Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 3, 2018 9:00am-10:00am GMT

9:00 am
an eight normal this is an eight normal commercial flight this is an eight normal commercial flight in australia. i called his name and he turned around, and that was his instant reaction. that really sums him up. almost catching the everyday. that is really what my favourite part of what i did was. the everyday and the story. it has been a pleasure talking to you. rohani headlines soon. see you soon. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today:
9:01 am
the funeral of the owner of leicester city begins in thailand — one week after he was killed in a helicopter crash. his players say they will take to the pitch in his honour this afternoon in a match against cardiff. broadcaster paul gambaccini wins damages from the crown prosecution service over its handling of unfounded sexual assault allegations against him. in sport, the hibernian manager says he may quit hisjob because of anti catholic rascism. after celebrating a disallowed goal on wednesday, neil lennon was struck by a coin thrown by a fan. and i get more than i bargained for, taking the wheel in the latest racing simulator. that was absolutely terrifying! milder but also when drier for
9:02 am
england and wales, have have all the details here on breakfast. it's saturday the 3rd of november. our top story: the funeral of leicester city owner, vichai srivaddhanaprabha, will take place in thailand later. members of the team are expected to fly out after their game against cardiff this afternoon. the businessman died, along with four other people, when his helicopter crashed outside the king power stadium last saturday. our south east asia correspondent jonathan head is in bangkok. this is going to be, a week—long funeral? six days of rituals where monks will be chanting, this is an religious ceremony for ties, where the deceased accumulates merit through traditions, and will start in about two hours tie with a bathing ceremony hairfor
9:03 am
two hours tie with a bathing ceremony hair for everyday family and friends. there will be monks on hand through the night, keeping up the charging. this is also a ceremony which has been formally sponsored by thailand's king as a mark of the status that vichai srivaddhanaprabha had achieved in thailand. a great honour to have that, and at the end of it, after all the ceremonies, there will be a formal cremation chosen on an auspicious day, when we expect the greater good to show up, funerals are very social occasions in thailand. everyone would be looking to see who shows up, it will be buried well attended. the cremation service. it might be next week, several weeks‘ time, we do not know at this stage. i can see camera ci’ews at this stage. i can see camera crews behind you, there are other funerals happening today. very many important ceremonies that become pa rt important ceremonies that become part of the funeral as well. yes,
9:04 am
where we are standing now is a temple in thailand‘s told royal city and it is one of the royally associated temples, so you have to reach a certain status to have a funeral taking place here. there is a lot that goes on in a thailand funeral, they are drawn out affair, but it is important, so you have to look at the spiritual side and remember that vichai srivaddhanaprabha was a religious man, everyone will remember him bringing the monks and to leicester city to bless the players, and for his family it is important that they go through all of these rituals, but the social side is important also. you have to remember he was known in britain as a fantastic sponsor football, here is years successful but not well—known businessman, and it will be interesting to see how people of thailand who are less earlier the leicester story choose to remember this man. —— who are less familiar. the bbc presenter,
9:05 am
paul gambaccini, has accepted undisclosed damages from the crown prosecution service because of the way it handled unfounded historical sex abuse allegations made against him. mr gambaccini, one of several high—profile figures to face claims in the wake of the jimmy savile scandal, was arrested in october 2013 but was never charged. he sued the cps, accusing it of issuing a misleading statement when it dropped the case. the presenter told the daily mail that prosecutors should have said there was "no evidence" rather than "insufficient evidence". the cps said it has reached an agreement without admission of liability. president erdogan of turkey has said that the order to kill journalist jamal khashoggi last
9:06 am
month came from the highest levels of the saudi government. writing in the washington post, mr erdogan calls for the unmasking of what he describes as the "puppet masters" behind the murder at the saudi consulate in istanbul. saudi arabia‘s version of events has changed several times, but it denies that crown prince mohammed bin salman had any knowledge of the killing. in the last hour, the brexit campaigner arron banks has returned to the uk — as he faces allegations that his multi—million pounbd donations to the "leave" cause may have broken electoral law. the "leave. eu" co—founder was referred to the national crime agency by the elections watchdog, which suspects that cash given to the campaign had come from what it called "impermissible sources". our political correspondent jonathan blake is in our london newsroom. he came back in and announced when he got a gatwick that he was reiterating, he has done nothing wrong. and early morning arrival from bermuda, arriving at gatwick and a couple hours ago. he was met by reporters and photographers and was asked about claims that money
9:07 am
donated to his league campaign, of which he was a high—profile member, came from russia. his response was that it hasn‘t, the money came from him. he went on to add that he will incorporate fully with the national crime agency investigation. he put out a statement describing the claims against him is ludicrous and said that the full and frank investigation would put an end to them. it has come about because the uk election watchdog was looking into the funding of the campaign, not the official league campaign, but the one fronted by nigel farage, and specifically loans made by arron banks and his companies to the campaign. the electoral commission decided that there was evidence that money had come from impermissible sources, possibly outside the uk, and that is by the past the national
9:08 am
crime agency to investigate. he is now back and will face further questioning about that when he is interviewed on the andrew marr programme tomorrow morning. full coverage of that tomorrow, jonathan, while you‘re with us, an interesting poll today suggesting how people are feeling about the possibility of there being some kind of vote referendum on the final deal if we get one. yes, the polis commissioned by the people‘s vote campaign which are campaigning fora by the people‘s vote campaign which are campaigning for a vote, public vote on the outcome of brexit, and it was done by you guys. they spoke to 26,000 people across the uk and two mainfindings, to 26,000 people across the uk and two main findings, suggesting that a majority of people in labour held seats across the uk now back the idea of a public vote on the outcome of brexit. any question they were passed, it was not said what the wording of that referendum question would be. the other main suggestion
9:09 am
from this poll is that a majority of labour voters would now favour staying in the eu if there was a public vote on the outcome of the brexit negotiations. that is the poll put out by the people‘s vote campaign today, a reminder the government has ruled out a second referendum on brexit, and later say they would prefer a general election in the event of a brexit deal not getting through parliament, but they are open to the idea. the success of nf has caused a drop in the number of children being adopted, the boss of the organisation that represents children in care has said. in the last a0 years, adoptions in england and wales have fallen by 62%. meanwhile, ivf success rates for women under 35 have nearly tripled. attacks on firefighters in england have increased by a quarter in the past year, according to their trade union. the fire brigades union says there were more than 930 incidents where crews were abused or threatened. the home office says new laws coming
9:10 am
into place this month should give the police and courts more power to deal with those who are violent towards emergency service workers. us actor alec baldwin has been charged with assault in new york city after allegedly punching a man in a fight over a parking space. the incident allegedly occurred in the west village area of manhattan on friday. the 60—year—old has been ordered to appear in court on the 26th of november. the actor‘s been in the spotlight most recently for his impressions of president trump on nbc‘s long—running satirical show saturday night live. those are the main stories. let‘s return to our top story now, the funeral of leicester city owner, vichai srivaddhanaprabha, will take place in thailand later. members of the team are expected to fly out after their game against cardiff this afternoon. the businessman died, along with four other people,
9:11 am
when his helicopter crashed outside the king power stadium last saturday. let‘s speak to former leicester city player gerry taggart who joins us from cardiff. vichai srivaddhanaprabha was someone who was very loved, and i had been reading a lot about how he gave his blessings to the players on the pitch, and was adored by many other players. it will be a very big day today for them playing in cardiff. yes, absolutely. tough time for everybody involved that the football club. eventually, isuppose, the players have to get back onto the pitch, and do theirjob. it is probably a collective decision where they just decided probably a collective decision where theyjust decided that today probably a collective decision where they just decided that today was the day that they would do that. it will
9:12 am
bea day that they would do that. it will be a strange atmosphere, bit of a strange... for the players to go out and soak up a strange atmosphere. eventually when the referee blows his whistle, they will get on with it, but the chairman was someone who was held in high regard. a unique relationship that he had with his players. you were there on monday at the stadium, playing —— paying your tributes. what was like there? very emotional. all the wreaths, pouring of sympathy from all different walks of sympathy from all different walks of life. all over the country, all over the world. jerry, if you are finding this difficult, b can come back to this. i am so sorry, it is
9:13 am
so emotional. i know he very much touched your heart and the hearts of many around you. would you like us to give you a a few moments? no, i will carry on. it is so obvious to see how much this man has touched your hearts, and i wonder if i can call on your memories as a player, the mindset now that as these players go onto the the whole stadium will be very respectful, wearing the black armband, and you said that once the whistle goes they have to focus. what would they have been spoken about, what have they been spoken about, what have they been told to have is a mindset when you get on the the face of such tragedy? i think it is the memory of the owner. what he did for the players, how the gelled with the players, how the gelled with the players off the pitch, stuff like that. just the memories that the players had of the owner. i think they use that as a motivational tool to go onto the pitch, and i think
9:14 am
before making the decision, they will have used that, saying, what would he have wanted? obviously they have come to a decision that he would have wanted them to play today. because he loved the football club, he loved watching the game of football, and so i think it was not an easy decision for the players to make, to get back onto the pitch as soon as make, to get back onto the pitch as soon as possible but within reason, but everyone is suffering. it is interesting you use the word suffering, because the players will be going to pay their respects, and that will be of great importance and significance to vichai srivaddhanaprabha‘s family, talk to me about what support the players will get, because in any time of grief, and this is something we have spoken about many times, and you are yourself feeling grief, for support ofa yourself feeling grief, for support of a baby getting from the club as well? they have lost someone they adored. the chief executive has been
9:15 am
absolutely phenomenal by all accounts. the players have been offered counselling on an individual basis. i think as a collective, they will be helping each other through this. the staff, players, they obviously are living inside each other‘s pockets for a large amount of time. they will be helping each other, along the lines of trying to get individuals through this, but they have been offered counselling by the club. all the staff at leicester city have been offered counselling. in regards to what happened last week. again, i think it has been a collective decisions, and obviously one that the players feel comfortable with, that today is the day that they go back out onto the day that they go back out onto the pitch. vichai srivaddhanaprabha, thatis the pitch. vichai srivaddhanaprabha, that is a name that is going to
9:16 am
resound any hearts and minds of phantom leicester and the world of football. what do you think his legacy will be? i think number one his kindness. he spread his generosity far and wide over the cou nty of generosity far and wide over the county of leicestershire. obviously winning the premier league is another legacy that will be left. just the kindness and the generosity of the man, the stuff he did, around the city for hospitals, charitable foundations, causes, was quite remarkable. it is going to lead a massive hole in the city of leicester. gerry, it is so apparent that you had, have an affection for this man, he has made a difference to your life, and the players as well, i can only thank you for being so openly, just so open with us this morning, and you are talking about
9:17 am
the players getting counselling, i hope you also have someone to lean on, and may simply go to you. thank you so much for talking to us and giving us some insight to what this man meant. thanks. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. before you dash out to put the gloves on, look behind me. yesterday morning in county down, a completely different story this morning. 20 celsius warmer, setting the scene for a much milder day across the country. a price to pay, some stronger wind and outbreaks of rain. clearing away from northern ireland, but further bus pushing northwards, heavy rain in western scotland, much of england and wales, our base of rain coming and going. much of it try and bright, sunny start in eastern areas and for many it will stay that way all day. brightening up stay that way all day. brightening up in parts of scotland and northern
9:18 am
ireland as we head into the afternoon. four o‘clock, sunny spells developing, one or two showers but improving. keble be the strength of the wind, possibly up to six miles per hour, milder air around the murray firth, could hit i7n around the murray firth, could hit 17 n across parts of northern ireland 15, edit more sunshine to the second half of the day. grey skies and cumbria in northumberland, pa rt skies and cumbria in northumberland, part of like a child, west wales have outbreaks of rain which will become persistent. turning wetter across parts of cornwall. the south and east will stay dry, temperatures in the mid—teens, staying dry into the evening, clearer in western scotla nd the evening, clearer in western scotland and parts of northern ireland. if you‘re having a fireworks party elsewhere, likely to be some rain around and the wind will be very strong. the wind today could be stronger because of problems, so please think carefully before you set any fireworks. tonight, outbreaks of rain, parts of
9:19 am
northern england, wales, the south—west, can fight a part of england and wales later, clearer skies for scotland and northern ireland, the coolest of the air remaining, but given the strength of the wind and bob not be a rich and start tomorrow. we will be frost free. low—pressure pushing between us free. low—pressure pushing between us and iceland. keeping the wind strong. further outbreaks of rain. scotla nd strong. further outbreaks of rain. scotland and northern ireland bright tomorrow, sunny spells, same at the far north of england. a lot more cloud scotland and northern ireland bright tomorrow, sunny spells, same of the far north of england. a lot more cloud scotland and northern ireland bright tomorrow, sunny spells, same of the far north of england. a lot more cloud midlands,, most persistent and the south—west, east anglia. you could get away with another dry day, attempt is around ii-isdc. the another dry day, attempt is around ii—isdc. the latter stage of sunday, any fireworks parties, there will be any fireworks parties, there will be a breeze blowing and the rain most likely to be across parts of western england and western parts of wales. that is next what is as in sausages?
9:20 am
no, fireworks. i don‘t know, a nice hopefully not in the run—up to bonfire night, we often hear reminders about the distress fireworks can cause to our pets, but this year one organisation is also asking people to think about their elderly neighbours. healthcare charity, kissing it better, says many older people it supports tell them that the sounds can bring back traumatic memories of the war. tim muffett reports. when you are sitting on your own and you suddenly hear a bang, it is really quite frightening. margaret is 81. she dreads bonfire night. it‘s definitely worse now i‘m a widow, on my own. what memories does that bring back?
9:21 am
well, they can trigger memories of the war, particularly people more my age and older. i had a bomb in my back garden. they all think about the pets and the poor dogs, poor cats, which it is, it is horrible for them but i think people who are on their own do get forgotten. margaret‘s reaction to the sound of fireworks might sound extreme, but some believe it is far more common than people realise. bonfire nights and the children... jill fraser runs kissing it better, a charity that visit people in hospitals and care homes. today they are in stratford—upon—avon. many older people, particularly with dementia, are concerned about loud noises they don't understand. many of them during the war were told to keep their feelings in, they don't talk about it to relatives but it's those triggers that suddenly spin them in time.
9:22 am
the horror of the war, any incident they have been in. it's a tiny gesture but by talking about bonfire night and reminding people that the noises aren't connected to the time of year can allay some of their fears. dorothy lived through the blitz on coventry in 1940, and air raids that almost destroyed the city and seriously injured her father. she finds fireworks traumatic. during the war, we were bombed out twice and i have never, ever got over that bang so i don't like fireworks. i think they should be more controlled than they are. in the wartime, i was the gun crew, so there was a lot of noise, so you think of that, you remember that. kissing it better doesn‘t want fireworks banned, just used more thoughtfully. we often overlook those people who are lonely, those people who are in their home and it's not because they are frightened by the noise, we also feel sad that nobody bothered to remind them.
9:23 am
are you ok, do you want tojoin us, we are having sparklers in the garden, let's talk about memories of what fireworks night was, it can make them feel more valued and they are giving enormous value to the young people they are talking to and families, reminding them what life is like in a different time. when it comes to fireworks, a little reassurance can go long way. tim muffett, bbc news. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. mike barton, chief constable for durham constabulary, is here to tell us what‘s caught his eye. let‘s start with will stop we are
9:24 am
talking a lot over the next week about the centenary of the first world war, and this is another one of those stories which just individual personal stories that brings it all back. theyjust grab you. a story about the first and last soldiers who were killed it was john parr, who was the first to be killed. , just, john parr, who was the first to be killed. ,just, george john parr, who was the first to be killed. , just, george ellison, john parr, who was the first to be killed. ,just, george ellison, so poignant, he was a0 at the time, before the end of the war. but long after what was also interesting
9:25 am
about george ellison was he was one of the first soldiers in france. to 1918 and then killed in the we'll hear a lot of those stories and in its week. we had one yesterday about the bilin which by a soldier who and it has now been finished and he has finally been played again. so many people got in touchlj finally been played again. so many people got in touch i wanted to do that story, but i knew you had covered he was amazed how new it looked and it was never finished. the musician who died had carved something we do not talk about a lot as we talk about it a lot, but many men do not talk about it. there is
9:26 am
talk, listen, assess,. this is why you are picked this out. this is a great story because november, started in 1999 in adelaide and picked up i have never done movember, but i do support people who do. the, it is all about young men who die from is one of the most chilling reasons why young men die, so they are moving into the depression and suicide the amount of money, the is actually a high water, a huge moustache being lifted up
9:27 am
here however battersea power station in the tower of if you are out and about, you that we is saying, it should not just be about, you that we is saying, it should notjust be photographs, we should notjust be photographs, we should be recording memories,” think that brings people to live, when i hear you get a feel of who the person was. that is exactly what he has from his whom he calls a raconteur, i think he one as well, and just got all those stories, those little anecdotes, finding so much about him, and my father—in—law andi much about him, and my father—in—law and i downloaded him for six months, which is why i was able to at the
9:28 am
funeral, if you do not when do you do it? you do not want to be morbid, but it is an important thing to remember people used to talk about death more, we we deny the thought that be this is breakfast. we‘re on bbc one until 10am this morning, when donal skehan takes over in the saturday kitchen. what‘s on the menu for us, donal? marry margolis eats whole poignant sunset and pickled onion, but not i think many people might is there
9:29 am
something i cannot say i have eaten too we do have some but i do not have a pervert, and for that, that woman does what she wants. we leave her i have seen her on graham norton, i would her i have seen her on graham norton, iwould not her i have seen her on graham norton, i would not mess with her. let her have it. our special guest is you have divisional food heaven tell me aboutjob food heaven. is you have divisional food heaven tell me about job food heaven. a raw piece ofjuly, that would the rats
9:30 am
of what is marinated sirloin steak with lam going i am going to do something sweet, a salted dark chocolate cake with a milk chocolate and mash. spectacular. and ollie is in charge of drinks. what a spectacular dish. i have gone all around the world to find some amazing wines. i have gone to argentina, spain, possibly a drink fromjapan, and to argentina, spain, possibly a drink from japan, and maybe one from chilly. we shall see, surfing the drinks cabinet. in for a treat, with lashings of food. don‘t forget, you guys are in charge of what jamie eats. don‘t forget, you guys are in charge of whatjamie eats. go to the website for the details and we will see you at ten o‘clock. website for the details and we will see you at ten o'clock. we just voted raw onion for him! oh dear,
9:31 am
jamie! jamie is with us next week. if he does eat before onions, could you ask them to brush his teeth many times before them. i am a very efficient toothbrush, i promise. just reading this from miriam, she explains why she eats raw onion, and she says she does it for health reasons. i wondered she says she does it for health reasons. iwondered if she says she does it for health reasons. i wondered if it was because of the properties in the onion. she says because when i have eaten a four onion, nobody hums anywhere near me, so i don‘t get exposed to any germs or bugs!” anywhere near me, so i don‘t get exposed to any germs or bugs! i was going to mention the sulphur in the onions, but that‘s not what she uses them for. genius. thank you for that, have a fabulous show. we will be back with the headlines shortly. hello, this is breakfast
9:32 am
withjon kay and naga munchetty. coming up before 10am, matt will have the weather. we will also have all the sports news. but first, a summary of this morning‘s main news. the week—long funeral of leicester city owner, vichai srivaddhanaprabha, will begin in thailand later. members of the team are expected to fly out after their game against cardiff this afternoon. the businessman died, along with four other people, when his helicopter crashed outside the king power stadium last saturday. he will be remembered for kindness.
9:33 am
he will be remembered for kindness. he spread his generosity far and wide over the county of leicestershire. obviously, winning the premier league is another legacy that will be left. but i think, you know, just the kindness and generosity of the stuff he did around the city. for hospitals, charitable foundations, causes, it was quite remarkable. he is going to leave a massive hole in the city of leicester. the bbc presenter, paul gambaccini, has accepted undisclosed damages from the crown prosecution service because of the way it handled unfounded historical sex abuse allegations made against him. mr gambaccini, one of several high profile figures to face claims in the wake of the jimmy savile scandal, was arrested in october 2013 but was never charged. he sued the cps, accusing it of issuing a misleading statement when it dropped the case. the presenter told the daily mail that prosecutors should have said
9:34 am
there was "no evidence" rather than "insufficient evidence". the cps said it has reached an agreement without admission of liability. attacks on firefighters in england have increased by a quarter in the past year, according to their trade union. the fire brigades union says there were more than 930 incidents where crews were abused or threatened. the home office says new laws coming into place this month should give the police and courts more power to deal with those who are violent towards emergency service workers. a diver involved in the search operations for the ill—fated lion air flight which crashed on monday, has died. syahrul anto is believed to have suffered decompression issues. all 189 people on board died when the plane crashed into the java sea shortly after taking off from jakarta airport. the success of ivf has caused a drop in the number of children being adopted, the boss of the organisation
9:35 am
that represents children in care has said. in the last a0 years, adoptions in england and wales have fallen by 62%. meanwhile, ivf success rates for women under 35 have nearly tripled. us actor alec baldwin has been charged with assault in new york city after allegedly punching a man in a fight over a parking space. the incident allegedly occurred in the west village area of manhattan on friday. the 60—year—old has been ordered to appear in court on the 26th of november. the actor‘s been in the spotlight most recently for his impressions of president trump on nbc‘s long—running satirical show "saturday night live." a russian strongman has impressed spectators at a sporting event by pulling a 26—tonne truck for a1 seconds. it‘s thought elbrus nigma—tullin may have set a new world record, but no
9:36 am
officials were present at the event to verify his attempt. so you do all of that, a1 seconds, and nobody was there! he likes doing things like this, though. the aa—year—old‘s previous feats include pulling a two—storey, 30—tonne wooden house over three metres. hopefully the guinness book of records were there for that one. cani records were there for that one. can i say micah, mourning, please don‘t ever try that. i have, don‘t ever try that. ihave, in don‘t ever try that. i have, in 2007, geoff capes got me to toe a truck for about seven metres. but he did get the lorry rolling. it is technique. he got the wheels rolling. i pulled it for about ten metres. we do not belittle you on this one! where you on a hill
9:37 am
quest remark stop it! that is brewing. technique aged over 20 bits. i am impressed by that. fantastic. thank you to all the breakfast family getting involved in the debate this morning. the debate over whether the top five english clubs in the premier league will be part of some european super league eventually. it is the back page of a lot of newspapers this morning, the sun newspaper says it is the end of football as we know it. the papers are reporting on alleged leaked documents seen by a german newspaper, der spiegel. a lot of fans are saying good riddance. i guess these are fans of lower clu bs,
9:38 am
riddance. i guess these are fans of lower clubs, who see it as a chance to start splitting the money evenly. but some are fans of bigger clubs who might be in the top five are saying, i don‘t want to have to travel to madrid or munich. yes, at the minute you get quite a lot of trips nearby. imagine if it was every week to the continent, to europe. one fan has said he will go back to supporting his local club if this happens. imagine a premier league without the likes of the manchester clubs, liverpool, arsenal and chelsea. arsene wenger once said a breakway european super league was in—evitable, and the papers claim it could happen within three years. the new competition, it is claimed, would involve 11 of europe‘s biggest clubs, like champions manchester city, those clubs would be known as the "founders", and be joind by five "initial guest clubs. the papers are reporting on alleged leaked documents seen by a german newspaper, der spiegel,
9:39 am
which claims the clubs have had secret meetings to explore the idea of a breakaway european superleague. so far we have yet to hear from most of the clubs, although a bayern munich statement said they were "unaware of recent plans for a so—called super league" and had not "taken part in negotiations relating to such plans". hibernian manager neil lennon says he may walk away from hisjob after suffering what he calls anti—catholic "racism". lennon was struck by a coin after celebrating a disallowed hearts goal at the end of the edinburgh derby on wednesday. he says there was an effigy of him, being hanged outside the ground and believes he‘s singled out for sectarian insults. you call it sectarianism in scotland, i call it racism. if a black man is abused, you are notjust abusing the colour of his skin, you abuse his culture, his heritage, his background. it‘s the exact same thing. in the championship, aston villa eased some
9:40 am
of their recent worries with victory over strugglers bolton. goals from jack grealisih and james chester gave them a 2—0 win, lifting them up the table to 13th. the preparations for next year‘s rugby union world cup step up today as the autumn internationals begin. yesterday was a year to the day to the final. england face south africa at twickenham, having only won one match in seven, and suffering from a string of injury troubles. manu tuilangi is the latest in the physio room, after getting injured in training. we have got a good squad. i don‘t think any england team would blame anything on missing any player. we have got so much talent in this team, as! have got so much talent in this team, as i said, we are excited to get out there on the field and play
9:41 am
together. in cardiff, wales take on scotland, for the doddie weir cup, in honour of the former scotland international who‘s battling motor neurone disease. money raised from the game, will go towards research into the condition. and ireland face italy in chicago this evening. fly—halfjonny sexton has been nominated for the world rugby men‘s player of the year. he‘s the only man from the northern hemisphere to make the shortlist. a stunning second half from wales saw them thrash scotland by 50—12 in rugby league‘s european cup. they had trailed at half—time, but record scorer rhys williams collected a hat trick of tries to seal the comeback. don‘t forget on the bbc tomorrow it is england against new zealand. olympic champion max whitlock, narrowly missed out on gold at the world gymnastics championships in doha, finishing second in the pommel horse event. he was hoping, to become the first british gymnast to win three consecutive world titles, but missed out, by the smallest of margins, to take silver. he got the same score as china‘s zao routeng, but was given a lower execution mark.
9:42 am
it saw him finish with a medal, but not the colour he wanted. i can‘t sit here and be annoyed, i can‘t sit here and be that gutted with a silver medal at the world championships. obviously i was hoping for a bit more, but it is just the way it goes sometimes. i am happy with myjob i have done here at the world championships and it is about moving forwards now. the remarkable run of simone biles at these championships continues. in her first international event, since taking a year off after rio, she became the first gymnast to win 13 world titles. she took gold in the vault, and followed that up with silver in the uneven bars. it takes her tally to three golds at these championships and she could add to that with two more individual events still to come. i am very excited, especially about the bar medal because i have worked especially hard on bars during in my time in gymnastics. i am really excited. roger federer remains on course for a 100th career title at the paris masters, but he‘ll have to beat one of his greatest rivals to do it.
9:43 am
federer beat kei nishikori in straight sets in the quarter finals, the 20 time grand slam champion was rarely troubled by his japanese opponent. he‘ll now face novak djokovic in the semis. djokovic came back from a set down to beat marin cilic. the new world number one went 2—1 down in the third before immediately breaking back, and then moving ahead at 5—3 before sealing victory. next, a warning to any teams parading their trophies in front of celebrating fans — the world series baseball trophy was broken by a beer can. won by the red sox and the damage was done on the victory parade around the streets of boston. actually on a duck boat on the road. you can see it takes a chunk out of the cup. now, i was outraged by seeing this, but you said it is a tradition. from what i was told, it was not malice. a bit ofa what i was told, it was not malice. a bit of a dangerous tradition! oppositely a full beer can. but the
9:44 am
trophy has been glued back together. by winning a fifth formula one world title, lewis hamilton will no doubt inspire more youngsters to dream about following him into the sport. but the vast majority will not have the financial backing to get that far, so now an increasing number are turning to race simulators. the uk‘s first electronic sports hub has opened in london, so i went along to see how fast this side of racing is growing. on the fast track to the top, james baldwin won 5 national karting championships before taking the first steps on to formula 1, following perhaps in the tyre tracks of lewis hamilton, until... he ran out of money. which is why his career rounded the bend and took off in a new direction. it is usually guys with the talent that get the money, but not
9:45 am
everyone gets noticed. e—sports is its own sport and has got its own market and fans. it gives alot of people the opportunity to compete at the highest level, even if they are not born and spoonfed into a very rich family. a sleepy mews in central london is the last place you would expect to take on a motor racing star of the future, but this is where they now train, at the uk‘s first e—sports racing hub. let‘s do it. james is soon hoping to become a full—time professional, realising his racing dream with the veloce team. unlike other e—sports sports, in sim racing you do need to have similar skill and techniques to real drivers, and also surprisingly, fitness. it is something people don‘t associate with gaming and it is important to know that me, myself and other drivers, i am in the gym three times a week, i‘ve got a diet plan and eating the right foods to be mentally ready for any race or event. especially when it came to handling the wheel and the pedals in the big simulator that many road racing
9:46 am
drivers also now use in training. avoid the curves, they‘re really bumpy, they will spin you off. be prepared to put a lot of force behind that wheel. you can give it some, you are being a bit wimpish right now. it feels so realistic! you do need the skills and the technique. i have gone off into the gravel, i don‘t want to go into the wall. it is only a simulator, you need to keep reminding yourself at that point! the chair is shaking, rattling around, throwing me about, it does feel incredibly realistic. luckily the future of e—sports is in safer hands than mine, including jack, who switched to managing a team. we just saw the audience grow in this area and the level of competition. you are able to compete globally with hundreds of thousands across the world, sort of blew me away. the audience is primarily online, people watching on their phone, tablets, chilling out, but the actual viewership numbers are rivalling real sports. it is just a more engaging thing
9:47 am
for them, for teenagers and young adults, they‘re playing these games themselves. going forward, e—sports is hoping to recruit more female drivers and more beginners who can sharpen their skills without the danger. but, no matter how safe this may be, try telling your brain that there isn‘t a wall coming at you at 120 mph. that was absolutely terrifying! sorry, it might seem like i am overreacting. you have totalled the car, my friend. knowing you fairly well, you would generally —— you were generally terrified, when two? yes, your brain is telling you something different. you have invested in really trying to drive the car well and know the track. very realistic. and it is physically tough? yes, the force of
9:48 am
the wheel and the pedals, that is why james goes to the gym three times a week and he has a special diet. if you save up, it is still expensive, but not the millions involved in formula 1. i will get you some learner plates and stick them on the back! thank you for this morning. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. all morning he has been having big bangs, snowflakes, some sunshine as well. i have been there, and that is stunning, such a beautiful place. stunning views over the beach. what a place for a walk this morning. it isa a place for a walk this morning. it is a stunning sky here in adlington, thank you to our weather watcher. for some it is a beta. to the weekend. let‘s temper that with other areas, because this is south lanarkshire. this looks completely
9:49 am
different, cloud, outbreaks of rain, and it does not show how windy it is. this is the remnants of hurricane oscar. it will push between us and iceland, close enough to strengthen the winds across the uk. widespread gales in the far west. very mild start, 20 degrees warmer in parts of northern ireland thanit warmer in parts of northern ireland than it was this time yesterday. rain in northern ireland and the west of scotland, brightening up into the afternoon. the south—east corner of the country stays dry and bright, and there will be more sunshine this afternoon across northern and western scotland between the showers. 50 — 60 mph gusts will have an impact on your day. grey skies in co durham, northumberland, lancashire, our picks of rain this afternoon, also into wales and cornwall. the midlands and east anglia and the
9:50 am
south—east will stay dry, highs of 14 south—east will stay dry, highs of 1a celsius. this evening, a strip of rain from the south—west and in eastern parts of scotland. there could be some rain in edinburgh, belfast and cardiff. a better chance of staying dry tomorrow. the wind not as strong as today, do bear that in mind if you are heading out for fireworks today. and check for hedgehogs before you set your bonfire alight. clearer skies to end the night. no frost, those winds still mild enough to keep us frost free. there are the re m na nts of to keep us frost free. there are the remnants of hurricane oscar. this weather front is bringing the weather front is bringing the weather front is bringing the weather front today, linking to another western weather system across the bay of biscay. part of
9:51 am
the south—west likely to see rain during tomorrow. scotland and northern ireland and the far north of england, a much better day tomorrow, staying dry. tempted 11-1adc. tomorrow, staying dry. tempted 11—1adc. enjoy your saturday. one of the things i love about you, matt, is how you weave in advice into your weather forecast. like checking for hedgehogs in your bonfire. enjoy your bonfire weekend. if you are out and about this weekend, and you are looking at the trees, he is something to think about. the world is losing plants at an unprecedented rate, with around one in five thought to be at risk of extinction, so the race is now on to store back—up copies in seed banks. but not all species can be preserved in this way, including many trees. our science correspondent helen briggs has been to speak to scientists who say trees grown
9:52 am
in test tubes could be the way forward. coming down into the vault itself... buried deep in the sussex countryside, a bomb—proof, flood—proof, radiation—proof vault, containing store rooms kept at —20 degrees. and everywhere you look, there are seeds. large seed collections in these jars. you can see all of these, drawer after drawer after drawer, 90,000 collections of 39,000—plus species. seeds from nearly every country can be found in these walls, an insurance policy against the extinction of plants in the wild. but not all seeds can be preserved in conventional seed banks. it doesn‘t give full cover for some very important groups of plants, threatened species, rainforest trees and even in the uk, some iconic species, oaks, their seeds cannot stand drying
9:53 am
and cannot be frozen, we need to work on alternative methods. one alternative being tested is cryopreservation, separating the plant embryo from the rest of the seed. in this state, it can survive very cold temperatures. when thawed out, it will grow into a new tree. this baby oak tree has come out of the deep freeze and is starting to grow. trees in a test tube could be the answer to protecting our forests in the long—term. trees face many threats in the wild, from climate change to diseases like ash dye—back, which can wipe out whole populations. scientists say it is crucial we have a back—up. this shipment of seeds from tanzania is being added to the collections. they could have anything in them. i mean, it could be a cure for lung cancer, we don‘t know, we don‘t know what‘s in them
9:54 am
but the really important thing is, with our changing climate, that we collect and conserve these things before they‘ve gone. and scientists say there is a need for more investment so we stop many of our plants from being lost forever. interesting, it is like backing up your photographs. it is 9:5aam. we have a special guest next. we have had some amazing stories this morning, some really interesting things to talk about. this one will touch many of you. when maggie moore‘s husband was posted to turkey as the british ambassador, and she moved there along with her guide dog star, she was shocked to find a lack of awareness. determined to change that, she helped to create the country‘s first guide dog programme, and has now been recognised for her contributions with an award. maggie and star are here now
9:55 am
to tell us all about it. congratulations on the award. thank you so much. that must mean a lot. yes, but i am conscious i did not get it on my own. it takes a lot of people to build a guide dog, and that starts with an incredible breeding programme that gets the best possible quality of dogs to do thejobs best possible quality of dogs to do the jobs they are being asked to do. that feeds into the incredible dedication of puppy walking families, people that have the puppies for a year before they go on to their training, puppies for a year before they go on to theirtraining, and puppies for a year before they go on to their training, and setting that foundation is immensely important. those incredible people look after the dog for a year, and at the end of it they give the dog up, the dog that has become part of their
9:56 am
family. what an incredible gift. we we re very family. what an incredible gift. we were very lucky, this is the award that you one and we were lucky to give out many of these awards yesterday. you talk about giving up those dogs after a year, but they know they are going to homes where they are so valued. interesting, your story in turkey, and just what happened. you went there, what did you see? what made you decide to make a difference? i saw that there we re make a difference? i saw that there were not any guide dogs, turkish people were very interested and very open to the idea of guide dogs, but what really clinched it was that, having been on a television interview on a saturday morning magazine programme, two weeks later i met magazine programme, two weeks later imeta magazine programme, two weeks later i met a lovely turkish lawyer, and she is also visually impaired, and she is also visually impaired, and she said she saw the interview on the television, and she asked where she got one will stop i said i am terribly as sorry, far as i know, there is no equivalent in turkey.
9:57 am
they just there is no equivalent in turkey. theyjust did there is no equivalent in turkey. they just did not there is no equivalent in turkey. theyjust did not exist? no, and why should they, really? they have only been around for 100 years, which sounds like a long time, but gradually they are making their way around the world. tell us about the reaction, the first time you went to the theatre with a guide dog.” reaction, the first time you went to the theatre with a guide dog. i am not sure what you are talking about. 0h, not sure what you are talking about. oh, when we were first there. people we re oh, when we were first there. people were baffled, white is this woman bringing her doctor v theatre, or to a concert? you would have the staff anxious because they assumed that the dog would be interfering with the dog would be interfering with the way the programme continued, but they are so beautifully trained, this is the behaviour you get when you are in a public situation. we will talk about star‘s impact, but i know you had a lot of help when you are out there to raise awareness. yes, absolutely. the lawyer was a
9:58 am
force of nature, but we have also been helped by alan brooks, a retired guide dog trainer with years of experience. he came and helped us to set up. every time we were flagging, because itjust seems like an immense task, how were you going to do this from absolute scratch, but alan was always there to bolster us but alan was always there to bolster us saying, you can do this, you really ca n. us saying, you can do this, you really can. and we have had great support from the european guide dog federation, the international guide dog federation, which we are working towards becoming a member of, and indeed from guide dogs here in the uk. if i did not have a guide dog, ifi uk. if i did not have a guide dog, if i had not been lucky enough to have her, none of this would have happened and it would have been an opportunity missed. you are a fantastic ambassador, and so is she, sleepy and relaxed! congratulations to both of you. thank you. breakfast will be back at 6am tomorrow. do
9:59 am
have a lovely weekend. goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines at 10: the week—long funeral of the leicester city owner vichai srivaddhanaprabha, who died in a helicopter crash last week, will begin in thailand. players from the club will fly out to thailand to pay their respects after this afternoon‘s match with cardiff. we wa nt we want to be there. after everything that the owner showed the players and the club, we should be there. it is an extended family. broadcaster paul gambaccini wins damages from the crown prosecution service over its handling of unfounded sexual assault allegations against him. in the united states — twitter removes thousands of automated accounts discouraging people from voting ahead of next week‘s mid week elections could growing trees in test tubes be the answer to protecting our forests in the long term? and at 10:30, the travel show team are in taiwan, visiting
10:00 am

20 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on