy. around for the team talks. he loves it. send a text message on game day.“ that another whatsapp group. he is a kiwi though. he was at the test midyear. he was supporting england, even though he is a kiwi. we looking forward to this weekend. good luck on sunday. when the series as well, if you can. thank you for coming in. if you want a reminder of the beautiful where the left behind and a reason to come back, we have matt from tamworth in staffordshire. he has the weather, not just for today was that he staffordshire. he has the weather, notjust for today was that he has his gloves on. that tells you everything. have got the gloves on
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and it's a cold start. we are in one of our viewers gardens. we will be meeting her later on but here, it's cold in tamworth, frosty start. but look at the forecast for today because it is cold around the uk. —6 in parts of northern ireland, minus four degrees in wales. yes, you'll be scraping. your car this morning but find they will follow, lovely, crisp, autumn day. the rain that we had yesterday, a weather front is now pushing off towards denmark and norway. that's the jayasundera ridge of high pressure. the high pressure means generally dry conditions. frosty start with lots of sunshine overhead. it is largely dry because we have one or two showers. maybe the highlands and islands of scotland, the 99%, if not more of
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the population, we start dry and frosty. lots of sunshine to come. a bit more in the way of cloud. turning the sunshine hazy. it should be fine, with light winds and temperatures, 13 degrees in southern england. into tonight, the frost will return to this part of central and eastern england. we will see cloud increasing. scotland, northern ireland, turning wet and windy. the winds will be widely touching gale force. that will keep the temperatures up here. as low as minus two degrees. a fine day to much of england and wales. more cloud pushing in. it will be windy across the board. we see outbreaks of rain. some of them heavy and persistent. we could see minor
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flooding. temperatures up on the last few days. we will see them getting into the low teens the many. it will come and go throughout the day. that does mean it will get away. comparing this saturday, sunday will be nowhere near as wendy. the winds were be quite as strong. more details on the throughout the as the weather gets colder, more of us are turning on the heating. iam very i am very mindful about the cost, as everyone. the heating bills have been going up. a number of people in debt to their energy providers. they are struggling in terms of making
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that decision. do you turn the heating on a go cold. you have been taking a look at this, colletta. we're talking about energy debt this morning , its called a priority debt because owing money to gas and electric companies has serious consequences. according to the comparison site uswitch: around 3 million households now owe money. those households owe a collective £400 million to their suppliers. it's particularly worrying as this is the time of year when households are generally in credit. that figure is up a quarter — or $75 million — on this time last year. uswitch also found that more than a fifth of customers don't have a plan for how to pay off the debt. what has happened over the last 12 months to see such a rise in energy
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debt. it tracks back a little bit more. we've seen a growing increase in the number of people who are struggling with their debts. probably now over half the people who cover for our free advice services have got a utility debt, which is a huge turnaround. services have got a utility debt, which is a huge turnaroundlj services have got a utility debt, which is a huge turnaround. i was mentioning that it is known as a priority debt. do people see it as that. are people more concerned keeping up with credit card payments? one of the things that is important with a priority debt is, if you don't pay that, you will as a service. typically you might have a gas. and it is the rent, there is a potential to lose your home. that is what we call a priority debt. potential to lose your home. that is what we call a priority debtm potential to lose your home. that is what we call a priority debt. it is obviously part of the bigger picture. people are struggling at the moment generally. get across the uk is on an increase. we are seeing
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a growing number of people use our services. one thing we would like to get people to understand is that there is help out there, over rate million people across the uk struggling with debt. free help is available for them and what we need them to do is to come forward and find the help that can move them on toa find the help that can move them on to a more sustainable footing and help them start to get back to normal. it's this of year, often people have maybe built up a bit of credit. maybe they don't use as much gas or electricity. normally, they should be in credit and they are not. moving into winter is always going to be a difficult time. what i would say to people is, have a look at all their bills. work out a sustainable plan, talk to the energy
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companies, talk to those people to whom you were in money and start the conversation. is it an easy conversation. is it an easy conversation to have? are they are into that? energy companies are now acutely aware of vulnerable people particularly in often they've done a lot of work to set out some best practice moving forward with the keys to talk about money. we are starting a uk wide talk on money but we wa nt starting a uk wide talk on money but we want to remove the stigma and get people to talk about money and move forward into a sustainable future. it's a difficult issue and not straightforward. thanks three much. when folk musician sam sweeney went in seach of a new violin, he had no idea of the incredible story he was about to uncover. his chosen instrument had a label inside saying it had been pa rt—assembled in leeds during the first world war, but the maker never returned home to finish it. breakfast‘s john maguire explains how 100 years on,
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the fiddle is now making music again. when sam sweeney, the folk musician, picked up and played this violin, it was love at first sound. picked up and played this violin, it was love at first soundlj picked up and played this violin, it was love at first sound. i singled out this fiddle and fell in love with it, and there was something about the tone that are just adored. sam spotted the fiddle in roger claridge's shop. the pieces had sat ina bag claridge's shop. the pieces had sat in a bag and roger's workshop the yea rs in a bag and roger's workshop the years until he was persuaded by his wife to assemble them, breathing new life into the old. inside, sam was intrigued by a label that read "richard howarth, 1915" and the words, "made in the great war". sam's father found the maker in all
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records. more than a century ago, richard howard had headed off to war but was killed in battle. at home, he left a wife, a daughter and the beginnings of a violin. he made five instruments, this is number six. he made five instruments and then he was called to war and he never comes back. and so the bits are they and here we are holding this now and you know, you don't make a byline ——a violin like this, that its fruit, without putting yourself into it. there is a big chunk of richard howard in this. and it was an extraordinary experience to go from just looking for a new violin to suddenly discovering this absolutely incredible story and now i'm the guardian of this incredible historical artefact. it means so much to me but it means so much to richard's descendants. your grandfather's violin. how lovely, thank you. and i can see the name
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inside. further research but to richard howard's granddaughter mary. through this instrument, she's been introduced to her grandfather for the first time. oh... ifi may introduced to her grandfather for the first time. oh... if i may use the first time. oh... if i may use the phrase, it blew my socks off. i knew nothing about my grandfather before that. i didn't even know his full name. it was overwhelmingly emotional. for the first six months, i really couldn't talk about it to anyone outside the family. with mary present, sam played her grandfather ‘s violin at his grave site in belgium. andjust ‘s violin at his grave site in belgium. and just thought the most amazing thing to do would be to take the fiddle but richard thought he would neverfinish, the fiddle but richard thought he would never finish, take the fiddle but richard thought he would neverfinish, take it to him and played for him. and it wasjust lovely. it was as if i had been at his funeral. mary has now met members of the wider family thanks to the fiddle's discovery and sam
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plays it on his new album titled the unfinished violin which, now com plete unfinished violin which, now complete is at long last fulfilling its destiny by bringing people together. for anyone watching this morning, i bet you never thought a story like that could have happened. it's those little stories and connections over 100 years that brings everything as we mark the centenary of the end of the first world war. amazing, beautiful story. and so nice to see that story completed and have some music out of it as well. time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alex bushill. police are appealing for witnesses after a 15—year—old boy was fatally stabbed at a chicken shop in south london. it happened on randlesdown road in bellingham
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at teatime yesterday. no arrests have been made. london's high streets have too many unhealthy businesses like betting shops, fast food outlets and off—licences which could significantly shorten the lives of locals, according to a new report. according to the royal society for public health, haringey has the unhealthiest high street on seven sisters road with muswell hill, only 3 miles away, coming out as the healthiest. a council in south london will start a trial that will ban cars from outside some schools during peak times. greenwich council hopes it will encourage more parents to engage in more sustainable ways to travel and discourage car use near schools. it's a move welcomed by some local residents. i have people parking outside my house from 2:30 in the afternoon and when i talk to them, they just say, "well, i'm fed up at home "and i want the prime parking space."
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so yeah, i think it's good. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, there is a good service on all lines. on the roads, the a102 pear island is down to a crawl northbound towards the blackwall tunnel. in the west end, on regent street, saint james, the one—way street is closed towards piccadilly circus for the installation of the christmas lights. and finally in euston, aaoo hampstead road remains closed in both directions between a501 euston road and william road for water main repairs. and finally in harringay: green lanes is running with a single alternate lane with temporary traffic lights 3) now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a much nicer day of weather today than we saw yesterday but it is a rather cold and frosty start, some of our temperatures last night slipped to just below freezing but it should stay dry and there will be lots of blue sky and sunshine around to enjoy,
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so here's the map. as you can see, not a whole lot going on on it so it means sparkling blue skies, lots of sunshine through the morning, other to the high clouds coming in from the west as we had through the afternoon and staying dry, the wind is fairly light, the temperature is not as high as they were yesterday but fairly decent between 10 and 12 celsius for the most part as we had through the end of the afternoon. the sky should stay mostly clear overnight, the cloud spilling and at times, perhaps temperatures not as low as they were last night that some spots could dip below freezing, otherwise holding at around 4 or 5 degrees celsius in central london. it is quite chilly start to saturday, the wings it is quite chilly start to saturday, the winds are going to start to pick up, a very windy day on saturday but if you are watching fireworks over the weekend, bear in mind it should stay dry, it will feeljust a touch milder, some sunshine on saturday, cloudier on sunday. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and jon. welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty.
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our headlines today: hotter, wetter, milder — a new met office report says the uk has experienced more extreme weather in the last ten years than in the previous 30. the row over high street betting machines — after sports minister tracy crouch resigns, the government defends its timetable for cutting the maximum stake. it might be breakfast in the uk, but the night is only getting started here in memphis tennessee. i'm live in the birthplace of rock ‘n' roll. but you'll find little harmony ahead of next week's crucial mid—term elections. closing the north—south divide. house price growth is predicted to continue for the next five years but the gap between property values in northern england versus london is set to narrow. brilliant biles makes history at the gymnastics world championships. simone biles has become the first woman to win four all—around titles. it's her 12th world gold overall.
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i have come to the garden of one of our viewers to celebrate years of bbc weather watchers. it is a lovely day ahead. details on that and the full weekend forecast right here on brea kfast. it's friday, 2nd november. our top story: the uk is experiencing more extreme weather, according to a new study by the met office. it says when comparing the last ten years to the previous 30, the hottest days have become hotter, while the coldest days are not as cold as they were. with the details, here's our news correspondent ben ando. who can forget the long, hot summer of 2018? well, get used to it, because the met office says warm spells of warm weather and individual scorching summer days are both on the rise. the report compares extreme weather from the 19605, 705, and 805, to the period from 2008 to 2017. it found that spells of warm weather have more than doubled,
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that individual hot days are 0.8 degrees hotter, and colder days are milder. on average 1.7 celsius warmer than in the past. but it's not all about the heat. there has also been a 17% increase in days of heavy rain. and while it may not feel like it at the start of november, researchers say that the number of tropical nights which averages don't fall below 20 celsius, or 68 fahrenheit, are also on the increase. in the 30 years between 1960 and 1990, there were just eight. whereas last summer alone there have been two. though tropical nights can have a downside. in periods of very high temperatures they can be a hazard for the elderly, who get no respite from the heat. and though this study has focused on extreme weather conditions, the met office says it's consistent with worldwide trends in global warming, driven primarily by fossil fuels. ben ando, bbc news. there's been support
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across the political spectrum for tracey crouch, who resigned as sports minister because of a row about fixed—odds betting terminals. the government was expected to cut the maximum stake from £100 to £2 next april, but this has been postponed until october. ministers say the gambling industry needs more time to adjust. we can speak now to our political correspondent ben wright who is in westminster. ben, it is interesting, as political resignations go, she seems to have an awful lot of support from right across the spectrum. that is right. good morning. that is partly because there is cross—party agreement that these machines are really bad. highly addictive and they need to be changed. these fixed odds betting terminals allow people to stay up to a maximum of £100 every 20 seconds
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on these electronic casino games like roulette. they are, some say, like roulette. they are, some say, like the crack cocaine of gambling. tracey crouch has spearheaded government efforts to reduce the maximum stay down to £2. expectation was that this change would come into force in april and has been hugely disappointed that in the budget it was announced that that in fact would be october. that is why she resigned yesterday. as you said, huge cross—party support for her. regret that she has decided to quit. the archbishop of canterbury, boris johnson, cabinet colleagues in the tory party have expressed their regret on twitter. it is a strange position for the gunmen to find themselves in. they have lost a minister everyone agrees is very principled and capable. it is by no means the end of the story. there is a high chance a cross—party group of mps will try to change the finance bill currently going through the commons to force the government to bring this change in earlier. ben,
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for now, thank you very much indeed. at 7:40, we'll speak to a dad whose son took his own life after running up huge gambling debts. former home secretary amber rudd was let down by her own officials, an inquiry into the events leading up to her resignation has concluded. ms rudd stood down in april, saying she had "inadvertently misled" mps investigating the windrush generation of post—war caribbean migrants. the report says ms rudd lost confidence in her officials and was "not supported as she should have been". president trump has suggested that soldiers deployed to the mexican border could shoot migrants who throw stones at them while attempting to cross into the us. mr trump's comments come just days ahead of crucial mid—term elections, the result of which will determine the success of the rest of his presidency. he also said he's planning to deny asylum to people who enter the united states outside legal ports of entry. anybody throwing stones, rocks, like
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they did to mexico and the mexican military, mexican police, where they badly hurt police and soldiers of mexico, we will consider that a firearm. because there's not much difference when you get hit in the face with a rock, which, as you know, it was very violent a few days ago, very, very violent, that brechin, it was a break—in of a country. they broke into mexico. —— break in. in around ten minutes' time we'll speak to our north america correspondent chris buckler, who is in memphis, tennessee. those elections will be very crucial to donald trump's presidency. brexit secretary dominic raab will travel to northern ireland today as the government seeks to inject some momentum into its divorce talks with the european union. he's expected to visit the border, which has been a huge point of tension during the brexit negotiations. we'rejoined now from belfast by our ireland correspondent, chris page. good to see. i can see dawn is
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breaking over your background. it is whether or not this will bring some harmony these talks. to say this has been a sticking point, i think, would be an understatement when it comes to brexit. that is right. this is all about brexit, the border, and the backstop. that is the major sticking point in negotiations. at the moment an insurance policy to guarantee there would be no new tax on the border between northern ireland and the irish republic under any circumstances. the eu thinks it should mean that northern ireland stays in the customs union and large parts of the single market. theresa may says that is not acceptable because it could mean checks on goods moving between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. the government think it should mean that the whole of the uk stays in the customs union for a time limited period. dominic raab coming here to northern ireland for his first visit as brexit secretary. he will be meeting business people, for whom this issue of the border is notjust some abstract political issue, it is
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something that could affectjobs and livelihoods. he will hold discussions with politicians. across that presently invisible border in dublin, british and irish ministers will be meeting to talk about politics in northern ireland and about brexit, the irish sources say they don't expect to hear anything new, any new proposals from britain at that meeting today. some gall sides agree on is that the clock is ticking and the sense of urgency does seem to be increasing everyday —— something all sides. the eu says there will not be any brexit deal at all if something is not agreed on. thank you for taking us through that. no doubt you will be updating throughout the day. chris page there for us. a series of walkout protests by staff at google offices around the world have continued overnight. employees in various cities including san francisco, left their desks to show their anger at the technology firm's treatment of women and ethnic minorities. google staff are demanding an end to pay inequality, as well as greater transparency around how the company deals with allegations of sexual harassment. half of all the people who go to a&e with sports—related injuries
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are children and teenagers, according to research published in the royal society of medicinejournal. boys aged 1a and girls aged 12 were most at risk of sustaining a sports injury. for boys, playing football, rugby union, and rugby league caused the most fractures while for girls, horse—riding, netball, and trampolining were mainly to blame. friday afternoon peak—fare restrictions on virgin trains from london euston station will be scrapped from today. services to birmingham, manchester and liverpool are often overcrowded and passengers have been forced to stand in order to avoid paying much higher peakfares. do you like cake? i love cake. i would like some cake right now.|j don't like cake. i have a big cake to show you. but you cannot eat it. a baker who took the phrase ‘royal icing' to the extreme will have her lifesize cake of the duke and duchess of sussex put on display at an
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exhibition in birmingham. do you want to know what goes into a ca ke do you want to know what goes into a cake like this? i do. lara mason spent more than 250 hours crafting the cake ahead of the royal wedding in may. it weighs in at nearly 20 stone, is made from 300 eggs and 50 kilograms of fondant icing. it is covered with chocolate ganache and everything is edible apart from the frames. you can eat everything, but it has not been eaten. it was made for the royal wedding but was preserved as an example of what can be done with cake—ology. or whatever the word is. it is 7:11a.m.. during the budget, the chancellor philip hammond announced that schools in england will receive £400 million to "buy the little extras they need" — a gesture which has infuriated head teachers who claim it does little to help their over stretched finances. today, the government says, since march, 500 new or improved
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breakfast clubs have been set up in some of the country's most disadvantaged schools. we can speak now to the children and families minister nadhim zahawi, who joins us from westminster. thank you forjoining us. 500 of these new or improved breakfast clu bs, these new or improved breakfast clubs, iam these new or improved breakfast clubs, i am sure they are welcome to the kids going to them this morning, but 500 does not seem that many, when you consider how many schools there are across the country. this is the first 500 since march, at that breakfast and family action have set up or enhanced. the target is to get to just over 1700, up to 2000 breakfast clubs in the most disadvantaged parts of the country. we have wild opportunity areas. the cosmic message to those teachers and schools and the disadvantaged areas
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is to please come forward and we will help you set up a breakfast clu b will help you set up a breakfast club with a £26 million investment we are making. i saw first—hand at st mary school yesterday, where 50% of the pupils there received pupil premium, that the breakfast club is making a huge difference to attendance, to learning, we have the evidence from the educational endowment foundation that children with a healthy, nutritious breakfast loane much better, whether it is maths, english, reading, writing —— learn. they do much but if they have a nutritious breakfast. 15,000 brea kfast a nutritious breakfast. 15,000 breakfast per day are being so. then action tell us that is good news, but i want many more —— family action. come forward in the most disadvantaged areas and will help you set up the breakfast clubs. the schools, teachers, governors watching debbie breakfast this morning will have been rather annoyed with the governor this week after the tonsillar referred to that quote in the budget about the little
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extras —— the chancellor. they saw that has really patronising and school budgets are stretched and times are tough. do you regret the fa ct times are tough. do you regret the fact use that language? budgets, you are right, are tight. institute of fiscal studies says that actually per pupil investment that we are making is maintained for 5— 16 —year—olds. that is important. the prime minister reiterated that as well. what the chancellor was doing was delivering extra funding for capital projects that the schools may need, whether it is updating their computers or other projects. £410 million going into that. that is important, equally important. exactly. people regarded as important, things like computers, they don't consider them as little extras. it was clumsy and some said patronising use of language that seems to have backfired. it has become one of the bigger stories out of the budget, surely not what the chancellor wanted. if you take the
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labour spin on it and focus on words and language, i would ratherfocus on action. what we're doing with the brea kfast clu bs, on action. what we're doing with the breakfast clubs, 15,000 breakfast clu bs, breakfast clubs, 15,000 breakfast clubs, being delivered to children today. i want many, many more. and of course the capital investment for those schools was up and of course the increase is already in funding so that we can maintain the per pupil, so that we can maintain the per pupil, you know, investment we are making in schools. that is what is governed is focusing on, rather than worrying about whether the phrase was right or wrong. i would rather focus on delivery. ui minister for food his stock ball you are with this this morning, we are hearing from otherfamilies this this morning, we are hearing from other families whose lives have been ripped apart by fixed betting machines, and that is something the government has tried to bring under control —— you are minister for family is. we had a resignation last night from a minister who felt the public is not doing it quickly enough. do you sympathise with
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tracey crouch, did you do the right thing in stepping down, residing in protest of the way theresa may's opposition is handling this? -- residing in protest. i worked very closely with her. some of the money is to do with the private school pe that we have worked well together in delivering for such is principled and passionate. she has very much lead on this reduction in this fixed odds betting amount. the government actually bought forward —— brought forward from 2020, we brought forward from 2020, we brought forward to october 2019, it is u nfortu nate forward to october 2019, it is unfortunate that we have lost. she isa unfortunate that we have lost. she is a passionate minister. i am sorry we have lost, but the governed is committed to bringing down the fixed odds amount to £2. it is damaging to you as a governed when she describes the plan as unjustifiable. she was one of your ministers yesterday —— government. the government is
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bringing forward the initial consultation talked about actually this being introduced in 2020. it was brought forward to october 20 19. it is unfortunate that, as i say, we have lost tracy. i would rather focus on delivering this policy now and making sure we get it right. of course we are sorry to lose tracey. i want to remind your school teachers and heads to come forward and join our breakfast clu bs, forward and join our breakfast clubs, because i think delivering thatis clubs, because i think delivering that is really important, which is what i am here to discuss. and it is the right programme to discuss brea kfast. the right programme to discuss breakfast. that is true. nadhim zahawi, breakfast. that is true. nadhim za hawi, thank you breakfast. that is true. nadhim zahawi, thank you forjoining us from westminster. thank you. do not eat too much cake. he knows you. was that a personal slight? i will stick to the breakfast, i think. i tell you who else likes cake, nat. i don't like cake. dyoo not like cake? you not liking cake?.
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there are very few cakes are like. i like desserts, just not cake. there is forced on the ground. firstly, i am just outside tamworth. the garden of one of our viewers who isa the garden of one of our viewers who is a nab the bbc weather watcher. weather watchers are celebrating a 3- weather watchers are celebrating a 3— year anniversary. —— anne added bbc weather watcher. —— anne added. —— an avid. as many as 1700 each and every day increase in viewers. we just look about all of your photographs that come in and choose the best ones that come to show an hour. they don't have to be spectacular as far as photographic talent is concerned but it helps us tell the weather story we are likely to use. you can still get involved whenever you want to buy having to
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bbc. co. uk/weatherwatchers, whenever you want to buy having to bbc.co.uk/weatherwatchers, if whenever you want to buy having to bbc. co. uk/weatherwatchers, if it whenever you want to buy having to bbc.co.uk/weatherwatchers, if it is a sunny day, a grey day, autumn pictures. we are looking forward to seeing more of your snowy pictures. hejust outside seeing more of your snowy pictures. he just outside tamworth this morning, a cracking start the day. there is a frost on the ground and it with a forecast, uk wide, it is cold and frosty start. temperatures close to freezing. popping as though a smile —— minus six. minus three degrees in northern england. overhead, blue skies. we have got high pressure with us. high pressure keeps things dry. if you're in the highlands and islands, there are one or two showers around, not too many. make the most of it. elsewhere, other than a bit of clout pushing
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in, afew other than a bit of clout pushing in, a few splashes of rain, most places stay dry. autumn crisp fresh day. averages around 7— 13 degrees. the cost will be back across parts of central and eastern england. down to —2 in the south—east corner. temperatures after an initial dip will pick up. thanks to the remnants of hurricane oscar which will pass between us and iceland. pushing quite a bit of rain through the night, especially western scotland with minor flooding as we head night, especially western scotland with minorflooding as we head into saturday. temperatures in the west will hold up because of the strength of the wind and has begun to saturday, a windy day across the uk. most persistent in western scotland. as we head towards the evening. across england and wales, mostly dry, a bit patchy rain into north—west england and wales, the rest of the sunshine in the south and east. strong south—westerly
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winds getting into the teens. sunday, nowhere near as windy. scotla nd sunday, nowhere near as windy. scotland and northern ireland, and try and buy today. sunshine in east anglia, the south—east and the east midlands. a cloudy day, outbreaks of rain, the most persistent in south wales in south—west england that not as windy and it will be quite not as mild as saturday. a big weekend for those celebrating were the fireworks. saturday, it could be windy and wet. in a linear as strong as we head into sunday. have you had a go on a climbing frame? it could be too high to me, a
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nosebleed. on tuesday, americans take to the polls for what they call the mid—term elections. he is in memphis, tennessee where it is definitely buzzing but i wonder if it's buzzing about how these mid—term elections are going to pan out. good morning. i am in beale street, the very famous beale street, the very famous beale street, you can see the line of neon behind me, each one representing one of the music clubs or the bars that plays all day long. just to the left
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to me is bb king's blues club. who will be singing the blues won election night comes? this is a really crucial election for president trump. in congress, the house of representatives and the senate, he has republican majorities. that makes it easy for him to push his policies to get legislation passed but all that could change if the democrats have a breakthrough in this upcoming election. that is why he is out, involved in rallies. he is tennessee in two days' time and he is talking about immigration, talking tough, an attempt to fire up his base. that kind of angry rhetoric doesn't go down well with everybody, including potentially some women voters. memphis might call itself home to the blues and the birthplace of rock'n'roll but there's not much harmony here thanks to america's mid—term elections.
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to come between us... the singing frazier sisters are proud republicans in tennessee, a state which has become an unexpected battleground and following some of the controversial comments made by donald trump about women, female voters are having to consider whether he is the man for them. i think a lot of the women who don't like him are not hearing what i'm hearing. maybe he is just kind of too aggressive for them or something. the allegations about affairs, the comments about where he might grab someone. those are things that...that aren't really presidential, are they? they're not, but he wasn't the president then and, you know, i feel like he's not being respected for what has accomplished.
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but polls that suggest that many women aren't impressed by donald trump are clearly playing on his mind. we did very well with women. trump calls women beautiful. you're beautiful, you are beautiful, beautiful. i think women like me more now than they did two years ago. not every woman is prepared to return those compliments. i guess as a businessman he's good for the country but he's very disrespectful and i think he's kind of like a loose cannon. he will call women fat, ugly, use really demeaning words. a woman has never represented tennessee in the us senate but that could change this time around. the republican candidate is female and in a straight fight between a man and a woman, you might expect female voters
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to fall in behind her, but it's not that simple, and that's because there's a little bad blood. the singer taylor swift blasted marsha blackburn over her voting record on minority and women's rights. as a result, she says she's fighting for the democrats and their male candidate, phil bredesen. it's not about the fact that she is a woman, it's really about the policies so we are looking for women's candidates who would advocate for equality and the fact that they happen to be a woman is sort of an added benefit, they are going to bring an extra perspective, their unique perspective. there has been a lot of noise during this election campaign. only next week will it become clear who america's voters have been listening to. and there will be a few players said come tuesday, with both democrats and republicans. it's worth pointing out that these are really a series of elections rather than one
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election. here in this senate race in tennessee, get this, $70 million has been spent on campaigning for that single seat in congress. it gives you a real sense ofjust how importantly the parties are regarding all of this and donald trump is as well. he is still going out, still campaigning. you do get the sense that in some ways, this election could be a referendum on the president himself. absolutely. $70 million on one seat. that's all it takes, to change the way president trump can get his legislation through, or not. full coverage of those election results next week, next wednesday morning on brea kfast. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. police are appealing
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for witnesses after a 15—year—old boy was fatally stabbed at a chicken shop in south london. it happened on randlesdown road in bellingham at teatime yesterday. no arrests have been made. london's high streets have too many unhealthy businesses like betting shops, fast food outlets and off—licences which could significantly shorten the lives of locals, according to a new report. according to the royal society for public health, haringey has the unhealthiest high street on seven sisters road with muswell hill, only 3 miles away, coming out as the healthiest. other unhealthy high streets include roman road west in bow and thornton heath in croydon. a council in south london will start a trial that will ban cars from outside some schools during peak times. greenwich council hopes it will encourage more parents to engage in more sustainable ways to travel and discourage car use near schools. it's a move welcomed by some local residents. i have people parking outside my house
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from 2:30 in the afternoon and when i talk to them, they just say, "well, i'm fed up at home "and i want the prime parking space." so yeah, i think it's good. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, there is a good service on all lines. like that all morning. on the roads, the a13 prince regents lane is very slow towards canning town after an earlier collision. you can see it's moving better. in the west end, on regent street saint james, the one way street is closed towards piccadilly circus for the installation of the christmas lights. it's that time of year! in euston, a400 hampstead road remains closed in both directions between a501 euston road and william road for water main repairs. and finally in harringay, green lanes is running with a single alternate lane with temporary traffic lights. you have been warned.
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now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a much nicer day of weather today than we saw yesterday but it is a rather cold and frosty start. some of our temperatures last night slipped to just below freezing but it should stay dry and there'll be lots of blue sky and sunshine around to enjoy, so here's the map. as you can see, not a whole lot going on on it, which means sparkling blue skies, lots of sunshine through the morning, a little bit more high clouds spilling in from the west as we head through the afternoon and staying dry, the wind is fairly light, the temperatures not as high as they were yesterday but fairly decent between 10 and 12 celsius for the most part as we had towards the end of the afternoon. and the sky should stay mostly clear overnight, a bit of cloud spilling in at times, perhaps temperatures not as low as they were last night that some spots could dip below freezing, otherwise holding at around 4 or 5 degrees celsius in central london. so it's quite chilly start to saturday, the winds are going to start to pick up,
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a very windy day on saturday but if you're watching fireworks over the weekend, bear in mind it should stay dry, it will feeljust a touch milder, some sunshine on saturday, cloudier on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the uk is experienced more extreme weather, according to a new study by the met office. it says when comparing the last ten years to the previous 30, the hottest days have become hotter, while the coldest days are not as cold as they were. it's also recorded more examples of what it calls "tropical nights", where there's no respite from the heat. there's been support across the political spectrum for tracey crouch who resigned as sports minister because of a row about fixed—odds betting terminals. the government was expected to cut the maximum stake from £100 to £2 next april, but this has been
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postponed until october. ministers say the gambling industry needs more time to adjust. the former foreign secretary boris johnson said ms crouch deserved "huge credit" and the archbishop of canterbury justin welby, described her decision as "principled and courageous". it is unfortunate, clearly, that we have lost. she was a passionate minister. but the government is committed to bringing down the fixed odd amount to £2. the government is bringing forward the initial consultation talks about this being introduced in 2020, it was brought forward to october 2019. it is u nfortu nate we forward to october 2019. it is unfortunate we have lost tracey. i would rather focus on delivering this policy now and making sure we get it right.
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former home secretary amber rudd was let down by her own officials, an inquiry into the events leading up to her resignation has concluded. ms rudd stood down in april, saying she had "inadvertently misled" mps investigating the windrush generation of post—war caribbean migrants. the report says ms rudd lost confidence in her officials and was "not supported as she should have been". president trump has suggested that soldiers deployed to the mexican border could shoot migrants who throw stones at them while attempting to cross into the us. mr trump's comments come just days ahead of crucial mid—term elections, the result of which will determine the success of the rest of his presidency. he also said he's planning to deny asylum to people who enter the united states outside legal ports of entry. the uk's brexit secretary, dominic raab, will visit northern ireland today to discuss the future of the border with business leaders and politicians. avoiding a hard border with the irish republic has become the biggest sticking point in the negotiations on the uk's departure from the eu. brexit will also be discussed at a meeting between british and irish ministers in dublin.
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half of all the people who go to a&e with sports—related injuries are children and teenagers, according to research published in the royal society of medicinejournal. boys aged 14 and girls aged 12 were most at risk of sustaining a sports injury. for boys, playing football, rugby union and rubgy league caused the most fractures while for girls, horse—riding, netball and trampolining were mainly to blame. friday afternoon peak—fare restrictions on virgin trains from london euston station will be scrapped from today. services to birmingham, manchester and liverpool are often overcrowded and passengers have been forced to stand in order to avoid paying much higher peakfares. those are this morning's menu stories.
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—— main news stories. coming up on the programme, matt is at a viewer's garden in tamworth, celebrating three years of bbc weather watchers. he has gone to catch up with somebody who has sent in pictures. it is really important to show the pictures instantly. it is a club that has grown and grown. just three yea rs on that has grown and grown. just three years on thousands. he will be with one of them very soon. good morning, mike. good morning. get out and take pictures of the back garden. only when it is interesting. tamworth is interesting. tamworth is interesting. the home of ski biking. and lots of badgers. really? my friends send me pictures of their badges. send them to the weather watchers. we are celebrating one of the greatest gymnasts of all time. this has come from marylou, the sweetheart of american gymnast. she
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isa sweetheart of american gymnast. she is a real pinup of american sport. she has said simone biles is the greatest of all time, certainly greater than herself. some accolade indeed. it is not surprising because simone biles has underlined her status as one of the all—time great gymnasts, at the world championships in doha. despite not being at her best, the american's become the first woman, to win four all around titles at the world championships — her first came back in 2013. it takes her tally to 12 world golds overall. this is definitely the scariest one from the ones from the past. i wish i could have put out a better performance. because that is not the gymnast that i am, that you saw, but we all have mistakes and we all fall. it is how you get up and prove yourself. this year has had its ups and downs. going to therapies and other things, besides just going to the gym, it has been a little rough. you try to focus on one thing at a time to get through it. and you can see today's action from doha —
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including max whitlock defending his title on the pommel horse — on bbc two at one o'clock this afternoon. leicester city manager claude puel has called this week one of the hardest in the club's history, following the death of owner vichai srivaddhanaprabha, and four others, in saturday's helicopter crash. the club's former manager claudio ranieri stood alongside vichai's son to lay a wreath at the club's stadium. he led the team to their triumph in the premier league two years ago. the man now in charge said it was the players decision for their game with cardiff to go ahead as planned — their first since the crash. this has been, without doubt, one of the hardest weeks in the history of this football club. the tragic loss of five lives has left us all numb, with sadness and shock. england star raheem sterling is set to become one of the highest earners in the premier league. he's verbally agreed a new contract with the champions,
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manchester city. the deal is reportedly worth around £300,000 pounds per week. sterling was an unused substitute in city's league cup win over fulham last night. mission impossible — glasgow city, were knocked out of the women's champions league following a 3—0 second leg defeat by barcelona. the scottish champions were 5—0 down from the first leg and two goals from england. striker toni duggan saw the spanish side progress to the quarter—finals. and some news overnight — wayne rooney missed a penalty as his side dc united were knocked out of the major league soccer play—offs. the former england captain missed his kick in the penalty shootout as united lost to columbus crew. the dream of becoming a professional footballer is over for the time being, it seems, for usain bolt. the athletics great has left his australian club central coats mariners, despite scoring twice in a preseason friendly. the club say they failed to find what they called a "commercial solution" to keep bolt. a p pa re ntly
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apparently his touch was not as good as his speed. dina asher—smith has been named the sunday times sports woman of the year for 2018. in august, asher—smith became the first british woman to win triple european championship gold, winning the 100m, 200m, and 4x100m relay titles in berlin. england's commonwealth games gold medal—winning netball team won the team of the year award. if lewis hamilton has inspired you to become the next champion racing driver, but you can't afford the jounrey into formula one, an alternative for a growing number of young drivers is e—sports. this is james baldwin — 5 times kart champion who now races on simulators for the velochey team. he works out in the gym and has a special diet. because i found out you need
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equivalent driving skills and technique to get around. there was a lot of noise, vibration, the chair was shaking. it was too much for me. i went into the wall. it was horrendous was a bit scary. i wrote the car off, for good measure. do you feel the pressure? yes. you can see why he works out and has a special diet. you are physically very fit and mentally how to be alert. it is exhausting just doing that. i know it sounds daft, it is a computer game, essentially. much more than that now. they do need very good driving skills to compete against others around the world. it isa against others around the world. it is a huge business. we will look at it more. but is it sport? he would argue that of course it is because he is competing, physically, mentally, it is a challenge. we will look forward to that tomorrow. the world's first esports hub has opened in this country, in london. thank you. gamblers can bet up to £100 every 20
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seconds on fixed odds betting terminals. the government was expected to cut the maximum stake from £100 to £2 next april, but it has been postponed until october. sports minister tracey crouch resigned yesterday saying this date was "unjustifiable" and would cost the lives of problem gamblers. we arejoined by we are joined by somebody who has very close experience of this. this isjohn myers. very close experience of this. this is john myers. good very close experience of this. this isjohn myers. good morning. your son ryan took his life in 2014 after developing a gambling addiction. we have asked you tojoin us addiction. we have asked you tojoin us because we believe you can give perspective on both were struggling. what you make of tracey crouch's resignation? i am disappointed. to be honest, at first i did have some dealings with tracey crouch and i
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felt that some of her replies to me we re felt that some of her replies to me were a bit condescending. but she has got into it and she has helped us has got into it and she has helped us and she has fought for this limit to come in. so it is a sad thing for us. to come in. so it is a sad thing for us. are you disappointed in hope for resigning were disappointed in the reasons that she says that forced? resigning were disappointed in the reasons that she says that forced ?|j reasons that she says that forced?” am disappointed in the reasons for her resigning, not disappointed in her. just tell us how has your family been affected by these machines, because unless you have used them and seen them, you might not even know that they exist, but they are on the high street, behind closed windows and doors in the shops, and you know only too well the effect they can have. these machines are designed to get people in, they are very fast, you can use money extremely fast, within seconds, spin after spin up a spin. that is what gets people hooked on them. you think next time i will win, next time i will win, and you never do. from our side, win, next time i will win, and you never do. from ourside, of win, next time i will win, and you never do. from our side, of course, we had the worst thing of all that can happen, our son took his own
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life, which is... the most horrible thing in the world you can never think of. and it is. we are so grateful for you coming to talk to us. grateful for you coming to talk to us. ina grateful for you coming to talk to us. in a moment i will read an e—mailfrom a us. in a moment i will read an e—mail from a viewer who has us. in a moment i will read an e—mailfrom a viewer who has been touched by this as well. what happened to ryan? what was the process in which he got to that point? it was difficult for us. people don't believe us, we knew he gambled, we knew he had a bet, we are not stupid, but we did not believe it was that bad. if ever we spoke to him about it he told is not to be stupid and said he was very careful with his money. and he was. he always had scabies, he always had money. he was great. it was always happy -- money. he was great. it was always happy —— always had savings. we had just been on holiday. had a fantastic holiday. normal happy—go—lucky self. fantastic holiday. normal happy-go-lucky self. my fantastic holiday. normal happy-go—lucky self. my wife fantastic holiday. normal happy—go—lucky self. my wife and yemeni saturday, he was in a good mood, talking about going to work on monday —— phoned him on saturday. and then on sunday he left a message
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on facebook, which basically said that he was sorry. what happened, he had racked up debts? we still don't know, exactly, how much you spend. we know on the day... on the day he had been on the fixed odd that in machines. he had spent all his wages will stop we know that because we found the receipt on the floor in his house. he had gone to a betting shop and his card had been refused. we realised that yet again he had lost all his money. after he died, i started looking into what had been happening. they managed to get his past work for facebook and found that he had been talking to another gambler, a guy called james, he had been speaking to him over a period of time, talking about how he had been trying to beat the addiction. he found it difficult. one of the things he said was that everywhere he went there were advertisements for gambling and he could not get away from it. it is stories like
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ryan's and like yours is a family, that persuaded the government to cut the maximum bet you can put on from £100 tojust £2. the maximum bet you can put on from £100 to just £2. there the maximum bet you can put on from £100 tojust £2. there is disagreement about the timing of when it comes into effect, but tracey crouch says it is unjustifiable to delay it until this time next year. how disappointed, you have said you are disappointed she has left the job, you have said you are disappointed she has left thejob, if you have said you are disappointed she has left the job, if it is being delayed by six months until this time next year, what are your concerns about other people who are out there who might be in the same position ryan is an? first of all, i am nota position ryan is an? first of all, i am not a surprise as other people. i was never sure they would bring it in. i still believe the gambling, they have a more powerful lobby than we would ever have. and they are lobbying with the government, giving out favours to mp5 to get them to vote their way. the government are adamant, we have been told by minister this morning that it will happen, but it will be later than tracey crouch and you would have
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wanted. until the tracey crouch and you would have wanted. untilthe day it tracey crouch and you would have wanted. until the day it happens i will not believe it. this is a simple wealth ethics. why does it ta ke simple wealth ethics. why does it take so long to do a software fix —— softwa re take so long to do a software fix —— software fix. this is the reason why it you will have four or five betting shops in one area, because they are only allowed to have four machines in one shot. so they opened more shops to have more machines to get more people hooked on gambling. michael has written to us and said that this is so emotional and it touches so many people, he said he had a massive problem with the fixed odd machines, lost thousands of pounds, sometimes he was playing to machines are £100 ago. for your experience, anyone who is watching, struggling at the moment, as a member of a family, as a family member of a family, as a family member who has lost someone they wish they could have helped more or no one will, what would you say to anyone out who was going through this, family member or someone addicted? anyone who was addicted,
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please talk to your family. that is the first and foremost thing. it is a heartening to talk because, u nfortu nately, a heartening to talk because, unfortunately, gambling is seen as a socially accessible part of society. people think it is stupid to become addicted. they think they have failed completely and they don't wa nt to failed completely and they don't want to talk about it. you need to talk about it. it is so hard to beat it. it really is hard. but the first step is to admit that you have a problem, as always. talk to people, get help from people. and just start from day one. and if you fail, just pick yourself up, dust yourself off, start all over again. and just keep going. that is what you have got to do. thank you so much for talking to us do. thank you so much for talking to us this morning. and if you have been affected by those machines and you want any guidance, if you go to the bbc‘s at a line website, then others of different charities and organisations that can offer you
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help in detailfor you. all the members and charities that can help you are listed on our website. matt is in tamworth where it is chilly but things are going to get a little bit brighter. good morning. it certainly is chilly here this morning. the sunshine is out, it will be all day long and across many parts of the uk. the reason we are here outside tamworth as we are celebrating the third anniversary of bbc weather watchers. it's our "outsourcing of whether photographs from across the uk to help us tell the weather story, not just your on breakfast across bbc weather and we are in the garden. carla has joined us weather and we are in the garden. carla hasjoined us here this morning. thank you very much having us. morning. thank you very much having us. you are keen whether one child —— weather watcher. us. you are keen whether one child -- weather watcher. what drew you first? we noticed it on the way to school one day, me and the children stopped, took the picture, centred in another first day, we got an
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editor '5 pick. a little bit like winning the world cup. on the first day, we just carried winning the world cup. on the first day, wejust carried on. i do a lot of running so i tend to do my weather watching when i am running. it makes me just realise what a beautiful part of the world we live in. totally switching off. i seem to notice everything. we got these two involved. do you enjoy taking the pictures? yes. did you take one of these ones? we've got another one to show you later. what do you enjoy that taking the pictures? ray says it gets closer to nature, doesn't
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it, ray? not so much helping. he is the director of photography. we should get that right, thank you the joining us. bbc weather watchers has taken off. joining us. bbc weather watchers has ta ken off. what joining us. bbc weather watchers has taken off. what is the appeal for landscape photography? it's something that everyone can do now. it does let you see the world differently. i think that is the big thing that we are finding taking pictures. what about the big tip on taking landscape photography? it's about keeping a rise in straight. light is the most important aspect. certainly looking at the light. you
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can see the great examples. these are all leading techniques for creating really interesting images. cold start, wrapped up well and truly warm. it is going to be a pretty cold day if you take a forecast. a cold day with a dry and sunny day. it should be a lovely crisp autumn day the many parts. a big change for the weather front. its departed towards denmark and also norway. it's left us with a of high pressure. one of two showers mainly across the highlands and islands. but temperatures of the
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moment as low as minus five degrees, -6 moment as low as minus five degrees, —6 in one or two areas. any missed and fog patches will clear. sunshine turning increasingly hazy. temperatures lifting to what it should be at this time of year but not too bad. by the end of the day, the breeze will be picking up. we got the remnants of what was hurricane o passing between us and iceland. that is set to bring widespread gales. heavy rain as well, especially in western parts of scotland. temperatures will stay up well above freezing. for england and wales, it's going to still be a cold night. temperatures around minus two. a fine saturday in store. it will be windy. most places will be
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dry in central and eastern areas. scotla nd dry in central and eastern areas. scotland and northern ireland from the gales continuing, gusts in the north—west of scotland and heavy rain at times. a milder day with temperatures in the teams. nowhere near as when across the uk. scotland and northern ireland have much brighter weather. the best of the sunshine across east anglia and the south—east. outbreaks of rain coming and going. some drier and brighter ones too. the frost becoming less abundant as we go through the weekend and into next week. that is how it is looking. thank you very much indeed, get warmed up, it looks cold. we often talk about the north—south divide on breakfast: in terms of money, health and jobs. colletta has news on one area where the gap might be closing. it's quite a surprising area. it is
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surprising. we are talking about house prices. often, we see a huge divide, particularly with london over recent decades, absolutely zooming ahead, not just over recent decades, absolutely zooming ahead, notjust in terms of overall cost but in terms of the amount of increase each year. a spin over the last few years and today, we have a report from savill‘s, looking at the housing market over the next few years. average house prices during that period will continue to increase. nearly 15% across the uk as a whole but when you drill down into those regional differences, the one line with the biggest increase is the north—west of england which will see 22% increase and on the other extreme, looking at london, just 4.5% increase. still a rise in house prices but not by nearly as much, basically everywhere other than
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london, east anglia, the south—east of england is around that sort of 18,19,20% of england is around that sort of 18, 19, 20% increase. potentially some reasons behind that, definitely some reasons behind that, definitely some brexit fears at the moment from those big international investors that have been driving property prices up. if we are seeing a little bit less about over the next few yea rs, bit less about over the next few years, that's likely to slow down the markets is a bit better. a big drive in northern cities, cities in scotland, really generating a bit of a buzz, having more business investment. that's increasing house prices. potentially why we are seeing more of a rise elsewhere in england. a bit of a health warning is always with these kind of discussions. looking five years into the future, particularly on a subject like house prices is trying to gaze into the crystal ball. interesting that a group like savill‘s, who are respected in this area, will say that house prices
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will continue and by so much. with brexit pending, it's even more difficult. one of the big predictions with brexit would be that we would see a big fall in house prices. uk average is going to be up more than 15% as an average and in some areas, considerably more. it's an interesting gap to narrow. we are at the age ofjust 21 and with five olympic medals to her name, the world of sport describes american simone biles, as "the greatest gymnast of all time". she has done the four all—round medals. they are putting a spooky play on it the theatre. halloween might be over but we have ghostly goings—on with
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those two. time for the news, travel and weather where you are watching brea kfast and weather where you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news. police are appealing for witnesses after a 15—year—old boy was fatally stabbed at a chicken shop in south london. it happened on randlesdown road in bellingham at teatime yesterday. no arrests have been made. london's high streets have too many "unhealthy" businesses like betting shops, fast food outlets and off—licences which could significantly shorten the lives of locals, according to a new report. according to the royal society for public health, haringey has the unhealthiest high street on seven sisters road with muswell hill, only 3 miles away, coming out as the healthiest. other unhealthy high streets include roman road west in bow and thornton heath in croydon. a council in south london will start a trial that will ban cars from outside some schools during peak times. greenwich council hopes it will encourage more parents to engage in more sustainable ways
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to travel and discourage car use near schools. it's a move welcomed by some local residents. i have people parking outside my house from 2:30 in the afternoon and when i talk to them, they just say, "well, i'm fed up at home "and i want the prime parking space." so yeah, i think it's good. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there is a good service on all lines. on the roads, the a13 prince regents lane is very slow towards canning town after an earlier collision. in the west end, on regent street saint james', the one way street is closed towards piccadilly circus for the installation of the christmas lights. now the weather
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with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's a much nicer day of weather today than we saw yesterday but it is a rather cold and frosty start. some of our temperatures last night slipped to just below freezing but it should stay dry and there'll be lots of blue sky and sunshine around to enjoy, so here's the map. as you can see, not a whole lot going on on it, which means sparkling blue skies, lots of sunshine through the morning, a little bit more high clouds spilling in from the west as we head through the afternoon and staying dry, the wind is fairly light, the temperatures not as high as they were yesterday but fairly decent between 10 and 12 celsius for the most part as we had towards the end of the afternoon. and the sky should stay mostly clear overnight, a bit of cloud spilling in at times, perhaps temperatures not as low as they were last night
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that some spots could dip below freezing, otherwise holding at around 4 or 5 degrees celsius in central london. so it's quite chilly start to saturday, the winds are going to start to pick up, a very windy day on saturday but if you're watching fireworks over the weekend, bear in mind it should stay dry, it will feeljust a touch milder, some sunshine on saturday, cloudier on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. our headlines today. hotter, wetter, milder — a new met office report says the uk has experienced more extreme weather in the last ten years than in the previous 30. the row over high street betting machines — after sports minister tracy crouch resigns, the government defends its timetable for cutting the maximum stake. i'm live in late—night memphis, tennessee. it's the birthplace of rock and roll. but you'll find little harmony ahead of next week's
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crucial mid term elections. closing the north—south divide. house price growth is predicted to continue for the next five years but the gap between property values in northern england versus london is set to narrow. brilliant biles makes history at the gymnastics world championships. simone biles has become the first woman to win four all—around titles. it's her 12th world gold overall. and i'm at the home of one of our weather watchers as we celebrate three years of the system. it's a cold start here today and a frosty start uk wide, but a lovely autumn day ahead. details on that and your full uk forecast coming up right here on breakfast. good morning. it's friday 2nd november. our top story. the uk is experiencing more extreme weather, according to a new study by the met office. it says when comparing the last ten years to the previous 30, the hottest days have become hotter, while the coldest days are not as cold as they were.
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with the details, here's our news correspondent ben ando. who can forget the long, hot summer of 2018? well, get used to it, because the met office says warm spells of warm weather and individual scorching summer days are both on the rise. the report compares extreme weather from the 19605, ‘705, and ‘805, to the period from 2008 to 2017. it found that spells of warm weather have more than doubled, that individual hot days are 0.8 degrees hotter, and colder days are milder — on average 1.7 celsius warmer than in the past. but it's not all about the heat. there has also been a 17% increase in days of heavy rain. and while it may not feel like it at the start of november, researchers say that the number of tropical nights where temperatures don't fall below 20 celsius — or 68 fahrenheit — are also on the increase. in the 30 years between 1960 and 1990, there were just eight. whereas last summer alone there have been two.
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though tropical nights can have a downside. in periods of very high temperatures they can be a hazard for the elderly, who get no respite from the heat. and though this study has focused on extreme weather conditions, the met office says it's consistent with worldwide trends in global warming, driven primarily by fossil fuels. ben ando, bbc news. there's been support across the political spectrum for tracey crouch who resigned as sports minister because of a row about fixed—odds betting terminals. the government was expected to cut the maximum stake from £100 to £2 next april, but this has been postponed until october. ministers say the gambling industry needs more time to adjust. we can speak now to our political correspondent ben wright who is in westminster. ben, what has been the reaction to the resignation? yeah, good morning from the
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archbishop of canterbury through to borisjohnson archbishop of canterbury through to boris johnson through to archbishop of canterbury through to borisjohnson through to some of tracey crouch's own conservative collea g u es tracey crouch's own conservative colleagues in the cabinet. widespread support for her, the principle stand that she's taken on this for many years, the way she spearheaded moves to slash the amount that people can spend on these machines, which are considered by everybody to be highly addictive and pretty dangerous. they allow people to spend up to a maximum of £100 every 20 seconds on electronic sort of casino games like roulette. all parties now agree that that limit needs to be slashed, the government's proposal if it comes down to £2. the reason tracey crouch quit yesterday is that she clearly felt she had a guarantee from her collea g u es felt she had a guarantee from her colleagues in government that that new limit would kick in in april next year, but on monday in the budget the treasury minister said it would be october next year. there is
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widespread anger in westminster about this. incomprehension that the government would delay. perhaps it's about money although the treasury doesn't get that much money from the betting revenue from these machines. i think this issue is far from betting revenue from these machines. i think this issue is farfrom dead, though, because a cross—party group of mps, iain duncan smith, labour, is going to i think force this issue when the finance bill proceeds through the house of commons in the next few weeks. i think they will try to force the government to introduce this new to pound limit themselves. i think tracey crouch will feel vindicated in the end. thank you very much indeed. former home secretary amber rudd was let down by her own officials, an inquiry into the events leading up to her resignation has concluded. ms rudd stood down in april, saying she had "inadvertently misled" mps investigating the windrush generation of post—war caribbean migrants. the report says ms rudd lost confidence in her officials and was "not supported as she should have been". president trump has suggested that soldiers deployed to the mexican
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border could shoot migrants who throw stones at them while attempting to cross into the us. mr trump's comments come just days ahead of crucial mid—term elections, the result of which will determine the success of the rest of his presidency. he also said he's planning to deny asylum to people who enter the united states outside legal ports of entry. anybody throwing stones, rocks, like they did to mexico and the mexican military, mexican police, where they badly hurt police and soldiers of mexico — we will consider that a firearm. because there's not much difference when you get hit in the face with a rock, which, as you know, it was very violent a few days ago, very, very violent, that break—in, it was a break—in of a country. they broke in to mexico. its big mid—term elections in the us
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next week. chris buckler has been crossing the us. his life for us in memphis, tennessee and willjoin us here ina memphis, tennessee and willjoin us here in a few minutes. half of all the people who go to a&e with sports—related injuries are children and teenagers, according to research published in the royal society of medicinejournal. i'm sure many parents aren't surprised by this! boys aged 14 and girls aged 12 were most at risk of sustaining a sports injury. for boys, playing football, rugby union and rubgy league caused the most fractures while for girls, horse—riding, netball and trampolining were mainly to blame. friday afternoon peak—fare restrictions on virgin trains from london euston station will be scrapped from today. services to birmingham, manchester and liverpool are often overcrowded and passengers have been forced to stand in order to avoid paying much higher peakfares. they are changing the ticketing, hopefully, they say, to combat that kind of crush. matt will have the
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weather for us and in around 20 minutes, mike will have the sport. first, though... for more than 20 years, malcolm brabant was an award—winning bbc foreign correspondent, covering wars, politics and natural disasters around the world. but in 2011, his life changed when he developed severe psychosis. as malcolm began to hear voices, his wife trine captured his experience on camera. the footage has now been made into a documentary which they hope will help to reduce some of the stigma around mental illness. let's take a look. you won't know this, but i used to be seriously mad. i had a yellow fever vaccine that fried my brain. and it sent me crazy. where are those bloody plates?! it was malcolm. he sounded incredibly pained. you've got loads of plates there... his bed had been levitating. they‘ re bombing libya! do you know who i am? bring those here to protect me. that was the signal that confirmed what he'd suspected. give me close air cover.
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jesus! please protect me. you are to be first to sign. get the air force over here now. i've been in an asylum. i wasn't scared of malcolm. i was scared of the thought that it could happen so easily. my husband has had his third ect treatment today, and i'm sitting here with him in the hospital in this room. and he is right next to me. i really don't think that i'm ever going to leave here. the husband i knew before the vaccine would never, ever have contemplated suicide. never, ever. if there is a god, please, please stop this suffering. malcolm, his wife trine and their son lukasjoin us now. good morning. thank you for coming in. i suppose the first question is how are you doing now? and perfectly
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all right. don't worry, i'm not the messiah, which is what i thought i was. i mightappear likejesus, my wife worse tips me and occasionally was to crucify me but i assure you i am not the messiah, i'm just a naughty boy. it's interesting you canjoke naughty boy. it's interesting you can joke about it. trine, the naughty boy. it's interesting you canjoke about it. trine, the pain, the anguish you were going through, knowing that this partner of yours, who you knew had gone and you didn't know when he was coming back.” simply could not believe what was happening. you know, one minute he had a yellow fever vaccine because he was going on assignment to africa and the next he was telling me, after having the vaccine, that his e—book reader was flying through the room, he was getting messages from dead friends, he wasjesus and our son wasjesus. that dead friends, he wasjesus and our son was jesus. that was the good side of psychosis. then the bad side of psychosis happened, when he thought he was the devil. he thought he was a suicide bomber. he tried to commit suicide. it was hell. how old
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we re commit suicide. it was hell. how old were you , commit suicide. it was hell. how old were you, lukas when this was happening? i was between 11 and 12 when that started. how was it for you? in fairness, i don't remember a lot of it. being that young, you don't really understand what's going on, but as i've grown older i've come to really grasp the full reality of what happened and that has definitely had a long—lasting effect. in which way? i've had to deal with my own sort of mental problems, but i think that's a story that might come out another day. i think... i've had to really kind of find myself as a person and really try to rebuild my character after this. malcolm, the film that you've made of your experience, it's extraordinary. it's only because you are making a film as a family while it all went on. you are filming yourself, trine was filming you. some people would think that was a bit odd but i suppose for you as a correspondence, it was normal. the thing was, i thought i was christ. i
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shoot my own films, i'm a one—man band. i thought the second coming has to be on tv. when the big relapse, the judas has to be on tv. when the big relapse, thejudas scene, is something ifilmed myself because i thought it had to be on tv. it was pa rt thought it had to be on tv. it was part of the process of trying to come into the world that the messiah was the. when you look back through those rushes as we call them in tv news, is it like you are looking at a different person? can you believe that was you? i remember most of the things that happen. the only things i don't really recall from my period of being locked up in a psychiatric hospitalfor of being locked up in a psychiatric hospital for 18 of being locked up in a psychiatric hospitalfor 18 months is when i had ect and that's damaged my memory. that is? electroconvulsive therapy. that is? electroconvulsive therapy. that was devastating. you saw what i was like and i said this was going to bea was like and i said this was going to be a silent movie. i don't recognise that person at all. i am back to being the old obnoxious person. let's look at another clip. this is when you are in greece. you
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are talking to your neighbours, in some cases shouting. hello! your christians next door, aren't you? i know you are. we never talk but i know you are. we never talk but i know your christians. please protect me! there are forces of evil out there! what do you hope is going to come out of this film? there are several things. we hope that it's going to be stigmatised mental illness. also, i'll be honest, this is an attempt to try to make some money. we were devastated we didn't get any compensation from the vaccine maker. we also hope that sonofi will investigate this properly because they claimed they will, they said they would look into it, but none of the doctors have done. we would like them to look at this properly. let's be clear about the relationship. the jab manufacturer sanofi pasteur says there is no yellow marker they want to talk to
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us on camera. let me give their statement. the jab manufacturer sanofi pasteur says there is no evidence of any relationship between the yellow fever vaccine and malcolm's conditions. they say the injection met all release specifications and that more than 120,000 doses of the batch were distributed in europe, with no similar illnesses reported. they did note that vaccines are easily suspected of causing adverse events without any firm evidence, other than the fact that the event was observed following vaccination. and you have, as you said, you have repeated events. you've invited them to the premiere of your film. we did. i sent an e-mailto to the premiere of your film. we did. i sent an e-mail to the ceo of sanofi, the vaccine maker. i got the same kind of carefully worded letter back, where they expressed sympathy for what we'd been through and that was very kind but i would like documentation for the investigation
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they say they carried out into this vaccine. as a consumer, i am lost. why did this happen to my husband? it's still happening. just this morning i learned of the case of a young girl in the czech republic who suffered acute psychosis after having this vaccine. it still happening. please could we notjust investigate this vaccine and find out what's going on?” investigate this vaccine and find out what's going on? i suppose they would say that they are investigating. we've heard what your dad wants the film to achieve. what do you as a family want this to achieve? what you want is say to otherfamilies the mental illness is important to us. it is important to show the world that when you have a loved one who is mentally ill there is a legacy. it is notjust a patient, it is the family and the burden on the families is enormous. we, to this day, my husband is fine, but lucas
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andl day, my husband is fine, but lucas and i to this day are struggling with what happened to my husband. i am going to be fine. i'm an old bird. but the long—term effects from lucas we are uncertain about and thatis lucas we are uncertain about and that is painful. that must be painful to you as well? it hurts me a lot. if i raise my voice in the house lucas starts to worry. the other day i had to have an argument with my current employers in america and it was in the middle of the night because of the time difference andi night because of the time difference and i was yelling at somebody and saying, jesus. i was making a false. that really disturbed him. i had to temper my behaviour and my anger. i am really easy—going guy most of the time. but if i get angry have to control it. i don't want to set lucas off and upset him. we wish you all the best with the film. it's been lovely talking to you rather than when we were talking down the line in other cases. thank you. you're thanks for having us. malcolm and trine's film is called malcolm is a little unwell.
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in parentheses, body is feeling much better now. matt is in tamworth this morning with the weather. he is meeting some of the weather watchers who have sent in some lovely pictures over the past few months. it isa pictures over the past few months. it is a lovely photographic morning. it is a lovely photographic morning. it certainly is. good morning. perfect order crisp morning. yes, we are talking weather watchers this morning. we are in the garden of one weather watchers. this week and we celebrate three years of weather watchers. there are more than 200,000 subscribers now posting over 2.2 million updates through the past three years. and as many as 1700 each and every day. believe it or not we do as a team look through just about all of them to choose the best pictures to help us tell you what the weather is doing across the
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uk and moving that weather story throughout. it doesn't matter if it isa throughout. it doesn't matter if it is a golden sunrise or mike a grey rainy day, we love your pictures and they are very useful to us. there are great for getting out and taking are great for getting out and taking a bit more notice of what is around you. we will be talking to carl and her children in the next half an hour. here this morning, just outside tamworth, it is quite a frosty start. lovely sunshine behind me. uk wide we have a frost this morning. temperatures dropped below —6 overnight. slowly starting to lift now. it will take a few hours. plenty of sunshine overhead. yesterday's rain, which came courtesy of the weather front which is in denmark and western part of norway, is being replaced by high pressure. that generally means dry. a few showers pushing into the highlands of scotland. they will be
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coming and going throughout the day. elsewhere across the uk after a lovely crisp start, sunny skies will dominate. most will stay dry. there will be some changes towards the far west, including northern ireland. the sunshine turns hazy as weekly —— see enquiries. rain in northern ireland by the time we hit the evening. temperatures between seven and 13 degrees. into this evening and 13 degrees. into this evening and overnight scotland and northern ireland will turn increasingly windy, widespread gains. 60 mile—per—hour ghosts by the end of the night and western scotland. we have the remnants of what was hurricane oscar. further away from that england and wales stay dry. for many, clear. the frost not as widespread tonight. temperatures in the south—east good to get —— get down to —2. not a bad start to the weekend for much of england and wales. sunshine turning hazy from the west. splashes of rain in
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north—west england and north—west words by the end of the day. scotla nd words by the end of the day. scotland and northern ireland the gales continue. heavy rain at times. persistent and western scotland. northern ireland biden sought by the end of the day. temperatures into the teens. not quite as miles on sunday that the winds not as strong. stays dry in east anglia and the south—east. scotland and northern ireland have a better day on sunday. outbreaks of rain. the heaviest in south wales and south—west england. nowhere near as windy as it will be on saturday, which is crucial because many of you will be celebrating the impending bonfire night. if you are selling fireworks of this weekend, please do so safely and take note of the forecast. strong winds on saturday. thank you. while we have got you here, the met office report this morning says weather has been getting extreme, milder winters, wet
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and sometimes hot summers. what do you make of that? it is part of the ongoing climate forecast we haven't talking about, but we do see more extremes. that has an happening. we look at averages in 30 year blocks. since the 19605 the general average across the uk has gone to ridge by as much as 1.7 degrees. we are seeing more insta nces degrees. we are seeing more instances of hot days in summer. in particular we are seeing that the nights are not as cold. that is crucial. warmer nights. that has a big impact on the climate and our health. more days and more night we re health. more days and more night were temperatures. drop below 20 degrees. interesting. we will follow that up in the next few days. thank you. on tuesday, americans take to the polls for what they call the mid—term elections. the result will affect how the rest of donald trump's presidency plays out. whether he has the support he needs
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to get his ideas through. our north america correspondent, chris buckler, has travelled across the states for breakfast and is now in memphis, tennessee. our diva is buzzing with talk of the presidency and congress? —— are at the bars? it is cruising time. late—night meet early morning. it stretches of it in memphis. throughout the day we have had people in the bars and the clubs here with country music playing, blues, soul. pretty much everything. the conversation is all about the elections. you may see up there they talk about live music been here seven nights a week. the big coming attraction is on tuesday. whenever america goes to the polls and they decide what happens with congress.
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here is where that is important. at the moment the republican party currently run both houses in congress. the house of representatives and the senate. they have control. that makes it pretty easy drinking pushes policies, to get laws passed. but all of that could potentially change on tuesday of democrats were to win either congress, senate or the house of representatives. that is what is up for grabs representatives. that is what is up forgrabs in the representatives. that is what is up for grabs in the coming elections. president trump is once again talking about immigration, trying to get his base support fired up. some of his angry words have not gone down well with some voters, particularly some women. memphis might call itself home to the blues and the birthplace of rock'n'roll, but there's not much harmony here thanks to america's mid—term elections. # those who've seen us # knows there's not a thing to come between us...# the singing frazier sisters are proud republicans in tennessee, a state which has
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become an unexpected battle ground, and following some of the controversial comments made by donald trump about women, female voters are having to consider whether he is the man for them. i think a lot of the women who don't like him are not hearing what i'm hearing. maybe he is just kind of too aggressive for them or something. the allegations about affairs, the comments about where he might grab some women. those are things that...that aren't really presidential, are they? they're not, but he wasn't the president then and, you know, i feel like he's not being respected for what he has accomplished. but polls that suggest that many women aren't impressed by donald trump are clearly playing on his mind.
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we did very well with women. trump calls women beautiful. you're beautiful, you are beautiful, beautiful. i think women like me more now than they did two years ago. not every woman is prepared to return those compliments. i guess as a businessman he's good for the country but he's very disrespectful and i think he's kind of like a loose cannon. he will call women fat, ugly, use really demeaning words. a woman has never represented tennessee in the us senate but that could change this time around. the republican candidate is female and in a straight fight between a man and a woman, you might expect female voters to fall in behind her, but it's not that simple, and that's because there's a little bad blood. the singer taylor swift blasted marsha blackburn over her voting record on minority and women's rights. as a result, she says she's
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fighting for the democrats and their male candidate, phil bredesen. it's not about the fact that she is a woman, it's really about the policies so we are looking for women's candidates who would advocate for equality and the fact that they happen to be a woman is sort of an added benefit, they are going to bring an extra perspective, their unique perspective. there has been a lot of noise during this election campaign. only next week will it become clear who america's voters have been listening to. to ensure they have a prayer, the democrats and the republicans have been campaigning extremely hard and spending a lot of money. in this one senate race taking place in tennessee, for one seat, so far it is believed $70 million has been spent on campaigning. that is more
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than £50 million. a big factor. a big figure. you win the prize today for the most stamina on breakfast. it is 3:27am and you are still smiling and laughing with us this morning. thank you. in memphis you can go out at this time. it's great. you can now! off you go. enjoy it! we don't want to see him tomorrow morning. goodness knows what will happen. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello there, good morning. it's been another cold and frosty start to the day. but it's been a clear and crisp start. a ridge of high pressure across many of us. start. a ridge of high pressure across many of us. it's going to remain sunny into the afternoon but the remnants of ex—hurricane oscar lingering in the atlantic. it
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throwing these weather fronts closer to us and that means that the cloud increasing across northern ireland and the west of scotland, making the sunshine turn hazy year into this afternoon. it should stay dry for much of the day before the rain moves in by this evening. staying largely dry and sunny elsewhere. temperatures get to around eight to 12 celsius. it's through this evening when the rain will push its way into northern ireland, into the west of scotland. the breeze picking up west of scotland. the breeze picking up here, some gales developing in northern and western parts. central eastern areas of much of england and wales, it will be dry and clear night and wales, it will be dry and clear nightand a wales, it will be dry and clear night and a chilly night in the south—east. the is close to freezing here. for the weekend, we have this area of low pressure, the remnants of ex—hurricane oscar. the white lines, the isa buyers, close together, indicative of strong winds. the weather front bringing some rain on saturday across scotland, northern ireland. the rain eventually moving into the far north—west of england and across the west of wales. for most of england
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and wales, though, through saturday, into the evening, it will remain dry. there will be sunshine but quite windy day. these are the wind gusts, up to 50 or 60 mph in the far north—west of scotland and it would be particularly cold. temperatures around to 14 celsius. sunday now, and we still have some rain. that will affect south—west england, wales, perhaps the midlands and northern parts of england. dry and bright to the south—east of that and a much drier and brighter day for scotla nd a much drier and brighter day for scotland and northern ireland. lighter winds on sunday. the best temperatures about 12 or 13 degrees. that's all from me, have a good day. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri
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and victoria fritz. china's biggest tech firm is due to reveal its financial results — how much is a trade war with the us hurting alibaba? live from london, that's our top story on friday 2nd november. china's alibaba — with a market value of approaching $400 billion — posts results later — we ask how exposed it is to trade tensions with the us. we'll also look at the likelihood of a trade deal between the us and china — after reports president trump is drafting a pact for the two nations.
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