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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 5, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live, it's11.00am and these are the main stories this morning — after the stabbing of four people in the capital in five days, london's mayor warns it could take a decade to tackle knife crime. we've got to actually focus on a generation and the reality is, maybe a generation before we get the levels of violent crime that are acceptable in our society. the united states imposes its "toughest ever" sanctions against iran hitting oil exports, shipping and banks. the iranian goverment say they will not comply. the eu says it's 50—50 that a deal on the irish border will be struck, as brexit negotiations enter the final phase a pay rise for 180,000 workers. companies signed up to the real living wage agree to pay staff £9.00 an hour from today. preventing illness should be the key focus of the nhs in england in a bid to extend the nation's life expectancy by five years, says the health secretary. and uncovering stories
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from the trenches of the western front. we'll be live in france as we look ahead to the armistice day centenary. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has warned it could take up to ten years, or even a generation, to make progress tackling the problem of violent crime in london. his comments come after a recent spike in murders in the capital, with four fatal stabbings since last wednesday. two men have been arrested on suspicion of stabbing a 22—year—old man to death in south east london, yesterday. on friday a 17—year—old was fatally stabbed outside a tube station, and a 15—year—old was killed on thursday in what police are describing as a pre—meditated attack. yesterday's stabbing is the fourth in less than a week. the latest victim was the 116th person to be murdered
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in the capital this year. this morning the mayor of london sadiq khan said the increase in violent crime in london is unacceptable. the home affairs select committee, a cross—party committee, recently did a report which was scathing on cuts from government. home office officials say there is a link between police officers being cut and violent crime going up. the most senior police officers say it would be naive to think there is not a link between police cuts and an increase in violence crime. all that being said, in london and in city hall we are doing as much as we can to invest in policing but also invest in our young people as well. the increase in violent crime in london and across england and wales is unacceptable. and the home office minister victoria atkins denied that the increase in violent crime was related to falling police numbers. well, of course the mayor is in charge of his budget so if he wants to spend more on policing then, as indeed he has done this year, he put up the precept and he can
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spend it on policing. but this isn't just about numbers, we know, sadly from looking at the previous experiences where we've had spikes in violent crime such as in the late 2000s, there were many more police officers on the street but nonetheless there was a spike in violence. i think we've got to look at the causes of this crime. we know for a fact that drugs is a major player in this rise. we know serious organised crime is a majorfactor and they are spreading the spread of drugs through the country through the use of what are called, county lines. and metropolitan police commander stuart cundy told our correspondent richard galpin there would be hundreds of extra officers on duty, as police face one of their busiest weeks of the year. tragically, we have had four murders since the middle of last week across a number of boroughs, none of them connected. each and every one of those tragic murders affects families, affects friends and acquaintances. i can't imagine the emotions
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and the distress they must be going through. my heart does go to them. why are we seeing so much knife crime? what is the issue, or the key issue, that lies behind it? i think there will be many, many reasons that is behind the levels of knife crime that, sadly, we're seeing here in london, and in other places across the uk. from the metropolitan police we're committed to everything that we can bring down those level of violence. we have specialist investigators investigating each of the murders from the last week. we have additional police on duty. 0ur levels of violence saw a significance surge in the early part of this year. since then, we've introduced our violent crime task force that everyday is policing the streets of london. sadly, we always expect this to be one of our busiest weeks of the year which is why today we have even more officers on duty, we have hundreds of additional uniformed officers on duty in every single borough in london. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw is here.
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shocking numbers of killings on the streets of london this year. talk this through the trends, how have things been changing. the trends began in 2014 when there was an increase in violent crime across england and wales. before that, we we re england and wales. before that, we were seeing england and wales. before that, we were seeing some england and wales. before that, we were seeing some really significant falls and there was a sense almost that the country may have not solved, but significantly reduce the problem of violence. but in the last four years or so problem of violence. but in the last four years 01’ so we problem of violence. but in the last four years or so we have seen this rise in a number of towns and cities, london in particular, this year. one until 18 killings so far. that has surpassed last year's total. —— 118. young people are losing their lives. the highest
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number of teenagers to be killed in london in a year in a decade. most of them stabbed to death. it brings around the issue of knife and knife crime and whether it is a habit, young people in certain areas who are concerned about their safety carry knives. what started to happen around 2014 or prior to that? what is the cause of this? it is difficult to tell. that is a lot of disagreement around this. even the disagreement around this. even the disagreement with victoria atkins from the home office saying it isn't about police members while others say police members have played a pa rt say police members have played a part and courts in other services, cuts in youth services have meant more young people the streets with the thing us to do. there's been a big reduction in the number of stop and search since 2011. has that played a part as well? there is a dispute between government and policing experts who say it has
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because it has enabled young people to feel they can carry weapons without the risk of being caught. but playing into all this, which is what the met commissioner said last week, is drug—related crime. there is an agreement that is a major factor of the availability of cocaine in particular, the extra purity of cocaine, is sparking a war between drug gangs which is playing out with young people who are being used as couriers by these gangs. that, sadly, is resulting in some of them been killed on the streets. that, sadly, is resulting in some of them been killed on the streetsm isa them been killed on the streetsm is a very complicated picture, lots of factors. what a baby strategy to get on top of this? there is a twin track approach. scotland yard and other police forces around the country have to try and calm things down on the streets, to stop these four murders in the past five days becoming a fifth murder and a sixth murder. that can create a spiral effect and a fear amongst other
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people that they need to do something, they need to take revenge 01’ something, they need to take revenge or carry a knife. it got bed down on that. they are putting hundreds more officers on the streets. they will be an increase in the numbers of stop and search as well to take the weapons off the streets. siddique khan has said it is a long—term public health strategy to work with young people, perhaps of primary school age to drill into them they cannot carry knives, to make it almost unfashionable, as unfashionable as smoking or not wearing seat belts. it has got to be a public health message and to give alternatives to do so they don't go on the path of violence and drugs. thank you. and we want to know what you think about this story. you can tweet us using the hashtag #bbcnewsroomlive or text us at 61124. if you have any experience of these issue or if you've got any
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particular thoughts on it. please get in touch. us sanctions on iran have been reinstated, in a measure described by president trump as the "toughest ever". the sanctions, which target iran's oil sales and banking sector, are being introduced following america's withdrawal from the international nuclear deal agreed in 2015. washington says it's trying to stop what it calls tehran's destructive behaviour across the middle east. 0ur correspondent in beirut told us why the us has chosen to reimpose sanctions now. it is really interesting because every country that has signed up to that iranians nuclear deal says that iran hasn't broken the terms of the agreement. what washington is saying is that iran needs to changes behaviour. its contention is that after this nuclear deal was signed up iran got a lot more cash and it has then used that cash to spread its influence across the region, supporting militias in iraq, in syria as well as here in lebanon, as well as ties to the houthis in yemen. and that, according to donald trump, is terrorism.
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he says that in order for iran to get the sanctions lifted it will need to change its behaviour. those lucky enough to work for an employer who has voluntarily signed up to the scheme known as the real living wage are set for a 2.8% pay rise this week. for the first time they will receive £9 an hour. that's substantially higher than the legally—binding national living wage of £7.83 per hour. 0ur correspondent joe miller explains. wages are growing faster than the cost of basic goods and unemployment has gone down. but the living wage foundation says one in five of us are still earning less than is needed to make ends meet. i have to look better at things, the prices, and go for what i can really afford, like, meat—wise, beef is out of the question. the boss says he can't afford to give staff a raise
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without increasing prices. and almost 5,000 businesses already are paying more than they have to by law, and are committed to a rate set by the living wage charity. from today that rate goes up by 35p an hour to £10.55 in london, and by 25p an hour to £9 in the rest of the uk. the government's minimum wage won't reach those levels for at least three years. this year we have seen private rental costs go up, council tax go up, public transport has got more expensive, and the basic price of the basic goods that you buy in the supermarket shop has also gone up. all of that has gone up together to mean that people need more this year to meet basic cost of living. big firms like ikea, google and hsbc pay the living wage but the charity says more private companies and even public sector organisations need to come on board. critics say this could mean even less money
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for cash—strapped council services. tess lanning is the direcotr of the living wage foundation who campaign to get employers to pay the real living wage. thank you very much for coming in. tell us more about how you set it because we heard you say in your report but the cost of living has gone up in areas which mean people are being stretched. you have put up the weight accordingly. there is a piece of breach of that asked the public what people need to meet their basic needs. we take that, we looked at 17 different family types and we work out best out at a full—time work and their family need to make ends meet. 5000 companies are paying the living wage, the
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national living wage. in terms of its being proportion, it is a small proportion. how do you persuade others to do is because we are hearing in our report as when a company does this it impacts on them having to put up prices. there is still a huge amount to do, one in five jobs across the country still pay less than a real living wage. that is why we need more employers to go further than the government's minimum. the 4700 employers who are paying it, they tell a citizenjust about affordable but it can lead to real business benefits. there is a more motivated workforce. if your workers are not wearing about their bills when they come into work, they can focus on the job. many of them talk about feeling more valued by their employers. when a company is looking at the bottom line or you have got organisations that have
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lots of things they need to make them any stretch to, how can you persuade them that is something that really is going to make a tangible difference to what they do?m really is going to make a tangible difference to what they do? it isn't without challenges in some sectors. there are employers across all sectors even in tricky sectors like retail, ikea who are important living wage employer for us because they are not an expensive, they are one of the cheaper furniture brands, but if they can do it it shows other companies have choices about how to compete. some of them will choose to compete. some of them will choose to compete on a low wage workforce. but it can lead to real improvements for customers as well as your staff. what is your experience on how companies that have handled the increased each time, do they knock it on the cost of the consumers? what do they do? but do they take a
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hit in the profit margins? it is inevitably a trade—off between this a success inevitably a trade—off between this a success and staff but visitors go further. when a living wage employer decides to pay a real living wage they tackle other issues like zero—hour contracts because they tackle other issues like zero— hour contracts because what that will often do is reduce staff turnover, absence rates. they do deliver real savings. 0ne company puts people on more stable contracts and they sold real improvements in the first six months in recruitment clocks and the savings they made on recruitment. it can be a false assumption it is always a trade—off between cost and wages. thank you very much. investigators are looking into the cause of a major fire which destroyed several buildings near the centre of nottingham overnight. more than a hundred firefighters were sent to the former cattle market, next to notts county fc‘s meadow lane stadium.
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nobody was injured. the headlines on bbc news — london's mayor warns that it could take a generation to turn the tide on knife crime in the capital — after four pepole were stabbed over the weekend. iran's president declares his country will continue selling its oil breaking the sanctions reimposed by the united states. around 180,000 people are to receive a pay rise today, as the real living wage increases to £9 an hour. and in sport — england's record caps holder peter shilton has criticised a decision to hand wayne rooney his 120th cap. he'll play against the us this month to raise money for his foundation. shilton says it "cheapens the cap". manchester city are back on top of the premier league. raheem sterling was the star as they hammered southampton 6—1 to move two points clear of second—placed chelsea who also won. and 0wen farrell's free to play against
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new zealand at the weekend. it's after he avoided further punishment for this big tackle as england beat south africa in the first autumn international. i'll be back with more on those stories later. there are reports this morning that eu officials have put the chances of a brexit deal on the irish border which will be acceptable to ministers and parliament at "50/50". the uk and the eu both want to avoid a hard border which would mean physical checks or infrastructure between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, but cannot agree how. let's go live to brussels to speak to our reporter adam fleming. this week, they are going to what has been described as a tunnel of talks. no briefing at all on what happens. explain how critical this week is going to be. the tunnel has beenin
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week is going to be. the tunnel has been in existence for about a month and it is frustrating for all of those observers because it means the negotiators do or they negotiating in secret. they don't tell us what is going on. there is no press conferences with michel barnier report st bees other paragraphs we have agreed. why people were thinking this week had become very crucial was because of the calendar and counting back from crucial bits. the uk still wants there to be an extra brexit summit to sign on the dotted line and give the green light to the brexit deal this month. they say, british sources, they need that much time to get the deal through parliament, to get through westminster. the original date for the extraordinary brexit summit of the extraordinary brexit summit of the 17th and 18th of november. the eu has said the hazards been enough progress to have it but they have kept the door opening for it to happen on that weekend. if you count
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back from then, for that summer to ta ke back from then, for that summer to take place, it gets you to deal having to be broadly agreed this week. that is there is so much hysteria whether that is going to happen this week. it doesn't mean they couldn't be an emergency brexit summit late in november, we might be going through this rigmarole again next week! it might be the eu says that isn't enough progress being made in brexit talks and we will come back to this at the next timetable summit of eu leaders which is in the middle of december. with the tunnel in force, how can we gauge what is the likelihood of a deal? there are reports eu officials are saying the chances of a deal on the irish border is 50—50. are saying the chances of a deal on the irish border is 50-50. that is an interesting quote the guardian has from a diplomatic source in brussels. i haven't had the same one myself. there was a little glint of light from the tunnel last week
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because michel barnier‘s team believe the ambassadors for the other 20 seven eu states on wednesday afternoon. we got a little bit of a flavour of how that meeting went from people. from people i spoke to come it came down to about 5015. half of them were pessimistic because they said they would be no progress on the irish border and that made them feel gloomy. then he spoke to the other half and they said, actually, the eu is considering seriously this british proposal of a uk wide customs arrangement that would replace the existing backstop which people saw as positive. you can take that as being 50—50. the truth is, we don't really know because of the tunnel and we won't know what has been agreed until we see it written down in black and white. then we will be able to make a judgment on whether the deal has been reached whether it isa win the deal has been reached whether it is a win for the uk on a compromise too farfor
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is a win for the uk on a compromise too far for theresa may. is a win for the uk on a compromise too farfor theresa may. then it goes to parliament for them to decide. that is a long way. what is the procedure around the grand unveiling when that deal is struck? how much notice do we get? i'm really not sure. what will happen, the choreography from last time from when they thought a deal was imminent, he would have dominic raab coming to brussels to see michel barnier, sealing the deal being done by civil servants, it would go to the cabinet for the cabinet to approve and then they would be an unveiling ceremony back in brussels. at the same time, the member states would be summit to be told other details were. that was the plan last time but that isn't what happened. it isa time but that isn't what happened. it is a case of reading the ruins of when various meetings happen. is there a pre—unveiling? it is annoying because we don't know what is happening. as you can detect my frustration! you are doing a
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brilliantjob keeping frustration! you are doing a brilliant job keeping us frustration! you are doing a brilliantjob keeping us updated. rules on who can join the british armed forces are set to change. currently commonwealth citizens can onlyjoin the army, navy or air force if they have lived in the uk for five years, but that limit is set to be scrapped, meaning any commonwealth national will be eligble to join up. 0ur defence correspondent jonnathan beale can tell us more. why are they making the change? they are making the change because there isa are making the change because there is a serious shortfall in the armed forces. it is 6% below the full strength. it should be 82,000 soldiers but at the moment it is 77,000 soldiers. they are struggling to recruit in the time of full employment. they don't have the recruiting sergeant of a major operation, a combat operation going on. it is more difficult for the armed forces to recruit when there is no war. the third point to make is no war. the third point to make is the in a hole because of the
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government's own making. they have outsourced recruitment to a private contractor. speak to anybody who's tried to get into the army or the other forces over the last few yea rs, other forces over the last few years, the army in particular, they will tell you it is a painful process. it is taking people longer than a year. you have medical certificate is required, computers crashing. it has been a sorry episode for the armed forces. therefore, they are having to relax the rules and looking outside the uk for recruits. two things, there's the company remain involved in recruitment? the rules were previously thought to be a good idea, their operational reasons for them to go but are their concerns are and what it might mean? first
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vote, on the company, at the moment the mod are sticking with the contract. they've made some adjustments. are sticking more serving military personnel in uniform and to reach out to people. they have had a recruitment office in the high street which will close down as part of this contract as it was centralised. we shouldn't get too hung up about this idea of... the telegraph has says, forces opened door to foreigners who have never lived in britain. the british military has a long tradition of recruiting from former commonwealth countries. we will be remembering armistice soon, there were thousands of people from india from australia, new zealand, canada who served alongside the british army in the first world war and the second world war. we may have turned a tap on and
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off over time. when the army has gone smaller, after 2010, there were big defence cuts, they introduced this five—year rule, it has been there before. essentially saying if you are from the common of guy you had to be in the uk forfive you are from the common of guy you had to be in the uk for five years. but it is nothing new for the british military ‘s have people from the congo serving inside. if you go and see people in the army you will see lots of people from fiji, people from the caribbean, it is something that they are used to. in addition to that, different rules apply to the gurkhas, people from the irish republic whojoined the gurkhas, people from the irish republic who joined the british armed forces. thank you very much. coming up on bbc newsroom live — we'll be speaking to conservative mp and former british army colonel bob stewart. he's recently spoken to the chief of the general staff about army recruitment problems, and says too many people are being rejected by the armed forces. stay with us for that. people should take greater responsibility for managing their own health, and more should be done to prevent illness.
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that's according to the government's new long—term plan for the nhs in england. in a speech later today, the health secretary, matt hancock will say the aim is for people to have five more years of healthy, independent life by the year 2035. here's our health editor, hugh pym. the health and social care secretary will say that ten times more public money is spent on treating disease than preventing it and that this does not stack up. mr hancock will point to a new strategy for england next year, which will include measures to encourage employers to help improve the health of their staff, including getting those who are off sick back into work. the government wants to see digital technology used to predict illnesses, allowing doctors to target advice at sections of the population, and genome sequencing analysing patients' dna playing a role in preventing future health problems. but labour argue that the conservatives have imposed cuts in public health services in recent years. the health foundation think tank welcomed the focus on prevention
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but said that the latest budget documents suggested there'd be another cut in spending on public health and staff training in england next year. hugh pym, bbc news. the health secretary matt hancock explained why he believes his plans are different from previous public health campaigns. we are about to see a £20 billion increase in the nhs budget, going from under 120 billion to over 140 billion. it is when you are increasing the budget you can really shift how resources are spent, because we've got to keep hospitals well funded. but i think more money needs to go into prevention rather than cure. but it is more than that. it is about the attitude that we have. we have rights as citizens to be able to use the nhs when we
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needed but i think we should talk more about the responsibilities too. in particular, the responsibility both of individuals and employers to help keep people healthy in the first place so that we don't have to go into hospital as often. prevention is better than sure. now it's time for a look at the weather. temperatures for the first part of this week will be way above average for the time of year. it has been a monster to the day, we will be keeping that this afternoon. —— it has been a milder day. a bit of brightness developing but rain will continue full—time over northern ireland and western scotland. maximum temperatures going up to 13 degrees in northern parts and 17th in the east of england. it remains miles this evening if you are heading out to bonfire night. it will stay dry for most of us. that
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is the risk of the odd shower drifting northwards across eastern areas of england through this evening. a bit of rain across northern ireland and the west of scotland. 0vernight, temperatures no lower than eight degrees. another mild start for tomorrow. it will be a bit of rain coming into western pa rt a bit of rain coming into western part and will turn heavy as the day goes on. central and eastern part dry with sunny spells. hello. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: after the stabbing of four people in the capital in five days, london's mayor warns it could take a decade to tackle knife crime. we have got to focus on a generation and the realities of maybe a generation before we get to the levels of violent crime that are a cce pta ble levels of violent crime that are acceptable for our society. the united states imposes its "toughest ever" sanctions against iran — hitting oil exports, shipping and banks. the iranian goverment say they will not comply. the eu says it's 50—50
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that a deal on the irish border will be struck, as brexit negotiations enter the final phase. a pay rise for 180,000 workers. companies signed up to the real living wage agree to pay staff £9 an hour from today. preventing illness should be the key focus of the nhs in england to extend the nation's life expectancy by five years, says the health secretary. and uncovering stories from the trenches of the western front. we'll be live in france as we look ahead to the armistice day centenary. sport now, here's katherine downs. england's record caps holder peter shilton says the decision to bring wayne rooney
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out of international retirement for his 120th england appearance "cheapens the cap". rooney will raise money for his foundation by playing against the us later this month. it's a one—off to raise money for his foundation. i must say i don't agree with the thinking on this. in fact, i'm a bit surprised by gareth southgate allowing this to happen especially after he made some bold decisions recently, especially at the world cup. i think england caps need to be earned, not just given cup. i think england caps need to be earned, notjust given out. you can have a presentation on the pitch. i think if he was picked on merit, then fair enough, but i don't think you can give caps out like give some presence. you got to be careful it does not set a precedent. peter shilton speaking this morning. loads of goals in the premier league yesterday, most of them for manchester city. they thumped southampton 6—1 with sergio aguero scored his 150th premier league goal, set up by raheem sterling who went on to score a couple of goals himself and really steal the show.
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city, back to the top of the league. liverpool midfielder xherdan shaqiri will miss the side's champions league game against red star belgrade in serbia on tuesday. he's been left out of the squad in order to "avoid any distractions" that may be caused by his albanian heritage. to rugby union, and a big boost for england ahead of their second autumn international against new zealand this weekend. co—ca ptain 0wen farrell is free to play. he's not going to be punished for this thumping tackle at the end of their match against south africa. it was the last play of the match and helped england hold on for a hard fought win. lots of commentators and former players felt it was at least a foul, but the authorities disagree. boxer floyd mayweather‘s making an unexpected move into the world of mixed martial arts. he's signed a deal to fight japanese kickboxer tenshin nasukawa on new year's eve. mayweather is 41, and has an unbeated boxing record in five different weight categories, but has never fought profrssionally in mixed martial arts.
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0n the eve of the first test against sri lanka — england captain joe root says his team will be trying a bolder and more courageous approach to their cricket. england haven't won a test series in sri lanka for 17 years. root says its time for them to try something different, and that players are feeling the competition for places on the team. guys know that throughout this trip we are going to play on three very different surfaces, and for us to win over here it's not going to be 11 players, it will be a squad performance. there will be a time when the balance of the team might change quite drastically and we have to be open to that and expect that. it's not about you individually, it's about collectively doing something special. we've done things ina certain something special. we've done things in a certain way in the past when we come to the subcontinent and i think it's time to try something slightly different. you know, be a little more bolder if you like, and
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courageous and maybe really try and exploit every surface we play on. no alastair cook, of course. it's ridiculous to say you went missing with his experience but what impact does it have on you as a captain, to be without somebody of such experience and authority? i've played 70 odd games and he's been involved in every single one of them. it will be slightly different. it has been slightly strange, him not being around, but it creates opportunities for other guys to stand up and take on that leadership role within the side on the squad. and you are starting to see that already, which is really promising. joe root talking to jonathan already, which is really promising. joe root talking tojonathan agnew. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the reuters news agency is reporting
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that 80 schoolchildren have been kidnapped in north—west cameroon. sources are reporting that and it is on the reuters news agency and we will check out the report and keep you updated. the cabinet will meet tomorrow to discuss a possible way forward after theresa may reportedly secured "private concessions" from brussels, which could see agreement being found in the brexit talks. much of the debate over the past two years has been centered on free—trade, but what exactly is a free trade agreement and how does it differ from what the uk has with the eu now? reality check‘s chris morris unpacks the terminology. everyone in the brexit debate is promising to give you free trade, and who doesn't like free stuff? so, what is a free—trade agreement, and how might it be different to what we have with the eu now? well, free trade deals aim to get rid of
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tariffs or border taxes on goods, all the stuff we make, meaning there are no charges for bring those products across the border. they also try to get rid of quotas so there's no limit on how much trade you can do. the idea is to make trade between different countries as easy as possible. but free—trade deals don't get rid of border checks entirely. it's not frictionless trade. countries still make their own rules on things like safety regulations or product standards, for which traded goods need to be checked. that doesn't happen when you're part of the eu, because in the eu's economic zone, the single market and the customs union, there is one set of rules that all countries follow. the eu also guarantees the free movement of services, capital and people. free—trade agreements simply don't cover as much. so when people talk about a super canada trade agreement between the uk and the eu after brexit, they are still talking about the much looser relationship than being part of the eu. however ambitious it
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might be, it wouldn't produce trade with no border checks or delays at all. and it wouldn't solve one of brexit‘s biggest dilemmas, how to avoid a hard border in ireland. you may think that's a price worth paying — the ability to set your own rules, make your own way and pay far less money into the eu budget. but in the end, free trade isn't entirely free. rules on who can join the british armed forces are set to change. currently, commonwealth citizens can onlyjoin the army, navy or air force if they have lived in the uk for five years, but that rule is set to be scrapped, meaning any commonwealth national will be eligble to join up. bob stewart is a conservative mp and a former british army colonel. hejoins us now. thanks forjoining us. do you think this is a good idea? it's been a good idea for a very long time. when ijoined the
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cheshire regiment in 1969 we had to fiji and sergeants and one of them was one of the sergeants in my company and we have always had commonwealth citizens, and in those days, as i recall an aeroplane when to bring back the men from fiji, so the idea that these men have to live in the country, it's happened before that they haven't. the reason it is being done is to deal with the recruitment crisis in the army. what you think is the reason for the recruitment crisis? one of the major reasons is the army's absurd reliance on a company called capita which two years ago, according to mark francois, the mp, his report, rejected 70% of the applicants applying for the army, the reserve army and the regular army. 70%, and they were rejected for medical reasons. some of those medical reasons. some of those medical reasons were absolutely absurd, such
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as wax in the ear, a broken leg five yea rs before as wax in the ear, a broken leg five years before playing rugby or some childhood malady. absolutely absurd that we rejected a whole swathe of people and i'm not sure that it has got much better. i complained about this in parliament and i complained about it right to the top of the army. the professional head of the army. the professional head of the army was the chief of the general staff and i complained to him and the assistant chief of the general staff and i said, are you meant to be responsible for what happens in the army, and if you are, get this sorted. they don't seem to have done much about it. the reasons that you cite do sound extraordinary. are you absolutely sure that those are the reasons for such a large number of people being turned away. an army spokesperson said large numbers of people do get turned away because they are not physically or mentally up they are not physically or mentally up to it and two thirds of them who fail to meet the standards have things like breathing problems, back
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injuries or leg injuries. frankly i disagree with that. if you look at the report he lists some of the things that stop people getting in. of course there are people that are too big, too small, not fit enough, can't see well enough and cannot hear, that sort of thing but there we re hear, that sort of thing but there were a heck of a lot of people in the list and had very minor problems and actually they were historic as well and i know people quite clearly who were rejected by the army for very, very silly reasons such as acorn which had no impact according to orthopaedic surgeons on their ability to march, run or do anything else. in fact the person concerned boxed and ran. literally somebody you know was not accepted into the army because of corn? yellow yes, absolutely. yes, that is a fact. that person
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appeal three times, all the way to the top of the army, to the assista nt the top of the army, to the assistant chief of the army and had no impact. what needs to be done? i'm beginning to wonder who runs the army. whether it is capita, or the generals who say that they are the professional head of the army and actually should run the army. they don't seem to be doing it. in the run—up to armstice day, we're on the road telling stories from the trenches of the western front. today we're joined by our correspondent robert hall in amiens, france — he'll be telling us about alexander gillespie, a british soldier who came up with a path for pilgrims, a route along no man's land, from switzerland to the belgian coast. good morning. good morning, joanna. we were last here in the summer, marking the beginning of the last
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100 days of the first world war and that was the battle of amiens where british, commonwealth, french americans climbed over the trenches and began the big advance that would eventually, we now know, end up with the armistice. we are now back because over the next five days leading up to the centenary weekend we are looking at different aspects of commemoration and remembrance and i will tell you more about tomorrow's story tomorrow, but we wa nt to tomorrow's story tomorrow, but we want to tell you about an ambitious plan to connect up foot paths across europe from switzerland up to the belgian coast to make a path of peace —— part of peace. it's called the western front weight and it all springs from a letter home written bya springs from a letter home written by a young british officer. "there are graves scattered up and down. the ground is so pitted and scarred and torn with shells, entangled with wire." alexander gillespie was 26 when he wrote his last letters home.
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in the weeks before his death, he began to plan a project that could now become his legacy. my great uncle was a prolific letter writer... countryfile presenter tom heap is alexander gillespie's great—nephew. well, he had this extraordinary leap of imagination when he was actually in the trenches amongst the fighting, that he thought when this is all over, when peace comes, we should put a route along no man's land for people of all nations to come and walk along. division is a network of marked footpaths stretching from the swiss border to the belgian coast, tracing the trench lines of the western front. that's over 630 miles. that means negotiating with dozens of landowners and local councils, but so far, reaction has been encouraging. translation: from the first moment
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i heard about the path, i immediately saw how it could work. i think we must widen the ways that we remember the past, because if we don't do that, people will lose interest. this here, this new monument, was sculpted by walter allward... high on vimy ridge stands this memorial to canadian troops who fought on the western front. here, too, gillespie's vision has received an enthusiastic welcome. i think it's a huge opportunity. we have so many visitors who come on pilgrimage to visit, kind of follow the path of their ancestors and this gives them an alternate route rather than taking highways and going around about. they can actually walk the western front as their ancestors did. tom heap believes projects like this provide new ways of connecting with a conflict which is moving further and further into our distant history. this to me is exactly what my great uncle envisaged when he was in those
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trenches 103 years ago today. he died somewhere near here, we don't know exactly where. to me it's quite spine—tingling, the thought that we are pretty much doing what he envisaged. "i would like to send every man, woman and child in western europe on pilgrimage along that sacred road so they might think and learn what war means from the silence witnesses on either side. a sentimental idea, perhaps, but we might make the most beautiful road in all the world." i was talking to tom a couple of days ago in the negotiations are still going on. it's appropriate we are standing by this river because it marks the boundary here and in associating with the somme battlefield, about a miles,
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tentatively agreed, so they are on their way and the network should be operational pretty soon. tomorrow, a different story as we talk about the losses that go with remembrance and talking to family in county durham and a poignant connection to this centenary. if you'd like to find out more about what life was like 100 years ago, then you might want to take a look at ‘armistice day', an interactive personalised journey through world war one that the bbc has created online. anyone can take a look at what role you might have played if you'd been around in 1914. you can also hearfirst—hand accounts from those who were there, in the trenches, day in and day out and you can see what happened in your area and learn about the local heroes. just go to bbc.co.uk/armisticeday in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. london's mayor warns that it could take a generation to turn the tide on knife crime in the capital — after four pepole were stabbed over the weekend.
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iran's president declares his country will continue selling its oil — breaking the sanctions reimposed by the united states. around 180,000 people are to receive a pay rise today, as the real living wage increases to £9 an hour. activity in the uk's dominate services sector slowed to 52.2 in october compared to 53.9 in september, according the ihs markit/cips survey. the services sector, which includes banks, hotels and retailers, accounts for around 76% of the uk economy. the survey says it has found a "number of firms noted that brexit—related uncertainty and concerns about the global economic outlook had constrained demand growth for business services". sales of new cars in the uk
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recovered slightly in october, although they were still down on a year previously. according to the society of motor manufacturers & traders were down around 3% on last year. though this is an improvement on september, when there was a 20.5% decline. britanny ferries has revealed that uk holidaymakers are delaying booking channel crossings for next summer amid concerns about the consequences of brexit. forward bookings were down between 4% and 5% from some of its regular customers. a spokesman for the ferry operator said people were worried about the impact on areas such as pet travel, health insurance and driving licences. so new car sales recovered a little in october, though they were still down compared to last year, according the latest smmt figures. it says news car sales fell 3% in october compared to the same car last year, bringing the total to just over 150,000 during the month. the smmt said there had been strong growth
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in alternative—fuelled vehicles , with combined plug—in hybrid and battery electric registrations up 30%. joining us now is emma butcher spokesperson at the society of motor manufacturers and traders. a slight improvement in october, but still down. this is the sixth month out of ten we have seen a decline in the market this year. but as you say, the decline is much less than it was last month and this is because the big backlog in emissions testing which caused supply issues last month is starting to ease although it is affecting some models. we do expect that to resolve itself over the coming months. so there has been pressure from emissions testing and that's the
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reason why you think there have been fewer new cars sold? absolutely. new emissions tests which are the toughest in the world came into force in september, which is great news, but the industry really had over a year to recertify every single new car sold across europe so there were limited numbers of test houses to do this so obviously there we re houses to do this so obviously there were backlog is there but we are happy to see those ease. hybrids, electric cars, they have seen a boost in new car sales. absolutely which is great news and there's an ever—increasing of models available to suit all different types of driving needs with hybrids maa plug—in hybrids, pure electric vehicles and hydrogen increasingly so there's a really good choice and i think consumers are responding to that. what kind of cars are the bestsellers the ones that people are going for more and more? in the alternative sector we are seeing the most popular segment being the
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hybrid segment which offers a lot of flexibility and is closer to what most people who are used to driving a straightforward diesel or petrol cari a straightforward diesel or petrol car i used it were also seeing strong in plug—in hybrid vehicle as well. there has been a push against diesel cars. is that reflected in the number of new diesel car sold? that is reflected in the figure this month, as it has been for the past several months. that is a shame, because the latest diesels are the clea nest because the latest diesels are the cleanest in history and on a par with petrol vehicles in terms of the emissions they produce and they are also incredibly economical to run. what we really want to see is the message getting through that you need to be looking for a car that suits the type of driving that you do. longer distance driving, you mightfind do. longer distance driving, you might find diesel is the most economical solution for you that if you're doing lots ofjourneys around town there might be a smaller petrol engine likea
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town there might be a smaller petrol engine like a plug—in or a battery electric vehicle which could be the best car for your needs. emma, good to talk to you. thank you very much. a look at some other business stories now . those lucky enough to work for an employer who has voluntarily signed up to the "real living wage" are set for a pay rise this week. for the first time they will receive £9 an hour. this is not to be confused with the compulsory national living wage, which is currently £7.83 an hour for anyone over the age of 25. real living wage employers in london will pay a minimum hourly rate of £10.55. meat retailer crawshaw has shut 35 stores with the loss of 354jobs. the company went into administration last week after several years of losses, with ernst & young appointed on friday. some 19 stores remain open and the company continues to employ 261 workers. the company's shares on aim were suspended on 31 october. profits at the uk's listed companies have hit a new record for the first time in seven years thanks to a run of high oil prices, according to research
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by the share centre today. it said profits from uk companies on the main stock market reached £217.9bn over the last 12 months. that breaks the all—time high last set in 2011, according to the report. a look at how the markets are faring today. looking pretty good, mixed picture for the markets across the board. in asia we had falls overnight the markets are looking ahead to those mid—term elections in america which are over tuesday and wednesday and those will have a big impact when investors are feeling for the future of the economy. trading is a bit thin because of that and at the moment we have seen the london market upjust that and at the moment we have seen the london market up just 0.25 of 8%. that's all the business now. in a moment the weather, but first let's look at some of the most striking images
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of the day. a giant map of australia that was carved into a wiltshire hillside during the first world war has been restored. the map was created by soldiers of the australian imperial force who were staying at hurdcott camp. a group of volunteers have been working hard to restore the chalk map in time for the centenary commemorations of the end of world war one. the world drone racing championships have been taking place in southern china and a new world record over 100 metres has been set by timothy trowbridge from switzerland, who hit an average speed of more than 70 miles—per—hour. competitors agreed that mastering the start was the key to getting a fast time. and a sculpture of liverpool and egypt football star mohamed salah unveiled in his home country is raising eyebrows on social media. people have suggested it looks more like singer leo sayer or marv the burglarfrom the film home alone. now it's time for a look at the weather. thank you. we started on a cloudy
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night across the uk but it was a mild start to the day on a frost free start and that's the average for the time of year. the cloud is thinning, and here in east sussex the cloud is breaking up to give sunny spells and as we go through the afternoon many more of us will get that son as well. you can see the best of any sunshine is down towards the south—eastern areas but otherwise it's quite cloudy and we have rain affecting areas of scotla nd have rain affecting areas of scotland and across northern ireland some rain at times. elsewhere the cloud breaks up to give sunshine and it really is quite a mild if not warm afternoon with temperatures in the south east getting up to 17 degrees. if you are heading further
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north, it should be dry with lighter winds compared to the weekend and that should not cause any problems and we will see clear spells as well. we could see the odd shower drifting northwards across eastern england and the most it is dry with some rain it's going to be a mild like with temperatures no lower than 811 celsius. for tuesday we will see dry weather for most of us, there could be breaks to give some sunshine and rain is moving its way through northern ireland and heavy rain spreading in. and those temperatures, like today are up to 17 into 18. the weatherfront temperatures, like today are up to 17 into 18. the weather front in the west is unsettling us and it will move further eastward and we are
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sensing a bit of rain and there are showers and eastern parts of the uk and eventually some heavy rain moves in through wales and the south—west. a bit of sunshine can reach 12 or 13 celsius then the rest of the week we keep this unsettled weather. there is quite a bit of rain in the forecast and temperatures are up to 11 or 13 celsius in between any rain, there could be bright spells here and there. a mixed picture for the rest of the week. goodbye. you're watching bbc newsroom live. these are today's main stories — after the stabbing of four people in the capital in five days, london's mayor warns it could take a decade to tackle knife crime. we've got to actually focus on a generation and the reality is, it may be a generation before we get the levels of violent crime that are acceptable in our society. the united states imposes
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its "toughest ever" sanctions against iran, hitting oil exports, shipping and banks. iran say they will break the sanctions. the eu says it's 50—50 that a deal on the irish border will be struck, as brexit negotiations enter the final phase. a pay rise for 180,000 workers. companies signed up to the real living wage agree to pay staff £9 an hour from today. preventing illness should be the key focus of the nhs in england to extend the nation's life expectancy by five years, says the health secretary. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has warned it could take up to ten years, or even a generation, to make progress tackling the
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problem of violent crime in london. his comments come after a recent spike in murders in the capital, with four fatal stabbings since last wednesday. two men have been arrested on suspicion of stabbing a 22—year—old man to death in south east london yesterday. on friday a 17—year—old was fatally stabbed outside a tube station, and a 15—year—old was killed on thursday in what police are describing as a "pre—meditated" attack. yesterday's stabbing is the fourth in less than a week. the latest victim was the eighth homicide in the capital this year which compares to 116 this time last year. this morning the mayor of london sadiq khan said the increase in violent crime in london is unacceptable. the home affairs select committee, a cross—party committee, recently did a report which was scathing on cuts from government. home office officials say there is a link between police officers being cut and violent crime going up. the most senior police officers say it would be naive to think there is not
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a link between police cuts and an increase in violence crime. all that being said, in london and in city hall we are doing as much as we can to invest in policing but also invest in our young people as well. the increase in violent crime in london and across england and wales is unacceptable. and the home office minister victoria atkins denied that the increase in violent crime was related to falling police numbers. well, of course the mayor is in charge of his budget so if he wants to spend more on policing then, as indeed he has done this year, he put up the precept and he can spend it on policing. but this isn't just about numbers, we know, sadly from looking at the previous experiences where we've had spikes in violent crime such as in the late 2000s, there were many more police officers on the street but nonetheless there was a spike in violence. i think we've got to look at the causes of this crime. we know for a fact that drugs is a major player in this rise. we know serious organised crime is a majorfactor and they are spreading
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the spread of drugs through the country through the use of what are called, county lines. and metropolitan police commander stuart cundy told our correspondent richard galpin there would be hundreds of extra officers on duty, as police face one of their busiest weeks of the year. tragically, we have had four murders since the middle of last week across a number of boroughs, none of them connected. each and every one of those tragic murders affects families, affects friends and acquaintances. i can't imagine the emotions and the distress they must be going through. my heart does go to them. why are we seeing so much knife crime? what is the issue, or the key issue, that lies behind it? i think there will be many, many reasons that is behind the levels of knife crime that, sadly, we're seeing here in london, and in other places across the uk. for the metropolitan police we're committed to everything that we can bring down those level of violence. we have specialist investigators
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investigating each of the murders from the last week. we have additional police on duty. 0ur levels of violence saw a significance surge in the early part of this year. since then, we've introduced our violent crime task force that everyday is policing the streets of london. sadly, we always expect this to be one of our busiest weeks of the year which is why today we have even more officers on duty, we have hundreds of additional uniformed officers on duty in every single borough in london. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw said this increase in violence is relatively new. the trends really began in 2014 when there was an increase, starting to be a increase, in violent crime across england and wales. before that, we were seeing some really significant falls and there was a sense almost that the country may have, not solved, but really significantly reduced the problem of violence. in the last four years
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or so we have seen this rise in a number of towns and cities, london in particular, this year, 118 killings so far. that has surpassed last yea r‘s total. what is really concerning, clearly, is that young people are losing their lives. the highest total of teenagers to have been killed in london this year for a decade and many of them, most of them, stabbed to death. it brings into question the issue around knives and knife crime and whether it is just becoming a habit for young people in certain areas, who are concerned about their safety, to carry knives. what started to happen around 2014 prior to that? what was the cause of this? it is really difficult to tell. there is a lot of disagreement around this. you have heard the disagreement with victoria atkins from the home office saying, it's not to do with police numbers. other people saying, police numbers have played a part and also cuts in other public services, cuts in youth services have meant
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there are more young people on the streets with nothing else to do. there has been a big reduction in the use of stop and search since around 2011. has that played a part as well? again, that is a dispute between the government and policing experts who say it has because it has enabled young people to feel they can carry weapons without the risk of being caught. but playing into all this, which is what cressida dick, the met commissioner said last week, is drugs related crime. i think there is a general agreement that is certainly a majorfactor, the availability of cocaine in particular, the extra purity of cocaine is sparking a war between drug gangs which is playing out with young people who are being used as couriers by these gangs and that, sadly, is resulting in some of them being killed on the streets. us sanctions on iran have been reinstated, in a measure described by president trump as the "toughest ever".
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the sanctions, which target iran's oil sales and banking sector, are being introduced following america's withdrawal from the international nuclear deal agreed in 2015. washington says it's trying to stop what it calls tehran's destructive behaviour across the middle east. 0ur correspondent in beirut told us why the us has chosen to reimpose sanctions now. it is really interesting because every country that has signed up to that iranian nuclear deal says that iran hasn't broken the terms of the agreement. what washington is saying is that iran needs to change its behaviour. its contention is that after this nuclear deal was signed up iran got a lot more cash and it has then used that cash to spread its influence across the region, supporting militias in iraq, in syria as well as here in lebanon, as well as ties to the houthis in yemen. and that, according to donald trump, is terrorism.
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he says that in order for iran to get the sanctions lifted it will need to change its behaviour. but what has the reaction been in iran? thousands of iranians rallied on sunday, burning us flags and chanting ‘death to america', as they rejected calls for talks with washington. the demonstrations took place on the thirty—ninth anniversary of the occupation of the us embassy in tehran, which led to four decades of hostility between the two nations. there are reports this morning that eu officials have put the chances of a brexit deal on the irish border, which would be acceptable to ministers and parliament, at "50/50". the uk and the eu both want to avoid a "hard border" which would mean physical checks or infrastructure between northern ireland and the republic of ireland but cannot agree how. earlier our brussles reporter adam fleming told me about the so—called negotiation "tunnel", meaning they are going on behind closed doors. the tunnel has been in existence for
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about a month now and it is frustrating for all of us observers because it means the negotiators do all the negotiating in secret and they don't tell us what is going on. that is no press conferences with michel barnier report saying these other paragraphs we have agreed. we got used to that in the early phase. why people were thinking this week had become very crucial was because of the calendar and counting back from crucial bits. the uk still wa nts from crucial bits. the uk still wants there to be an extra brexit summit to sign on the dotted line and give the green light to the brexit deal this month because they say, british sources, they need that much time to get the deal through parliament, to get through westminster. the original dates for the extraordinary brexit summit of the extraordinary brexit summit of the 17th and 18th of november. the eu has said there hasn't been enough progress to have it then but they've kept the door open for it happen
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that we can. if you count back from then and the preparatory meeting, it gets you to a deal having to be broadly agreed this week and that is why there is so much hysteria whether that will happen this week. that doesn't mean they couldn't be an emergency brexit summit later in november and we might be going through this whole rigmarole again next week! 0r through this whole rigmarole again next week! or it may be the eu says, that isn't enough progress being made in brexit talks and will come back to this in the next timetabled summit of eu leaders which is in the middle of december. where they cannot enforce, how can we gauge what is the likelihood of the deal? there are reports eu officials are saying the chances of a deal on the irish border issue is 50—50. saying the chances of a deal on the irish border issue is 50-50. that is an interesting quote the guardian has got there from a diplomatic source. i haven't had the same one
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myself but there was a little glint of light from the tunnel last week because michel barnier‘s team believe the ambassadors from the other 27 member states on wednesday afternoon and we got a little bit of afternoon and we got a little bit of a flavour of how that meeting went from people. from the people i spoke to, it did come down to about 50—50. half of them were pessimistic because they said they would be no progress on the main sticking points, the irish border. then he spoke to the other half and they said, actually, the eu is now considering seriously this british proposal of a uk wide customs arrangement that would replace the existing backstop proposalfrom the eu which some people saw as positive. you could take that as being a 50—50. we won't know because of the eternal and we won't really know for sure what has been agreed until we had actually written down in black and white and then we will be able to make a judgment about whether the deal has been reached or
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whether the deal has been reached or whether it is a win for the uk, a compromise too far for theresa may. then it goes to parliament. that seems quite long way off. what is the procedure around the grand unveiling when that deal is struck? how much notice do we get? i'm really not sure. what will happen, the choreography from last time when they thought a deal was imminent was you would have dominic raab coming to brussels to see michel barnier, sealing the deal having done by civil servants, then it'd go to the cabins for the cabinet to approve it and then they would be a big unveiling ceremony back in brussels, and at the same time the member states would be summoned to be told the details. that was the plan last time. that isn't what happened. it isa time. that isn't what happened. it is a case on breeding the ruins of when various meetings happen. the unveiling and then is that a pre—unveiling? it is incredibly annoying. a branch of the restaurant, zizzi, will reopen tomorrow in salisbury, nearly eight months after traces of the nerve
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agent novichok were found inside the premises. it was one of a number of locations in salisbury that had to be cordoned off, after the poisoning of sergei and yulia skripal in the city. zizzi's operations director phil boyd says: "it's been a difficult few months for the city" and the company are "excited that zizzi is reopening "to the people of salisbury" more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. those lucky enough to work for an employer who has voluntarily signed up to the scheme known as the real living wage are set for a 2.8% pay rise this week. for the first time they will receive £9 an hour. that's substantially higher than the legally—binding "national living wage" of £7.83 per hour. 0ur correspondent joe miller explains.
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wages are growing faster than the cost of basic goods and unemployment has gone down. but the living wage foundation says one in five of us are still earning less than is needed to make ends meet. i have to look better at things, the prices, and go for what i can really afford, like, meat—wise, beef is out of the question. the boss says he can't afford to give staff a raise without increasing prices. and almost 5,000 businesses already are paying more than they have to by law, and are committed to a rate set by the living wage charity. from today that rate goes up by 35p an hour to £10.55 in london, and by 25p an hour to £9 in the rest of the uk. the government's minimum wage won't reach those levels for at least three years.
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this year we have seen private rental costs go up, council tax go up, public transport has got more expensive, and the basic price of the basic goods that you buy in the supermarket shop has also gone up. all of that has gone up together to mean that people need more this year to meet basic cost of living. big firms like ikea, google and hsbc pay the living wage but the charity says more private companies and even public sector organisations need to come on board. critics say this could mean even less money for cash—strapped council services. the headlines on bbc news — london's mayor warns that it could take a generation to turn the tide on knife crime in the capital as the number of people killed in violent crimes across london this year reaches 118. iran's president declares his country will continue selling its oil, breaking the sanctions reimposed by the united states. around 180,000 people
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are to receive a pay rise today, as the real living wage increases to nine—pound an hour. england's record caps holder, peter shilton, has criticsed the fa's decision to hand wayne rooney his 120th cap. rooney will come out of retirement for a friendly against the united states at wembley later this month. rooney is england's all time record goalscorer, and his appearance will be a one—off to raise money for his foundation but shilton's not happy. i must say i don't agree with the thinking on this. in fact, i'm a bit surprised by gareth southgate allowing this to happen especially after he made some bold decisions recently, especially at the world cup. i think england caps need to be earned, notjust given out. you can have a presentation on the pitch. i think if he was picked on merit, then fair enough, but i don't think you can give caps out
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like gifts or presents. you got to be careful it does not set a precedent. loads of goals in the premier league yesterday, most of them for manchester city. they thumped southampton 6—1. sergio aguero scored his 150th premier league goal, set up by raheem sterling who went on to score a couple of goals himself and really steal the show. city, back to the top of the league — two points ahead of chelsea who also won. liverpool midfielder xherdan shaqiri will miss the side's champions league game against red star belgrade in serbia on tuesday. he's been left out of the squad in order to "avoid any distractions" that may be caused by his albanian heritage. to rugby union, and a big boost for england ahead of their second autumn international against new zealand this weekend. co—ca ptain 0wen farrell is free to play. he's not going to be punished for this thumping tackle at the end of their match against south africa. it was the last play of the match and helped england hold
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on for a hard fought win. lots of commentators and former players felt it was at least a foul, but the authorities disagree. boxer floyd mayweather‘s making an unexpected move into the world of mixed martial arts. he's signed a deal to fight japanese kickboxer tenshin nasukawa on new year's eve. mayweather is 41, and has an unbeated boxing record in five different weight categories, but has never fought profrssionally in mixed martial arts. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. i will be back in about 1:30pm. there are reports that there have been a kidnapping in cameroon. we can talk to our reporter who joins
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us can talk to our reporter who joins us from nigeria. temperatures what you know. we don't know very much so far. the numbers are still a little bit confusing. local sources told is that 11 students were kidnapped and not a tee. from what we gather from people in the ground coming the early hours of today, around 4am local time, gunmen stormed a school in the outskirts and kidnapped the number of pupils as well as, we believe, a headteacher and the driver. it is an area that has seen a lot of conflict decently between english—speaking separatists and the government. the separatists want to create a breakaway states because they said they have been discriminated against by the french—speaking government. the government has accused the separatists of kidnapping and violence. has there been anything
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like this before? yes, there have been a number of kidnappings in the area. the separatists say they are being killed and driven out of their homes by the government over the last two years. hundreds of thousands of people have left cameroon to go to nigeria and some have tried to reach europe. both sides of the divide are accusing each other off islands and that is why the numbers... the government wa nts to why the numbers... the government wants to drive up the numbers to show the separatists are dangerous. but the separatists want to show they are fighting a government. we're just a day away from the midterm elections in the us in which voters will be electing all members of the house of representatives and 35 members of the senate, as well as some state governorships. the outcome is far from certain but one thing is clear, there is a record number of women standing for office. ros atkins has been looking into this in our virtual congress. whatever happens, this election
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will be remembered for one thing, a surge in female candidates. 262 women are on the ballots for house or senate races, that's an all—time record. let's take a closer look at this. 84 women currently serve in the house, that's the highest number in history, but it's less than 20% of all representitives. this year, 239 women are running. of those, over three quarters are democrats. next, let's look at the senate. this year, 23 women are running. but remember, not all senate seats are up for election. just 35 on them. that means women represent about a third of all candidates for the senate. of those running, 50 are democrats, eight are republicans. these are just the people that are running, all of this won't necessarily translate to record numbers of female representatives in either chamber of congress. let's look at the last time record—breaking numbers of women entered the house of representatives. in 1992, more women were elected than ever before. 24 new female representatives
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entered the lower house. why? many point to the controversial appointment of clarence thomas as a supreme courtjudge in 1991. he'd been accused of sexual harassment, but after testimony by thomas, and his accuser, anita hill, the senate narrowly confirmed him. that decision was seen as a galvanising force for many women to go out and vote for female candidates. this year, history in some ways has repeated itself with the confirmation of brett kavanaugh after multiple allegations of sexual misconduct. we'll have to see what impact that has on the electorate. 0ur washington correspondent, jane 0'brien is on capitol hill for us now. they laughed at stake in these midterms. certainly. it is all about bus building behind me. you can get control of both chambers of
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congress? democrat need 23 seats to ta ke congress? democrat need 23 seats to take the highs. they are favoured to do that. but the republicans are likely to keep control of the senate which could jam up the works for the next two years because with the divided congress, it is difficult to get any legislation through. democrats will see this as a check on donald trump, republicans will see it as an almighty frustration and creating an inability to get anything done. there is a lot at sta ke anything done. there is a lot at stake here. what we are seeing is a record number of americans turning out to vote early. more than 30 million so far which is putting this midterm election on part to have the highest turnout in decades. both parties aborted clearly very energised. what is fuelling that? it is -- energised. what is fuelling that? it is —— both parties supporters add energised.
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we are also seeing a highly energised republican base. what is causing it? donald trump. he is at front and centre of everything. this election is seen as a referendum on him. he has been out in force as we've been hearing, blitzing the states, rallying the base in time to get people out to vote. at the end of the day, it is going to be all about turnout. who can get people out there into those polling booths the most. on the democrat side, who is the figure? is that a figurehead for the democrats? that is an interesting question. of course, neither donald trump nor barack 0bama from the pilot boat barack 0bama from the pilot boat barack 0bama has been campaigning. we have seen a liberal insurgency come a lotto grassroot activists coming up
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from the roots and toppling better known establishment of democratic figures at primary level. they are winning primaries that can translate that success into a wider ballot? that remains to be seen. we are going to be watching that closely because the democrat party has been soul—searching since 2016, wondering why they lost the presidential election and still trying to work out how they are going to do in 2020. this election could also be an indicator of the strategy for that. thank you very much. and at 7pm this evening, katty kay and christian fraser are both in washington for a special edition of beyond 100 days — looking ahead to the midterms. people should take greater responsibility for managing their own health, and more should be done to prevent illness. that's according to the government's new long—term plan for the nhs in england. in a speech later today, the health secretary, matt hancock will say the aim is for people to have five more years of healthy, independent life by the year 2035. here's our health editor, hugh pym. the health and social care secretary
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will say that ten times more public money is spent on treating disease than preventing it and that this does not stack up. mr hancock will point to a new strategy for england next year, which will include measures to encourage employers to help improve the health of their staff, including getting those who are off sick back into work. the government wants to see digital technology used to predict illnesses, allowing doctors to target advice at sections of the population, and genome sequencing analysing patients' dna playing a role in preventing future health problems. but labour argue that the conservatives have imposed cuts in public health services in recent years. the health foundation think tank welcomed the focus on prevention but said that the latest budget documents suggested there'd be another cut in spending on public health and staff training in england next year. hugh pym, bbc news. the health secretary
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matt hancock explained why he believes his plans are different from previous public health campaigns. we are about to see a £20 billion increase in the nhs budget, going from just under 120 billion to over 140 billion. it is when you are increasing the budget you can really shift how resources are spent, because we've got to keep hospitals well funded. but i think more money needs to go into prevention rather than cure. but it is more than that. it is about the attitude that we have. we have rights as citizens to be able to use the nhs when we need it, but i think we should talk more about the responsibilities too. in particular, the responsibilities both of individuals and employers to help keep people healthy in the first place so that we don't have to go to hospital as often. prevention is better than cure.
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now it's time for a look at the weather. the weather is the king smiled out there. it is quite apt sectional for november. tensions could net up to 17 degrees. the weather is looking good, looking mild. temperatures and 13 degrees around seven or 8pm this evening in london. double figures further north. it is looking mostly dry. it is a chance of one or two showers across england, there is little bit more of a chance in scotla nd little bit more of a chance in scotland but the vast majority of us will have a dry night and still very mild by tuesday. double figures in the south of the country and it is thanks to these southerly winds, all the way from the mediterranean. tomorrow, a weather front approaching it looks like we will
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have heavy rain in the south—west also wales. hello. this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines: after the stabbing of four people in the capital in five days, london's mayor warns it could take a decade to tackle knife crime. we have got to focus on a generation and the realities of maybe a generation before we get to the levels of violent crime that are acceptable for our society. iranians react to the united states imposing its "toughest ever" sanctions against iran, rejecting calls for talks with washington by burning us flags. the eu says it's 50—50 that a deal on the irish border will be struck, as brexit negotiations enter the final phase. a pay rise for 180 thousand workers: companies signed up to the real living wage agree to pay staff nine—pounds—an—hour from today preventing illness should be the key focus
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of the nhs in england — to extend the nation's life expectancy by five years — says the health secretary. and coming up — could you cope if your rubbish was collected once a month? a council in north wales has introduced four—weekly bin collections — claiming it will save money and boost recycling — but residents are not happy. we'll have more before 12. the cabinet will meet tomorrow to discuss a possible way forward — after theresa may reportedly secured "private concessions" from brussels, which could see agreement being found in the brexit talks. much of the debate over the past two years has centered on free—trade. but what exactly is a free trade agreement and how does it differ from what the uk has with the eu now? reality check‘s chris morris unpacks the terminology. everyone in the brexit debate is promising to give you free trade, and who doesn't like free stuff? so, what is a free—trade agreement, and
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how might it be different to what we have with the eu now? well, free trade deals aim to get rid of tariffs or border taxes on goods, all the stuff we make, meaning there are no charges for bring those products across the border. they also try to get rid of quotas so there's no limit on how much trade you can do. the idea is to make trade between different countries as easy as possible. but free—trade deals don't get rid of border checks entirely. it's not frictionless trade. countries still make their own rules on things like safety regulations or product standards, for which traded goods need to be checked. that doesn't happen when you're part of the eu, because in the eu's economic zone, the single market and the customs union, there is one set of rules that all countries follow. the eu also guarantees the free movement of services, capital and people. free—trade agreements simply don't cover as much. so when people talk about a super
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canada trade agreement between the uk and the eu after brexit, they are still talking about a much looser relationship than being part of the eu. however ambitious it might be, it wouldn't produce trade with no border checks or delays at all. and it wouldn't solve one of brexit‘s biggest dilemmas, how to avoid a hard border in ireland. you may think that's a price worth paying — the ability to set your own rules, make your own way and pay far less money into the eu budget. but in the end, free trade isn't entirely free. rules on who can join the british armed forces are set to change. currently, commonwealth citizens can onlyjoin the army, navy or air force if they have lived in the uk for five years. but that rule is set to be scrapped — meaning any commonwealth national will be eligble to join up. earlier our defence correspondent jonathan beale explained to me why the rules are changing.
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i think they are making the change because there is a serious shortfall in the armed forces. they are about 6% below full strength. it should be 82,000 soldiers and at the moment it is 77,000 soldiers. they are struggling to recruit in a time of relative full employment and they do not have the recruiting sergeant of a major operation, combat operation. it is more difficult often bawdy armed forces to recruit when there is no warand armed forces to recruit when there is no war and the third to make is that they are in a hole because of the government's own making because they have outsourced recruitment to a private contractor, capita and speak to anybody who's tried to get into the army or the forces in the last few years, the army in particular, and they will tell you it isa particular, and they will tell you it is a painful process and is taking many people longer than a year. there are stories of medical
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certificates being required, computers crashing and it has been a pretty sorry episode for the armed forces, capita. therefore they are having to relax the rules and are looking outside the uk for recruits. two things then. does capita remain involved in recruitment here, and secondly, if the rules on commonwealth citizens joining were previously thought to be a good idea, obviously there are operational reasons for them to go, but are their concerns about what it might mean? first of all, capita, the mod is sticking to the contract and have made adjustments and art having more people reaching out to people as they would have in the past. they would have had a recruitment office in the high street as it was centralised. we should not get too hung up about the
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idea more. the telegraph said it seemed to be a fairly inflammatory headline, the forces open door to foreigners who never lived in britain. the british military has a long tradition of recruiting from former commonwealth countries, what was the empire. we are going to be remembering armistice someday soon and there were thousands of people from india, from australia, new zealand, canada, who were serving alongside the british army in the first world war and second world war. they have turned the tap on and off from time to time so when the army has got smaller they have essentially, after 2010, the big defence cuts, they introduced a five—year rule that had been there before but essentially said if you are from the commonwealth you have to be in the uk to five years but they are relaxing that rule because they are relaxing that rule because they have a manpower crisis. but it is nothing new for the british military to have people from the commonwealth serving and if you go
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and see people in the army you will see lots of people from fiji, from the caribbean, it is something they are used to and in addition to that different rules apply to the gurkhas and people from the irish republic tojoin the armed and people from the irish republic to join the armed forces. the airspeed indicator on the plane which crashed into the java sea last week was damaged for the boeing 737‘s last four flights. indonesia's national transportation safety committee said the damage was revealed after information had been downloaded from the plane's flight data recorder. all 189 people on board the lion air flight to jakarta died when it plummeted into the waterjust 13 minutes after take—off. shocking images used on cigarette packets helped reduce the number of smokers, and now surgeons are calling for the same thing to be done with firework packaging. they say that if people saw pictures of the horrific burns caused by them, it could cut down on the number of injuries. frances head, who was badly injured by a firework, supports the idea.
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i was iwas ina i was in a school canteen and another pupil through a firework into the school canteen and it landed on me and exploded resulting in second and third degree burns across my stomach and both thighs. the superficial burns underneath my eye and on my right arm. i think if we put graphic images on packaging like a surgeon ‘s warning, or the fire service warning, it will drill into people said it is not funny, it isa and into people said it is not funny, it is a and can cause damage and they should not be played with and it should not be played with and it should not be done incorrectly either —— it is a firearm. mps are preparing to debate a major report into bullying and sexual harassment in the houses of parliament. the report, written by dame laura cox, was commissioned after a series of allegations about bullying in parliament came to light. 0nejunior house of commons member of staff, speaking exclusively to the victoria derbyshire programme, — said that ‘dealing with abuse is part of the job'. i've had, you know, members of staff shouting in my face, calling me stupid. 0ne older senior member of staff
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shouted at me and asked if i even knew what brexit was, if i even knew what was going on. i've had inappropriate comments, members of staff, particularly mps, asking, don't i know who they are? i have one kind of older senior civil servant from a government department get right in my face, shouting at me. i could almost feel kind of like the spit landing on my face. he was so angry. i'd only been in the job a few months and it was so overwhelming and scary that i didn't know how to deal with it. but when i talked to the members of staff, particularly female members of staff, they all had a similar experience and, again, itjust seemeed to be part of thejob was dealing with abuse like that. it if no one has complained and you think maybe no one has because they don't have confidence that anything would be done, how can could an investigation be done? i do understand that, and i knew that people would need to come forward to do it. so i know that nothing could happen until they do. but for that to occur, surely you've got to allow people
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to have the confidence in a reporting system that exists and to know that they would be taken seriously. and at the minute, and the way i think the commons authorities have responded to dame laura cox's report, that confidence isn't going to come any time soon, i don't think. so i don't think any investigation will happen. i don't think any mp will face any consequences because people just don't think the system works for members of staff like them. in the run—up to armstice day, we're on the road telling stories from the trenches of the western front. 0ur correspondent robert halljoined us from amiens, france, to tell us about alexander gillespie, a british soldier who came up with a path for pilgrims, a route along no man's land, from switzerland to the belgian coast. we were last here in the summer marking the beginning of the last 100 days of the first world war and that was the battle of amiens where
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british, commonwealth, french americans, climbed along the line and began the big advance that would end up with the armistice. we are back because over the next five days leading up to the centenary weekend we are going to be looking at different ways and different aspects of commemoration and remembrance and i will tell you a little bit about tomorrow's story tomorrow, but today we wa nt tomorrow's story tomorrow, but today we want to tell you about an ambitious plan to connect up foot paths right across europe from switzerland up to the belgian coast to make a path of peace. it is called the western front way and it all springs from a letter home written by a young british officer. "there are graves scattered up and down. the ground is so pitted and scarred and torn with shells, entangled with wire." alexander gillespie was 26 when he wrote his last letters home. in the weeks before his death, he began to plan a project that could now become his legacy. my great uncle was a
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prolific letter writer... countryfile presenter tom heap is alexander gillespie's great—nephew. well, he had this extraordinary leap of imagination when he was actually in the trenches amongst the fighting, that he thought when this is all over, when peace comes, we should put a route along no man's land for people of all nations to come and walk along. the vision is a network of marked footpaths stretching from the swiss border to the belgian coast, tracing the trench lines of the western front. that's over 630 miles. that means negotiating with dozens of landowners and local councils, but so far, reaction has been encouraging. translation: from the first moment i heard about the path, i immediately saw how it could work. i think we must widen the ways that we remember the past,
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because if we don't do that, people will lose interest. this here, this new monument, was sculpted by walter allward... high on vimy ridge stands this memorial to canadian troops who fought on the western front. here too gillespie's vision has received an enthusiastic welcome. i think it's a huge opportunity. we have so many visitors who come on pilgrimage to visit, kind of follow the path of their ancestors and this gives them an alternate route rather than taking highways and going around about. they can actually walk the western front as their ancestors did. tom heap believes projects like this provide new ways of connecting with a conflict which is moving further and further into our distant history. this to me is exactly what my great uncle envisaged when he was in those trenches 103 years ago today. he died somewhere near here, we don't know exactly where. to me it's quite spine—tingling,
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the thought that we are pretty much doing what he envisaged. "i would like to send every man, woman and child in western europe on pilgrimage along that sacred road so they might think and learn what war means from the silent witnesses on either side. a sentimental idea, perhaps, but we might make the most beautiful road in all the world." i was talking to tom heap a couple of days ago and the negotiations are still going up. it appropriate we are standing by the river somme because this marks the current southern boundary of the paths and there are about 174 miles tentatively agreed, so they are on their way. the footpath network should be operational pretty soon. tomorrow, a different story. we are
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talking about the losses they go with remembrance, talking to a family and a village from county durham and a particularly poignant connection to the centenary. robert hall reporting. if you'd like to find out more about what life was like 100 years ago, then head to the bbc online to ‘armistice day‘, a new interactive personalised journey through world war one. anyone can take a look at what role you might have played if you‘d been around in 1914. you can also hearfirst—hand accounts from those who were there, in the trenches, day in and day out and you can see what happened in your area and learn about the local heroes. just go to bbc.co.uk/armisticeday theresa may‘s official spokesman has said the government is working to achieve a brexit deal "as soon as possible" and cabinet would discuss preparations tomorrow. 0ur political correspondent iain watsonjoins me now from westminster. we keep saying we are at a critical phase, but we really are, aren‘t we?
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we are indeed at a critical phase but we should take a deep breath at the moment and wait for a few more days. there‘s been a lot of excitement over the weekend that perhaps a deal could be done or a d raft perhaps a deal could be done or a draft agreement would go to the cabinet tomorrow but it seems pretty clear that is not the case and there will not be a detailed plan discussed by cabinet ministers on withdrawing from the eu tomorrow but there will be a wide ranging discussion on brexit, including preparations for no deal. there had been hoped there might be a special summit to sign off a deal this month and the date was pencilled in around mid—november by the european council president but it now looks less likely that that particular date will happen but i am told we could still potentially see a special summit before the end of the month but the idea that there is something imminent is certainly not the case. there were reports that the brexit secretary talked to the irish government about any potential
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agreement on a backstop, the idea of agreement on a backstop, the idea of a hardboard in ireland where we could exit from that within three months. and the official spokesman at downing street was asked for his response to that and he said that the british government was making it clear they did not want any agreement on an irish backstop to be agreement on an irish backstop to be a temporary measure and they were looking through a mechanism for axing from that but he did not use this three—month period, specifically a three—month notice period and certainly the idea of a three—month period was denounced pretty strongly at every level with the irish prime minister himself and his deputy saying that any temporary backstop as they see it isn‘t a backstop as they see it isn‘t a backstop at all. and i think that is at the core of why there is not a more enthusiastic or optimistic approach at this stage, that while an awful lot of negotiations have been concluded, the government is happy about the nature of discussions on the future partnership with the eu, but they do
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say that this hurdle of agreeing the mechanism for no hardboard in ireland still has not been overcome yet and the big difference, really, is for the irish government, they wa nt is for the irish government, they wantan is for the irish government, they want an all—weather backstop to kick in no matter the circumstances and for theresa may to get this through parliament she knows this has to be temporary in nature. the gap may be narrow but it might as well be a chasm because unless it is bridged there will not be a withdrawal agreement so that is why tomorrow no d raft agreement so that is why tomorrow no draft deal will be put before cabinet ministers. the headlines on bbc news. london‘s mayor warns that it could take a generation to turn the tide on knife crime in the capital — as the number of people killed in violent crimes across london this year reaches 118. iran‘s president declares his country will continue selling its oil — breaking the sanctions reimposed by the united states. around 180,000 people are to receive a pay rise today,
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as the real living wage increases to nine—pound an hour. too many graduates in england are seeing too little payback for the big debts they rack up at university, according to a group of mps. the education select committee says there needs to be more transparency about what sort ofjobs students can expect after they graduate. 0ur education correspondent elaine dunkley reports. going to university is a big decision and investment, but with students graduating with an average debt of £50,000, is it worth it when looking atjob prospects and future earnings? today‘s report by the commons education committee highlights that 49% of recent graduates are working in non—graduate roles across the uk. it also criticises vice chancellors‘ pay, with the average salary in excess of £200,000 a year with bonuses and benefits. the report also calls for the government to reinstate means tested loans and maintenance grants for students
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from poorer backgrounds. we‘re saying that universities should look at these skills, they should be much more transparent and clear about graduate outcomes — they do a lot more for social justice, that would be value for money, to make sure the most disadvantaged students has the chance to climb the education ladder of opportunity. the department for education says universities are offering more choice and value and introduced measures such as degree apprenticeships, which allows students to earn a salary while learning and bringing valuable skills to the workforce. do you recycle everything you can at home? and could you wait four weeks between black bin refuse collections? well, for the residents of conwy county in north wales, that‘s now the norm. the council has become the first in england and wales, and the second in the uk, to change their waste collection to once every four weeks. tomos morgan has been to see how things have been after the first month. so it looks like you‘re already fairly organised. indeed.
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plastic cans, brown cardboard, glass and paper, easy to take out. sabrina edwards lives with her partner and a stepson. she is a stickler when it comes to recycling, but last month in a bid to increase recycling rates across this county, conwy council changed black bin refuse collections to once every four weeks. after three weeks we will count down to the next collection, looking at the chart waiting for it to happen. yeah, i have got to borrow from next door, she doesn‘t mind us using it. it is always full, every time. for households with six or more, an additional wheelie bin will be provided. those collecting rubbish across conwy have witnessed the locals‘ worries first—hand. residents have shown concerns to ourselves in terms of how they are going to manage. it is more those with particularly young families, we still see sometimes all of the recycling
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going into the grey bins at the moment but it is reducing as time goes on. residents here on the east side of the county have had a chance to come to terms with the new regime. they were part of the year—long trial before these four—weekly collections were implemented across the whole of the county, and the result of that trial found the recycling had increased by 14% and the amount of refuse in these black bins had decreased by almost a third. by 2020, the uk has a target of recycling 50% of all household waste and wales is currently the only country in britain meeting that figure. the welsh government have set their own target, wanting local authorities to achieve a recycling rate of 64% by the end of 2020. hitting targets and improving recycling rates is the reason behind the change here. the council will also be saving almost £400,000 a year. isn‘t this simply
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a cost—cutting measure? we are actually out there to recycle and the more we recycle, the better it is for the future. we have seen all of the programmes, blue planet, and we know that is the way forward and that is what we are doing for our residents. so it is not a cost—cutting measure? no, any benefits alongs the side are purely additional. two years ago, falkirk in scotland was the first local authority in britain to move to four—weekly collections. in the year that followed they saw almost a 5% increase in recycling. neighbouring councils are watching closely and are considering changes. with christmas around the corner, reusing the leftover turkey won‘t be the only form of recycling being done in conwy this festive season. it was only a matter
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of time — but drone racing seems to be really — well — taking off. it‘s a fairly accessible sport — you can buy one on the high street or even make one for yourself. the world drone racing championships have been taking place in southern china — and saw a new world record. tim allman reports. drone racing claims to be one of the fastest—growing sports in the world. this is clearly a past time when age more or lack thereof is no obstacle to success. it seems, anyone who was anyone in this game is young. take the women‘s final, where the winner isn‘t technically a woman yet. thailand‘s competitor is just 11 years old. but she left more senior competitors in her wake. a specially constructed track saw 62 pilots trying to set a new world record, switzerland doing the trick. with an average speed of more
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than 114 kilometres per hour. the first race, i got a super good start and just pinned it all the way down and got first place and the second one, i got a good start as well but went a little bit too high. so i needed to correct down and in that time, swift overtook me but i still got the better average time so that‘s how i won it. the overall winner was another youngster, a 15—year—old from australia, his country also taking the team prize. speed and youth releasing to be a winning combination. in a moment, it‘s time for the one 0‘clock news with ben brown but first, it‘s time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. many of us hoping for some fine weather tonight. remember, remember the 5th of november, bonfire night and we had some fireworks at the
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weekend but tonight is the night and weekend but tonight is the night and we are expecting mostly dry weather across the uk and it will be very mild. this is what is happening right now, a big lot of low pressure across spain and portugal and it is shunting mild air in our direction and you can see the motion of the cloud. a lot of cloud towards the west and in the atlantic heading our way but this is what we expect in the middle of the afternoon with temperatures peaking at around 16 or 17 degrees in the south, a little bit less cold or mild there in the north of the country that these are the values we expect at around 8pm so it is 13 degrees in london, and for most of us the weather is looking drive. this is what happens through the evening as the mild southerly wind gives a chance of one or two showers but they will be very hit and miss that there is the chance of a bit of rain across northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland and look at that on early tuesday morning. we are still
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talking double figures in the south. tomorrow the southerly winds continue and it is a mild day and there will be mist and fog in the morning but a weather front approaches and the western part of the uk, it looks as though it will be very wet over the following areas of the south west and this weather front is going to bring a lot of rain, tuesday into wednesday and it will not be a pretty picture, so once again, south—western parts of england into wales, heavy rain spilling into wednesday through northern ireland and it is a very moist day, and that is what will happen as we get these wet weather fronts. still quite mild on wednesday, 13 in london and norwich and around 30 degrees in newcastle. the outlook for the following few
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days, going into thursday and friday, you can still see the mild weather with temperatures up to 14 degrees in the south. four murders in five days in london — scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed in the capital. all the latest murder victims have been stabbed to death — community leaders say families have suffered enough. i‘m concerned for the young people, for theirfamilies... ..how much trauma the families have to go through when a tragedy of this nature occurs. i‘m concerned for the future of a generation. the mayor of london says it could take a generation to turn the tide of knife crime in the capital. also this lunchtime... mass protests in iran as the us imposes what is says are the toughest sanctions yet. donald trump and barack 0bama both on the campaign trail with just hours to go until america‘s crucial mid—term elections. torches are lit around the tower of london to mark
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