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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 2, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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that's a weather forecast that would usually bring a bit of cheer — but when the reason for it is climate change.. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. hotter days and "tropical nights" — the met office charts the dramatic effects of climate change. the met office says summer days are getting hotter, with warm spells longer than they used to be.. and tropical nights — where temperatures stay above20 degrees celsius — will be more frequent. meanwhile the chilliest days of the year are not as cold as they used to be. the report also says britain has experienced more weather extremes in the last ten years than in previous decades. here's our environment correspondent, matt mcgrath. while 2018 was an exceptionally warm here across the uk, this new study from the met office
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suggests that in general britain is now experiencing more warmer days than in the recent past. it found that, on average, the hottest day in each year over the recent ten years was 0.8 degrees warmer than during the earlier period. there's been an even bigger change when it comes to cold weather. the chilliest days and nights are not quite as biting — with substantial areas of the uk having on average less than one day per year when the temperature is below zero. met office scientists say we might see more of these changes in future. we expect to see an increase in certain types of extreme events, heatwaves and hot spells and warm spells, so i should point out we are particular looking at warm spells here across any time of year. these changes we are observing are consistent with our warming climate, so the uk has warmed byjust under a degree in the last sort of 50 years or so. while 1976 was one of the most significant heatwaves to hit the uk
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in the past 50 years, longer spells of warmer weather have become more common, essentially doubling over the period of the report. one intriguing aspect of the study concerns what are termed tropical nights, when the mercury stays above 20 celsius. this year, there were two nights in london that went above that mark, but in the 30 years between 1961 and 1990 there were just eight nights that exceeded that temperature. climate scientists say the changes in weather we are seeing the uk are down to global warming, keeping in step with the rest of the world. as the world warms, we expect to see more hot stays in summer, more warm nights, the kind of pattern of changes we are seeing, and the uk is warming roughly in line with the global average, so we will see these changes reflecting what's going on in the world as a whole. while the report details changes that scientists have recorded, do theirfindings chime with the experience of the public? it's getting out of hand. it's getting a lot hotter than it should be, really. and...
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well, especially when they are turning round and say it's hotter in the uk than in spain. i'm fortunate to live in a house that's quite cold, but i purchased a fan over the summer and all the windows are open, all the doors, and enjoyed the heat. it was great. it's not all about heat. the report also found that extremely wet days have increased by 17%. this could have significant implications for flooding across the uk in years to come. matt mcgrath, bbc news. for more on this we can speak to the met office's alex deakin, who joins me now from the service's exeter ho. nice to see you, alex. looking at these figures, for the last 50 years it isa these figures, for the last 50 years it is a remarkable change? yes, we have seen a big jump, and remember this is looking at extremes. when we talk about climate change we tend to be looking at the general trend, the
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average temperature rising, but this report is looking at extremes, how extremes have changed in terms of the top temperature through the year 01’ the top temperature through the year or the lowest throughout the year, so or the lowest throughout the year, so isa or the lowest throughout the year, so is a quite interesting statistics we are looking at and it really does markedly short, and it isjust we are looking at and it really does markedly short, and it is just a different way of showing, that the climate has changed across the uk in that time period. if you were doing a forecast of warmer days, tropical nights, it would put a smile on the faces of most people, but what other invocations? tropical night does sound quite nice, but it has very serious obligations. temperatures not dropping below 20 celsius. a lot of people who like what this —— serious implications. although it is warm, hard to sleep, a lot of people don't enjoy that. and it is also about the real health impacts, elderly people, vulnerable people, really suffering when the temperature at night does not drop below a centre certain level because they don't get any respite. hot days without that mating period to recuperate can have serious health
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impacts. we are in november, talking about extremes, in the same goes for winter? yes, but don't forget these are averages. this is climate change going forward, but looking back there is of course still time and scope for cold spells. remembering this year, there will be called extremes as well, but we are expecting these incredible extremes to generally be on the rise, with temperatures both by day and night, so temperatures both by day and night, so and it is overall getting warmer but there will still be periods with cold weather. it will not rule out snow completely, for example. cockney do this —— clock us through the science of the warmer weather. the warmer atmosphere can hold more water —— talk us through. it is therefore consistent you get more intense rainfall events. a warmer climate can hold more brain so when it falls there is more of it to fall in this report shows that as well.
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—— can hold more rain. this leads to more extreme weather events and more intense rainfall that can obviously lead to more flooding. the other side of increasing temperatures around the globe, the sea level will rise as well. two aspects of their leading to flooding. and it also means more mosquitoes, things like that. people have noticed that this summer. that. people have noticed that this summer. something we willjust have to get used to? again, a lot of people, talk about bringing on the higher temperatures, but they don't really think about the wider impact. mother nature will obviously also have to cope with changing temperatures and we're not sure how the projections forward will damage wildlife across the uk, and we will see rising temperatures which suggest different patterns of migrating birds and insects. alex, a lwa ys migrating birds and insects. alex, always good to speak to you, alex deakin there, thank you. thank you. you're watching afternoon live. now, two people have been stabbed in after an argument broke out between kitchen staff at sony music's headquarters
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in central london. armed police were called to the incident at a building in kensington at 11 o'clock this morning. the building was evacuated after the violence broke out. one person has been arrested. well, our reporter keith doyle is at the scene — let's get more from him now. what is this all about? a terrifying experience for staff in the building behind me, we're sony is based along with other businesses. they were evacuated shortly after 11 this morning —— where ferrari is based. armed police stormed the building after reports of a man with a knife entering the building —— were sony is based. people see this man walk down the street with a knife unchallenged and go through the doors behind me. sony describe it as a violent altercation between kitchen staff. we know that two people were stabbed and one man has been arrested. we understand that the moment that the people who were stabbed or not in a serious condition, certainly not a life—threatening condition, and that one man has been arrested in the
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last hour. staff have been allowed in the last hour back into the building, so dramatic events in kensington this morning but things have resumed and back to normal now. keith, thank you very much, keith doyle with the in kensington. —— the latest in kensington. cressida dick has voiced her support for the senior officer who said —— police have begun a criminal investigation into allegations of anti—semitic hate crime within the labour party. it comes after the lbc radio station passed an internal labour party dossier to cressida dick, commissoner of the metropolitan police. our political correspondent ben wright reports. he must have hoped this row had gone away. any response at all about the police investigation? good morning, how nice to see you. do you think... good morning, how nice to see you, goodbye. but after the metropolitan police was given a leaked labour party dossier detailing 45 cases of alleged
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anti—semitic hate crimes linked to labour party members, scotland yard is now investigating. we have been assessing some material which was passed in fact to me in a radio studio, of all things, about two months ago. and we are now investigating some of that material, because it appears there may have been crime committed. the met is not investigating the labour party itself, but examples of online anti—semitic abuse that may constitute hate crime. and the police is consulting the crown prosecution service. during the summer, labour was engulfed in a dispute about its handling of anti—semitism. in september the party's ruling body eventually agreed to adopt in full an international definition of anti—semitism, and jeremy corbyn told his party conference later that month he wanted an end to the dispute. the row over anti—semitism has caused immense hurt and anxiety in thejewish community, and great dismay in the labour party. i say this to all in the jewish community... we are your ally. applause. today labour's deputy leader said anti—semitism had to be rooted out of the party. we have anti—semitism in the labour party, we've improved our
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measures to deal with it. i don't want any anti—semite in my party and we want them out, and if they're guilty of hate crime we want them investigated and convicted too. but we need to see the facts. what had been an internal labour party investigation is now a police matter, and the problem of anti—semitism is not going away. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. we saw in that report. cressida dick, the crime and police commissioner, has voiced her support for the senior officer who said police forces are too stretched to deal with issues such as logging hate incidents against women. sara thornton, chair of the national police chiefs council, was criticised by some people for saying police should focus on violent crime rather than misogyny. we can now get the thoughts of sir peter fahy, former chief constable of greater manchester police, who joins us via skype from oldham. good afternoon. was she right to say
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that? yes, she was. she was obviously reinforcing the comments made by sara thornton, the chair of the national police chiefs. two issues here. one is about resources, the huge cuts in the police budgets, further cuts due to pension changes, the fact that chief constables are threatening to take the treasury to judicial review, but i think the issueis judicial review, but i think the issue is also about whether a criminal justice issue is also about whether a criminaljustice approach is the best solution to a problem like misogyny. even then, that debate about this one issue can hide a much more serious issue about how police forces are stretched, not able to give the book is to violent crime they would like. one thing i wanted to say, having retired you're probably more able to speak than those still serving. is their anger at that police level at the fact that police are having to make a decision, choice, as to what their priorities have to be? it is really in anger, frustration, almost bemusement, about the level of resources . bemusement, about the level of resources. i bemusement, about the level of resources. i remember bemusement, about the level of resources. i remember earlier in my
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career every year political parties used to compete as to who could promise more police officers, and they are have now been 20,000 cuts and threats of more, so i think there is a frustration, very big frustration, amongst police officers in general, that they want to provide a much better service to the public, and absolutely they are having tojuggle public, and absolutely they are having to juggle between these different priorities, sometimes driven by individual pressure groups, but without a wider recognition from the government and home office that, you know, policing is being stretched in all sorts of different ways and there should be some more fundamental questions about what it is we want our police to do. but whilst having less, being asked to do more, and particularly this issue of hate crimes, the issue of misogyny, which people say should be treated now as a crime. what is your stance on that? ijust don't think the way you deal with a really serious issue like misogyny, which isa serious issue like misogyny, which is a societal problem, the way you deal with it is just by saying you will make it a hate crime. this does
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not mean crimes against women, assault, harassment, stalking, will not be treated seriously, but again i would say it is not so much this issue about hate crime. what most police forces and police officers are seeing, there's a huge change in the nature of police work, away from the nature of police work, away from the sort of traditional crime and crime investigation to protecting vulnerable and needy people, particularly in areas like mental health, and it is that sort of issue, to say to the public and the politicians, is this really what you wa nt politicians, is this really what you want your police to be doing? is this a conscious shift or something that has happened incrementally? because, as i say, a lot of the public what the to concentrate on crime, but at the moment there are all these other issues, which often involve people at great risk which mean the police have moved away from that traditional type of work. while you were chief constable were you aware of this shift away from what people perceive should be the priorities, violent crime, burglaries, things like that, was there a decision taken that, "hang on, we will have to pull back a bit
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on, we will have to pull back a bit on that because there are a new issues to deal with"? really, on that because there are a new issues to dealwith"? really, it on that because there are a new issues to deal with"? really, it was that incremental drift. certainly when ijoined policing it was very much about property crime, and in some cases you felt more like a security guard, and over time that is because society is in a much more healthy place, gives much more importance to people than perhaps property, but there have also been a growth in the number of mental health cases, lots of other agencies are struggling because of their own cuts, and really the police have been criticised in a number of cases because they didn't protect people enough, so at the end of the day if somebody calls the police and believes somebody is at risk because ofa believes somebody is at risk because of a mental health crisis, the police have to deal with that, as a priority, and until they can hand it over to another agency, and that means if you're faced with, say, a case where somebody has found the bike stolen from them is being sold ina bike stolen from them is being sold in a second—hand shop, or they have somebody apparently going through mental health crisis at home and
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ambulances not able to respond, it will be the mental health case that will be the mental health case that will take priority and it is that sort of thing i think which is causing bemusement to the public, andi causing bemusement to the public, and i think in their day—to—day experience they are seeing a growth in burglaries, violent crime, then when they contact the police they are not getting the service they expected. i bet you have met a few armchair chief constables whose view is, if you have more bobbies on the beat, it would solve everything?” don't think so and i try absolutely not to be a grumpy old chief co nsta ble. not to be a grumpy old chief constable. i wasn't referring to you! but there is a very serious issue, highlighted in the recent home affairs select committee report on the future of policing. absolutely. it is notjust responding to calls, dealing with issues like misogyny or child abuse, it is about the long—term relationship with local people which comes from neighbourhood policing, being out on the streets, talking to local people, getting on the back of local people, getting on the back of local criminals, and i think it's exactly that sort of work which cressida dick is saying is being
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eroded, and clearly very concerned about the number of young people being murdered in london, and the huge tragedy and tragedy and distress and pain that causes to families over many years, and neighbourhood policing is at the heart of that, because you have to know the young people, you have to be able to get into the gangs, you have to know what is going on, and also we know that neighbourhood policing is actually the foundation of good anti—terrorism policing as well. if you were a young man or woman now, would you go into the police? i would, i think it is woman now, would you go into the police? iwould, ithink it is the most wonderfuljob, police? iwould, ithink it is the most wonderful job, and police? iwould, ithink it is the most wonderfuljob, and being out there every day is different, and it is an enormous privilege to serve the public, sometimes, in the various moments of their lives, but having said that i am very conscious there are lots of officers very disheartened because they cannot give the sort of service they nor the public wants, they are going home feeling very stressed. because they believe there are victims out there they are not able to protecting the way they would like —— they know that the public wants. that is leading to some officers leaving the service which was almost
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unknown in the past, and a greater incidence of mental ill health, which is important but also concerning either number of ordinary members of the public noticing this increase in crime in their area, and the danger that when they contact the danger that when they contact the police they feel they don't care, which isn't the case but it is just they are too far over stretched, but long—term that erodes confidence in the police come in the danger is the public think there is no point in contacting them. sir peter fahy, no point in contacting them. sir peter fa hy, great no point in contacting them. sir peter fahy, great pleasure to talk to you. thank you very much for your time this afternoon. thanks. the former home secretary amber rudd was let down by her own officials, according to an inquiry into the events leading up to her resignation earlier this year. ms rudd stood down in april, saying she had "inadvertently misled" mps investigating the windrush generation of post—war caribbean migrants. the report says she lost confidence in her officials and was "not supported as she should have been." you're watching afternoon live — these are our headlines: our changing climate: a new report says britain has had more extreme weather over the last ten years than in previous decades. police launch a criminal investigation into allegations
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of anti—semitic hate crimes within the labour party. rescuers search for the 15 victims of a bus crash — the vehicle plunged into a river after a row between the driver and passenger. in sport the leicester cityjamie vardy says the players want to win their match with cardiff city tomorrow in honour of the club's owners who died over the weekend. he calls it the hardest moment in the club's history. kevin de bruyne has been ruled out for six weeks with a knee injury. he had to be substituted in the latter stages in their win over fulham last night. and simone biles has claimed with 13th world title at the world gymnastic championships in doha. yesterday she became the first gymnast to win four all—round world titles. i will be back with more on those stories at around half past two. a woman and her
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ex—partner have been cleared of the manslaughter of a toddler who was tied to a "cage" bed, but have been found guilty of causing or allowing her death. lauren coyle, the mother of 19—month—old ellie—may minshull coyle, was also found guilty of child cruelty, for caging and restraining her daughter in the bed. her ex—boyfriend reece hitchcott was found guilty of the same counts. the toddler was found dead at the couple's home in preston on march 23rd last year. air accident investigators have removed the wreckage of the helicopter which crashed next to leicester city's stadium last weekend. it's been taken to a specialist facility in hampshire, where a more detailed examination will take place. the club's owner died along with two members of his staff, the pilot and a passenger when the aircraft came down just after taking off from the king power stadium on saturday. in a few days' time, millions of voters across the united states will have their biggest say yet on the donald trump's presidency. the mid—term elections on tuesday will see americans casting their ballot for members
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of congress and state governors. the president himself is travelling around the countrying rallying republican support. last night, he was in missouri, which is expected to a very tight race. he urged voters to throw out their democratic senator. philippa thomas is in st louis for us this afternoon. philippa? welcome to visit lewis, and you can probably see the famous gateway behind me which dominates the skyline, just next to the mississippi river. —— welcome to st louis. a lot of issues but donald trump tends to draw all the oxygen in american political debate, and he is spending a lot of time here. very interesting to see that the republican for the seat here is saying is that a vote for him is a vote for donald trump, really
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blaming himself up with the president and making it a national fight in this state, and that is causing problems for a long time and pretty popular democratic incumbent senator, so that is a race we have been watching. democrat claire mccaskill needs all the help she can get. donald trump secured an easy victory in missouri. although no one here wants to name him, he is still defining the agenda. the very character of our country is on the ballot this time round. we have some doors to knock, we have some phone calls to make... fighting in trump country, mcaskill defines herself as a moderate, not liberal. that may not be enough to save her. we have got to get outside our comfort zone. we have got to talk to people we have never talked to before. which is why this first—time democratic candidate is putting
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in the hours to get out the vote. hi, there, i'm your democratic candidate for missouri. this photo says she is backing claire mcaskill, but patrice agrees the senator isn't taking anything for granted. no she is not and nor should she. she is at this moment in time not a slam dunk for re—election. she has found it matters here to be a candidate conservatives can warm to. i am a gun owner. men love to talk about guns and weapons and i do too. they like to talk about circumstances that i have been involved in as a police officer and i do too. there has been a surge of new voters registering in this county, saint charles, but they don't have to say for which party and canvassing customers at this vintage car dealers i found many still driven by enthusiasm for mr trump. you were also nodding that you think energy is up for the conservatives?
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i think so and i think that the kavanaugh confirmation had a lot to do with that. the way they were just dragging him through the swamp and the sewers, trying to belittle him, the guy was kind of qualified. i agree with trump on some things, some things i don't. he could stay off the twitter a little bit, but at least you know how he feels about a subject. mcaskill or hawley? i have to go with hawley. local republican activists are not alone in trying to boost josh hawley‘s chances. isn't it an incredible honour to have president donald trump in missouri? it's amazing. the president will be back on monday, making this his last stop before election day, confident that he has the power to help republicans harvest those final, vital votes. well, here in misery there is
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another key community, the african—american community, simon. and kenneth ahmadi of the naacp is here to speak to me. it is just four yea rs here to speak to me. it is just four years —— kenneth of the naacp is here. remind our viewers what a shocking tragedy that was. yes, it's still resonate for a lot of voters, but in the black community it really made josh hawley hyper invest in elections. when we hear the president of the united states say he is at nationalised and her senatorial candidates a hand in hand, "i'm with the president," it scares a lot of black voters. this was the shooting dead of michael brown. the body remained on the street for over four hours, and they rememberall of street for over four hours, and they remember all of the tanks in the international controversy, that brought attention to misery of being
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a place of racial angstrom that climate. do you think black voters will go for the democratic? that is interesting, no. african americans mostly vote in their own self interest, and we are very diverse intercommunity were some do like donald trump's tax cuts, and some african americans, working—class, who didn't feel anything from the tax cut, and then there are some academic african americans, and other identity groups, but we are not a single voting bloc. we are many different groups and interest clinic that really what candidates to speak to our community needs. that is where it is interesting, as we have just been showing our waters, claire mcaskill describes itself as a centrist, a liberal —— not a liberal, so kouassi been reaching the voters? she says she is a moderate, we get a little concerned —— so how has she been
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reaching the voters? when she says she votes with donald trump or puts through a lot of hisjudicial appointments, that is concerning to because we don't want the national sentiment into the judicial part of our system of america. you were saying earlier, you're worried about the way the political conversation is being held in this country, full stop. yes, i am very concerned we are having a conversation that looks are having a conversation that looks a lot like the 1960s instead of the 20005. a lot like the 1960s instead of the 2000s. tell me what that means. we are still having controversy about things we thought we solve, still talking about nationalism versus... we are still treating women badly in america and a lot of identity groups have not been heard so they will shout at the boarding box, we will be heard because we want to make america look like a melting pot is not a single identity —— shout at the foot inbox. it is really hard for me tojudge the foot inbox. it is really hard for me to judge who will get the voters out. it is challenging but claire have some things to help on
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the ballot, medical marijuana, the gerrymandering, all of these issues put on the bottom of the ballot, they helped out voters who think it will give claire a little bit of an edge, but misery is very conservative and a lot of people agree with the donald trump nationalist line and we'll be voting forjosh nationalist line and we'll be voting for josh hawley. nationalist line and we'll be voting forjosh hawley. reminding us that it is not a simple matter. many different concerns and that is why i will not give you any prediction about what will happen on election day. philippa, and we will keep nicolas —— us in touch with that. philippa thomas, from st louis. time to catch up with the weather, and darren is here, to answer some questions... the first question sent
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m, questions... the first question sent in, why does it always rain on me? is it because i lied when i was 17? the answer... "even though the sun is shining, you cannot avoid the lightning." travis. it's a song, travis. why does it always rain on me? any other weather—related songs you can think of, from your red? raindrops keep falling on my head. the sun always shines on tv. not always! laughter are you going all elvis on me? uh huh! laughter let's have another question. this one is more pertinent, let's see. at what point does an atlantic ex—hurricane become a uk or irish storm. the first thing, just because you got an ex—hurricane heading to the uk, it doesn't mean it will be named storm. essentially, an ex—hurricane is at the area of low pressure, coming towards the uk, an
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area of low pressure. but aberdeen is only over what? —— but a hurricane is all the water? no, the wea k over hurricane is all the water? no, the weak over land because they lose their energy source, which is the water, but no. laughter 0k! essentially, what it is, by the time an extra cane gets near our shores it is deep area low pressure —— an ex—hurricane. just because it is an ex—hurricane. just because it is an ex—hurricane does not mean it will be named storm. those area of low pressure, storms, only get named if they will have an impact on the uk or indeed southern ireland. named by the met office, or by the agency in southern ireland. they have to get close enough to the uk to become a named storm and have an impact. this question is particularly relevant at the moment because there is an
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ex—hurricane heading across the atla ntic to ex—hurricane heading across the atlantic to the uk. oscar. that variable pressure, drawing some code which will bring the bricks of rain into the uk. let's follow the forecast... in the uk than in spain. into the uk. let's follow the forecast... as it gets closer to the uk, the pressure rises across the area of low pressure and it is not as deep or intense. the wind becomes less of a feature. it is getting close but not close enough to have an impact. we will have some strong to gale force winds across the uk, developing overnight, but because it's not going to have the impact it is not expected to be a named storm u nless is not expected to be a named storm unless it changes its track and gets closer. it is all about impact. you are back at az30pm. if people wa nt to you are back at az30pm. if people want to ask you questions, what should they do? you can send them to bbc weather. we
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have them lined up and ready to go but we will do our best to answer them. we need to think of some more weather related songs. there is some rain around, as we will see in the forecast. the lot of it, particularly on sunday, will be out at the. that is when we will be watching fireworks and that kind of thing. what we have been seeing todayis thing. what we have been seeing today is a lot of dry weather. a cold and frosty start. a lovely day for many parts of the country, in advance of the wind and rain, pushing in to northern ireland this evening. the winter driving rain into scotland and the north—west of the uk, some gale likely. clear skies and lighter winds for most of the night across the south—east of england and east anglia. it will be called here and a hint of frost in
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some areas. otherwise nowhere near as cold as last night. this is how we start the weekend. this could be heavy over the hills of western scotland. slowly moving across the irish sea into cumbria and west wales eventually, pushing some ploughed ahead of its. it should be a lovely day. it will be quite windy with strong and gusty wind. gales likely through the irish sea into western parts of scotland and because it's a southerly, the rain is not moving very slowly, it will be mild with temperatures of 13 or 14 be mild with temperatures of 13 or 1a degrees. now let's get towards the time people will be thinking about watching fireworks. pretty wet across a good part of scotland, rain in edinburgh. moving away from belfast, it should be dry for cardiff and london. more of the country will be tried during sunday evening if you have plans for them. the reason we are getting the rain on saturday evening is because the
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weather front is stuck, moving slowly, weakening and getting anchored by this developing area of low pressure in the south—west. a cloudy start for england and wales on sunday. not a lot of rain but we are likely to see some developing in the and wales. sunshine and showers in the north—west of scotland and northern ireland, with sunshine arriving in the south—west of england and east anglia. temperatures hitting 1230 degrees. into the early part of next week and it stays quite windy. we will get some wet weather across the western side of the uk primarily. still a southerly wind. saying on the mild side and hopefully frost free as well. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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britain has had more weather extremes over the past 10 years than in any other decade, a new met office report reveals. it says the hottest days are becoming hotter and there are more tropical nights. police have begun a criminal inquiry into allegations of anti—semitic hate crimes within the labour party. scotland yard said its inquiry is based on evidence contained in an internal party dossier it received in september. two men have been stabbed during a fight between kitchen workers at sony music's headquarters in central london. police say a man's been arrested. a fight between a driver and a passenger caused their bus to plunge from a bridge into the yangtze river in southwest china. it's reported that all 15 people on board were killed. sport now on afternoon live withjohn. let's talk leicester first —
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and the club will play their first game on saturday since the helicopter crash which killed their chairman. yesterday we heard from the club's manager, today we've heard from striker jamie vardy, who says he hopes his side can win their match with cardiff tomorrow to honour his memory. it was the players who decided the game would go ahead following the death of srivaddhanaprabha. it's expected vardy and his team mates will travel to thailand for the funeral after the game. cardiff manager neil warnock backed the decision to play the fixture, in a week which has brought the game into perspective. it is just on an edge isn't it, life? you sometimes take things for granted. i know it's just a football match and i think it puts things in perspective, our problems and worries of promotion and relegation, it is just a game of football. that has been the biggest
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thing this week. if i had been the manager of leicester i would have wanted the lads to play to get back on what they are. it is such a turmoil in your mind when things like this happen. i've seen the effect it has had on my players, we weren't directly involved. i think it is just the whole football community have felt the shock. let's move on to manchester city, because some disappointment for theirfans. another because some disappointment for their fans. another injury worry. some dreadful luck for the belgian midfielder — he's been ruled out for around six weeks after injuring knee ligaments in yesterday's league cup win over fulham. kevin de bruyne spent two months on the sidelines, it was just his second start since returning from injury. he had to be substituted late on in the game after defender timothy fosu—mensah landed heavily on his left knee. he's set to miss the manchester
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derby later this month. manchester united manager jose mourinho is refusing to discuss his side's title ambitions until they break into the top four. five points adrift of the champions league places, they're away at bournemouth in the lunchtime kick off, who sit two places above them in sixth. when you're outside the top four, i don't think you should speak about it. when you are in the top four, which i believe we are going to be, then when you are there you can look up then when you are there you can look up and see the distance. you can look to the situation. at the moment injuries, suspensions, form, and then you can fill it. america's simone biles has claimed her 13th
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world title of her career at the world gymnastics championships in doha. biles won her first ever gold in the vault, beating her nearest rival by over a point despite not performing to her best. yesterday, she became the first gymnast to win four all around world titles. max whitlock is looking to win britain's first medal of the world gymnastics championship in doha this afternoon as he goes in the final of the pommel. there's another blow for england with news that manu tualingi is out of tomorrow's first rugby union autumn international with a groin strain. it's the latest set back for the centre — sale wing chris ashton has been brought onto the bench to replace him. i think he's fine. lads have seen him around, spoken to him. he seems in high enough spirit so i don't think it's anything too serious but obviously, with his history, it's probably not want to risk. i'm sure he will be back around in the next couple of weeks. i don't think any england team will blame anything on missing any player. we've got so much talent in
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this team so we are excited to get out on the field and play together. some big matches to come. that is all the sport for now. i will be that with more at 3:30pm. the brexit secretary dominic raab is visiting northern ireland for meetings with politicians and business leaders. the northern ireland so—called "backstop" remains the major unresolved issue in current withdrawal negotiations. let's speak to our reality check correspondent chris morris and get more on this. this is still the big stumbling block in brexit talks. the backstop, the guarantee that they will be no return to a horrid border, checks or infrastructure on the border in ireland. the idea is this will kick in if at the end of the transition period, there is no deal keeping the border open. customs has proved the most difficult thing to resolve. in the last few weeks the two sides have been exploring the idea of a
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temporary uk wide customs union, so for the whole of the uk and notjust northern ireland. no customs checks on the irish border but no possibility of checks on the irish sea. the negotiation kind of boils down to the language that can be included in the withdrawal agreement, what is being negotiated at the moment. can there be legally binding language that sets out the terms of this uk wide customs union? in more detail you can put in the less likely it is that it falls apartand less likely it is that it falls apart and you have to go to a northern ireland only backstop, which creates these potential constitutional problems. we have picked the only picture where they have defaced the sign! now, officials are continuing to negotiate. is there any chance of a breakthrough? it is possible. they are negotiating behind—the—scenes. both sides want to break through and there have been optimistic noises but there are plenty of pitfalls. if
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you are having a temporary customs union, can it be time limited? the eu says no because then it is not a backstop under all circumstances. then there is a search for a mechanism which would allow the uk to say we can't escape if we want to but also for the eu to say, we have the assurance that under all circumstances there will be a backstop in place. the best deal in the world could be agreed between negotiators but then obviously it has to be ratified in both parliaments. the vote in parliament here, in westminster, will you have discussed it many times with collea g u es discussed it many times with colleagues in the bank. it is really ha rd to call colleagues in the bank. it is really hard to call and nobody knows what kind of deal would get through the house of commons, and it will be closed. but, and it is a big but, if there isa but, and it is a big but, if there is a long—term trade deal which keeps some kind of border, there is no need for a backstop?
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there is a big butt and a big if. there is a big butt and a big if. the idea of a backstop is that it is only are there if there is a long—term trade deal. —— a big but. it is broadly frictionless. frictionless. i have spoken to officials and eu officials think the only way to have completely frictionless trade is to stay in the single market and the customs union. our old friend. that is the one thing that the prime minister and those who are more in favour of a harder brexit than her are wanting to avoid. that is the elephant in the room. is it possible that this temporary uk wide customs union is agreed could stretch on and on and become somehow permanent. on the english language, it is frictionless or if it is not. the foreign secretary said broadly
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frictionless. as frictionless as possible. that is the thing about the single market and customs union. it is frictionless. a free trade agreement sounds frictionless but there are some areas. when you go out for dinner, what do you do? i talk about this all the time. i usually eat out alone. nothing we can say to that one. chris, nice to talk to you. a senior turkish official has said he believes the body of the journalist jamal khashoggi was dissolved in acid after he was murdered in the saudi consulate in istanbul. saudi authorities have said the murder of the journalist, last month, was carried out by state actors without the authority of the saudi crown prince, mohammed bin salman. the bbc‘s mark lowen has been following these developments from istanbul. dissolved in acid, that's new. yes and i think it is a logical conclusion based on what the
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istanbul prosecutor said a couple of days ago, which is that as soon as khashoggi entered the consulate, was strangled, then his body was dismembered and destroyed. the fact that they have not been able to find the remains and the suggestion that the remains and the suggestion that the destruction of the body happened very close to where he was killed, so on very close to where he was killed, so on the promises of the consulate or where the consulate lives, a senior official has told me that the logical conclusion is that it was dissolved in acid. a lot of frustration on the turkish side that the saudis are not saying where the remains were, what happened to the body afterwards or indeed giving any suggestion as to who ordered this state assassination. mark, in terms of the investigation, where are we at the moment? because there seems to be almost silence from the sources who, within hours
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of the murder, seem to have a lot to say. there is stalling. a month since khashoggi was killed. there is frustration from turkey, prevarication by saudi arabia. no concrete results were achieved this week, according to turkey. there are now sources saying week, according to turkey. there are now sources saying that the saudi crown prince held a phone call with jarrod kushner, donald trump's son—in—law, on the 9th of october, a week after the disappearance of khashoggi. on the phone call he was described as a dangerous islamist. the saudi government has said that is not true, no such commentary was made, but if that was to have been true, that would suggest there could have been a motive if this indeed
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does prove to be a state sanctioned murder. mark, thank you. the shale gas company cuadrilla has said it has seen the first natural gas flow at its site in lancashire, since it began fracking operations there just over two weeks ago. the company says it is a good early indication of the gas potential of the site in preston new road. the project has been controversial and work had to be suspended recently because of minor earth tremors. campaigners against fracking continue to raise concerns about its potential impact on the environment. jamie is here and will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. our changing climate: a new report says britain has had more extreme weather over the last ten years than in previous decades. police launch a criminal investigation into allegations of anti—semitic hate crimes within the labour party. rescuers search for the 15 victims of a bus crash — the vehicle plunged into a river after a row between the driver and passenger. here's your business
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headlines on afternoon live. more strong economic numbers out from the us. the number of people in work increased by 250,000 — way ahead of most predictions — and the unemployment rate was the same as last month: 3.7%. these are the last big economic numbers out before the mid—term elections in the us. a warning from mps about the pressure being put on hm revenue & customs. the public accounts committee is warning that tax officials are already struggling with a huge workload and has "serious concerns" about the introduction of a new customs service and the impact of brexit on uk borders. the new £50 note will feature a prominent british scientist, the bank of england has announced, with the public being asked for nominations. in addition to the queen, the note will portray an eminent late scientist from fields such as biology, astronomy and medical research. if you have an idea you can suggest it on the bank's website over the next six weeks. apple shares have fallen
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badly — what's wrong? they fell 6% — it's no longer worth a trillion dollars. it has forecast sales at a a lower level during the coming quarter — black friday and christmas — and it's upset people by saying it is not going to release numbers on iphone sales. isn't it a bit odd? they have a wider range of items which they are making and selling, and they think they will look to the future. they want to get the emphasis away from the telephone. it hasn't affected the other technology stocks. google and netflix are up. these job stocks. google and netflix are up. thesejob figures. 250,000. people
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we re thesejob figures. 250,000. people were saying 190,000 or so and it is 250,000. it really shows that donald trump, as he goes into the mid—term elections, he really is on top of the economy. it seems. it seems as though the economy is going great guns. samira hussain, our north america business correspondent joins us from the new york stock exchange. it would seem these figures are very good for america and the government, it is what they want? in fact, the president took to twitter earlier this morning to praise his blockbusterjobs numbers and at the very end of his tweet, taking credit for the labour market here in the us and then please vote republican. it is a great set of numbers for the republican party to ta ke numbers for the republican party to take into the mid—term elections. that said, thejobs take into the mid—term elections. that said, the jobs and economy doesn't normally play a very strong
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game in the mid—term elections. for these particular elections there has been a lot more emphasis being placed on immigration and, of course, the supreme placed on immigration and, of course, the supreme course. “— placed on immigration and, of course, the supreme course. —— the supreme court. in terms ofjob numbers, it came in much higher than people expected and also, you know, there is something that people have been looking for very closely and thatis been looking for very closely and that is wage growth. how much are people being paid per hour, and that has increased. that is also giving people a lot more good news to digest from these numbers. what about these apple announcements? other technology stocks don't seem to be worried but investors in apple seem worried about the behaviour. a few things to keep in mind. when you look at the way that stocks trade, they are trading based not on the information they have put on the
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information they are getting about the future. a few things that have stood out for investors— the fact that you're not going to to be talking about how many individual iphones and ipods they are selling anymore, that is an indication to investors that perhaps they are not thinking iphone sales are going to be strong going forward. that hits the stock price. they had softer than expected sales numbers, and they are not expecting very good sales for the christmas season for their products, which is why we are seeing rates trading 6.5% lower. thanks very much indeed. the dow not looking to write. —— not looking too bad. slightly disappointing figures. over six and a half percent looks a
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ha rd over six and a half percent looks a hard drop. yes. apple concerned about the holiday season coming forward. we call it christmas, of course. is. and the pound? a little bit weaker. it has been on a run the last few days. it has gone up above 1.30. it is all to do with brexit talks. a little bit more optimistic now. some solution around. that is this our. let's see what happens in the next hour. that is rather like the currency. see you later on. that's all the business news. the former liberal democrat leader paddy ashdown has revealed he has bladder cancer. the 77—year—old, who led the party between 1988
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and 1999, described how he had been diagnosed with the disease within the last month. a liberal democrat spokesperson said, "we wish him a speedy recovery and know that he will fight this with the vigour of a person a0 years younger." he may have been the fastest man on the planet — but usain bolt‘s dream of becoming a professional football player has hit the buffers. the olympic sprint champion was on trial with the australian football club central coast mariners, but he's now leaving after contract talks failed. our correspondent phil mercer reports. this is probably the end of usain bolt‘s football fairy tale in australia. it appears to be money, not ability, that's forced the olympic champion to leave the central coast mariners. the club had offered the jamaican legend a contract that was well below his reported wage demands of more than £1.5 million. third—party sponsorship couldn't be found, and the mariners, who finished bottom of australia's a—league last season, have thanked bolt for his dedication. it was great to see usain
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grow so much with us. we said before he came that we knew that he was going to be a fast learner, and he showed that, and the goals that he scored at campbelltown will go down in history, and he's got that to take around the world and to leave as a real credit to his football ability. his ability, though, has been under intense scrutiny. the former republic of ireland striker andy keogh, who plays for perth glory, said the former sprinter‘s first touch was like a trampoline, and he would never make it as a footballer. his box office appeal, however, is beyond doubt. a crowd of almost 10,000 people turned out to watch bolt in a pre—season friendly for the mariners. a year ago, a similarfixture attracted just a few hundred fans. it's unclear if he'll be given an opportunity at another australian club. in october, bolt turned down a two—year deal with maltese champions valletta fc. phil mercer, bbc news, sydney. a new arrival in central park has got new york's
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twitchers all of a flutter. this male mandarin duck has turned up out of the blue on one of the park's ponds. the breed is actually native to east asia, so it's a bit of a mystery as to why he's there. park rangers first spotted him in early october, but he hasn't been seen for a few weeks until now. these new yorkers are making the most of the new arrival. it is an incredible gift to new york. an opportunity to see a beautiful animal. it is a rare experience of city kids to get out into nature and the things. it is beautiful. that is the thing that's getting people's imaginations fired. it is probably the most beautiful duck in the world. time for a look at the weather with darren bett.
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wetter weather coming. further east, across england, it isjust wetter weather coming. further east, across england, it is just cold enough for a touch of frost. it should be a mild night overall. and probably stay dry with some sunshine at times across the midlands, lincolnshire, east anglia and the southeast. rain in scotland, bordering into what western parts of england and wales and may be easing offa mild england and wales and may be easing off a mild day. 13 or 14 degrees. not much rain left to start the day on sunday across england and wales. it will turn wetter here in the south west and across wales. sunshine and showers in the north—west but still bright and mild in the north. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3: a stark warning from the met office — the uk has faced more weather extremes over the last decade
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due to global warming. these changes that we are observing are consistent with our warming climate, so the uk has warmed byjust under a degree in the last sort of 50 years or so. all detectives begin a criminal inquiry into claims that members of the labour party have committed anti—semitic hate crimes. rescuers search for the 15 victims of a bus crash — the vehicle plunged into a river after a row between the driver and a passenger. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport... american gymnast simone biles wins a 13th world title with gold in the vault at the world championships in doha. in? in combat. —— she is amazing, isn't she? we will have more on that. darren has all the weather. milder conditions, rain at times.
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more on all of that coming up. thanks, darren. also coming up: who do you think should be the face on the new £50 note? the bank of england wants it to be a prominent scientist. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. hotter days and tropical nights — that's a weather forecast that would usually bring a bit of cheer, but when the reason for it is climate change, well, it's a reason for concern. the met office says summer days are getting hotter, with warm spells longer than they used to be, and tropical nights — where temperatures stay above 20 degrees celsius — will be more frequent. meanwhile, the chilliest days of the year are not as cold as they used to be. the report also says britain has experienced more weather extremes in the last ten years than in previous decades. here's our environment correspondent, matt mcgrath. while 2018 was an exceptionally warm here across the uk,
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this new study from the met office suggests that in general britain is now experiencing more warmer days than in the recent past. the report looked at uk weather data from 1961 to 1990, and compared it with the decade between 2008 and 2017. it found that, on average, the hottest day in each year over the recent ten years was 0.8 degrees warmer than during the earlier period. there's been an even bigger change when it comes to cold weather. the chilliest days and nights are not quite as biting — with substantial areas of the uk having on average less than one day per year when the temperature is below zero. met office scientists say we might see more of these changes in future. we expect to see an increase in certain types of extreme events, heatwaves and hot spells and warm spells, so i should point out we are particular looking at warm spells here across any time of year. these changes we are observing are consistent with our warming climate, so the uk has warmed byjust under a degree in the last sort of 50 years or so.
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while 1976 was one of the most significant heatwaves to hit the uk in the past 50 years, longer spells of warmer weather have become more common, essentially doubling over the period of the report. one intriguing aspect of the study concerns what are termed tropical nights, when the mercury stays above 20 celsius. this year, there were two nights in london that went above that mark, but in the 30 years between 1961 and 1990 there were just eight nights that exceeded that temperature. climate scientists say the changes in weather we are seeing the uk are down to global warming, keeping in step with the rest of the world. as the world warms, we expect to see more hot stays in summer, more warm nights, the kind of pattern of changes we are seeing, and the uk is warming roughly in line with the global average, so we will see these changes reflecting what's going on in the world as a whole. while the report details changes that scientists have recorded, do theirfindings chime with the experience of the public? it's getting out of hand.
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it's getting a lot hotter than it should be, really. and... well, especially when they are turning round and say it's hotter in the uk than in spain. i'm fortunate to live in a house that's quite cold, but i purchased a fan over the summer and all the windows are open, all the doors, and just enjoyed the heat. it was great. it's not all about heat. the report also found that extremely wet days have increased by 17%. this could have significant implications for flooding across the uk in years to come. matt mcgrath, bbc news. for more analysis of the the met office's findings we can now speak to drjohn marsham, enviromental professor from the univerity of leeds, and researcher with the national centre of atmospherical science. hejoins me from our look north newsroom. craig good afternoon. good afternoon. everybody talking about predictions but the shows this is happening now. —— yes, good afternoon. yes, one thing to take away from this report, climate change is not a theory for the
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future, but it is already happening, with these extremes the uk is experiencing. one of the eye -- what are the eye—catching things to come out of this, as far as you're concerned? it is exactly consistent with what we expect for climate change for the uk. a particular warming at the minimums, but the really eye—catching thing for me was the increase in extreme rainfall. as you said, that has gone up by 17%, and that is again exactly what we would expect of global warming, the warm atmosphere able to hold more water, and the earth has warmed by about a degree, and there is increasingly strong evidence that the extreme rain increases faster than that, so exactly consistent with that 17%. we will see a lot more flooding? exactly. the uk has quite a moderate climate but we are very vulnerable to flooding. and we expect i think, even with the 1.5 degrees warming, the absolutely best case scenario
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degrees warming, the absolutely best case scenario now, we expect degrees warming, the absolutely best case scenario now, we expect double the... with economic impact even larger, and if you combine that with the rise in sea level which i think a recent report said we are now committed to a one metre rise, which will add millions more homes to be invulnerable flooding. with reports like this, a lot of people ask what can we do to slow down or even stop that trajectory? i think the recent report with the 1.5 degrees warming is very valuable, so what that showed is that to limit the warming toi.5 showed is that to limit the warming to 1.5 degrees we have to have met zero emissions by 2050, only 31 yea rs zero emissions by 2050, only 31 years from now. . if we don't and we have a 2 degrees warming even, it will be catastrophic. that will destroy all the world's coral reefs, while at 1.5 we could limit that to 70-80, while at 1.5 we could limit that to 70—80, or maybe 90%.|j while at 1.5 we could limit that to 70-80, or maybe 90%. i expect it iss
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la ke 70-80, or maybe 90%. i expect it iss lake yourself who have been going on about this for an awfully long time, will have the sort of a heavy heart but will welcome reports like this because it shows people climate change is real. yes, i think people a lwa ys change is real. yes, i think people always respond that —— scientists like yourself. the harry kane —— hurricanes in america and so on, it shows people what the future could hold. and it is not the far future. it is in the lifetime of my daughter who was born this summer, so were talking about impacts in the lifetimes of children alive today. doomsday scenario. if we do nothing, in 2100, what could britain look like? i think doing nothing is unthinkable, to my mind. we have to limit this to 2 degrees and 1.5 is far preferable. we will still be wiping out uk systems and species, but we can limit the damage to something more bearable. and in some sense i am an optimist. we have the
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technology to decarbonise almost already and to my mind it is much doing it very much a matter of public and political will. doing it very much a matter of public and politicalwill. dr doing it very much a matter of public and political will. dr john marsham thank you very much for speaking to us about it, thank you for your time. thank you. police have begun a criminal investigation into allegations of anti—semitic hate crime within the labour party. it comes after the lbc radio station passed an internal labour party dossier to cressida dick, commissoner of the metropolitan police. our political correspondent ben wright reports. he must have hoped this row had gone away. any response at all about the police investigation? good morning, how nice to see you. do you think... good morning, how nice to see you, goodbye. but after the metropolitan police was given a leaked labour party dossier detailing 45 cases of alleged anti—semitic hate crimes linked to labour party members, scotland yard is now investigating. we have been assessing some material which was passed in fact to me in a radio studio, of all things, about two months ago. and we are now investigating some of that material, because it appears there may have been crime committed. the met is not investigating the labour party itself,
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but examples of online anti—semitic abuse that may constitute hate crime. and the police is consulting the crown prosecution service. during the summer, labour was engulfed in a dispute about its handling of anti—semitism. in september the party's ruling body eventually agreed to adopt in full an international definition of anti—semitism, and jeremy corbyn told his party conference later that month he wanted an end to the dispute. the row over anti—semitism has caused immense hurt and anxiety in thejewish community, and great dismay in the labour party. i say this to all in the jewish community... we are your ally. applause. applause today labour's deputy leader said anti—semitism had to be
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rooted out of the party. we have anti—semitism in the labour party, we've improved our measures to deal with it. i don't want any anti—semite in my party and we want them out, and if they're guilty of hate crime we want them investigated and convicted too. but we need to see the facts. what had been an internal labour party investigation is now a police matter, and the problem of anti—semitism is not going away. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. cressida dick has voiced her support for the senior officer who said police forces are too stretched to deal with issues such as logging hate incidents against women. sara thornton, chair of the national police chiefs council, was criticised by some people for saying police should focus on violent crime rather than misogyny. i spoke to sir peter fahy, former chief constable of greater manchester police, and asked him, was cressida dick right to speak out in support of "back to basics" policing? yes, she was. she was just obviously reinforcing the comments made by sara thornton, the chair of the national police chiefs. there's two issues here. one is absolutely about resources, the huge cuts in the police budgets, further cuts due to pension changes,
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the fact that chief constables are threatening to take the treasury to judicial review, but i think the issue is also about whether a criminal justice approach is always the best solution to a problem like misogyny. but even then, i think that debate about this one issue can hide a much more serious issue about how police forces are stretched, not able to give the focus to violent crime they would like. one thing i wanted to say, having retired you're probably more able to speak than those still serving. is their anger, at that police level, at the fact that police are having to make a decision, choice, as to what their priorities have to be? it is really an anger, a frustration, almost a bemusement, about the level of resources. i remember earlier in my career every year political parties used to compete as to who could promise more police officers, and there have now been 20,000 cuts and threats of more, so i think there is a frustration,
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a very big frustration, amongst police officers in general, that they want to provide a much better service to the public, and absolutely they are having to juggle between these different priorities, sometimes driven by individual pressure groups, but without a wider recognition from the government and home office that, you know, policing is being stretched in all sorts of different ways, and there should be some more fundamental questions about what it is we want our police to do. but whilst having less, being asked to do more, and particularly this issue of hate crimes, the issue of misogyny, which people say should be treated now as a crime. what is your stance on that? i just don't think that the way you deal with a really serious issue like misogyny, which is a societal problem, the way you deal with it is just by saying you will make it a hate crime. this does not mean crimes against women, assaults, harassment, stalking, will not be treated seriously, but again i would say it is not so much this issue about hate crime. what most police forces and police officers are seeing,
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there's a huge change in the nature of police work, away from the sort of traditional crime and crime investigation, to protecting vulnerable and needy people, particularly in areas like mental health, and it is that sort of issue, to say to the public and the politicians, is this really what you want your police to be doing? was this a conscious shift or something that has just happened incrementally? because, as i say, i think a lot of the public what the to concentrate on crime, but at the moment there are all these other issues, which often involve people at great risk, which mean the police have moved away from that traditional type of work. while you were chief constable, were you aware of this shift away from what people perceive should be the priorities — violent crime, burglaries, things like that — was there a decision taken that, "hang on, we will have to pull back a bit on that because there are new issues to deal with"? really, it was that incremental drift. certainly when ijoined policing it was very much about property crime,
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and in some instances you felt more like a security guard, and over time that's shifted — largely because society is in a much more healthy place, gives much more importance to people than perhaps property, but there have also been a growth in the number of mental health cases, lots of other agencies are struggling because of their own cuts, and really the police have been criticised in a number of cases because they didn't protect people enough, so at the end of the day if somebody calls the police and believes somebody is at risk because of a mental health crisis, the police have to deal with that, as a priority, until they can hand it over to another agency, and that means if you're faced with, say, a case where somebody has found the bike stolen from them is being sold in a second—hand shop, or they have somebody apparently going through a mental health crisis at home and the ambulance is not able to respond, it will be the mental health case that will take priority and it is that sort of thing i think which is causing bemusement
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to the public, and i think in their day—to—day experience they are seeing a growth in burglaries, violent crime, then when they contact the police they are not getting the service they expected. that was sir peter fahy speaking to me earlier. the former home secretary amber rudd was let down by her own officials, according to an inquiry into the events leading up to her resignation earlier this year. ms rudd stood down in april, saying she had "inadvertently misled" mps investigating the windrush generation of post—war caribbean migrants. the report says she lost confidence in her officials and was "not supported as she should have been". you're watching afternoon live — these are our headlines: a stark warning from the met office — the uk has faced more weather extremes over the last decade due to global warming. detectives begin a criminal inquiry into claims that members of the labour party have committed anti—semitic hate crimes. rescuers in china search for the 15 victims of a bus crash — the vehicle plunged into a river after a row between the driver and a passenger.
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and in sport... britain's max whitlock narrowly missed out on retaining his world title on the pommel horse. on and on and on in doha. —— that is at the title gymnastics world championships bee. championships in doha.. leicester strikerjamie vardy says the players want to win their match with cardiff city tomorrow in honour of the club's former owner who died in a helicopter crash last weekend — he called it the hardest week in the club's history. manchester city manager pep guardiola says he's "sad" for midfielder kevin du bruyne after he was ruled out for around six weeks with another knee injury. i'll be back with more on those stores after half—past. let's get the latest on the stabbing at sony in kensington this morning.
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our reporter keith doyle has the latest update from the scene. a terrifying experience for staff in the building behind me, wheree sony is based along with other businesses. they were evacuated shortly after 11 this morning, when armed police stormed the building after reports of a man with a knife entering the building. witnesses have told me they saw a man with a large machete—type knife walk down the street unchallenged and go through the doors behind me. sony describe it as a violent altercation between kitchen staff. we know that two people were stabbed and one man has been arrested. we understand at the moment that the people who were stabbed are not in a serious condition, certainly not a life—threatening condition, and that one man has been arrested in the last hour. staff have been allowed in the last hour back into the building, so dramatic events in kensington this morning but things have resumed and are back to normal now. that was keith doyle with the latest. the brexit secretary dominic raab is in northern ireland this afternoon for the first time since he was appointed to the role injuly. the question of how to avoid a hard border with the irish republic after brexit has become one of the biggest sticking points in negotiations with the eu.
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our ireland correspondent, chris page is in the border town of warrenpoint. you could say this is the brexit frontline. i'm standing in northern ireland. those hills behind the cranes there are in the irish republic, and right behind me is warrenpoint docks, where dominic raab has spent some time this morning. goods come into this port from all over the world, and then they are driven all over the island of ireland, and there is no need for them to be checked at the land frontier, and the question, though, of course, is whether that will remain the case after brexit. so mr raab has been meeting business people, for whom the border issue is not an abstract political argument — it's a real—life issue, something that affects jobs and livelihoods. it's been a pretty private affair so far. no cameras were allowed into the docks while mr raab
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was there, leaving the local mp, chris hazzard of sinn fein, unimpressed. he accused the brexit secretary of sneaking into the constituency for a stunt. however, later this afternoon dominic raab will meet politicians at stormont, and will discuss with them the state of the brexit talks. he'll hear what they have to say. the sticking point in the negotiations at the moment is over a backstop, a kind of insurance policy which will only kick in if the border can't be kept open as a result of a new trade agreement between the uk and the eu. all sides agree there should be a backstop, they don't agree as to what it should look like. the eu say that under those circumstances northern ireland should remain in the customs union and large parts of the single market. theresa may says that's not acceptable as it could lead to checks between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. so the government's preference would be for the whole of the uk to stay in the customs union for a time—limited period. there is no big expectation of any breakthrough this afternoon. british and irish ministers are also meeting in dublin to discuss the political situation in northern ireland, and brexit, but irish sources have said they don't expect any new proposal from britain to be brought forward.
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what all sides agree on is the sense of urgency and every day that goes by now things seem more urgent, the eu saying if there is not a deal on the backstop there won't be a brexit deal at all. ijust want i just want to bring a ijust want to bring a bit of breaking news. we arejust ijust want to bring a bit of breaking news. we are just hearing the dup leader arlene foster has just been quoted on the newswires, from reuters... we will show you what is happening. this is where any news co nfe re nces what is happening. this is where any news conferences will be given this afternoon, at stormont, and we are expecting this in the next half—hour orso, sinn fein expecting this in the next half—hour or so, sinn fein and the dup, and we are also expecting to hear at around four o'clock from the brexit secretary dominic but some optimism according to the quote from arlene foster that there could be some sort of breakthrough. any developments on that of course we will take you straight to stormont as that happens. that could be quite a story later today for you. you're watching afternoon live from bbc news. air accident investigators have removed the wreckage of the helicopter which crashed next to leicester city's stadium last weekend.
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it's been taken to a specialist facility in hampshire, where a more detailed examination will take place. the club's owner died along with two members of his staff, the pilot and a passenger when the aircraft came down just after taking off from the king power stadium on saturday. a woman and her ex—partner have been cleared of the manslaughter of a toddler who was tied to a "cage" bed, but have been found guilty of causing or allowing her death. lauren coyle, the mother of 19—month—old ellie—may minshull coyle, was also found guilty of child cruelty, for caging and restraining her daughter in the bed. her ex—boyfriend reece hitchcott was found guilty of the same counts. the toddler was found dead at the couple's home in preston on march 23rd last year. the former liberal democrat leader paddy ashdown has revealed he has bladder cancer. the 77—year—old, who led the party between 1988 and 1999, described how he had been diagnosed with the disease within the last month. a liberal democrat spokesperson said, "we wish him a speedy recovery and know that he will fight this
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with the vigour of a person 40 years younger." in a few days' time, millions of voters across the united states will have their biggest say yet on the donald trump's presidency. the midterm elections on tuesday will see americans casting their ballot for members of congress and state governors. the president himself is travelling around the countrying rallying republican support. last night, he was in missouri, which is expected to a very tight race. he urged voters to throw out their democratic senator. simon, fellow, good afternoon, from st louis, and you can probably see the famous gateway that dominates the famous gateway that dominates the skyline behind this, the mississippi river —— simon, hello. a lot of local issues here but donald trump tends to draw all the oxygen in american political debate and he is spending a lot of time here. very
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interesting to see that the republican for the key senate seat, josh hawley, is saying, "i vote for josh hawley, is saying, "i vote for josh hawley, is saying, "i vote for josh hawley is a vote for donald trump," really lining himself up with the president and making international fight with the president and making internationalfight in with the president and making international fight in this state —— a vote. that is causing problems for the long time and pretty popular democratic incumbent senator claire mccaskill. that is a race we have been watching. democrat claire mccaskill needs all the help she can get. donald trump secured an easy victory in missouri. although no one here wants to name him, he is still defining the agenda. the very character of our country is on the ballot this time round. we have some doors to knock, we have some phone calls to make... fighting in trump country,
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mcaskill defines herself as a moderate, not liberal. that may not be enough to save her. we've got to get outside our comfort zone. we've got to talk to people we have never talked to before. which is why this first—time democratic candidate is putting in the hours to get out the vote. hi, there, i'm patrice billings, your democratic candidate for missouri. this photo says she's backing mcaskill, but patrice agrees the senator isn't taking anything for granted. no, she is not, and nor should she. she is at this moment in time not a slam dunk for re—election. she's found it matters here to be a candidate conservatives can warm to. i am a gun owner. men love to talk about guns and weapons, and i do too. and they like to talk about circumstances that i have been involved in as a police officer, and i do too. there's been a surge of new voters registering in this county, saint charles, but they don't have
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to say for which party, and canvassing customers at this vintage car dealers i found many still driven by enthusiasm for mr trump. you were also nodding that you think actually energy is up for conservatives? i think so and i think that the kavanaugh confirmation had a lot to do with that. the way they were just dragging him through the swamp and the sewers, trying to belittle him, the guy was kind of qualified. i agree with trump on some things, some things i don't. he could stay off the twitter a little bit, but at least you know how he feels about a subject. mcaskill or hawley? i have to go with hawley. hello? local republican activists are not alone in trying to boost josh hawley‘s chances. isn't it an incredible honour to have president donald trump in missouri? it's amazing. the president will be back on monday, making this his last stop
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before election day, confident that he has the power to help republicans harvest those final, vital votes. here in missouri there is another key community of voters, the african american community and to talk about this is kenneth murdoch of the naacp in missouri. it is just four years since what happened in ferguson, missouri. remind our viewers of what a shocking incident that was. missouri. remind our viewers of what a shocking incident that wasm missouri. remind our viewers of what a shocking incident that was. it is one of the tragedies of missouri and it still resonates for a lot of voters, but it made the black community — invest in elections, so hearing our president and our —— presents a user national under a segments senatorial candidate hand—in—hand, it scares a lot of black voters. this was the shooting
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dead of michael brown. they remember the body in the street for four hours, they remember the tanks, and the international controversy that brought attention to missouri of being a racial climate, and thanks to. does that make it automatic that african—american voters will go for the democratic candidate, claire mccaskill? that is interesting. no. african—americans mccaskill? that is interesting. no. african—america ns mostly bought mccaskill? that is interesting. no. african—americans mostly bought in their own self interests and we are a diverse community. some are of greater affluence that like donald trump's tax cuts, and summer working class who didn't feel anything from the tax cut. then there are some african—americans of academia, and different identity groups, but we are not a single voting bloc. we are many different groups and enter iss that really what candidates to top to our community needs. that is where it is interesting. claire mccaskill, as we havejust where it is interesting. claire mccaskill, as we have just been showing our viewers, she calls herself a centrist, moderate, not a liberal. she hasn't been up a lot perhaps in speaking to
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african—american voters? perhaps in speaking to african-american voters? claire has been working a little harder with the african american community in this election, but where she says she is a moderate we are a little concerned because a missouri moderate, will they call them a conservative in washington, dc? wishy with donald trump and pits to a lot of his judicial appointments, that concerns claire mccaskill through doing as well because we don't want the national sentiment in our judicial system don't want the national sentiment in ourjudicial system in america —— that concerns ours as well. and you are concerned about this...” that concerns ours as well. and you are concerned about this... i am concerned we are having a conversation that looks like the 19605 rather than the 20005. conversation that looks like the 1960s rather than the 2000s. what does that mean? we are starving controversy about things we thought we re controversy about things we thought were solved, still talking about nationalism versus equity, still treating women badly in america and there are a lot of identity groups that have not been heard so who will shout at the voting box and say "we will be heard because they want america to look like a melting pot,
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not a single identity." four days to go and it is really hard for me to judge who will get the voters out. it is challenging but claire have something is helping her on the ballot, medical marijuana, the changing of gerrymandering in missouri, all of these issues that on the bottom of the ballot, they help drive out voters who i think will give claire little bit of an edge, but it is razor thin because missouri is the ball—mac conservative, and a lot of people agree with the national lane and we'll be voting withjosh hawley, and the people because of the tax cut. thank you, and you reminded me there, it is very much not a simple matter. many layers of government to be voted for next tuesday, many different concerns, and that is why iam not different concerns, and that is why i am not going to give you any prediction about what will happen on election day. that was my colleagues, philippa thomas, who needs no introduction, and that's why we didn't get her one! that was her reporting from missouri. you're watching afternoon live. just to
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keep you updated with developments in northern ireland, where dominic raab the brexit secretary is in discussions at the moment. and we we re discussions at the moment. and we were telling you some of the comments coming out of the dup from their leader arlene foster in the last few minutes were saying the eu in the uk are close to a deal that will work for northern ireland. "goodness, we have been here on a number of occasions, and i think they are close to a deal that will work for northern ireland. that is what we want." she was talking to reporters after meeting with the brexit secretary, dominic raab. we are awaiting a number of news conferences in stormont and i can show you the picture there, inside the building. we are expecting sinn fein to give a news conference quite soon. fein to give a news conference quite soon. we have heard from the dup. of course, they may have a very different view. so we are waiting for what they have to say after their meetings with dominic raab and we are expecting to hear from dominic raab himself as well within the next half hour or so, but it does perhaps suggest the uk is inching towards some sort of resolution to that crucial issue.
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that crucial issue of the irish border. as far as the brexit negotiations are concerned, and we will take you back to stormont as soon as will take you back to stormont as soon as there is any development on that. mild aircoming in. mild air coming in. we have the wetter, windier weather. and across scotla nd wetter, windier weather. and across scotland and maybe over the irish sea. across england it isjust about cold enough for a touch of frost but it should be a martyr night than it was last night. and probably staying dry with some sunshine at times across much of the midlands, lincolnshire, east anglia and the south—east. we still have windy weather through the irish sea into western parts of scotland. rain for scotland, into more western parts of england and wales, maybe the rain easing off later in northern ireland, but a mild day. temperatures perhaps as high as 13 or 14 degrees.
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not much rain left to start the day probably on sunday across england and wales, but it may turn wetter in the south—west and across wales during the afternoon. sunshine and a few showers in the north—west, scotland and northern ireland. still bright and quite mild as well in the south—east and east anglia. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. britain has had more weather extremes over the past 10 years than in any other decade, a new met office report reveals. it says the hottest days are becoming hotter and there are more tropical nights. police have begun a criminal inquiry into allegations of anti—semitic hate crimes within the labour party. scotland yard said its inquiry is based on evidence contained in an internal party dossier it received in september. two men have been stabbed during a fight between kitchen workers at sony music's headquarters in central london. police say a man's been arrested. rescuers in china search for the 15 victims of a bus crash after the vehicle plunged 200 feet into a river following a row between the driver and a passenger. sport now on afternoon
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live withjohn watson. great britain have won theirfirst medal at the world gymnastic championships but it wasn't quite the colour hoped for. britain's max whitlock failed in his attempts to win great britain gold at the world gymnastics championships in doha, as he finished second in the pommell. he had won gold in this event at the two previous world championships in montreal and then glasgow. he was one of the favourites to become the first british gymnast to win three conscutive world gyumnastic golds, but missed out by the smallest of margins. earlier the remarkable run of simone biles at these championships continued.
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in this her first international event since taking a year off after rio, she became the first gymnast to win 13 world titles. she took gold in the vault and she could add to her three golds with three more events to come. look at us grumpy old men say, he only got a silver! still an amazing achievement. i will move on. i will move on. a very difficult week for leicester city. one of leicester city's star players has been speaking ahead of their first match since the death of the club's owner. a hugely emotional week. jamie vardy, says he hopes his side can win their match with cardiff tomorrow in honour of the club's former owner. the players decided the game would go ahead following the death of srivaddhanaprabha in a helicopter crash on saturday. vardy and his team mates will travel
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to thailand for the funeral after the game tomorrow. cardiff manager neil warnock backed the decision to play the fixture, in a week which has brought the game into perspective. manchester city midfielder kevin du bruyne has been ruled out around six weeks after injuring knee ligaments in yesterday's league cup win over fulham. it was just his second start having already spent two months on the sidelines at the start of the season following an injury to his right knee. he had to be substituted late on in the game after defender timothy fosu—mensah landed heavily on his left knee. this kind of injury is under the. i think he is so strong and he recovered so well from the previous injury. it was more dangerous than this one. so i think he will recover
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well because we have an excellent department and he is doing well and hopefully i think he is likely. we area hopefully i think he is likely. we are a stronger team. that we have to live with that. neil lennon says he "may reconsider" his position as hibernian boss after being hit with a coin during wednesday's goalless edinburgh derby. lennon was struck after celebrating a disallowed hearts goal near the end of the match. today he's claimed he suffers anti—catholic "racism" in scotland and his career in england was "unblemished" by these issues. lennon says it's making him consider walking away from the game north of the border. former arsenal striker nicklas bendtner has been convicted of assaulting a taxi driver and been sentenced to 50 days in prison. bendtner broke the jaw of the taxi driver in september following a night out in copenhagen and the court was shown a video from inside the cab of the incident. the 30—year—old, who now plays for norwegian side rosenborg, has appealed the sentence.
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over to stormont. we have had what i would describe as a very direct meeting with dominic ryan. we have set out for him in the thinnest of terms the necessity for a backstop that protects the basic well—being of the island of ireland. we have reminded him that he and his government, last december, signed up to that, understood that the north of ireland is a particular scenario for a need for a bespoke solution. we have told him that he and his government are acting in bad faith, that they have stepped back from commitments that they made to protect the good friday agreement and all of its parts, to ensure no hardening of the border on our
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island and ensure no loss of rights for our citizens. we have told him thatis for our citizens. we have told him that is wholly unacceptable and we have left him in no doubt that the view right across the irish politics, north and south, with the exception of the dup, is that we need to act in a responsible way, in a way that recognises the real jeopardy and damage that brexit can and will do to our economy and potentially to a peace agreement is and we have told him that to offer up and we have told him that to offer up anything short of an operable enduring backstop is to act recklessly and in a way that is entirely unacceptable. he has simply reacts rated the position of the prime minister that 95% of the work is done, but 5%
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remains. —— reiterated the position. he says everything is agreed except for the political and the needs of ireland, and we have made very clear to him that the needs of ireland will not be set aside. they are not a footnote. they are not a matter of detail. they are essential to agree any withdrawal agreement, and indeed any withdrawal agreement, and indeed any future relationship. and we have reminded him that the backstop is necessary for anyone withdrawal agreement to be landed on and indeed asa agreement to be landed on and indeed as a prerequisite for any future relationship. how have you responded to the visit of dominic raab in ireland? there has been criticism of his approach to ireland? well, it was very much a flying visit. it is curious the way in which tories seek to visit this part
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of ireland under cover and very short visit. i think that he wasn't going through the motions. this strikes me very much as a box ticking exercise. let's face it, the whole brexit debate took place across the water with no mind or no consideration for ireland, for our priest agreement, oursocial consideration for ireland, for our priest agreement, our social and political needs. he is very much a day—tripper. cash our peace agreement. he is welcome to visit. what we need now is not box ticking exercises, we need leadership and an operable, enduring backstop. what do you think about the fact that the visit from dominic raab was a bit ofa that the visit from dominic raab was a bit of a distraction? we had philip hammond do a tour of
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bombarding a. i think to reflect on the previous question, if you look at dominic raab's visit, or yesterday's. question, if you look at dominic raab's visit, oryesterday's. fees are obligatory. they come in with no notice, they choose who they want to meet. that is reflective of how the british government treats the people here. this respect, disregard. there is plenty of evidence to support that over the last couple of years. we are all very clear that there are three reasons why we don't have an executive assembly up and running. the dup supported brexit, the co nfe re nce the dup supported brexit, the conference deal which they have with the tories. they are the reasons we don't have an institution up and running so we entered the mental co nfe re nce running so we entered the mental conference can remove these obstacles. it is within the confines of the good friday agreement and the two governments could deliver citizens' rights here because they are co—parent tours of the good
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friday agreement. they have response ability for equality of rights of citizens and they are looking to hold the british government's feet to the fire on this issue because we know that the british government itself hasn't moved because they are under the dup. they can't move an inch without asking the dup and that is the problem. the irish government has the responsibility to put pressure on the government we need to deliver on the promise that no citizen in the north will be left behind ever again. we also remind dominic raab that despite theatrics and melodramatic language, there are already checks in the irish sea between the two islands, and once a case of bse is reported, for entirely rational reasons, because it's about protecting the cows across the island, it is about protecting jobs,
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in other words, practical, workable, real—life politics kicks in. dominic raab doesn't live in ireland. the tories are not elected, did have a mandate from any part of ireland. the people of the north of ireland voted to remain, not brexit. it is essential that in a pragmatic and enduring way that the economic and political rights and needs of people across the island are protected. thank you very much. thanks. as we were. any sense of optimism from what arlene foster was quoted as saying yesterday has been firmly put aside. that was mary mcdonald with the deputy president. very scathing about dominic raab and his visit. he was described by mcdonald as a day—tripper. this was a fly by night visit, she said, simply going through the motions and this is a box ticking exercise. he
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was accused of theatrics. they were emphasising once again the need for an enduring backstop. making the pointjust an enduring backstop. making the point just there that when push comes to shove, which it did of a recent bse scare in the area, there is already effectively checks between the islands. i want to show you a message from twitter. arlene foster at the meeting with dominic raab. she has reiterated her party's position that any additional checks to northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom and the delegation you can see there, nigel dodds, diane dodds and the south belfast mla christopher salford. she said this is a part of ongoing
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meetings. we are delighted he has come. she made it clear to two that it is very important that as we cannot have any regulatory barriers. it would appear, frankly, very little change in the opinion of sinn fein and the dup. we will hearfrom dominic raab in the next half hour or so. police have begun a criminal investigation into allegations of anti—semitic hate crime within the labour party. it comes after the lbc radio station passed an internal labour party dossier to cressida dick, commissoner of the metropolitan police. joining me now via webcam from liverpool is the labour mp dame louise ellman. your reaction to the fact the police
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are looking into this? iam are looking into this? i am deeply concerned that it is clear the labour party still isn't dealing with anti—semitism properly. asa dealing with anti—semitism properly. as a result of a leaked dossier handed to the bbc, the police are now looking at 45 cases where there could be criminal prosecutions. what have the labour party been doing? why didn't they do this? has the labour party informed all the individuals who may be under threat of violence about what is actually happening? do you mean, why didn't they hand it to the police? because it is their dossier. it is a dossier belonging to the labour party. the police are now investigating because of a leak. why didn't the labour party pass it to the police? it could be that individuals are at risk of violence. have even been told about what is happening? the questions to ask, and i'm concerned about the failure to deal with this in a proper way after
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the problems there have been. tom watson, the deputy party leader describing this as thoroughly depressing. he said he wasn't surprised that he also said if it does one thing, it means it will silence those who still believe there isn't a problem of anti—semitism in parts of the labour party. this seems like there isn't much belief that there is a problem of anti—semitism, and the only way the labour party can resolve this is acting on the cases brought to them. all the debate, it is clear the labour party is not acting in a proper way and potentially serious problems, problems that are being investigated by the police. would you expect the leaderjeremy corbyn to have seen this dossier? i don't know exactly how the internal mechanics of the party operate, but i hope that by now
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jeremy has found out exactly what is involved in the dossier. i don't know if he is involved in meetings to look at it. i hope that by now he has made himself aware of the issue. this issue has dogged your party all summer this issue has dogged your party all summerand this issue has dogged your party all summer and with this news, this is going to go on? the issue of anti—semitism and the disgraceful position the labour party is in is continuing. i would have thought the people responsible would have learned their lesson by now and it appears they haven't done so. thank you very much. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a stark warning from the met office — the uk has faced more weather extremes over the last decade due to global warming.
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detectives begin a criminal inquiry into claims that members of the labour party have committed anti—semitic hate crimes. rescuers search for the 15 victims of a bus crash — the vehicle plunged into a river after a row between the driver and a passenger. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. more strong economic numbers out from the us. the number of people in work increased by 250,000 — way ahead of most predictions — and the unemployment rate was the same as last month: 3.7%. these are the last big economic numbers out before the mid—term elections in the us. a warning from mps about the pressure being put on hm revenue & customs. the public accounts committee is warning that tax officials are already struggling with a huge workload and has "serious concerns" about the introduction of a new customs service and the impact of brexit on uk borders. the new £50 note will feature a prominent british scientist, the bank of england has announced, with the public being asked for nominations.
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in addition to the queen, the note will portray an eminent late scientist from fields such as biology, astronomy and medical research. if you have an idea you can suggest it on the bank's website over the next six weeks. so who's going on the new £50 note? stephen hawking, i think. i think alan turing will be a good one. there are suggestions it should bea one. there are suggestions it should be a woman. apart from the queen, only one woman ona apart from the queen, only one woman on a banknote at the moment, jane austen, of course. she is only £10 note. yes, women scientists. there is usually a very good story behind them because they are usually an
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acknowledged in their time and you're talking about ada lovelace. —— not acknowledged in their time. and rosalind franklin, dna scientist. both of them were rather pushed into the background. that would make quite an interesting story. one of my favourites is mary allen, a palaeontologist in lyme regis who was completely uneducated. she discovered fossils. she discovered the first ichthyosaur as fossil in the hills in an regis. all of her discoveries were usually stolen by eminent victorian scientists and claimed as their own. they were all men. she wasn't allowed to be a member of the royal geological society either. she was a very interesting one. great stories. we can talk a bit more about currency of course. craig erlam, senior market analyst.
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are there many of them, £50 notes? there are apparently a huge amount in circulation but they are often associated with the criminal world, which is quite interesting. one of the things that mark carney will seek to sort out. in terms of the manufactured. they haveissued in terms of the manufactured. they have issued the new polymer note. are they more difficult to forge or use it in terms of criminal activities? that is the idea. whether they achieve that we will have to wait and see. the question for many people is how necessary are they? people have got along well without them so far tom with the use of phones and cards for banking. —— so
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far, with the use of phones and cards for banking. that is the odd thing, the persistence of something like the £50 note. it is a little bit of a rarity. there are 300 million of them or whatever but because we have not had inflation, therefore the £50 note is not something we all have in our back pockets. it hasn't become more prevalent at all and if anything, it hasn't become more prevalent at alland ifanything, a it hasn't become more prevalent at all and if anything, a lot of people feel awkward trying to spend them, which is always a funny thing. whether it becomes more prevalent with inflation, making things more expensive, making it more demand for it. how important is the pound at the minute? it goes up and down day—to—day. if you are and international currency trader, do you always have the pound? is it a lwa ys you always have the pound? is it always in your portfolio? it is still an extremely important
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currency. naturally, the us dollar is the world's reserve currency. the euro has coming increasingly, and so with the chinese currency. the pound could become less important but i think it certainly has a place in the world. and who do you reckon is going to be on the new note? i think volunteering is a perfect sample, but i think stephen hawking, he is going to have a lot of support. —— alun turing. i want maryellen but i don't suppose he will get it. the pound is up. looking strong, a send up. —— a sent
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up. staying with the animal theme. a new arrival in central park has got new york's twitchers all of a flutter. this male mandarin duck has turned up out of the blue on one of the park's ponds. the breed is actually native to east asia, so it's a bit of a mystery as to why he's there. park rangers first spotted him in early october, but he hasn't been seen for a few weeks until now. these new yorkers are making the most of the new arrival. it is an incredible gift to new york. an opportunity to see a beautiful animal. it is a rare experience for city kids to get out into nature and see things. it is beautiful. that is the thing that's getting people's imaginations fired. it is probably the most beautiful duck in the world. time for a look at the weather with darren bett. after a cold and frosty start, many
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of us enjoyed some sunshine but the weather is changing. look out into the atlantic, a deep area of low pressure pushing ahead. cloud on the weather fronts, and remnants pressure pushing ahead. cloud on the weatherfronts, and remnants of ex—harry kane oscar as well, just for good measure. that is producing this rain at the end of the day across northern ireland. wet and windy weather arriving in western scotla nd windy weather arriving in western scotland —— hurricane arriving just for good measure. the wind would be quite so strong. a hint of a touch of frost in rural areas but it should be a milder and last night, particularly in the north—west of the uk where it is wet and windy. that is how we start the weekend— wet and windy weather. some heavy rain into cumbria and this band of rain into cumbria and this band of rain moves over the irish sea, moving into western parts. the rain easing off in northern ireland and wet in scotland to a certain extent. try towards the south—east of the
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uk. windy everywhere but gales more likely. nate myles date and with was the south—east, it should be a pretty decent day as well. —— a mild day. heading into the fireworks during saturday evening, that band of rain in scotland, the irish sea and moving away from belfast, heading towards cardiff later on in the evening. many parts of the country look like being dry on sunday evening if you have got plans then. the reason we've got the rain on saturday evening is that weather front producing that band of rain, moving slowly eastwards into england and wales and then it stops, gets anchored by this developing area of low pressure into the south—west. there may not be much rain to greet the day, turning letter in the south—east, pushing into wales and back over the irish sea. most of the showers in the north—west. it is
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still pretty mild here with temperatures everywhere getting into double figures. as we have a quick look ahead to next week, most of the rain in the west with southerly wind and it should be milder and frost free. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 4. a stark warning from the met office, the uk has faced more weather extremes over the last decade due to global warming. we'll still be cold extremes as well, but we are expecting that these incredible extremes to be generally on the rise with the temperatures both by day and by night. so the night over all will be getting warmer, but there will still be periods when we get cold weather. brexit secretary dominic raab holds talks with the dup in belfast. they say they hope a deal is close, but sinn fein accuse him of behaving like a thief in the night. detectives begin a criminal inquiry into claims that members of the labour party have committed anti—semitic hate crimes. following a row over
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luton airport's facilities for disabled people, a paraplegic man and champion wheelchair athlete drags himself through the airport terminal coming up on afternoon live all the sport with john watson. he settles for silver and the promo. darren till is lovely out there. it's going to be mild and quite windy. i will have the full forecast later on. a nod to next week, i will be answering other viewers questions. they give very much darren. who do you think should be the face on the new 50—pund note? the bank of england wants it to be a prominent scientist. hello everyone.
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this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. hotter days and tropical nights. that's a weather forecast that would usually bring a bit of cheer, but when the reason for it is climate change. well it's a reason for concern. the met office says summer days are getting hotter, with warm spells longer than they used to be. and tropical nights, where temperatures stay above2 0 degrees celsius, will be more frequent. meanwhile the chilliest days of the year are not as cold as they used to be. the report also says britain has experienced more weather extremes in the last ten years than in previous decades. here's our environment correspondent, matt mcgrath. while 2018 was an exceptionally warm here across the uk, this new study from the met office suggests that in general britain is now experiencing more warmer days than in the recent past. the report looked at uk weather data from 1961 to 1990, and compared it with the decade between 2008 and 2017. it found that, on average, the hottest day in each
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year over the recent ten years was 0.8 degrees warmer than during the earlier period. there's been an even bigger change when it comes to cold weather. the chilliest days and nights are not quite as biting, with substantial areas of the uk having on average less than one day per year when the temperature is below zero. met office scientists say we might see more of these changes in the future. we expect to see an increase in certain types of extreme events, heatwaves and hot spells and warm spells, so i should point out we are particular looking at warm spells here across any time of year. these changes we are observing are consistent with our warming climate, so the uk has warmed byjust under a degree in the last sort of 50 years or so. while 1976 was one of the most significant heatwaves to hit the uk in the past 50 years, longer spells of warmer weather have become more common, essentially doubling over the period of the report. one intriguing aspect of the study concerns what are termed tropical nights, when the mercury stays
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above 20 celsius. this year, there were two nights in london that went above that mark, but in the 30 years between 1961 and 1990 there were just eight nights that exceeded that temperature. climate scientists say the changes in weather we are seeing the uk are down to global warming, keeping in step with the rest of the world. as the world warms, we expect to see more hot stays in summer, more warm nights, the kind of pattern of changes we are seeing, and the uk is warming roughly in line with the global average, so we will see these changes reflecting what's going on in the world as a whole. while the report details changes that scientists have recorded, do theirfindings chime with the experience of the public? it's getting out of hand. it's getting a lot hotter than it should be, really. and... well, especially when they are turning round and say it's hotter in the uk than in spain. i'm fortunate to live in a house that's quite cold, but i purchased a fan over the summer and all the windows are open, all the doors, and enjoyed the heat.
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it was great. it's not all about heat. the report also found that extremely wet days have increased by 17%. this could have significant implications for flooding across the uk in years to come. brexit secretary domenech wrapped is in talks to visit the dv. siin fin is being claimed that he is acting like a thief in the night. let's go to our ireland correspondent. is there any cause for optimism here. does really seem so. dominic rabb has arrived here. he drove to belfast after speaking to business people on the border about this issue which remains the major sticking point in the brexit
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negotiations. there will be no new controls on the border between border. the parties have been coming out and having their say here. first up out and having their say here. first up we heard from eileen foster. we are close to a deal that would work for northern ireland. we want to see an exit from a european union that is sustainable and that works for everyone. we want to see it work for our neighbours in the republic of ireland. no one in the democratic unionist party wants to see a hard border. we want to see a sustainable exit from the european union, but one that is rooted in the reality of the constitutional position of northern ireland which is in the united kingdom. so the democratic unionist theresa may's parliamentary allies set a red line and said that the brexit deal cannot separate the
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northern ireland for the rest of the uk. of course siinn fin is very against brexit. it's very curious to see how the tories visit this part of ireland, it's a very short visit. i think he is simply going through the motions. this strikes me as a box ticking exercise without let's face it, the whole brexit debate took place across the water with no mind, or no consideration for ireland, for our peace agreements, for our economy for our social and political needs. it is very much he is a day trip or to this part of ireland. he of course is most welcome to visit, but we need leadership. we need answers.
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that means an operable in during backstop. merryman mcdonald also said that dominic rabb told her that 95% of the brexit deal was done. the remaining 5% is all about ireland and the border. the eu says that the backstop means that the borders if not solved to the deal, and the first government backed by the dv said that would not be acceptable. —— do you pay. —— dup. british minister and i sources are saying they did not expect britain to bring forward any new proposals on brexit come up but both sides to agree that there is an increased sense of urgency. remember, the eu saying
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that if there isn't a deal on the irish border in the backstop, the there will be a brexit withdrawal agreement as well. a paraplegic man is suing luton airport after staff there failed to provide him with a chair that he could wheel himself. justin levene said the rigid wheelchair he was offered could give him pressure sores and also remove his independence. his own chair had been left behind on a flight, and he felt he had no option but to drag himself through the airport along the floor. our legal correspondent clive coleman has the story. what could have led to this? justin levine a paraplegic dragging himself through nugent airport after his wheelchair was left behind behind. wheelchair was left behind age through nugent airport after his wheelchair was left behind age 20 justin the herniated a disc, and an operation went wrong. it hasn't held him back. he has become an
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international wheelchair athlete, trainer, and mentor to disabled athletes. in august of last year, it's justin arrived athletes. in august of last year, it'sjustin arrived back on a flight to nugent airport. stranded without a self propelling wheelchair, the airport offered him a rigid chair widget to be pushed someone else. i've worked very hard to maintain my independence, and one of the biggest problems i've had is if i do not have my wheelchair and my legs will be taken away for me. all of my independence is gone. i like to be one of those chairs, and it made me feel humiliated. if you are in one of those chairs and at the risk of being strapped down, i would not have been able to move myself. pressure shorts can be very common, and he wanted to be transported by buggy. and he wanted to be transported by buggy, but the airport did not have one. at the heart of this dispute is justin's complained that a complaint that the airport was leaving him one
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viable option to haul himself along these floors for hundreds of yards, denying him both his independence, and his dignity. once outside the terminal, justin used a luggage trolley to wheel himself to his taxi. his own wheelchair was returned a day later. in a statement, luton airport said our teams worked hard to find a solution, offering mr levine and assisted wheelchair. mr levine declined offers to help as he deemed it unacceptable. we are satisfied that our agents inspected all the goodin that our agents inspected all the good in difficult circumstances. a significant number of international and uk airports do provide self propelling wheelchairs. terry olympia and and who is also faced problems at airports, understand justin levine's actions.”
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problems at airports, understand justin levine's actions. i would you like my independence is being taken away, and as a disabled person, we are still in charge of the type of people we want to be. i we the people we want to be. i we the people that want to be pushed around, for people to feel sorry for us? no. justin levine's story is at the cutting edge for thinking about issues. is it enough for service providers like airports to give some assistance, even if what they offered denies the disabled person and their independence. and clive coleman is with me now. that is really the heart of this. absolutely, the issue is we have moved a long way in terms of disability issues and disability rights. many disabled people will say it's simply not enough for them to be some provision for service providers, however it might be, whether it's an airport or sports stadium. if that provision, that equipment or what ever it is doesn't allow me to be the independent
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person i have strived to become, and you heard that from just then, you heard that from anne, and that there was some people who say the airport offered him a wheelchair and that was sufficient, and i think that's what this case is likely to determine, whether that is sufficient or more needs to be done. asi sufficient or more needs to be done. as i said, lots of airports around the world and in the uk, not all, provide either the self propelling wheelchairs, or they have the motorised buggies that can transport people or the arrival halls. but he made the point that if he was put in the chair that they offered he would have developed sores. he was concerned about that, and pressure sores country to what people think, you do not have to be in bed for six weeks to develop one, they can develop very very quickly depending on the thinness of the skin, and the status of the bones. if they develop they can be serious indeed. he was concerned about his independence as
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well, and i think you will probably say there was an element of protest and what he did, but he really felt that he just and what he did, but he really felt that hejust did and what he did, but he really felt that he just did not want to be in that he just did not want to be in that chair. there was no other option except dragging himself to the airport. so legally what is the basis of an argument here? his case is essentially suing the airport saying they failed to provide equipment that was suitable for someone equipment that was suitable for someone of his need. also note that the staff were not trained sufficiently in terms of disability awareness. now airports get a fair amount of legal cover here. their responsibility is to transport people safely from the aeroplane through to their onward journey, and thatis through to their onward journey, and that is governed by european law. it is going to be very interesting to see ifjustin's is going to be very interesting to see if justin's arguments is going to be very interesting to see ifjustin's arguments succeed in this case were at the airport prevails. clive, thank you very much. police have begun a criminal investigation into allegations of anti—semitic hate crime within the labour party. it comes after the lbc radio station passed an internal labour party dossier to cressida dick,
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commissoner of the metropolitan police. our political correspondent ben wright reports. he must have hoped this row had gone away. any response at all about the police investigation? good morning, how nice to see you. do you think... good morning, how nice to see you, goodbye. but after the metropolitan police was given a leaked labour party dossier detailing 45 cases of alleged anti—semitic hate crimes linked to labour party members, scotland yard is now investigating. we have been assessing some material which was passed in fact to me in a radio studio, of all things, about two months ago. and we are now investigating some of that material, because it appears there may have been crime committed. the met is not investigating the labour party itself, but examples of online anti—semitic abuse that may constitute hate crime. and the police is consulting the crown prosecution service. during the summer, labour was engulfed in a dispute
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about its handling of anti—semitism. in september the party's ruling body eventually agreed to adopt in full an international definition of anti—semitism, and jeremy corbyn told his party conference later that month he wanted an end to the dispute. the row over anti—semitism has caused immense hurt and anxiety in thejewish community, and great dismay in the labour party. i say this to all in the jewish community... we are your ally. applause. today labour's deputy leader said anti—semitism had to be rooted out of the party. we have anti—semitism in the labour party, we've improved our measures to deal with it. i don't want any anti—semite in my party and we want them out, and if they're guilty of hate crime we want them investigated and convicted too. but we need to see the facts. what had been an internal labour party investigation is now a police matter, and the problem of anti—semitism is not going away. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. he hasjust
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he has just use the line i was going to use this isn't going to win. that is not my line as well, that's three of us. that is the crux of this. after a ll of us. that is the crux of this. after all of the turbulence and the turmoil in the questions but the awkwardness of the labour party over the summer, one of the very few political stories that has punched through the nose of brexit to command attention for a good period of weeks is indeed during this. this revelation today from the metropolitan police commissioner is a reminder that it has not gone away, and it will be going away for some time and that the investigation that they are now conducting without ta ke that they are now conducting without take a look at this. senior labour mp margaret hodge isjewish, and she is talking to our political editor john with her reflections on this. it's very important that the police are now investigating this properly. the labour party should ever for the cases to the police, particularly in the wake ofjo cox murder. i think
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they have a duty of care whether there are allegations for hate crimes. as a jewish mp and an immigrant, it feels, i've neverfelt like this before. i have always felt that the labour party is a natural home for dues, and for immigrants, and are now concerned i look the other way and i look behind me. there is a sort of feeling about here about them. —— we're about them —— fear about them. here about them. —— we're about them -- fear about them. yes as a proportion of the uk population does art to ourjewish is small, but the extent to which this question has come over this party for so long about it, attitudes towards anti—semitism, and rooting out those
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who have anti—semitic abuse continues to hang there, and despite the best efforts ofjeremy corbin, to say look we are going to draw a line. these revelations today prove that it's going to continue rumbling on, and they will continue to have questions about it. the former home secretary amber rudd was let down by her own officials, according to an inquiry into the events leading up to her resignation earlier this year. ms rudd stood down in april, saying she had "inadvertently misled" mps investigating the windrush generation of post—war caribbean migrants. the report says she lost confidence in her officials and was "not supported as she should have been". let's speak now to nick broderick, a windrush migrant who came to the uk as a baby in 1962. i'm just wondering if this makes any difference to you whatsoever. good afternoon. not really. she can say what she likes, and when you are at
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the bottom of an organisation, the responsibility lies on your shoulders, so she really should be blaming her staff, she should be looking at herself at this. that you call it a fiasco. for many of us in the news business things have moved on, but for you the issue of wind rush is still very much there. of course it is. it will never go away, because at the end of the day people might say what are you looking for, but that at the end of the day is what's happening to us. a lot of people in my position were put in that position by the government's mistakes, so in the end, when you are in deposition and you are in desperate, you do things like you have to borrow money, and of those channels are not owned to you, you have to go to people that would lend you the money, and now it has come back to bite many of us, and we have to pay that money back. so, yes we are looking for compensation, and i know the goalposts have moved on to
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numberthe know the goalposts have moved on to number the 16th before they are going to let finish with it. —— november 16 that mike ——... the money has to be paid back. the government is setting up a task force, but in terms of you and others, what was that moment like when you realised hang on a minute, i don't seem to have anything to back up who i am? it was terrible. it was like hanging onto a rope that was slowly breaking. you know you did not know who to turn with at the start, i thought i was the only one. i thought i was the only person in this position and i thought i'd had done something terribly wrong, and through the years, obviously i hadn't done anything wrong, but it does leave you in great anxiety, because i don't know what the next step is. i know the government is looking into it, and things take
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time, but within that time people like me people have to pay money back. there's nothing like sleeping at night. because you lost yourjob because of all this. i lost my job and my licence, close my bank down and my licence, close my bank down and everything. i'm still picking up the pieces, and at my age, trying to get a job is really really hard. some nights it's really hard to bear, because the frustration of not being able to get, although i know the government is giving consideration, but i still have to live, i have to pay that money back you know, and there is no hope for me. because it's chatting all the time. do you think the government actually gets it? i think maybe some of them do, but i don't really think, look you can say what you like, but the government will do something when they want to do it,
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how they want to do it, regardless of how much art there is. that's what governments do. i am just hoping they actually will understand that some people we are desperate to get our lives back on track, because no matter if i can stay here, if left a scar in me that will not go away. i'm a very nervous person now, because i still think somebody is going to come for me. i know it's ridiculous and there are people worse off than me, but i really wish they would be more honest with us, and tell us what is happening, because they have just left us up in the air. many people like me are in the air. many people like me are in the same position. best of luck to you nick. in a few days' time, millions of voters across the united states will have their biggest say yet on donald trump's presidency. the midterm elections on tuesday will see americans casting their ballots for members of congress and many
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state governors. at the moment the republicans conttrol both houses of congress, and president trump is campaigning hard to try and keep it that way. last night he was in st louis, missouri. philippa thomas is there for us now. st louis, missouri. thank st louis, missouri. you very much. i can see the arch thank you very much. i can see the arch and this is the gateway to the west of the mississippi. that means we are in the middle of the country. the middle of a vast country, so an issue like immigration should it necessarily matter too much, but it is playing big here as it is playing big everywhere, because this is what donald trump is talking about, and thatis donald trump is talking about, and that is the really unusual think about these midterm elections. the president seems to be setting the agenda, and nationalising the debate across all of these states. that is potentially good for the republican who wants to take missouri's senate seat. a vote forjosh is a vote for
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donald trump, but it is a potentially a problem for the democratic incumbent here. —— democrat claire mccaskill needs all the help she can get. donald trump secured an easy victory in missouri. although no one here wants to name him, he is still defining the agenda. the very character of our country is on the ballot this time round. we have some doors to knock, we have some phone calls to make... fighting in trump country, mcaskill defines herself as a moderate, not liberal. that may not be enough to save her. we have got to get outside our comfort zone. we have got to talk to people we have never talked to before. which is why this first—time democratic candidate is putting in the hours to get out the vote. hi, there, i'm your democratic candidate for missouri. this photo says she is backing claire mcaskill, but patrice agrees
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the senator isn't taking anything for granted. no she is not and nor should she. she is at this moment in time not a slam dunk for re—election. she has found it matters here to be a candidate conservatives can warm to. i am a gun owner. men love to talk about guns and weapons and i do too. they like to talk about circumstances that i have been involved in as a police officer and i do too. there has been a surge of new voters registering in this county, saint charles, but they don't have to say for which party and canvassing customers at this vintage car dealers i found many still driven by enthusiasm for mr trump. you were also nodding that you think energy is up for the conservatives? i think so and i think that the kavanaugh confirmation had a lot to do with that.
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where they are are just dragging him through the swamp and the sewers, trying to belittle him, the guy was highly qualified. i agree with trump on some things, some things i don't. he could stay off the twitter a little bit but at least you know how he feels about the subject. mcaskill or hawley? i have to go with hawley. local republican activists are not alone in trying to boost josh hawley‘s chances. isn't it an incredible honour to have president donald trump in missouri? it's amazing. the president will be back on monday, making this his last stop before election day, confident that he has the power to help republicans harvest those final, vital votes. simon i guess the final question in this get out to vote phase of
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electoral operations is, the new‘s agenda are voters to did do? are they thinking as the democrats would like them to think, about health ca re like them to think, about health care for example, and holding on separate sections for pre—existing conditions, or are they thinking about the dangers to the united states whether it be from a caravan of migrants that is hundreds and hundreds of miles from the border, orfrom a rogue hundreds of miles from the border, or from a rogue state like hundreds of miles from the border, orfrom a rogue state like iran. it's funny you say that, because in the last 20 minutes he has tweeted about that because of course they are reimposing all sanctions on iran, let's show this is that he has remade the game of thrones poster, sanctions are coming. the date november the 5th is also there. he clearly believes this is something that will appeal to those core voters. this is but the president and commander—in—chief speaking and the reality television star, i mean simon he gets it doesn't he. he
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knows what grabs attention, and he knows what grabs attention, and he knows that this is something that will make voters sit up. yes he is talking about the sanctions that we re talking about the sanctions that were lifted on iran after the nuclear deal, the multinational nuclear deal, the multinational nuclear deal, the multinational nuclear deal that was agreed three yea rs nuclear deal that was agreed three years ago. donald job has always railed against that, and said we have been too soft on iran, and potentially they are a threat. european powers disagree with them, and now he is saying i am doing something about it. you can trust me, iam something about it. you can trust me, i am your president and i am protecting us from what i see is a big real estate. again i see the potential power of donald trump to change the agenda, set the agenda, and round out the democrats. let's get more from northern ireland now where the brexit secretary dominic raab has been visiting for talks with the dup. he's been speaking in the last few minutes, let's hear a little of what he had to say. economic and saturday of the united
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kingdom. we endanger the negotiations and want to protect the integrity of those negotiations and we are confident we will get a good dealfor the united we are confident we will get a good deal for the united kingdom. we are confident we will get a good dealfor the united kingdom. but you have not ruled out any new regulation or checks on goods coming from northern ireland to great britain. i'm not going to give a running commentary on the negotiations, but we are very clear about the business negotiations whether it's the east or north—south trade, and we want personal history between the eu, and we want to preserve the internal market within the united kingdom. this is a win—win here for the uk, but also to make sure that we have a good relationship going forward with our european partners. i'mjust not 100% clear. european partners. i'mjust not 10096 clear. have any new regulatory checks between great britain and northern ireland be definitively ruled out? we are engaged in the
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negotiation prosperous, and whether it's the customs were seen for the custom —— engaged in the negotiation process , custom —— engaged in the negotiation process, and whether it's the customs regime emma and of course we wa nt to customs regime emma and of course we want to maintain frictionless trade with the eu partners, but the internal market within the uk is crucial too. we want to preserve both, and also enhance and increase the opportunities for global trade that are different the eu and good for northern ireland. those is, grab speaking. —— that was dominic rapp. first let's have a look at the weather because darren is here, and even getting more questions. yes i've been getting more questions, which when current is bringing more parents from the win. let's talk about air masses. an hermas is a body of air that has a specific characteristic depending on
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where it is coming from. —— air mass. cold, warm, wet or dry. depending on the surface it was over, land or the sea. there are quite a few hermas is affecting our weather. —— air mass. tropical maritime, that is coming over the sea. maritime, that is coming over the sea. it picks up the lot of moisture and clouds. tropical continental, that comes in overland, it is much drier. the tip of the continent. indeed, it is a large land. over the continental landmass, and it brings dry airand sunny continental landmass, and it brings dry air and sunny skies. this is where we get hot weather from, sometimes from africa. there could be dust in there as well. these are going to give us dry weather. the polar continental is a different hermas, and this is the air that
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comes away from russia. —— the polar continental is a different air mass. it moves things on for four or five months, and all of the land is warmed up as well as the continent. a drier, warmer wind warmed up as well as the continent. a drier, warmerwind in warmed up as well as the continent. a drier, warmer wind in the summer that gives us know in the winter. this one here is called returning polar maritime bust i'm going to write this down. this originates from greenland and picks up moisture, and is not as cold as a polarairof time —— moisture, and is not as cold as a polar air of time —— polar maritime air mass. unstable cold air. once these, producing showers and snow. what is the arctic maritime? arctic maritime, this is air coming from all the way from the arctic. brilliance. this is going to give us know. winter time snow, lots of snow, and often a showery snow,
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anywhere that is prone to northerly winds will get snow showers. those air masses, the blur ones can give us some snow. lots of the region tonight. in the meantime, what is the weather going to be. the reason why the weather is so difficult to forecast is because there are lots of different landmasses that affect our weather. this is when you say you are not quite sure what we're going to get. this is when we use the word uncertain. i'm not going to use it this time. i will show you what's happening at the moment. we've actually got some tropical maritime aircoming in through actually got some tropical maritime air coming in through the two weather fronts. polar air coming in through the two weatherfronts. polar maritime coming behind, former hurricane oscar. ahead of that cloud we've got beautiful sunshine after a cold and frosty start. the cloud is already
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arriving and pushing into northern ireland, into scotland driven on by some strengthening winds with gales around western coast of scotland and the wind picks up. some cloud blowing into the west and clear skies and light winds for east anglia and the south—east. here with gotan area anglia and the south—east. here with got an area where we could find temperatures close to freezing in the countryside. as for it is mild. much milder in the north—west, where it is wet and windy. it moves very slowly out over the irish sea so it comes into west wales. the rest of england and wales probably dry with sunshine towards the south—east and eastern england. and a blustery day. the strongest winds, gales are likely through the irish sea and into western parts of scotland. because it is a southerly wind, mild airand the because it is a southerly wind, mild air and the temperatures will reflect that. 13—15d. a band of cloud and rain into the evening.
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bonfires, maybe fireworks got a fair bit of rain. that could affect any fireworks in edinburgh. they should stay dry. the reason for this is because of the weather front. it is slowing down and getting anchored in an area of low pressure developing towards the south—west. quite a tidy start for england and wales and not a great deal of rain. with the low pressure developing, the rain develops into wales. scotland and northern ireland probably seen some sunshine. a few showers around and then some sunshine in the south—east. these are the temperatures. near normal, maybe slightly above, for this time of year. not very windy on sunday but we'll keep the southerly winds into next week, and most of the rain will across the side of the uk. with
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southerly winds, it should be mild and frost free. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. britain has had more weather extremes over the past 10 years than in any other decade, a new met office report reveals. it says the hottest days are becoming hotter and there are more tropical nights. brexit secretary dominic raab has held talks with the two major parties in northern ireland. the democratic unionists say they hope a deal is close, but sinn fein accuse mr raab of behaving like a thief in the night. police have begun a criminal inquiry into allegations of anti—semitic hate crimes
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within the labour party. scotland yard said its inquiry is based on evidence contained in an internal party dossier it received in september. following a row over luton airport's facilities for disabled people, a paraplegic man and champion wheelchair athlete drags himself through the terminal — he's now suing the airport. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson. great britain have won theirfirst medal at the world gymnastic championships. gymnast max whitlock missed out on gold at the world championships in doha, finishing second in the pommell. he was hoping to become the first british gymnast to win three consecutive world titles, but missed out by the smallest of margins, to take silver. he produced the same score as china's xiao routeng, but produced a lower execution mark. the remarkable run of simone biles at the championships continues.
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in her first international event since taking a year off after rio, she became the first gymnast to win 13 world titles. she took gold in the vault — and followed that up with silver in the uneven bars. it takes her tally to three golds at these championships and she could add to that with two more individual events to come tomorrow. hibernian manager neil lennon says he may reconsider his position at the club — why? the abuse he receives from football fan in scotland. from football fans in scotland. lennon was struck by a coin after celebrating a disallowed hearts goal near the end of wednesday's edinburgh derby. today he's claimed he suffers anti—catholic "racism" in scotland and that an effigy of him being hanged was put up outside tynecastle. i think i've been subjected to this
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for 18 years. i'm 47. fed up with it. iam for 18 years. i'm 47. fed up with it. i am the manager here now and i'm still getting it, in the derby. whether it is isolated incidents, sectarian, motivated or not, that effigy outside the ground before the game for me is sectarian abuse, that's what i want to call it. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk.
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let's go to edward sault in southampton for an update on arij altai — who we featured earlier this week on nationwide — an iraqi woman who has been diagnosed with terminal cancer and is fundraising to pay for a medical flight home to be with herfamily. and in hull, peter levy is here with news of grimsby being crowned the unhealthiest town in britain. we will talk more about that. why is it she wants to raise this money? she came with her son and husband, studying for a link sticks ph.d. at southampton, supported by the iraqi government. in 2014 she was diagnosed with breast cancer, something she fought but then at the beginning of this year, she found out she had secondary cancer and it was all over her body. her husband had to go back to iraq because he had to go back to iraq because he had finished his doctorate, and she was told there was no further treatment but she was too sick to fly home. she was desperate to be able to go home to see her son one last time and she was told this weekend she would be discharged to a hospice in hampshire to see out her last few weeks and days.
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my last few weeks and days. my husband had to go back because he finished his study and he can't stay here. they won't allow him. so i have to go back because no one will be here with me. i don't want to die now before icy my son. i want to be with him. that is the clip we showed on this programme on tuesday and as soon as i left the studio, people were on twitter asking how they could raise money. good news on the fundraising? incredible. i was checking out the web page or evening to see how the total was racking up. they need 56 5000 -- 50 £6,000 -- 50 £6,000. they managed to get £62,000. i watched it go up. i was checking the page or through the day, seeing it to go up. on wednesday night i was cooking my
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dinner, refreshing the target, and i saw it had been broken. herfriend debra spearheaded the effort and posted a message online thanking eve ryo ne posted a message online thanking everyone for their generosity. we just wanted to say thank you. i'm sorry i haven't been able to thank everyone personally for the donations that have come in. ijust couldn't keep up with it all. we are alljust a bit overwhelmed but we wanted to say thank you. so the money is there but time is a pressure. when does she fly? they are hoping she will fly to baghdad from southampton tomorrow. she needs bed to bed care needs an ambulance to ta ke to to bed care needs an ambulance to take to the airport from the hospital, on to iraq. medics in southampton are talking to their collea g u es southampton are talking to their colleagues in iraq about the care that she needs. it is really bittersweet because they know there is no miracle, no cure, no magic wand. at least has got one step
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closer to her dying wish, which is to see her family and her eight—year—old son for the last time. that has to be something. great news on that story, thanks for breaking that story on tuesday. let's go to peter. grimsby has topped a list which perhaps it wouldn't want to top right now. this is a report from the royal society for public health and grimsby has come out on top of the most unhealthy place in the uk because of its high number of ta keaways, because of its high number of takeaways, betting shops, payday lenders and empty shops. places like grimsby, there is a huge growth of fast food shops. also the pink shops. —— e—cigarette shops. they are considered positive because they have moved people away from cigarettes. in grimsey, but this altogether and it holds the title as the most unhealthy streets in the
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country, walsall in second place, then blackpool and then stoke—on—trent. simon, you do sort of think for viewers living in these places they might be thinking, surely not, sherlock. you're probably not wrong, peter. always good to see you. more at 6:30pm. and edward with that... well, it's an awful story but we've got some good news at least in the short—term. thanks, both. and if you would like to see more on either of those stories, there is more on the eye player. we are nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm. the public is being asked to nominate which famous scientist they think should be on the new £50 note.
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the bank of england's governor mark carney will make the final decision and announce it next year. the new £50 note will be made of plastic polymer, and replace the current paper note. simon gompertz reports. the clue to who is going to be on the new £50 note is in way the appeal for names is being launched, in london's science museum. the field we selected on the advice of the advisory panel is science. as has always been the case, the bank will not represent living people or fictional characters on our banknotes, so i'm afraid time lords of whatever gender are ineligible. hello there, charles. have you heard the news? what news, charles? charles darwin and sir isaac newton are helping with the launch. you will never guess, the theme is... love island ? but who does the public think should be chosen? stephen hawking. stephen hawking? yes, that's a good one. it would be a good note
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with a black hole on it. there is ada lovelace always. the first computer. the mathematician. stephen hawking has passed away, so stephen hawking. so you would expect stephen hawking on the list somewhere, also perhaps the computer pioneer alan turing, the wartime code breaker. and how about mathematician ada lovelace who worked on an early form of computing. or rosalind franklin who played a key part in finding the structure of dna. there are two man on the current £50 note, the engineers bolton and watt, and there will be plenty of people arguing that the men have had their turn, it's time to see a female scientist on the new 50. that could weigh on the mind of this tv science star who will help draw up a shortlist. it would be a very powerful thing and if that is the way the public vote, that will be wonderful. but it doesn't matter which way they vote.
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we are throwing it open to the public, we want them to nominate the great and the good and the unsung heroes. the signature on the new plastic 50 is likely to be from the bank of england's sarah john. i am only the 33rd chief cashier so there are only 33 people who have had their signature on the back of england banknotes and it is a great honour, a great privilege and i can't wait. even if you don't think you will have a much need for cash in 505, you will care whose face is on the new ones. they will not be issued for at least another couple of years, but you have six weeks only to get your names of scientists in. simon gompertz, bbc news, at the science museum. and steven hawking also has the backing from the physicist and tv presenter brian cox. he tweeted: theo is here — in a moment
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he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a stark warning from the met office — the uk has faced more weather extremes over the last decade due to global warming. brexit secretary dominic raab holds talks with the dup in belfast. unionists say they hope a deal is close, but sinn fein accuse mr raab of behaving like a thief in the night. detectives begin a criminal inquiry into claims that members of the labour party have committed anti—semitic hate crimes. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. more strong economic numbers out from the us. the number of people in work increased by 250,000 — way ahead of most predictions — and the unemployment rate was the same as last month: 3.7%. these are the last big economic numbers out before the mid—term elections in the us.
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a warning from mps about the pressure being put on hm revenue & customs. the public accounts committee is warning that tax officials are already struggling with a huge workload and has "serious concerns" about the introduction of a new customs service and the impact of brexit on uk borders. ford is in talks with a chemical company about using part of its bridgend plant to build a new off—road vehicle. ineos wants to build a replacement for the classic land rover defender which went out of production in 2016. if a deal‘s done, it could help safeguard hundreds of jobs at the plant when other contracts come to an end. so it's friday, and a good time to look back on what's been happening this week on the markets — and overall things have been rather positive haven't they? that's right. october as a whole was a pretty dismal month on the major stockmarkets — some big falls, particularly at the start of the month, but the past week we've seen a pretty decent rally,
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helped along by suggestions the us is pushing for a trade deal with china that could unwind some of the current tensions, the row which has led to new tariffs on a whole range of goods. there's also been a strong recovery among tech stocks, which were some of the big losers this time last week. that's given markets some momentum. except for apple — their shares are well down today? yes — and that's despite making a profit of 14 billion dollars — or about £11 billion — in the three months to the end of september. there are two things going on here, really. firstly, investors aren't really looking at what's already happened, they know those figures are good. they're looking at what apple is saying about the next few months, which include the thanksgiving holiday weekend in the states, black friday and so on, and the run up to christmas. and those earnings are likely to be lower than expected. then there's apple's announcement that it won't be specifying how many iphones
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and ipads its been selling in future — it claims those numbers don't say anything about its financial health. but investors are worried it's a sign that the numbers aren't growing very fast anymore, and the company wants to avoid awkward questions. and finally — the really important news of the day — we've had some details about the new £50 note, and who might be featured on it? this is the new plastic polymer 50, which will replace the current paper note in a few years time. yes — and it won't be a famous footballer riding a unicorn, despite a petition sent to the government asking for just that. the bank of england has decided that it should feature a scientist, alongside the queen of course. the public now have six weeks to send in nominations. frontrunners include the wartime codemaker alan turing and steven hawking, along with the matehmatician ada lovelace and the dna research pioneer rosalind franklin. we'll talk about £50 notes in a minute, but first
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what's your take on what we've seen on the markets this week? well, for more on all this, i'm joined byjeremy stretch from cibc world markets. let's start with the markets. what do you think has been going on? it is rallying at the end of the week. it has been rallying, and markets were keen to put the month of october behind them because that was a tumultuous month as a whole. probably the most as an equity space for six years. we have seen an improvement, or at least we had until earlier in the day. in the last few hours there has been some pushback regarding hopes of a rapprochement between the us and china. we have seen improvements in the underlying backdrop and that has helped. asian equities in particular. the us is not holding up
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quite so well into the end of the week and ironically it could be those implement numbers you have mentioned because whilst there has been a significant number ofjobs created in the month and also earnings growth has been at its fastest pace since 2009 but it won't deflect from those high rates. that perhaps is just causing a little deflect from those high rates. that perhaps isjust causing a little bit of equity market fragility in the us as we round out the week. what about the stirling? up against major currencies towards the end of the week. down beforehand. is this the week. down beforehand. is this the kind of volatility we could expect more of over the next few months? the market is susceptible to brexit related rumours. when we have seen stories over the last few days when they have been optimistic regarding a deal being conducted, initially on financial services and then on an overall deal over the next few weeks, that has limited market fear about the no deal scenario. so against the us dollar we were
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trailing below one. 27. earlier todayit trailing below one. 27. earlier today it was well over 1.30. a significant recovery. volatility is going to be the underlying message. apologies, we don't have time to ask you about the £50 note. no? 0k. you about the £50 note. no? ok. quick look at the markets. the ftse is ending on a positive note. slightly down today that over the past week it has been pretty good. i don't think the cac is correct. the pound looking stronger than it has been. a new arrival in central park has got new york's
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twitchers all of a flutter. this male mandarin duck has turned up out of the blue on one of the park's ponds. the breed is actually native to east asia, so it's a bit of a mystery as to why he's there. park rangers first spotted him in early october, but he hasn't been seen for a few weeks until now. these new yorkers have gone quackers at the new arrival. it is an incredible gift to new york. an opportunity to see a beautiful animal. it is a rare experience for city kids to get out into nature and see things. it is beautiful. that is the thing that's getting people's imaginations fired. it is probably the most beautiful duck in the world. that's it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at five with ben brown. time for a look at the weather, here's darren bett. after a cold start, the weather is changing. looking out into the
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atla ntic we changing. looking out into the atlantic we have a deep area of low pressure pushing this cloud on the weather fronts, and remnants pressure pushing this cloud on the weatherfronts, and remnants of pressure pushing this cloud on the weather fronts, and remnants of x hurricane oscar in there as well. that cloud producing this rain at the end of the day, wet windy weather arriving in western scotland this evening and overnight with rain pushing eastwards across scotland. cloud over the sea into england and wales. further east clearer skies with lighter winds. a hint of frost here, particularly in rural areas. it should be a milder night than last night, particularly in the north—west of the uk where it is wet and windy. that is how we start the weekend. heavy rain across western scotla nd weekend. heavy rain across western scotland into cumbria as well. this moves scotland into cumbria as well. this m oves over scotland into cumbria as well. this moves over the irish sea, running into western parts. the rain easing off in northern ireland, perhaps the north—west of scotland. a little dry towards the south east. windy everywhere but gales are more likely
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through the irish sea. a mild day. and with some sunshine towards the south—east, the midlands and east anglia and lincolnshire, it should bea anglia and lincolnshire, it should be a pretty decent day. heading into the bonfire time a fireworks during saturday evening and that band affecting scotland, moving across the irish sea and away from belfast into cardiff later on in the evening. many parts of the country look like being dry on sunday evening if you got plans then. the reason we've got the rain on saturday evening is that weather front producing that band of rain and it is moving very slowly eastwards into england and wales, stopping and getting anchored by this developing area of low pressure into the south—west. not much rain to greet the day that we will find it turning wetter in the south—west, pushing its way into wales and over the irish sea. sunshine and showers for scotland and northern ireland, in the north—west. a dry day probably with some sunshine in the south—east and east anglia. pretty
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mild here. temperatures in double figures everywhere. as we have a quick look ahead to next week, most of the rain is in the west. it should be milder and frost free. come on that is shared to discuss but is it too often put negative spin on the data. join us tonight at 745. today at five, britain's changing climate. a met office report says we've experienced more weather extremes in the last ten years than in any previous decades. the study says the hottest days have become hotter, while the coldest days are not at as cold as they were. these changes that we are observing
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are consistent with our warming climate, so the uk has warmed byjust under a degree in the last sort of 50 years or so. we'll have full details in a moment. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. police launch a criminal inquiry into allegations of anti—semitic hate crimes within the labour party. a paraplegic man sues luton airport after claims that he was forced to drag himself through the terminal building after staff failed to provide him with a self—propelling wheelchair.
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