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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 3, 2018 2:00pm-2:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 2pm. six days of funeral ceremonies have begun in thailand for the billionaire businessman and owner of leicester city football club, vichai srivaddhanaprabha. there will be a minute ‘s silence at 3pm. broadcaster paul gambaccini receives a payout from the crown prosecution service over its handling of unfounded sexual assault allegations against him. new fears for a christian woman in pakistan, whose acquittal for blasphemy sparked days of violent protests across the country. a man—eating tiger that claimed more than a dozen victims in two years has been shot dead in india, sparking controversy over the legality of its killing. and in half an hour, we look back at
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the week in parliament, which began on monday with the budget. good afternoon. thousands of leicester city supporters are in cardiff for the football clubs first game since the death of its chairman in a helicopter crash. members of the squad will afterwards fly to thailand to attend the funeral of vichai srivaddhanaprabha. the ceremony starts today and will continue throughout the week. from bangkok, jonathan head reports. the setting for the final farewell
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to the leicester chairman is as grand as he would have wanted. a royal temple and a royally sponsored funeral. in leicester, the city whose spirits he did so much to lift, the grief was open and spontaneous. mr vichai was seen as a generous benefactor there, an owner who is genuine love of football shone through. in thailand though he had a very different image. as a powerful and very private man. the elaborate funeral going on here is a mark of the status that vichai srivaddhanaprabha achieved here in thailand. that was largely as a successful entrepreneur skilled at political connections any controversial business. his success at leicester city certainly raised his profile in this country but the outpouring of gratitude and affection we've seen in britain, will you just don't see much of that here. the funeral began with the ritual bathing ceremony for the body
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attended by close friends and family. later buddhist monks will chant for six nights important religious rights wrote the deceased spurfor the cremation. funerals are big social networking occasions in thailand and mr vichai's will be watched closely to see who does and does not attend. but the arrival of much of the leicester city team tomorrow straight from their match against cardiff will bring home to the people of thailand just how much this elusive tycoon meant to the club that he bought eight years ago. jonathan head, bbc news, bangkok. eleanor roper is in cardiff, where leicester play cardiff city. kick off is at 3pm. what's the mood like there? it is going to be a really emotional
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afternoon in cardiff and it will be the first time that leicester have played since last saturday. we are joined by two lifelong leicester supporters. thank you both for joining us. are you expecting a big turnout of fans today? absolutely. it was a sell—out anyway. the leicester city games always tend to be. but this is more poignant today. ido be. but this is more poignant today. i do know there are a fair few be. but this is more poignant today. i do know there are a fairfew in the away end as well. what does it mean for the fans to be in cardiff this afternoon? the players want to play and we want to support the team. if they want to play, we will be here as the football family to support our team. i knowjamie vardy has said the players were given the choice and they all felt it was really important and they want to do the chairman proud. do you think the result is important today? no, it is
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about being here, it is the first match, it is not at home, but the cardiff fa ns match, it is not at home, but the cardiff fans have been phenomenal to us. cardiff fans have been phenomenal to us. and we want to be here because thatis us. and we want to be here because that is what we do. we support our tea m that is what we do. we support our team and we really are one big family. it seems he wasn'tjust a chairman, he meant more than that to the supporters. tel is a bit about his significance within the club. he is at the top of the family tree really, from supporters, the fans, the players, he has been there for the players, he has been there for the community, not just the players, he has been there for the community, notjust for the club but for the wider community. he has done a lot for football in the country and around the world. he has shown how you can run a football club. talk to us about how the club has changed under his ownership. when they came in, we were near enough on the brink of collapse. we we re enough on the brink of collapse. we were skint. he has changed the
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facilities at the stadium, we did the 5000-1 facilities at the stadium, we did the 5000—1 extraordinary champions of england, we won the premier league, but he has made little changes. he has shown respect to the supporters as well. the fans, the players, no one has said a horrible word about him and they never will. we feel as supporters we are valued asa we feel as supporters we are valued as a club and there are not many premiership teams that can say that. he sits with us in the stand at away matches. when we were in madrid for the champions league, he came in the square and said hello to us. even if it was just a smile and a thumbs square and said hello to us. even if it wasjust a smile and a thumbs up, he always acknowledged as as the fa ns he always acknowledged as as the fans who had taken the trouble to go. and am i right in thinking you travelled out to thailand? yes, vichai paid for us to go out to the headquarters and receive the facilities they have out there as
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well and it made us realise we had someone very well and it made us realise we had someone very special when you saw what they had out there in thailand. it showed us that he is notjust here to make money, he does care about powerful —— football club, and we knew that we had some good guys behind this. hopefully we will be able to carry on his vision. and he paid for us to go over to belgium and stay overnight and go to a match. nigel pearson manages that club. he paid for the fans to go over there to meet the other fans. it is fantastic. a lot of fans feel the same way as you because there has been an enormous showing of support outside the king power stadium. so many amazing tributes. but not just leicester stadium. so many amazing tributes. but notjust leicester city. it is at the fans and we are very grateful to other clubs' at the fans and we are very grateful to other clu bs' support. at the fans and we are very grateful to other clubs' support. it goes beyond football, doesn't it? to other clubs' support. it goes
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beyond football, doesn't mm does, and we are very grateful. the success of ivf has caused a drop in the number of children being adopted, according to the boss of the organisation that represents children in care. in the last a0 years, adoptions in england and wales have fallen by 62%. meanwhile, ivf success rates for women under 35 have nearly tripled. anthony douglas,the head of the children and family court advisory and support service, told the daily telegraph the adoption process is still "far too slow". the radio presenter paul gambaccini has received a payout from prosecutors over the way they handled unfounded historical sex abuse claims made against him. the bbc presenter was arrested in 2013 over allegations he sexually assaulted two teenage boys in the early ‘80s. mr gambaccini always denied the claims, calling the case "completely fictitious". he spent a year on bail before the case was dropped.
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frankie mccamley reports. arriving at the bbc studios in central london this morning to host his radio 2show, pick of the pops, paul gambaccini has nothing to say. the veteran broadcaster, known as the professor of pop, has been paid an undisclosed sum by the crown prosecution service of over unfounded allegations of historic sex offences. in a statement, a cps spokesperson said... the 69—year—old, in an interview with the daily mail, talked about how his life had been turned upside down following his arrest, claiming the organisations he had supported throughout his life had ghosted him and praised his husband, who he said saved his life through the ordeal. mr gambaccini was arrested following allegations he had sexually abused two boys in the 1970s and 80s. claims he says were fictitious.
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the cps dropped the case and since then he has called for changes in the law. if we are to have a just society, we must have anonymity before charge. because what we had during this recent five years was anybody could make an accusation against anybody, whether they knew them or not, and it would get publicised. and since then, paul gambaccini has called for changes in the law. the bbc has said paul is valued and appreciated, which is why he presents two much loved shows. frankie mccamley, bbc news. the brexit campaigner arron banks has returned to the uk as he faces allegations that his multi—million pound donations to the leave cause may have broken electoral law. the leave.eu co—founder was referred to the national crime agency by the elections watchdog, which suspects that cash given to the campaign had come from what it called "impermissible sources". mr banks denies any wrongdoing. our political correspondent jonathan blakejoins me now.
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what kind of welcome did he receive on his return? it was an early morning arrival back in the uk this morning arrival back in the uk this morning for aaron banks. he was in bermuda, where he had gone fishing. there were reporters and photographers, as you would expect, and he answered some questions on his way through the airport, and it was put to him that some of the money, or he was asked what he made of claims about some of the money that was donated to leave.eu came from russia, and he said it hadn't and that the money came from him, and that the money came from him, and he said he would co—operate fully with the national crime agency's investigation. they are looking into this because the electoral commission have been investigating many that has been donated to leave. eu, investigating many that has been donated to leave.eu, which was not the official leave campaign but the
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one fronted by nigel farage and bankrolled to a large extent by aaron banks. they say that they have evidence that the true source of that many, the loans to the campaign, has been withheld and they came from impermissible sources, potentially from abroad, and that is why the national crime agency is looking into this, because they have a remit is to investigate across international borders. aaron banks has denied any wrongdoing, he has described the allegations as ludicrous, and he says a investigation will put an end to it. meanwhile, the people's folk are camping —— continuing their campaign for a second referendum. they are campaigning fora for a second referendum. they are campaigning for a vote on the outcome of the brexit deal. they have commissioned a poll conducted by yougov of 26,000 people across the uk focusing on labour constituencies all over the uk and
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there are two main finding is that they are highlighting. the polls suggest a melodic —— majority of voters in those areas to back the idea of a public vote on the outcome of brexit negotiations, although it was not put them the question would be. potentially a vote on the outcome of the negotiations. and secondly, focusing on labour voters specifically, the poll suggests that labour voters in labour held seats would, given the chance, now choose to remain in the eu rather than to leave. those are the two main findings from the poll that the campaign are putting forward and they will no doubt use this to further try to influence political discussion around brexit. the labour party say they would be open to the idea of a second public vote, although they prefer a general election if theresa may can't get a deal through parliament. the government have consistently ruled
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it out. thank you. the lawyer representing a christian woman asia bibi, acquitted of blasphemy after eight years on death row has fled pakistan in fear for his life. ms bibi has been banned from leaving pakistan in order to end violent protests over the ruling. a man in his 50s was struck by a vehicle and killed while walking on a motorway, around 2 o'clock this morning. west mercia police said it was yet to be established why he was on the m5 near to frankley services in worcestershire. the motorway was closed overnight for investigations but it's now been re—opened. attacks on firefighters in england have increased by a quarter in the past year, according to their trade union. the fire brigades union says there were more than 930 incidents where crews were abused or threatened. the home office says new laws coming into place this month should give the police and courts more power to deal with those who are violent towards emergency service workers.
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the headlines on bbc news. the funeral of the leicester city owner who died in a helicopter crash a week ago will begin in thailand. a minutes' silence will be held at cardiff city stadium as leicester city play their first game since last week's tragic accident. broadcaster paul gambaccini receives a payout from the crown prosecution service over its handling of unfounded sexual assault allegations against him. new fears for a christian woman in pakistan —— whose acquittal for blasphemy sparked days of violent protests across the country. a tigress in india which is said to have killed 13 people has been shot dead after a major hunt. the six—year—old tigress had evaded capture in the jungles
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of the western state of maharashtra for two years. activists had campaigned to save the tiger, but india's supreme court said it would not interfere if forest rangers were forced to shoot it. joining me now for more onn this is our south asia regional editor anbarasan ethirajan. this has caused a lot of outrage for wildlife activists. why were they forced or should that tiger? because forced or should that tiger? because for the last two years, this has ca ptu red for the last two years, this has captured the imagination of people in india because the authorities used a number of means to track down this tigress. they used drones, gliders and even people riding on elephants to goad the into the forest. even calvin klein perfume because apparently it attracts the tigress. they used a different kind
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of method to lure this tigress but it was very, very clever. it was hiding deep in thejungle. but this isa hiding deep in thejungle. but this is a mother of two cubs and in this population, which is dwindling, that is why activists have been saying the forest rangers could have taken this and put it in a zoo rather than killing this tigress, and that is what has cost outrage. they also say the authorities who shot the tiger, they flouted all rules protecting they flouted all rules protecting the national tiger conservation authority. that is why they are saying the authorities should have been more cautious while handling this entire episode. so what is the problem here? has the tiger in crouched on human settlement or is it now the other way around? the human animal conflict is becoming a huge problem in india. the economy
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is growing, more people are occupying forest lands. with their habitat reducing, that puts people into co nta ct habitat reducing, that puts people into contact with animals. the figures say at least one person a day is killed in india because of elephants or tigers alone. this is leaving aside and other animals like leopards. that is the intensity of the problem in india. people living on the fringes of these natural reserves , on the fringes of these natural reserves, they take these cattle to graze inside these forest areas and thatis graze inside these forest areas and that is where big come into contact with animals like tigers. it is going to be expensive for many of these farmers or villagers, so that is where they go. these are clearly protected areas so when someone comes in to their territory, the tigers become very ferocious and attack people. this has happened over a period of two years for this tigress and increasingly it is becoming a problem. but also it is the traditional issue between development and conservation. thank
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you. just days before crucial midterm elections in the us, two presidents, past and present, have been dominating the campaign trail. on friday, the former president, barack 0bama, launched a scathing attack on donald trump, accusing his successor of fear—mongering over a caravan of migrants travelling towards the united states, and calling the current president a liar. what we have not seen, at least in my lifetime, is an approach in which folks in the highest levels of office, folks who we thought our children should be looking up to, we'll just blatantly, repeatedly, boldly, shamelessly, life. just make
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stuff up. just say things that they know are not true. and theyjust keep on doing it. president trump has also been on the attack. while he acknowledged that the democrats could take the house of representatives, he sharply criticised the 0bama years and defended his own record. we don't want to go to the 0bama days of low wages, high unemployment, rising crime, open judges, far leftjudges, oppressive regulations, horrible, horrible trade deals, disastrous foreign policy. look at the mess i inherited in north korea and look at how well we are doing now. while the democrats are widely expected to make gains in the house of representatives, their path to a majority in the senate is far from certain. that's partly to do with the cycle of states up for election this year. ten senators are defending
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their seats in states that donald trump won in 2016. ros atkins has been looking at the maths in our virtual congress. many democrats are making donald trump's presidency a central issue of these elections. his approval levels are historically low and there is a momentum behind some anti—trump candidates but if we do see a big swing against the republicans, it won't necessarily be just be about the man in the white house. it will be part of a broader pattern in american politics. that of moving congress away from the president. let's go back to 1992 when bill clinton swept to power. he entered the white house with relatively high majorities in both the senate and the house. but two years later, after various scandals and the public keen to put up barriers on executive power, the democrats saw a huge swing against them and the republicans took the house. they would hold it for the final six years of clinton's time in office.
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next, let's go to 2000. and as george w bush was narrowly winning the presidency, the republicans were narrowly taking the house. initially, mr bush had high approval ratings, in particular following 911 and what he called the war on terror. throughout that time republicans held the house. public opinion was shifting against the boards in iraq and afghanistan and by the 2006 midterms the house saw another swing against the party in power. in this case, towards the democrats. in 2008 it was barack 0babma being elected president and he took power in full control of the chambers of congress. in the house the democrats won the largest majority in almost 20 years. but the same pattern would repeat itself. just two years into the 0bama presidency there was a huge swing against the democrats in the house, handing power to the republicans and they would controll both chambers of congress by 2014. now, this is the state of the house
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after the elections in 2016. with the republicans in control. so what can we make of all of this? well, if the pattern holds, voters will be electing representatives that constrain donald trump's presidency. steff and lyn have been married for 45 years, which is impressive. but perhaps more impressive is the fact they've stayed together even after steff's gender reassignment 15 years ago. steff barnett was born steve, but at the age of 50 decided to undergo gender reassignment. the couple had been together since they were 16, married and had two sons. they're still together, albeit in a platonic relationship. they've told seb choudhury about the highs and lows and what it is that has kept them together. lyn misses her husband desperately
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even now. every day. a man's arms around you, cuddling you, kissing you, protecting you. she stood by me. she was brave enough to do that, despite the fact she just about lost her husband, who she loved passionately. two weeks after they started dating, steve, as he was back then, told lyn something that would have a huge impact on their lives. it was, i like wearing women's clothes. not once was it said, ithink women's clothes. not once was it said, i think i've been born in the wrong body. i had no clue what gender dysmorphia was, but neither of us knew the consequences of what was coming. the couple raised their two children and it wasn't until after they had grown up and left home that the feeling steve had suppressed for so long beating to much to contain. at 40, i wobbled. i
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nearly didn't make it through. but at 50, that was the turning point. friends and family were then saying, you need to transition now, otherwise you are going to do something really bad to yourself. otherwise you are going to do something really bad to yourselflj knew something really bad to yourself.” knew there was no turning back, but i loved steve enough to know that this was the only way forward, to let steff through. i don't think i would be here if i haven't transition, so valentine's day was when i went in and i had surgery. i walked out and ijust when i went in and i had surgery. i walked out and i just whooped for jov- walked out and i just whooped for joy. although they have stayed together and remained married, for steff and lyn, it is now a purely platonic relationship. lyn had to go through the loss of a husband and after that i would go through the
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loss of my wife. our marriage certificate still says steve barnett, lyn hogan. as far as i'm concerned, that is a sacred piece of paper to concerned, that is a sacred piece of paperto me and concerned, that is a sacred piece of paper to me and that is how it will always be. we still love each other andi always be. we still love each other and i guess that is what got us through this. and viewers in the west country can see the full version of this on inside out west at 7:30pm on monday on bbc1 and it will also be available on the iplayer. 0ne lucky ticket holder in the uk has won the entire jackpot in last night's euromillions draw — a total of more than £76 million. the national lottery is urging people to check their tickets to see if they've won. a spokesperson said they've got plenty of champagne on ice ready to celebrate. now it's time for a look at the weather. amazing, isn't it? there is a lucky
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person out there. you might be lucky to stay dry tonight if you are heading out to any bonfire events, particularly across the south—east. a little bit of dry weather towards the north—west of the country. 0therwise the north—west of the country. otherwise that rain affecting much of southern scotland, north—west england, wales and the south—west. turning a bit drier, some blustery showers later in the day, and then across the south—east, it will stay dry year. wherever you are, windy, very mild, extremely windy across the far north. it is going to allow a brighter day for scotland and northern ireland tomorrow, whereas further south, more cloud around. again, east anglia and the south—east should stay dry with some sunshine. winds like to across the board but still strong in the north.
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the mild theme continues into next week as well. the best of the sunshine further east, further west there will always be weather fronts. hello, this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines: an elaborate funeral process is underway in thailand for the billionaire owner of leicester city football club, vichai srivaddhanaprabha. members of the team are expected to fly out after their game against cardiff this afternoon. the bbc presenter, paul gambaccini, has accepted a payout from the crown prosecution service because of the way it handled unfounded historical sex abuse allegations made against him. mr gambaccini was arrested in 2013 but was never charged. new fears for a christian woman in pakistan, whose acquittal for blasphemy sparked days of violent protests across the country. a man—eating tiger that claimed more than a dozen victims in two years has been shot dead in india, sparking controversy over the legality of its killing. now it's time for the
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week in parliament.
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