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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 5, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm... four people stabbed to death in five days in london — scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of the capital. iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed once again by america, with the iranian president declaring his country is in an "economic war". our country needs you: the mod is scrapping the need for commonwealth citizens to have lived in the uk for at least five years before they can enlist. donald trump and barack obama both on the campaign trail with just hours to go until america's crucial mid—term elections. and on after line live, all the sport with katherine downes. wayne rooney will come out of international retirement to win his 120th england cap, but the debate rages, is it a fitting tribute to him oran rages, is it a fitting tribute to him or an indulgence too far? i'll have more at 2:30pm. will it be a november the 5th to remember?
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actually it will be, very mild out there, temperatures could get up to 17, the forecast coming up for this evening because it is bonfire night. lots happened over the weekend, we will see if the weather holds for this evening. also coming up — a monumental laugh: as this tribute to footballer mo saleh is unveiled we'll ask: what is it about a statue that can sometimes get itjust so wrong. this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. hundreds more police officers are being deployed on the streets of london after four murders in five days. the metropolitan police say it's been a ‘terrible' few days in the capital, taking to 118 the number of killings in london so far this year, including 73 stabbings and 12 shootings. and there's no sign of an imminent change — the mayor of london says it
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could take a decade to deal with the problem of violent crime. richard galpin reports from the scene of one of the latest murders. this is where 15—year—old jay hughes was fatally stabbed here in lewisham last thursday. there are reports that two men who had been following him in a taxi, jumped out and attacked him as he went to get some takeaway food. friends have described jay, who is also known as jai sewell, as loving and thoughtful. the priest at the local church showed me the candles jay's family had lit in his memory at yesterday's service. the family in profound shock. they are absolutely shattered. it is a shock for them, for the entire family, and they are equally looking for answers, just as the rest of the community is. as well as jay, 38—year—old rocky djelal was stabbed
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to death in southwark on october 31st. on 2nd november, 17—year—old malcolm mide—madariola was fatally stabbed in clapham. and yesterday, a 22—year—old man was found with fatal stab wounds in bromley. of the 118 murders so far in london this year, the police say a significant number were stabbings, and today there have been renewed calls for the police to have more funding. it is really important we have all public agencies, councils, the nhs, social services, education, the police, working with central government to solve this problem, but ultimately it means the government has to invest in policing and preventative services too. in a statement today, the metropolitan police described the violence as senseless, but played down the issue of funding. it's notjust a question of funding, you know,
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we as the police have a big role to play, but this is a collective responsibility. we are always prioritising the work that we do, violence, tackling violence, is an absolute priority for the metropolitan police. but according to some politicians, this wave of violent crime in which many young people have been killed could persist for a generation before it is brought under control. richard galpin, bbc news, in south—east london. for more on this lets speak to patrick green, ceo of the ben kinsella trust, a charity set up to knife crime in the wake of the murder of its namesake, 16 year old ben kinsella, who 10 years ago was stabbed to death in an unprovoked attack. where are we now in comparison with that stage? we are in a worse position, but the believe the most terrible thing i can say. we had falling knife crime for part of the last decade and then it has started to increase and increase rapidly in
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the last few years. and we are really at a crisis point. why has it got so much worse? well, if we look at why knife crime was falling, and it fell to about 50% of where it is 110w it fell to about 50% of where it is now in 2014, and compare this to glasgow, which had the same fall rate, the response in scotland was to continue funding the interventions, continue funding the policing... but it was the nature of the intervention, notjust the money thrown at it. what have they done in scotla nd thrown at it. what have they done in scotland that you say london needs to do? it's tackling both the symptoms and the cause. so this is cause and effect. policing tackles the symptoms, and if you don't tackle the causes, all you've got is a c0 nveyor tackle the causes, all you've got is a conveyor belt coming down the line. so as soon as you take one set of measures against one group of young people, or any offenders, then there's another lot waiting to take their place, and this is what we've
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seenin their place, and this is what we've seen in london, and this is why the commissioner herself has said this can't be tackled by policing alone. so it's not just can't be tackled by policing alone. so it's notjust an issue about policemen on the beach, which is what we hear again and again, we also hear lack of male role models for these young men, who turn to gangs and others, looking for that sort of guidance in life, if you like. yes, there are a whole number of things. the police do a very good job, certainly at the moment we do need more of them. we are seeing an increase in the problem. to do what, because a lot of people say come up what does that mean, more stop and search, which the mayor of london says he is bringing in, which he says he is bringing in, which he says helps. is that the right approach? stop and search isjust one police tactic. what the police are saying is over the last years, an increase in murders in london alone, there is a huge resource occasion for each murder that is stretching police numbers. we see in terms of arrests, three out of four
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knife crimes, the offender is not brought tojustice. knife crimes, the offender is not brought to justice. that is an issue for policing but also for public confidence. we need notjust police workers, we need youth workers. we need a sustainable level of investment to tackle this, and it has to tackle both prevention, because remember now child is born carrying a knife, it is a learned behaviour. a lot of people say a lot of youngsters are going out on the streets with knives because they feel they need that as protection, they don't feel safe, and that is their pre—emptive measure, if you like. and this is all part of a huge problem. this is a component of gangs and drugs, so young people don't feel safe, because there are gang members out there who they now carries a knife, if there are two friends, one carries a knife, the other is likely through peer pressure. we refer to it as a virus, we see it spread and spread and
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spread. were you at the ben kinsella trust when it started?” spread. were you at the ben kinsella trust when it started? i was not. i wonder if you would think we would be here ten years later? yellow macro i was their eight years ago. it was an ex—eastenders actress in front of the campaign, we were all familiar with the work back then and it was the sense that something could be done, looking back.|j it was the sense that something could be done, looking back. i go back, we had a number of years when we we re back, we had a number of years when we were driving knife crime down. we need to get back to doing what we we re need to get back to doing what we were doing in that period between 2011 and 2014, we need to learn from the scottish model, they continue to fund their interventions. they have had over a decade of falling knife crime. this is not something you can't turn around particularly quickly, but it has to have sustainable investment, something has to last longer than a mayoral term, longer than a government term, it has to have a ten or 20 year
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strategy. it is a generational thing now, then? it is, and left uncontrollable blight another generation. when people watching now, perhaps some parents have done the unimaginable thing of burying their children as a result of this sort of crime, looking at us all talking about it, we don't seem to be getting anywhere. no, and these last five days have been very difficult for everybody who is involved in anti—knife crime work. there is a real need to push this, this is one of the big priorities of this is one of the big priorities of this country at the moment. we have got to look at what we're doing to tackle this. we have got to make it easierfor young people. tackle this. we have got to make it easier for young people. it tackle this. we have got to make it easierfor young people. it is very easy for a young person to get a job with a drug dealer, you don't have to do everything, they will find you. that is very difficult to get a career. we need to do far more to tackle the culture that is helping gangs and drug barons bring in more
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young people, and lead them into this terrible lifestyle. patrick, very good of you to come in and talk about it, thank you very much. we will be talking about this throughout the afternoon on afternoon live. president rouhani of iran says his country is in a state of economic war, and has promised to, in his words, ‘proudly bypass' us sanctions. it comes after the united states imposed sweeping sanctions against the country today. in a news conference a few moments ago the us said the sanctions will continue until iran ends its destabilising behaviour in the middle east. naomi grimley reports. today, we're imposing all sanctions that were previously lifted under the nuclear deal, it includes energy, banking and shipping and shipbuilding industries. since the trump administration came into office, we've done 19 rounds of sanctions, targeting 168 iranian entities. today's sanctions will accelerate the rapid decline of
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international economic activity in iran since the plantation of our strategy in may. since that time, since back in may, over 100 countries have withdrawn from iran oi’ countries have withdrawn from iran or cancelled plans to do business there. it should be noted that if a company evades our sanctions regime, the united states will live a severe swift penalties on it, including potential sanctions. i promise you that doing business with iran in defiance of our sanctions will ultimately be a much more painful business decision than pulling out of iran and than being connected with iran entirely. over the last five months, treasury has been committed some of the most impactful sanctions ever seen. committed some of the most impactful sanctions ever seen. combined with the previous actions, over 900 iran related sanctions have been targeted and of the administration over the la st two and of the administration over the last two years, marking the highest ever level us sanctions on iran. we
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have made it clear they will face mounting isolation until they fundamentally change their destabilising behaviour. iran's leaders must cease immediately, they must stop ballistic missiles and abandon their nuclear plans if they continue tapp want to avoid the sanctions. we will take action to disrupt their activity time and time again. that news conference a short time ago. rules on who can join the british armed forces are set to change. currently, commonwealth citizens can onlyjoin the army, navy or air force if they have lived in the uk for five years, but that limit is set to be scrapped — meaning any commonwealth national will be eligble to join up. our defence correspondent jonathan beale can tell us more. let's just clear up exactly what the rule has been up until now. the
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rules change over time, the truth is, and since 2016, there has been a limit to the number of people from commonwealth nations who can join the british armed forces. that cap is 200. above that, if you are from a commonwealth nation and you have beenin a commonwealth nation and you have been in the uk for five years, you can then apply to join the armed forces. so this tap is turned on and off, depending on where recruitment is in the armed forces, and depending on the size of the armed forces. so after the 2010 defence cuts, a lot of british soldiers were joining thejob queue, and that meant the government had to clamp down on the number of people applying from the commonwealth. now we are at another era, which is essentially they can't fill the ranks. there is a recruitment crisis, and therefore they are turning to the commonwealth to provide the troops, it is mostly the army for stock let's just separate
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oui’ army for stock let's just separate our terms, there is a recruitment crisis and they can't fill the ranks, but ba nts crisis and they can't fill the ranks, but bants people still wanting to join? there ranks, but bants people still wanting tojoin? there is an issue with that process. err there is a huge issue with that process. to be fairto huge issue with that process. to be fair to the government, we are in an era of high employment, so there's a lot of competition to people through the door. there isn't a major combat operation, and a recruiting sergeant isa war operation, and a recruiting sergeant is a war essentially. added to this is a war essentially. added to this isa is a war essentially. added to this is a mess of the government's own making, and that is handing out the recruitment, centralising it, giving it to recruitment, centralising it, giving ittoa recruitment, centralising it, giving it to a private contractor, capita, other people stick and are in there somewhere, because they are so frustrated with it. but you talk to anybody who has tried to go through this process, and i have. it is tortuous. you may have had childhood asthma, even if you have recovered, they will want to see medical certificates that show you have
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recovered. trying to go through the computer system, it crashes, recovered. trying to go through the computersystem, it crashes, it recovered. trying to go through the computer system, it crashes, it has been crashing over time, it has been an unmitigated disaster that has turned people off, people waiting to long, a year to get through the whole process. there was a time when the army had an office on the high street. he would speak to a retired sergeant major, and you would be there in three weeks. we're kind of quy there in three weeks. we're kind of guy that that because the army has made some changes because they realise it is going so badly that they are now putting people in uniform into the process to try to make the connection with people. but you know, there is a big question, can this contract, the defence secretary got a very rough ride recently in the defence select committee about this. he was told that the army is disappearing before your own eyes, and this is happening on your watch, he is being asked can you continue with this contract with capita, and the moment they say they are, it is under review. another r.
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you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines — scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of london after four people were stabbed to death in less than a week. iran ira n vows iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed by america, saying his country is in an economic war. the army is scrapping rules that say come and will citizens have to have lived in the uk for five years before they can join the army. and in sport, wayne rooney will win his 120th english cap this weekley unbeaten as a boxer, now floyd mayweather has signed up to be a professional mixed martial arts fighter, at the age of 41. and owen farrell will be available to play against the all blacks this weekend after escaping punishment for this
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crunching tackle against south africa on saturday. i will be back with more on all of those stories just after half past. taoiseach leo varadkar has told prime minister theresa may that ireland will consider a "review mechanism" to the controversial northern ireland backstop plan. he spoke with the prime minister earlier today to discuss how to avoid a hard border between northern ireland and the republic. asa as a government, we are working very ha rd to as a government, we are working very hard to get an agreement, ideally by the end of the year, but one thing we can't countenance is any idea that there would be a three—month limit on the backstop. a backstop with a three—month limit, an expiry date of that nature, is not worth the paper it is written on, and what the paper it is written on, and what the uk government has signed up to isa the uk government has signed up to is a legally operative backstop that will apply at least until we have a new agreement to supersede it, and i think it is reasonable for us to
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expect a country like the united kingdom and a government like the uk government to stand by its commitments. ? inaudible question to be honest it has been a problem all along, the united kingdom in many ways is a divided kingdom, the blast it 50—50 on whether they want to leave the european union or not, the cabinet seems divided, parliament is divided, and that has made it very difficult to come to an agreement. i would much prefer to have a united kingdom, and a united country to be a partner in this negotiation but we don't service have to work through. tha nkfully don't service have to work through. thankfully in ireland we have a government that's united and we have a parliament that as well is largely united behind the government. it
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doesn't help, but that's the way it is. wejust doesn't help, but that's the way it is. we just have to work through that and get an agreement. adam fleming is in brussels, we have to talk about it and get an agreement, thatis talk about it and get an agreement, that is a sentiment we hear a lot, but you really need to keep an eye on twitter to see what they are really thinking. allan yes, funny you mention that, this morning there was a brief flurry because the telegraph was reporting, the crowd had stunned the irishman he spoke to them last week by saying this review mechanism for the backstop could be triggered unilaterally by the uk, and they could leave with giving three—month notice, which really annoyed the irish. we got a message on twitter from leo varadkar‘s deputy, simon coakley, who said a back stop that is time—limited or could be unilaterally used by the uk would not be a backstop at all. that was then retweeted i michel barnier‘s deputy, and last time i checkedit barnier‘s deputy, and last time i checked it had more than 1000 likes, which shows you how people lap up
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her tweets from peering behind the curtain of the brexit negotiations, which are very secret at the moment. that interview clip has now been superseded by a statement from his office, because he spoke to theresa may by phone earlier today, and i think we can take a look at the statement. it says the prime minister, theresa may, raised the possibility of a review mechanism for the backstop. the taoiseach indicated an open list to continue a review, provided it was clear the outcome of any such review could not involve a unilateral decision to end the backstop. that is the uk getting one thing it wanted, a review mechanism, so the backstop does not necessarily have to exist for ever, but also not getting a unilateral power so but also not getting a unilateral power so in london we don't need this any more, it will have to be a joint decision between the uk and the eu. also what is very key about all of this and we don't know yet, all of this and we don't know yet, all this talk about the uk wide
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backstop, does that mean that there will not have to be the original northern ireland only backstop in the withdrawal agreement as well? that is the uk's number one priority, to get that northern ireland only bit to get out of the treaty and replaced by the uk wide bit. we are now clairol whether they have got that. wagg we are now clearer about many things but over the weekend this flurry of excitement saying we could be very close to a deal, and then today we sort of art that we are not, and then what we do know, the one thing we really do know, time is running out now. and the reason there was a flurry of excitement is because of time. you will remember that the uk really wa nted time. you will remember that the uk really wanted there to be an extraordinary brexit summit where the deal was effectively signed off by all the other eu leaders on the weekend of 17th and 18th of november. eu said it is looking like that won't be possible but they didn't close off the possibility entirely. so what people have been
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doing is looking at that weekend of the 17th of november and kind of counting backwards like a reverse advent calendar with all the key dates that you would have, like meetings of european affairs ministers, prime ministerial advisers eu ambassadors, counting to the point at which you would need a dealfor all the point at which you would need a deal for all of the point at which you would need a dealfor all of that to the point at which you would need a deal for all of that to and people got this week, which is why people thought well, this is where we will have to see some progress of a deal if there is to be special summit in november. but then you chat to people in brussels and the uk and they say it doesn't have to be that we can, it could be later in november, which means this whole process could happen again next week or the week after. thanks, adam (i) iain watsonjointly from westminster. there is a cabinet meeting tomorrow, because regardless of what brussels, dublin, everyone else thinks, theresa may still has a battle within westminster. that's right, clearly she has to get the support of her cabinet for ever she moves next, but as far as i am aware
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there will not be a plan on the table, there will not be a draft withdrawal agreement, we are not on the cusp of some kind of agreement, and certainly that conversation she had with the irish prime minister suggested there is still a gap that needs to be bridged between them. but there will be a full discussion about where she might move in order to get a deal. there will be a discussion about what kind of regulatory checks might be necessary between britain and ireland and discussion of progress of planning for a new deal scenario tomorrow. but we are told basically there will not be a decisive cabinet meeting by any means, still the possibility of having a summit late in the month but they are not at the stage right now that they can agree to a draft withdrawal treaty. the key issue of course is this idea of how do you avoid permanently a hard border in northern ireland? it does look as though there is at least some agreement to review the mechanism, as they call it. for exiting from any kind of agreement, any kind of backstop, which would only kick in
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really if a future trade deal could not be done and implemented in time to avoid a hard border. but the trouble is this, where divisions may occur, and that is whether britain would have unilateral right to withdraw further down the line, if they say we want this backstop to end, if there is effectively an irish/ eu veto on that, then some people not least of all boris johnson and some long—standing leave campaigners will say hang on a minute, if we need their agreement, that could keep us linked into the eu's that could keep us linked into the eu's systems, customs, regulatory checks, all the rest of it, in perpetuity, they might not ever be an excerpt from this. downing street would say that is rubbish, but if that fear is there, there is a bigger chance that whatever deal theresa may brings back, that deal could then be voted down. although this might seem like a very technical, very narrow issue, it may as well be a chasm between britain and the eu because unless it is
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bridged, there will be no withdrawal agreement she can get through parliament. we're just a day away from the midterm elections in the us in which voters will be electing all members of the house of representatives and thirty—five members of the senate —— as well as some state governorships. the outcome is farfrom certain — but one thing is clear, there is a record number of women standing for office. our washington correspondent, jane o'brien is on capitol hill for us now. with just these days to go, how do you assess where we are? with just these days to go, how do you assess where we are ?|j with just these days to go, how do you assess where we are? i am not entirely certain, only idiots would predict, and i happen to have somebody with a crystal ball with me right now, mallory newell, who is with the independent bipartisan polling firm, if source. so who is going to win the house? at its source we believe that democrats are poised to take back the house
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tomorrow night. why are you confident, because you got it wrong in 2016? that is one thing people do like to say about pollsters, but the reality is that most public opinion polls were actually pretty close to the popular vote, when it came to 2016. however, that doesn't mean there aren't lessons to be learned, and we have still done a lot of research and learning for the midterms cycle. one of the things we know is that it is best to not rely oni's know is that it is best to not rely on 1's sole indicator or one single forecast, so what we at its source have done, we have built a website called the political atlas, where we bring together our polling data with expert race rankings from the university of virginia and social media analytics, so we can kind of trying to lick them together and allow people to reach their own conclusions with multiple sources of data. you are only as good as the data. you are only as good as the data you get, aren't you? how do you know voters are telling the truth, particularly republicans, a lot of whom don't want to admit they support donald trump? that's a great
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question. one of the things our polls offers us is that its source allow was polling online, which allows for a greater level of anonymity because you are not admitting something to another person on the other end of the phone. and what about women, people are talking a lot about women being are talking a lot about women being a real voting bloc which way are they breaking? it is hard to say yet. there is a good reason why people are talking about women, mainly suburban women. so if you lick at the house, there is a number of races that are so very close right now, and most of them tend to be these suburban districts, where perhaps you have women that may have voted for tromp all voted republican in 2016 but are now starting to align themselves more with democratic issues, such as how to ca re democratic issues, such as how to care and really an outrage against rampant self. so i think looking at suburban women in this kebe district is going to be a key indicator of what will happen tomorrow night. you
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mentioned health care as being one of the key issues, but donald trump is talking all about immigration. he is talking all about immigration. he is not focusing on the economy which is not focusing on the economy which is doing really well, why not? why is doing really well, why not? why is immigration such a big sell? immigration is a key issue for his base, for republicans, we have seen that in our polling for months. but the main issue in this election is truly donald trump himself, and his vision of what america should be. and so what he's doing by talking about immigration for his base is sort of trying to some outrage by invoking this idea of a migrant ca rava n invoking this idea of a migrant caravan marching towards america, because on the other side, on the democratic side, you have people that are outraged against trump, like i said, this is a referendum against him, looking at access to health care, and that outrage is already there. so what he is trying to do by talking about immigration is really gen up his base and hopefully motivate them to turn out tomorrow. there is already 30 million—plus americans who have already voted. when are we going to
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know if you are right?|j already voted. when are we going to know if you are right? i think there are some states on the east coast that polls closed pretty early, that will be good indicator is to watch will be good indicator is to watch will stop for example, right here in northern virginia, you have a few suburban districts, such as the tenth seventh, but i also think you can look to states like from florida and georgia. in florida you have toss—up governor and senate races, and in georgia you have a very close governor boz mcrae says well that i think we'll be ready interesting to know what will happen tomorrow night. thank you very much indeed for joining night. thank you very much indeed forjoining me, night. thank you very much indeed for joining me, can night. thank you very much indeed forjoining me, can you predict the weather next? i hope so. hopefully better. we will find out tomorrow. very quickly, the focus has been on what donald trump stands for but there doesn't seem to be a figurehead if you like for the democrats? that is a very interesting question, because what we have seen on the democratic side is that a lot of insurgent candidates, people who are very
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liberal, very progressive, unseating the more establishment, better recognised incumbents. and they have won at a primary level, several weeks ago, but what we are now trying to work out is whether or not they are going to appeal to a broader electorate, and whether or not they are going to be an auto that it's those independent voters of the more moderate voters, or whether they will have the same problem as president trump has had on the other side, that they're just too extreme to attract those independents. let's ta ke let's take a look at the weather. a lot of people in europe have been enjoying the sunshine. that is a question you often get asked. i want some sunshine, shall i go to the mediterranean because it is bound to be better over there
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thanit is bound to be better over there than it is year. actually, the a nswer than it is year. actually, the answer is no. i will show you some pictures from the last day or two. this is cicely. this is a lot worse compared to what we've had. the weather generally in italy since even before halloween has been terrible over there. there are reports because of the storm damage that 14 million trees have been damaged or blown down. so clearly the extent of the storm across italy isa the extent of the storm across italy is a substantial. people have lost their lives. this is the heart of their lives. this is the heart of the mediterranean. it's not been great across spain either. it looks like the unsettled weather is going to continue. the interesting thing is, thanks to some of the storms we've had milder weather because the
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storms have been pushing the milder in our direction. spain here and italy. it looks like the swirling hurricane. the cloud is going from south northwoods so the bad weather is there. it means we are enjoying someone. and it's mild for november the 5th. 17 degrees the top temperature today. let's get on with the forecasts. can you do me a favour, i could not remember all of the statistics! anything else? no. you are not off to the mediterranean and time soon are you? no. let's get the forecasts. with this mild air also comes the
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risk of mist and fog and it has been misty in the last day or so. there isa misty in the last day or so. there is a wider shot of the storm across italy which is blowing itself out. across spain, you can see the cloud moving from the south up to north pushing in our direction. temperatures at least 15 or 16 degrees celsius. the actual focus for bonfire night, a lot of people marked the date over the weekend, but tonight traditionally, we're talking about double figures in the north of the country. you can see there's milder wins. that will continue through tonight. temperatures falling now lower than 11 tonight in london. 11 is closer
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to what you would get in the daytime and this is a night. some mist and fog tomorrow across the midlands into parts of yorkshire. the next thing we are watching is the weather going downhill across western parts of the uk. as we go through tuesday and wednesday the west country and the whole south—west of england and wales into northern ireland will get a real soaking. all of this bad weather across western europe right now continues and a weather front stretching all the way from iberia. the worst of it will be across our pa rt the worst of it will be across our part of the world on tuesday night and wednesday. to the east of that it looks like it will be more hit and miss. ithink it looks like it will be more hit and miss. i think there will be some sunshine as well. wednesday across lincolnshire and the north—east of england should be decent but in wales it will be pouring with rain. we're talking about these mild
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temperatures. still 14 in london but the weather is unsettled. i would rather it be mild and unsettled. thanks for that. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: four people stabbed to death in five days in london. scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of the capital. iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed once again by america, with the iranian president declaring his country is in an "economic war". our country needs you. the mod is scrapping the need for commonwealth citizens to have lived in the uk for at least 5 years before they can enlist. donald trump and barack obama both on the campaign trail with just hours to go until america's crucial mid term elections. a nottingham retailer had to evacuate 200 animals from its premises after a huge blaze destroyed a number of businesses in nottingham. sport now on afternoon live
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with katherine downes. wayne rooney is coming out of international retirement to play for england later this month, but the news has not been welcomed by all quarters of the footballing world. i have just dropped i havejust dropped my i have just dropped my notes on the floor you couldn't pick them up for me could you? no. wayne rooney will win his 120th cap for england. he will be in front of a home crowd at wembley playing a friendly against the united states, the country where he now lives playing for dc united and all of that money going to the wayne rooney foundation. the criticism is, does he deserve his place on the team? many would say no, england have
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moved on and they have reached the semifinal of the world cup. they should be developing the talent coming through. peter shilton, england's former goalkeeper, says they should not be giving away caps like gifts. he says wayne rooney should get his moment in front of his home crowd for wembley fans to say thank you for the dead but he doesn't need to be part of the team or to be on the pitch. the debate raises. another household name making a come back — floyd mayweather has signed a deal. if at the back boxing career and you are 41 years old and you sign a deal to becoming mixed martial arts fighter. why would you want to do
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that? floyd mayweather will fight tenshin nasukawa on new year's eve. he is unbeaten in the boxing ring in five different weight categories. he has never fought professionally and mixed martial arts. i can wrestle a little bit. i can box a lot. we will just see. i can do at all. i can do anything if i set my mind to it. i will speak to my team and we will be on the same page. one thing we have to do, we have to have rules because there are rules and regulations to everything we do in life. i will speak to the guys from 18 so we can go out there and do what we have to do. to rugby union, and a big boost
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for england ahead of their second autumn international against new zealand this weekend. co—ca ptain owen farrell is free to play. he's not going to be punished for this thumping tackle at the end of their match against south africa. it was the last play of the match and helped england hold on for a hard fought win. lots of commentators and former players felt it was at least a foul, but the authorities disagree. in rugby league, george burgess will appear at a disciplinary hearing on tuesday evening after new zealand cited an incident during sunday's second test at anfield. the england foward is seen to have his fingers in the eyes of new zealand's captain dallin wa tenny zelez—niak. england won the match 20—14, to take an unassailable lead in the 3 match series. johanna konta has got a new, permanent coach. she's hired dimitri zavialoff who she worked with one a trial basis at the kremlin cup in moscow last month. the frenchman was stan wawrinka's first coach. on the eve of the first test against sri lanka, england captain joe root says his team will be trying a bolder and more courageous approach to their cricket.
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england haven't won a test series in sri lanka for 17 years. root says its time for them to try something different and that players are feeling the competition for places on the team. i have played 70 odd games and he has been involved in every one of them so it will be different. it has been strange him not being around but it creates opportunities for other guys to stand up and take that leadership role within the squad. you are starting to see that already which is promising. i am sure that is how it he would want it, for somebody else to stand up and do something specialfor somebody else to stand up and do something special for inland. the first test starts in sri lanka tomorrow. that's all the sport for now. an investigation is underway after a massive fire at the cattle market in nottingham.
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several businesses were destroyed in the blaze which broke out about 5.30pm last night. elise chamberlain reports. in the daylight of the extent of the destruction caused by the fire last night is clear. many businesses have been destroyed. the buildings that survived are dealing with the aftermath. tim owns a reptile business which is next to some of the flattened buildings. the trees that were separating us have been flattened and they were on fire. we have a lot of animals in the shop and my first thought was how can we get them out. he had to evacuate 200 animals but help is on hand. members of the public were on the grass watching so they were running backwards and forwards and luckily they all escaped. you could feel the heat from here even though we were far away from it. there was just
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fire everywhere. it was spreading so quickly. it was a dark night and the sky was lit up with flames and smoke. as well as the buildings themselves a multitude of things being stored here also went up in flames. fireworks and welding equipment. and today you can still see the remains of gas canisters and destroyed cars. for today at least the shop is closed well the team focus on getting things back to normal. there are lucky, it could have been very different. he just giving page has been set up to help the businesses severely affected. shocking images used on cigarette packets helped reduce the number of smokers, and now surgeons are calling for the same thing to be done with firework packaging. they say that if people saw pictures of the horrific burns caused by them, it could cut down on the number of injuries. frances head, who was badly injured by a firework, supports the idea. i was in a school canteen and another pupil through a firework
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into the school canteen. it landed on me and exploded, resulting in second and third degree burns across my stomach and both thighs, a superficial burn underneath my eye and on my right arm. i think if we put graphic images on packaging like surgeons are wanting, like the fire service are wanting, it will really drill into people's heads it isn't funny, it is a firearm, it can cause a lot of damage and they should not be played with. they should not be done incorrectly either. we'll take a look at the business news in a moment. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of london after four people were stabbed to death in less than a week. iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed once again by america with the iranian president declaring his country is in an "economic war". the mod is scrapping the need
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for commonwealth citizens to have lived in the uk for at least 5 years before they can enlist in the british armed forces. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: activity in the uk's services sector slowed in october compared to september. that's according to the ihs markit survey. the services sector , which includes banks, hotels and retailers, accounts for around 76% of the uk economy. the survey says it lots of companies were concerned about brexit uncertainty and the economic outlook. sales of new cars in the uk recovered slightly in october, although they were still down on a year previously. according to the society of motor manufacturers & traders, sales were down around 3% on last year. though this is an improvement on september, when there was a 20.5% decline. britanny ferries has revealed that uk holidaymakers are delaying booking channel crossings for next summer amid concerns about the consequences of brexit.
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forward bookings were down between 4% and 5% from some of its regular customers. a spokesman for the ferry operator said people were worried about the impact on areas such as pet travel, health insurance and driving licences. america's new sanctions against iran have come into effect this morning. the idea is to put economic pressure on the country and force it to change its behaviour. but europe is doing all it can against the sanctions. they want to help companies handle the sanctions and we can hear more about the sanctions and how they are affecting companies. how did we get here? this was part
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of the 2015 iran nuclear deal that was of the 2015 iran nuclear deal that was signed by president obama. donald trump campaigned on saying this was a very bad deal and that he vowed to rip them up. before the mid—term elections he can say he has ripped up that deal and now he has reimposed the sanctions on iran. this marks the end of a grace period in which companies had to change their practices. how does this affect businesses? in terms of businesses that are in iran we are talking about many banks and shipping companies, oil companies. they will feel the heavy impact of the sanctions. for international companies, if you look at boeing for example immediately after that 2015 deal was signed boeing had agreed to
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a $20 billion deal with iran. that is now being scrapped. other companies are starting to move away from that because they don't want to be in defiance of the sanctions. but when it comes to european companies they have vowed to remain part of they have vowed to remain part of the deal and they will try and find some kind of workaround in order to continue to do business with companies in iran. uk holiday—makers are delaying looking —— booking channel crossings because of concerns about brexit. brittany ferries have said bookings we re brittany ferries have said bookings were down between four and 5%. that does not seem like a huge amount but if regular customers at this time of year are booking their ferries for
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six months‘ time and they are concerned about economic outlook and brexit, that is something to take note of. particularly because the ferry crossing business is quite an important part of the tourist market. the pound is also important. it's market. the pound is also important. it‘s all looking fairly positive. the pound has done quite well. it‘s been encouraged by lots of progress about wrecked it. the pound is looking healthier than it did last week against the euro. the euro has got italy ‘s worries weighing on it. we are likely to see a stand—off between the european union and italy over that budget. a bit of pound
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strengthening and euro weakness. thank you very much. too many graduates in england are seeing too little payback for the big debts they rack up at university, according to a group of mps. the education select committee says there needs to be more transparency about what sort ofjobs students can expect after they graduate. our education correspondent elaine dunkley reports. going to university is a big decision and investment, but with students graduating with an average debt of £50,000, is it worth it when looking atjob prospects and future earnings? today‘s report by the commons education committee highlights that 49% of recent graduates are working in non—graduate roles across the uk. it also criticises vice chancellors‘ pay, with the average salary in excess of £200,000 a year with bonuses and benefits. the report also calls for the government to reinstate means tested loans and maintenance grants for students from poorer backgrounds. we‘re saying that universities should look at these skills,
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they should be much more transparent and clear about graduate outcomes — they do a lot more for social justice, that would be value for money, to make sure the most disadvantaged students has the chance to climb the education ladder of opportunity. the department for education says universities are offering more choice and value and introduced measures such as degree apprenticeships, which allows students to earn a salary while learning and bringing valuable skills to the workforce. a branch of the restaurant, zizzi, will reopen tomorrow in salisbury, nearly eight months after traces of the nerve agent novichok were found inside the premises. it was one of a number of locations in salisbury that had to be cordoned off, after the poisoning of sergei and yulia skripal in the city. will glennon is in salisbury for us. good afternoon. it was a months ago
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that cd screw ball and yulia skripal we re that cd screw ball and yulia skripal were dining in this restaurant and a short time later they were found on a bench not froth from here poisoned by that nerve agent. since then the restau ra nt by that nerve agent. since then the restaurant has been refurbished and it is now reopening to the public, a real symbol of the recovery in salisbury. it is right in the city centre and a very visual reminder of what happened. let‘s talk to the recovery coordinator, alistair cunningham. this is a real milestone. it's brilliant. the confident this restaurant has shown in investing in this wonderful facility in the heart of the city is brilliant. it's brilliant for business, brilliant felicity and in the run—up to christmas what a great to opena the run—up to christmas what a great to open a restaurant. people can go to open a restaurant. people can go to the christmas market, see the cathedral and have something to eat.
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lam cathedral and have something to eat. iamso cathedral and have something to eat. i am so pleased this is happening. how difficult has it been in the last eight months? we have seen footfall drop by 20%. it's getting back and things like this investment will help that. we are still waiting to see visitors coming back. we are 15 or 20% down on visitor numbers. that will take counsel —— take time. people want to start exploring the city again and hearing that the re sta u ra nt city again and hearing that the restaurant has reopened and it's a wonderful restaurant, so come along and have something to eat and enjoy the city. that will start building that momentum. salisbury has got so much to offer, we just want people back here. do you feel the city is starting to bounce back now?m back here. do you feel the city is starting to bounce back now? it is. you have the christmas market starting at the end of the month. the run up to christmas is always rate and the cathedral with the
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heritage and history, that is a place you want to come christmas. i think we will see some real things happening in the city now. long—term with government support and local partners and more investment, that is key. it was a commercial decision to invest in this restaurant and thatis to invest in this restaurant and that is a real vote of confidence. do you wish the authorities could have done their cleaning a bit quicker? i don't know. they did a meticulous and brilliant job. painstaking, methodical, following the scientific advice. they took the time that needed to be taken. people need to be reassured the city is clean. but the turnaround to get this back has been so impressive. there has been a lot of bad things and we can forget that and we are not complacent but this is such a vote of confidence and i want people
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to see this and think i will go and invest in salisbury, i will come back and visit the city. thank you very much. salisbury is not quite there and there is still work ongoing but this restaurant reopening as a real milestone for the recovery of salisbury. now, the latest sculpture to shock the footballing world for its sheer ineptitude has gone on show in sharm el sheik in egypt. this is the brand new bust of the liverpool and egypt footballer mo salah, which was on display yesterday at the world youth forum. it claims to depict the striker with his arms out wide in the goalscoring celebration he is famous for. but the figure has sparked a satirical response on social media. indeed, for many, it‘s less mo salah and more leo sayer. the piece was met with the sound of silence by another critic, who said it looked much more like art garfunkel.
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so in some sense then it is a work of art? unfortunately, it has triggered memories of this infamous bust of cristiano ronaldo which was met with worldwide ridicule and eventually replaced. it is not known how mr salah himself has reacted to this less than flattering representation but it‘s hard to imagine he‘d be anything other than stony faced. at 3pm we are expecting an announcement from the spice girls. very exciting. time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. many of us are hoping for fine
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weather tonight. tonight is the night and we are expecting mostly dry weather across the uk and it‘s going to be very mild. this is what‘s happening right now. low pressure a cross what‘s happening right now. low pressure across pain and poor developer moment and that is shunting milder in our direction. a lot of cloud towards the west and out in the atlantic which is heading no way. this is what we are expecting in the middle of the afternoon. temperatures could peak at around 17 degrees in the south. these are the values we are expecting around 8pm this evening. still around 13 degrees in london and for most of us the weather is looking dry. this is what happens tonight. the mild winds and the chance of one of two showers but they will be hit and miss. the
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chancellor little bit of rain across northern ireland and western scotland. early on tuesday temperatures still high in the south. another mild day tomorrow. some mist and fog in the morning. a weather front approaching western parts of the uk and it does look as though it‘s going to be very wet over the following 24 hours in south—western parts of england and wales. this weather front is going to bring a lot of rain on tuesday night into wednesday. it will not be a pretty picture at all. south—western parts of england into wales but also some heavy rain spelling in on wednesday through northern ireland and western parts of scotland. very mild air coming from the south and that is where we get these very wet weather fronts. still quite mild on wednesday. the
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outlook for the following few days, we keep that mild weather into thursday and friday. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 3pm — four people stabbed to death in five days in london. scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of the capital. we are absolutely committed to do absolutely nothing we can to bring down those levels of violence. we have specialist investigators investigating each of the murders from the last week. iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed once again by america — with the iranian president declaring his country is in an "economic war". our country needs you: the mod is scrapping the need for commonwealth citizens to have lived in the uk for at least 5 years before they can enlist. donald trump and barack obama both on the campaign trail with just hours to go until america‘s crucial mid—term elections.
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and all the sport with katherine downes. thanks very much. are they giving away england caps like gifts? peter shields and certainly feels so, the former england goalkeeper saying it is not right that wayne rooney should be taken out of international retirementjust rooney should be taken out of international retirement just win his 120th cap and be given a good wembley sendoff. what do you think? more at half past three. wembley sendoff. what do you think? more at half past threelj wembley sendoff. what do you think? more at half past three. i will tell you at half past three, then! with the weather forecast, tomasz schafernaker. the next 48 hours will bring a lot of mild weather. towards the end of the week, a little bit more unsettled. more coming up in half an hour. also coming up — the spice girls announce a reunion tour — although victoria beckham is not expected to bejoining the four other members. hundreds more police
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officers are being deployed on the streets of london after four murders in five days. the metropolitan police say it‘s been a ‘terrible‘ few days in the capital — taking to 118 the number of killings in london so far this year, including 73 stabbings and 12 shootings. and there‘s no sign of an imminent change — the mayor of london says it could take a decade to deal with the problem of violent crime. richard galpin reports from the scene of one of the latest murders. this is where15—year—old jay hughes was fatally stabbed here in lewisham last thursday. there are reports that two men, who had been following him in a taxi, jumped out and attacked him as he
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went to get some takeaway food. friends have described jay, who is also known as jai sewell, as loving and thoughtful. the priest at the local church showed me the candles jay‘s family had lit in his memory at yesterday‘s service. the family in profound shock. they are absolutely shattered. it is a shock for them, for the entire family, and they are equally looking for answers, just as the rest of the community is. as well as jay, 38—year—old rocky djelal was stabbed to death in southwark on october 31st. on 2nd november, 17—year—old malcolm mide—madariola was fatally stabbed in clapham. and yesterday, a 22—year—old man was found with fatal stab wounds in bromley. of the 118 murders so far in london this year, the police say a significant number were stabbings, and today there have been renewed calls for the police to have more funding. it is really important we have
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all public agencies, councils, the nhs, social services, education, the police, working with central government to solve this problem, but ultimately it means the government has to invest in policing and preventative services too. in a statement today, the metropolitan police described the violence as senseless, but played down the issue of funding. it's notjust a question of funding, you know, we as the police have a big role to play, but this is a collective responsibility. we are always prioritising the work that we do, violence, tackling violence, is an absolute priority for the metropolitan police. but according to some politicians,
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this wave of violent crime in which many young people have been killed could persist for a generation before it is brought under control. richard galpin, bbc news, in south—east london. as you heard in that report — 17 year old malcolm mide—madariola was killed outside clapham south tube on friday — in the past hour a 17 year old boy has been arrested in connection with his murder. we will bring you more on that as we get it. president rouhani of iran says his country is in a state of economic war, and has promised to, in his words, ‘proudly bypass‘ us sanctions. it comes after the united states imposed sweeping sanctions against the country today. in a news conference this afternoon, the us said the sanctions will continue until iran ends its destabilising behaviour in the middle east. naomi grimley reports. death to america, shout these protesters in tehran. burning the american flag is a yearly ritual on
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the anniversary of the seizure of the anniversary of the seizure of the us enemy di embassy in 1979. this week, though, extra antigonus and as america reimpose as its oil and as america reimpose as its oil and sanctions on iran. the new sanctions target key pillars of the iranian economy, including oil, shipping and banking, with more than 700 entities being targeted. at eight major importers of iranian oil, including india and japan, have been granted temporary waivers.- the centre of this effort, and there are multiple lines of effort, but at at the centre of it is an unprecedented campaign of economic pressure. our objective is to starve the iranian regime, our ultimate
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goal to convince the regime to abandon its current revolutionary course. european powers remain committed to the original iran nuclear deal. they object to the sanctions, but that puts them at loggerheads with the us. ordinary iranians are bracing themselves for a rocky time ahead. the economy has had a tricky year, with oil sales already dropping. the impact will be felt in many ways. people are having less access to food, medicine, jobs are being cut, and rising prices, so there is a lot of anxiety and uncertainty. but iran's president says his country won‘t be pratt —— won‘t be cowled. translation: says his country won‘t be pratt —— won't be cowled. translation: the americans should be punished forever, they are bullying and old nation with a great cultural heritage, it is unacceptable to our state. president trump says he wants a new dealfor the iranians can
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which will see them stop there nuclear programme and abandon proxy wa rs nuclear programme and abandon proxy wars in the middle east. so far though there seems little sign of that happening. naomi grimley, bbc news. rules on who can join the british armed forces are set to change. currently commonwealth citizens can onlyjoin the army, navy or air force if they have lived in the uk for five years, but that limit is set to be scrapped — meaning any commonwealth national will be eligble to join up. the rules change all the time, the truth is, and since 2016, there has been a limit to the number of people from commonwealth nations who can join the british armed forces. that cat is 200. above that, if you are from a commonwealth nation and you‘ve been in the uk forfive yea rs, you‘ve been in the uk forfive years, you can then apply to join the armed forces, and if you have permanent leave to remain. so this tab is turned on and off, depending where recruitment is in the armed forces, and depending on the size of
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the armed forces. so after the 2010 defence cuts, a lot of community, a lot of british soldiers were joining thejob queue, lot of british soldiers were joining the job queue, and lot of british soldiers were joining thejob queue, and that meant lot of british soldiers were joining the job queue, and that meant that the job queue, and that meant that the government to clamp down on the number of people are playing from the commonwealth. now we are at another era, which is essentially they can‘t fill the ranks. there is a recruitment crisis, and therefore they are turning to the commonwealth to provide the troops, the people in the navy with their needs. it is mostly the army. let's separate our terms, there is a recruitment crisis and they can‘t fill the ranks, but aren‘t people still wanting to join? there is an issue with that process. there is an issue with that process. there is a huge issue with that process. to be fed to the government, we have to say we are in an era of high employment, so there isa an era of high employment, so there is a lot of to forgetting people through the door. there wasn‘t a major, operation like there was in afghanistan and iran, and a recruiting sergeant is a war, essentially. but added to this is a mess of the government‘s own making,
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and that is handing out the recruitment centralising giving it toa recruitment centralising giving it to a branch contractor, capita, other people stick an are in there somewhere, because they are so frustrated with it, but you talk to anybody who are trying to go through this process, and i have. it is tortuous. it is, you may have had childhood asthma, even if you have recovered, they will want to see medical certificates that show you recovered. trying to get through the computer system, it has been crashing all the time, it has been an unmitigated disaster and it has turned people off, people waiting too long. a year to try to get through the whole process was that there was a time when the army had an office on the high street, you walked in from you talk to a retired sergeant major, you‘d be on the parade ground within three weeks. and we are kind of going actor that because the army has made some changes, they realise it is going so
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badly that they are now putting people in uniform into the process to try to make the connection with people, but there is a big question. can this contract, the defence secretary got a rough guide about this, they were told the army is disappearing before your own eyes coming was asked can you continue with this contract with catheter, and the moment they say they are but it is under review. it could take a generation to solve london‘s violent crime problem, the city‘s mayor sadiq khan has warned. the warning comes after four people were stabbed to death in five days in london: scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of the capital. we can now speak to joe russo, head of the east midlands based anti—violence charity the enthusiasm trust, whojoins me now from derby. joe, first of all, i would just like you to tell the viewers how you got involved. i think you confronted some youngsters who are up to no
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good, and this is how it all began? sure, my background is i am a carpenter by trade, i ended up in derby with work and i was looking out of my window one night, kids climbing upa out of my window one night, kids climbing up a lamp post wrote in the middle of the estate, nicking lead. igo middle of the estate, nicking lead. i go outside as a good citizen and challenge these kids and i ask what are you doing, they say we are in the king lead, and it all went from there. we have, social, one of the kids that was really clear was that these kids had very little, in terms of boundaries, parameters, or even opportunities. so 26 years ago i started a youth club. you said to one of them what would your dad said if he saw them doing this? absolutely, as you can probably see, i buy the name and italian, and i grew up with a very strong family background and environment come i was very privileged with that. i could have gone off the rails myself on numerous occasions, however my dad and my family became very strong
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protective factors. was this kid was on the reverse of what your dad said to you right now, thinking that would have an impact. it had no impact because the kid‘s dad was serving a fairly substantial prison service, so what i saw and felt was these kids needed people in their lives to help direct them, challenge them and give them that support. everybody accepts there is a very convex everybody accepts there is a very co nvex reaso n everybody accepts there is a very convex reason as to why we are seeing this increase in knife crime. you will always hear people say it isa you will always hear people say it is a lack of male role model, and thatis is a lack of male role model, and that is something you are tackling head—on. that is something you are tackling head-on. absolutely. as you said, there is no one single point of why this is an issue. however, that is for some kids a criticalfactor, and it isa for some kids a criticalfactor, and it is a critical factor of having meaningful, positive relationships, and we do that. we have been developing a meant touring programme over many yea rs, developing a meant touring programme over many years, and critical to what we do, we look to bring people throughout the system, people who
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we re throughout the system, people who were once the young people, who are now the mentors, who can speak with real authority, real positivity, now the mentors, who can speak with realauthority, real positivity, but also come from a real understanding of where these kids are coming from themselves. joe, what would work? we keep hearing about schemes, principally glasgow, but more generally across scotland, there seems to be an approach that has an impact. would that work here?” think there are lots of schemes, there are lots of different things where people want to buy a product off—the—shelf to deal with an issue. you can‘t buy this off—the—shelf, you have to grow something, you have two d evelo p you have to grow something, you have two develop something, this is a long—term solution. for years, we throw money at short—term projects, six months, 12 months. the work we have been doing is 26 years old, and actually the kids that we are meant touring now, we begin a journey with them and we expect to continue to be meant touring those kids in two
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yea rs‘ meant touring those kids in two years‘ time, six years‘ time, a year‘s time. and what we are doing is for many of our young people we are mentoring the siblings of those kids to try and break those familial links into criminality. at the heart of that, joe, i don‘t want to second you, but it seems that the issue of respect is central to this.” you, but it seems that the issue of respect is central to this. i think there is a whole bunch of words, we can talk about respect, we can talk about resilience. a lot of these kids need somebody to look up to, somebody who believes in them. don‘t get me wrong, the state of our young people, they show a lack of respect. iama people, they show a lack of respect. iam a dad, and i people, they show a lack of respect. i am a dad, and i talk to parents. it is difficult. i think it would be fantastic to be of to do a piece of research around millennials, and how they think young people operate and understand. however, at the core of the kids who are tied in this world of criminality, the kids that you‘ve mentioned, actually it‘s about
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survival for those kids. mentioned, actually it‘s about survivalfor those kids. they are living in a world of how do i get through to the next day? because thatis through to the next day? because that is their normality. i remove the chatting to a kid, and he said this to me, he said something really profound, he said when you live in hell, you got to become a devil to survive. and what we‘ve got to be of to do is reach out to these kids, connect with these kids, and see beyond the behaviour. and actually for me, my experience shows the vast majority of our kids are exploited and drawn into that world of criminality. what we‘ve got to do is provide an alternative. we‘ve got to give them a moral framework, provide an alternative. we‘ve got to give them a moralframework, we‘ve got to give them a moral compass, because normality to these kids is normality, which isn‘t my normality, maybe not the normality of many viewers today. but who gives that compass? it is great that you do it in the charity work for, but on an estate in the south all the north of london, thatjust does not exist, does it? i am certain there are a
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number of organisations like my own that are doing a fabulous job, and there are a number of organisations like my own who need to be mobilised. we need to work together, that‘s what we need to do. i come across police officers, teachers, social workers, volunteers, charity workers, who are passionate about this agenda. what we need to be able to do is to connect those agencies together, connect those people together, connect those people together, with a single goal on an objective, to formulate solutions, to be able to have that impact. really good of you to join us, thank you. taoiseach leo varadkar has told prime minister theresa may that ireland will consider a "review mechanism" to the controversial northern ireland backstop plan. but he has said that any backstop that is agreed can not be time limited — and it should only be possible to end the it with the agreement of both the uk, and the eu.
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the irish premier spoke with the prime minister earlier today to discuss how to avoid a hard border between northern ireland and the republic. let‘s go live to brussels to speak to our reporter adam fleming. i have just read that, iheanacho i havejust read that, iheanacho i have understood any of that, this whole issue of the backstop is now mired in different people‘s interpretations of what it is. mired in different people‘s interpretations of what it ism mired in different people‘s interpretations of what it is. it is getting very confusing, even i am confused sometimes, and i study at 24-7, confused sometimes, and i study at 24—7, maybe not the full 24 but definitely the seventh. the withdrawal agreement, the legally binding brexit divorce treaty that has to basically be agreed in the next few weeks, certainly the next few months, with the irish backstop, avoiding a hard border being reintroduced between northern ireland and ireland, if that problem is not sold by the future trading relationship, we are now seeing there will be three options in there, we think, 11, in northern ireland only option, where northern
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ireland only option, where northern ireland could stay in the customs union and elements of the single market, so the cross border trade could continue as it does now, that is the original backstop proposed in which we have all become very familiar with. the uk government hates that idea, because they think its threatens the constitutional integrity of the uk, so they proposed a second option, which is a uk wide customs arrangement between the uk and the eu macro. the uk and the eu option uk wide customs arrangement between the uk and the eu option three was this idea of extending the transition or implementation period, which runs from brexit day next march until the end of december 2020, what is happening now is that the eu side are taking option two, the eu side are taking option two, the uk wide backstop, really quite seriously. they are looking to see to what extent, halogen detail, they could put into it in the withdrawal agreement to satisfy the uk. at what
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the uk wants, what theresa may needs,is the uk wants, what theresa may needs, is for option one, the northern ireland only option to be struck out of the withdrawal agreement. so what we are waiting for, all this talk about the uk option, whether there is a review clause or not, whether it could be ended by both parties or unilaterally, what really matters is whether that northern ireland only option will be there at the end of the day still. have you seen this breaking news about the spice girls going back on tour? allan i have, are they coming to brussels? i don‘t know, i will talk to you later. we will talk about that in just a moment, but first at just after quarter past three, the headlines. scotla nd quarter past three, the headlines. scotland yard says hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of london after four people we re streets of london after four people were stabbed to death in less than a week. iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed by america with the iranian president declaring his country is in an economic wall. the mod is scrapping the need for commonwealth citizens to have lived
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in the uk for at least five years before they can enlist in the armed forces. and in sport, wayne rooney will win his 120th england cap later this month is a celebration of his international career, but former england goalkeeper peter shilton says they should not be given out like gifts. england‘s george burgess will face a disciplinary panel tomorrow, after he was cited for i gal during during yesterday‘s rugby league gal during during yesterday‘s rugby lea g u e test gal during during yesterday‘s rugby league test against new zealand. and unbeaten as a boxer, now floyd mayweather has signed up to be a professional mixed martial arts fighter at the age of 41. more on all those stories just after half past. the spice girls are reforming and are set to tour the uk next year minus posh spice. #if # if you want to be my lover, you‘ve got to get with my friends. the announcement was made
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on their official twitter page — proving that friendship never ends... girls, do you think i‘m too old for bunches? hello, ladies, i'm ready. geri... what is that? we were all on the e—mail. we said we were all going to be in black tuxedos. melanie... i think you will find you are in fact wearing a sparkly dress. we are going on tour, people need to see it to believe it. sylla seriously, we can't be falling out now if we are going on tour. # la—la—la la—la—la la—la—la. now if we are going on tour. # la-la-la la-la-la la-la-la. and
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joining us now, the spice girls with the shock announcement of the uk tour. i'm in shock. you should be. chi chi izundu, our reporter, is here with the details. watch truck me there is without victoria, will the music suffer? laughter the spice girls have been a force before, let‘s not forget that, around the 2000s, when geri halle welcome as she was known back then, left the band, so i don‘t think the music will suffer per se without victoria but it won‘t feel like the original line—up, and everyone had their favourite, original line—up, and everyone had theirfavourite, spice, if you like, be it posh, scary, sporty, baby, so she will be missed. but melanie b did say they are leaving the door open for her tojoin did say they are leaving the door open for her to join them at any point. i should have prepared for
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this, because there are so many questions that do spring to mind about this. principally, this is a big deal, isn‘t it? about this. principally, this is a big deal, isn't it? it is a big deal! if we go back a decade or so, they were big. we don't even have to go back that far, let‘s not forget they were part of the closing olympic ceremony at the elliptic games in 2012 stop that was their last performance as a fivesome. everybody loves the spice girls, they were a particular era in our history, they did signify staff and they did in power a lot of young women to believe in girl power, and now they‘re coming back. there are bands that have reformed and made millions. take that, for example, came back, they now are a threesome, when they came back they were a force, they make millions. so far i‘ve become four, and the ticket sales on saturday, presumably they will sell out? i can't imagine they
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would take that long to sell—out, and it is a stadium talk which means it will be huge, and i expect it‘ll be quite theatrical and big, i don‘t respect it to be just them singing, and also they have invited jess glynne on tour with them as a special guest, so it is no small affair. there will be a big deal. and it‘s nice to have nice fun news in the news currently. yes. just allow me to be slightly cynical for allow me to be slightly cynical for a moment. more than usual? no time for that! are they short of cash? what is behind this? they are not short of cash. i mean, victoria beckham currently runs a global fashion empire, hence why she is probably notjoining, fashion empire, hence why she is probably not joining, she just celebrated ten years of her victoria beckham passion level. geri horner is not short of cash. she made a lot
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of money in her own right. they all did, and the spice girls is not a thing that has gone away, it has been quiet, and they have been teasing this for about a year. since earlier this year, they were pictured at geri‘s house, all five of them, as a reunion picture. there was the spice girls memorabilia that happened at the o2 in the summer. melanie be dressed up as victoria beckham for halloween, claiming i‘m not going on tour, big hint. all of us took it. i got an e—mail on the 3ist us took it. i got an e—mail on the 31st of october asking if i still wa nted 31st of october asking if i still wanted to be part of the spice girls e—mail correspondence, so they all have made money in their own right, it is not something that i feel they need to make money, but it‘s nice to have the stanjek things to look to. you‘re excited. have the stanjek things to look to. you're excited. of course i'm excited. their songs were the epitome of an era so we can‘tjust
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ignore the fact the spice girls are coming back. i have an admission, i‘ve seen them in concert. coming back. i have an admission, i've seen them in concert. there you go. long time ago. so i'll see you in the queue on saturday. you can queue for me. thank you very sure that breaking news. oh, the excitement is tangible. go on, give a shot of her now, she‘s lost it. she has. she will be back. we‘re just a day away from the midterm elections in the us in which voters will be electing all members of the house of representatives and thirty—five members of the senate — as well as some state governorships. the outcome is farfrom certain — but one thing is clear — there is a record number of women standing for office. our washington correspondent, jane o‘brien is on capitol hill for us now. this is supposed to be the year of the women, you‘ve got the me too movement is certainly having an
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impact on this race, but at the end of the day it still comes down to partisan preferences. will republican women vote for trump, even though he‘s not on the ballot? winner this is a referendum of trump, and will democratic women turn out in sufficient numbers to be able to give democrats the house? that is widely expected, that the democrats will take control of the house. it is also widely expected that the republicans will retain control of the senate and possibly even increase their majority, which means we have the riveting prospect ofa means we have the riveting prospect of a split government, in which case absolutely nothing will get done for the next two years. jane, in terms of the democrats, of course, sorry for the delay, i was just mulling over what you are saying. it's all right. in terms of the democrats, we have seen barack obama out on the stump, but there isn‘t a figure which would save the future for the democrats at the moment, is there?
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well, there‘s multiple figures i think, because what we have seen with the democrats over the last year or so is with the democrats over the last yearorso isa with the democrats over the last year or so is a distinct move waltz the left. a lot of very progressive young ethnically diverse female candidates coming to the fore, winning the primary is at a local level, and becoming the main candidates. there is clearly a lot of enthusiasm to replace the old guard of the democratic party, but will those candidates translate to a broader appeal and bring out the moderate voters, the independent voters that both parties are vying for? that is what we are absolutely not certain about yet. and are we seeing a blue democratic wave? or is this election going to be a typical adjustment of power that we generally see during the midterms? the one thing we do know is that
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both parties are grimly galvanised, republicans are turning out in force, democrats are turning out in force, democrats are turning out in force, record numbers of americans have already cast their votes, more than 30 billion, so the turnout of the selection, unusually, could be one of the highest we have seen an absolute decades. and we know what donald trump thinks of it because we are seeing it in action today, sanctions on irani, we have seen him getting tough with that caravan heading north from central america. he believes that is a vote winner. he does. the economy is doing well at the moment. unemployment is at a record low. wages are rising. more jobs are being added to the economy. why isn‘t he talking about that? why is he talking about immigration? because he believes it will generate the enthusiasm among republican voters who may be sitting there thinking life is ok at the moment, donald trump is in for another two yea rs, donald trump is in for another two
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years, why bother? but if the democrats get in, he says all his good work will be undone. and at 7pm this evening, katty kay and christian fraser are both in washington for a special edition of beyond 100 days, looking ahead to the midterms. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker we have some exceptionally mild weather out there today, particularly in southern parts of the uk. temperatures around 16 or 17 degrees. tonight it‘s going to be mild and it will turn foggy as well. it's mild and it will turn foggy as well. it‘s an invalid —— it‘s bonfire night. these are the temperatures so relatively it‘s going to be mild for november. a lot of dry weather across november. a lot of dry weather a cross m ost november. a lot of dry weather across most of the country. a few
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spots of rain in northern ireland and western scotland. a very mild start tomorrow but in the west later on the weather is going downhill and we are expecting heavy rain and the following 24 hours will be very wet particularly in south—western parts of england and wales. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: four people stabbed to death in five days in london. scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of the capital. we are committed to doing everything we can to bring down we are committed to doing everything we can to bring down those we are committed to doing everything we can to bring down those levels we are committed to doing everything we can to bring down those levels of violence. we have specialist investigators investigating each of the murders. iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed once again by america with the iranian president
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declaring his country is in an "economic war". our country needs you. the mod is scrapping the need for commonwealth citizens to have lived in the uk for at least 5 years before they can enlist. donald trump and barack obama both on the campaign trail with just hours to go until america‘s crucial mid term elections. snakes alive. a nottingham reptile retailer had to evacuate 200 animals from its premises after a huge blaze destroyed a number of businesses in nottingham. and the spice girls announce a reunion tour, although victoria beckham is not expected to bejoining the four other members. sport now on afternoon live with katherine downes. you have been loving breaking that news this afternoon. we shall move
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on. there is always wayne rooney who‘s back but not everybody is happy. wayne rooney will be coming out of international retirement and win his 120th cap two years after he officially retired because the fa wa nt to officially retired because the fa want to give him the sendoff they think he deserves. he is england‘s record goal—scorer and they think he should have a final hurrah at wembley so the fans can thank him for what he did. looking at foot of the some reaction, it has been a divisive issue. i am so glad wayne rooney is getting another chance in an england shirt. don‘t get first. it's an england shirt. don‘t get first. it‘s a friendly and it‘s the charity. but then other people say they are disgusted at england throwing another cab at wayne rooney showing it aims nothing any more to play feel country. no other player
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gets a sendoff like this, it‘s all about the money with wayne rooney because he‘s playing the us. the fa should not be giving him one final game. the former england goalkeeper piddle shildon has said the fa should not be giving away caps like gifts —— peter shilton. he says it should be taken seriously. you know he will just scored should be taken seriously. you know he willjust scored a hat—trick. let‘s look at somebody else back in the limelight, floyd mayweather. he‘s done everything but a new challenge. it's all about the money, this deal that floyd mayweather has signed to fight in mixed martial arts. he will take onjapanese kick
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boxer tenshin nasukawa on new year‘s eve. floyd mayweather is 41. he has an unbeaten boxing record in five different weight categories. he has never fought professionally in mixed martial arts. this is what he has had to say. i can wrestle a little bit. i can box a lot. we willjust see. ican bit. i can box a lot. we willjust see. i can do it all. i can do anything if i set my mind to it. i will speak to my team to make sure we are on the same page. we have to have rules and relations to everything. i am have rules and relations to everything. lam pretty have rules and relations to everything. i am pretty sure when i speak to the guys are my team we will be on the same page so we can
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go out and do what we have to do. in rugby league, george burgess will appear at a disciplinary hearing on tuesday evening after new zealand cited an incident during sunday‘s second test at anfield. the england foward is seen to have his fingers in the eyes of the new zealand‘s captain. england won the match 20—14, to take an unassailable lead in the three match series. good and bad news for eddiejones as his england side prepare to face new zealand at twickenham this weekend. starting with the bad news, forward tom curry has been ruled out with whatjones has described as a "severe ankle injury". he was part of the inexperienced back row that helped england beat south africa on saturday. the good news is that co—captain owen farrell is free to play. he‘s not going to be punished for this thumping tackle at the end of their match against south africa. it was the last play of the match and helped england hold on for a hard fought win. lots of commentators and former players felt it was at least a foul, but the authorities disagree.
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that‘s all the sport for now. a cash—strapped council has set out for the first time what it believes is the minimum level of services that residents should expect it to deliver. east sussex has warned that it is several million pounds short of being able to afford even that. ?the council has made 129 million pounds of savings since 2010. our correspondent helen cattjoins us from bexhill—on—sea in east sussex. how bad are things? the council has cut £129 million in the last eight yea rs. cut £129 million in the last eight years. it has made cuts across its services and says this is not
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sustainable. it has been warning it does not have the funds to keep funding everything it does. it has gone away and come up with what it calls its core offer and that is the minimum services it believes residents should be able to get from the council. it‘s all the things that are provided by law plus a extra bit means reducing some services are currently offers four east —— so it says it will safeguard children but it withdraw some of the early help it gives to families. it will undertake special educational needs assessments but it warns they could be slower. it will amend the roads but not to many of the footpaths. this is a more sustainable approach looking forward to the next three years to what it should be able to fund. however, this takes about £12 million of the cost of the council on services over the next three years and that still is not enough to balance the books. it's is not enough to balance the books. it‘s warning that on the current levels it would still be on a worst—case scenario £33 million
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short within three years. so the idea of this is to take this to the government and say this is the minimum service we think our residents should get and you need to give us the funds to do that. how likely is that to happen? in the budget last week the cat chancellor promised more funds for social care and more funds for pin fixing potholes. we don‘t know what share of that will come to east sussex. we also know that is a spending review being promised next year with a lot of uncertainty in the public finances so this is a some way of landing a marker to try and make sure whatever the financial uncertainty is their case definitely gets looked at. it says it has specific demographic issues does a quarter of the population is over 65 compared to 18% in a month and it also already charges high council
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tax, the highest rate of council tax any council in the country. so it has limited ways of raising more funds. too many graduates in england are seeing too little payback for the big debts they rack up at university, according to a group of mps. the education select committee says there needs to be more transparency about what sort ofjobs students can expect after they graduate. our education correspondent elaine dunkley reports. going to university is a big decision and investment, but with students graduating with an average debt of £50,000, is it worth it when looking atjob prospects and future earnings? today‘s report by the commons education committee highlights that 49% of recent graduates are working in non—graduate roles across the uk. it also criticises vice chancellors‘ pay, with the average salary in excess of £200,000 a year with bonuses and benefits. the report also calls for the government to reinstate means tested loans and maintenance grants for students
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from poorer backgrounds. we‘re saying that universities should look at these skills, they should be much more transparent and clear about graduate outcomes — they do a lot more for social justice, that would be value for money, to make sure the most disadvantaged students has the chance to climb the education ladder of opportunity. the department for education says universities are offering more choice and value and introduced measures such as degree apprenticeships, which allows students to earn a salary while learning and bringing valuable skills to the workforce. mps are preparing to debate a major report into bullying and sexual harassment in the houses of parliament. the report, written by dame laura cox, was commissioned after a series of allegations about bullying in parliament came to light. onejunior house of commons member of staff, speaking exclusively to the victoria derbyshire programme, said that "dealing with abuse is part of the job". i‘ve had, you know, members of staff shouting
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in my face, calling me stupid. one older senior member of staff shouted at me and asked if i even knew what brexit was, if i even knew what was going on. i‘ve had inappropriate comments, members of staff, particularly mps, asking, don‘t i know who they are? i have one kind of older senior civil servant from a government department get right in my face, shouting at me. i could almost feel kind of like the spit landing on my face. he was so angry. i‘d only been in the job a few months and it was so overwhelming and scary that i didn‘t know how to deal with it. but when i talked to the members of staff, particularly female members of staff, they all had a similar experience and, again, itjust be part of the job was dealing with abuse like that. it if no one has complained and you think maybe no one has because they don‘t have confidence that anything would be done, how can could an investigation be done? i do understand that, and i knew that people would need to come forward to do it. so i know that nothing could happen until they do.
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but for that to occur, surely you‘ve got to allow people to the confidence in a reporting system that exists and to know that they would be taken seriously. and that the minute, and the way i think the commons authorities have responded to dame laura cox‘s report, that confidence is going to come any time soon, i don‘t think. so i don‘t think any investigation will happen. i don‘t think any mp will face any consequences because people just don‘t think the system works for members of staff like them. the founder of celtic boys‘ club in glasgow has been found guilty of sexual offences against three boys in the 1980s and 1990s. james torbett — who is now 71 years old — was previously convicted for crimes against three boys in the 1960s and 70s. joining me now from glasgow is our correspondent, lorna gordon. jim tolbert used football as a cover for his crimes. he founded celtic
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boys club in 1966 and four decades he used it as a cover for his offences. celtic say the boys club isa offences. celtic say the boys club is a separate entity from celtic fc but they shared a club creche and facilities and it was seen as a feeder club for the professional club.jim feeder club for the professional club. jim told that was a father figure to some of the boys he coached and bought them tracksuits and gained their trust and made them promises. in effect he groomed these young men and the court heard horrific details of the attacks. one of the mana boyd was just five years old. one young man spoke as how he was subjected to four years of abuse at the hands ofjim talbot and the abuse continued when they signed for celtic fc. he was jailed previously
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for similar crimes. thejulie celtic fc. he was jailed previously for similar crimes. the julie did not get to hear about his previous convictions. but today he was found guilty of five counts and a sixth charge was found not proven and he has been sentenced to six years in jail. the lack of progress on gender stereotyping in pe is "depressing", that‘s according to the children‘s commissionerfor wales. it comes as one teenage footballer tells bbc wales she‘s been called ‘a lesbian‘ for playing the sport. sally holland says it‘s an important issue that needs addressing. the welsh government has declined to comment. our sport news correspondent, kate morgan, reports. meet this team, unbeaten in the league. i am 13 years old and
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rovers. darcy has been playing since she was eight but she said above people calling her names. they criticise me by saying i‘m a lesbian ora criticise me by saying i‘m a lesbian or a man. they call me different types of names. outside of school football is a life. she plans on playing professionally. the sports are hockey, netball, dance and for the boys it‘s basketball, rugby and football. i asked my gp teacher whether it could play football and they said no. the children's commissioner wants to change things. sally holland says it‘s depressing not more has changed and worrying as it could be putting children of sport. girls say there is very little opportunity for them to take pa rt little opportunity for them to take part in football. sometimes schools have clubs were girls can take part but it's not part of core pe
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lessons. it is important and it's surprisingly that we're still having such a segregation of the in 2018. on pe adviser and academic says the idea of traditional sports for boys and girls and a hangoverfrom post—war education. she says attitudes have been slow to change but the curriculum is flexible and thatis but the curriculum is flexible and that is a need for a more modern approach. i don't think it's a curriculum, that‘s in place. it‘s down to the training of teachers, their expertise. we have a lack of physical education expertise in primary school. it is not a specialist subject. darcy is focused on the future. the love of football wants change but she is hopeful attitudes will.” think it‘s wrong that people
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criticise girls for playing football because it‘s something they want to do and love. joining me now from our cardiff studio is bbc wales‘ sports news correspondent, kate morgan. gender stereotypes is nothing new but it is seem more when we come to believe. even in schools girls are not expecting to do sewing but this experience is not a single one. they hear parents saying on the sideline the bbq by a girl. i‘ve had e—mails today from people who say their experiences similar to the one they had all those years ago and others from parents who say their children have had a wider range of opportunity. that is reflective of change outside of schools. here in wales there has been a 17% increase in girls playing football and
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thousands more girls playing rugby in recent years. darcy‘s league is a thriving on so there is an aptitude —— appetite for change. thriving on so there is an aptitude -- appetite for change. how do you change those attitudes? we can keep doing things we have always done. there is room in the curriculum to offer a whole range of activity. one thing that is being trialled in west wales ‘s server as part of the pe curriculum so anyone can learn to juggle curriculum so anyone can learn to juggle and you can understand more about movement and development by doing something like that. there will always be room for traditional sports but we need to see them as pa rt sports but we need to see them as part of the toolkit. she does say perhaps this is part of a push for a radical rethink of what we know pe to be and that might help ring down some of the stereotypes. vishala is here.
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in a moment she will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of london after four people were stabbed to death iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed once again by america with the iranian president declaring his country is in an "economic war". the mod is scrapping the need for commonwealth citizens to have lived in the uk for at least 5 years before they can enlist in the british armed forces. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. online bookings and check—in with ryanair will close for 12 hours on wednesday after the airline said it needed to shut down its website and mobile phone app. rya nair "sincerely apologised" to customers for any inconvenience, and urged anyone needing to check in to do so before the closure. activity in the uk‘s services sector slowed in october
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compared to september. that‘s according to the ihs markit survey. the services sector, which includes banks, hotels and retailers, accounts for around 76% of the uk economy. the survey says it lots of companies were concerned about brexit uncertainty and the economic outlook. sales of new cars in the uk recovered slightly in october, although they were still down on a year previously. according to the society of motor manufacturers & traders, sales were down around 3% on last year. although this is an improvement on september, when there was a 20.5% decline. uk holidaymakers are delaying booking channel crossings for next summer amid concerns about the consequences of brexit. regular customers are down by 4% to 596 regular customers are down by 4% to 5% on brittany ferries and that‘s because of wrecks it concerns. we can hear more now from the boss of
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brittany ferries. joining us now is nigel wonnacott, chief executive of brittany ferries. how do we know this is because of brexit? we don't but we know these are some of our most regular passengers, families who book with us every year for this holiday or their weekend away. so it's really a signal from our most loyal customers and its raising a red flag for us and its raising a red flag for us and suggesting that a lot of the issues many of our customers are raising through twitter and other forums is that they are concerned about some of the brexit essentials, things like passports, health—insurance, please is. this level of uncertainty is what's troubling them. are these fears overblown? people will always want to go on holiday. they will. let's
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hope, we have been on a brexit roller coasters for a month —— and this. we very much hope when the announcement is made that we do have announcement is made that we do have a deal and announcement is made that we do have a dealand a announcement is made that we do have a deal and a lot of these concerns will be allayed. we will of course have a transition period. the concern is if we crash out of the european union in march next year there is very little time for people to prepare. that is probably why we are seeing people holding off until they have that level of certainty. are you tempted to cut your prices to attract people? our prices are always reasonable. we have some fantastic rices. what was he going to say to that? ! joining us now is tom jenkins, chief executive of the european tour
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operators association. you are looking after a wider market. what kind of impact you see? what we've heard from brittany ferries is a graphic example of the dangers of uncertainty. in my market we are concerned at the prospect of a nodal brexit. if uk citizens have to go through the non—eu line that isa to go through the non—eu line that is a delay of up to 90 seconds a person. that does not sound much but if you have 20,000 people going through a channel port or 200 people this barking from a jet, that is many hours of delays. that sort of thing is causing a real concern in the industry. so your concern is the
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impact it will have on the businesses in terms of how their production flows. it is the passengers. within no deal you would be facing 20, 30 or 40 hours of delays. you are looking at many hours of delays trying to get into a european nation state if you have to go through the non—eu q. my main concern is that these people will be caught up in this. we sincerely hope it's not going to happen but at the moment we have now assured us is it's not going to happen. what will happen? you are reliant on non—uk staff. what happens to them? we have no certainty. there is an assured us
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that the ones we have here can stay although they will have to register with the home office. what concerns me is that my members currently draw ona me is that my members currently draw on a talent pool of 520 million people and it will be released 60 million people. it's not good news. what‘s going on in the markets. it was a negative territory this morning. the pound starting on a positive note. there are higher steel prices in china. it will be interesting to see what happens with the pound on the road later in the week as we hear more from brussels about italy and brexit. last week
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the euro was higher against the sterling. we will see what happens. let‘s catch up with the weather. we have some exceptionally mild weather today in seven parts of the uk. temperatures around 16 or 17 degrees. to like it‘s going to be mild. it‘s an important night because it is bonfire night. these are the temperatures so relatively for november it‘s going to be mild. a lot of dry weather across most of the country. there will be some rain here and there in parts of northern ireland. by the end of the night into tuesday those temperatures are still in double figures across the
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south. a mild start with those southerly winds tomorrow but in the west later on the weather is going downhill and we are expecting heavy rain and in the following 24 hours it will be very wet in south—western parts of england and. —— wales. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4pm, four people stabbed to death in five days in london. scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of the capital. james torbett — founder of celtic boys‘ club in glasgow — is found guilty of sexual offences against three boys in the 1980s and 1990s. iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed once again by america, with the iranian president declaring his country is in an "economic war". and all the sport with katherine downes. bringing wayne rooney out of international retirement to win his
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120th cap, is it a fitting tribute to england fozz leading goal—scorer or is it making a mockery of an england call—up? wagg tomasz schafernaker, is the weather setting usa schafernaker, is the weather setting us a light tonight? hopefully not. the weather is looking good. the thermometer shot up today, we managed to get to 17 degrees, so that was very nice. i will show you some lovely pictures of the northern lights, which have been coming in over the last 24 hours, that is in half an hour. also coming up... # i‘ll tell you what i want, what i really, really want... the spice girls announce a reunion tour — although victoria beckham won‘t be joining the other four bandmates. hundreds more police officers are being deployed
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on the streets of london, after four murders in five days. the metropolitan police say it‘s been a "terrible" few days in the capital — taking to 118 the number of killings in london so far this year, including 73 stabbings and 12 shootings. and there‘s no sign of an imminent change — the mayor of london says it could take a decade to deal with the problem of violent crime. richard galpin reports from the scene of one of the latest murders. this is where15—year—old jay hughes was fatally stabbed here in lewisham last thursday. there are reports that two men, who had been following him in a taxi, jumped out and attacked him as he went to get some takeaway food. friends have described jay, who is also known as jai sewell,
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as loving and thoughtful. the priest at the local church showed me the candles jay‘s family had lit in his memory at yesterday‘s service. the family in profound shock. they are absolutely shattered. it is a shock for them, for the entire family, and they are equally looking for answers, just as the rest of the community is. as well as jay, 38—year—old rocky djelal was stabbed to death in southwark on october 31st. on 2nd november, 17—year—old malcolm mide—madariola was fatally stabbed in clapham. and yesterday, a 22—year—old man was found with fatal stab wounds in bromley. of the 118 murders so far in london this year, the police say a significant number were stabbings, and today there have been renewed calls for the police to have more funding. it is really important we have all public agencies, councils,
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the nhs, social services, education, the police, working with central government to solve this problem, but ultimately it means the government has to invest in policing and preventative services too. in a statement today, the metropolitan police described the violence as senseless, but played down the issue of funding. it's notjust a question of funding, you know, we as the police have a big role to play, but this is a collective responsibility. we are always prioritising the work that we do, violence, tackling violence, is an absolute priority for the metropolitan police. but according to some politicians, this wave of violent crime in which many young people have been killed could persist for a generation before it is brought under control. richard galpin, bbc news, in south—east london. in the daylight of the extent of the destruction caused joining me now from glasgow
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is our correspondent, lorna gordon. james tolbert in effect set up celtic boys club as a training ground for young boys who hoped to progress to celtic football club. in fa ct progress to celtic football club. in fact he used football as a cover against his crimes. he groomed the individuals he targeted. he made them promises. he became a father figure to some of the boys he coached, he brought them tracksuits, he charmed their parents but over the course of two weeks, the court heard appalling details of the attacks are carried out, one born a boy of just five years attacks are carried out, one born a boy ofjust five years old. these
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attacks carried out over a period of eight years, he assaulted the boys ona number of eight years, he assaulted the boys on a number of occasions at his business, his home and in his car. as we‘ve been hearing, he was previously jailed for similar crimes. thejury of previously jailed for similar crimes. the jury of course knew nothing of this. but today he was sentenced to six years in jail. he was put on the sex offenders register indefinitely. he shook his head as he heard the verdict, but from today he is now facing six yea rs from today he is now facing six years injail. president rouhani of iran says his country is in a state of economic war, and has promised to, in his words, ‘proudly bypass‘ us sanctions. it comes after the united states imposed sweeping sanctions against the country today. in a news conference a few moments ago, the us secretary of state mike pompeo and treasury secretary, steve mnuchin, said the sanctions will continue until iran ends its destabilising behaviour in the middle east.
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naomi grimley reports. death to america, shout these protesters in tehran. burning the american flag is a yearly ritual on the anniversary of the seizure of the us embassy in 1979. this week, though, extra antagonism, as america reimpose as its oil and financial sanctions on iran. the new sanctions target key pillars of the iranian economy, including oil, shipping and banking, with more than 700 entities being targeted. but eight major importers of iranian oil, including india and japan, have been granted temporary waivers. at the centre of this effort, and there are multiple lines of effort, but at at the centre of it is an unprecedented campaign
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of economic pressure. our objective is to starve the iranian regime, our ultimate goal to convince the regime to abandon its current revolutionary course. european powers remain committed to the original iran nuclear deal. they object to the sanctions, but that puts them at loggerheads with the us. ordinary iranians are bracing themselves for a rocky time ahead. the economy has had a tricky year, with oil sales already dropping. the impact will be felt in many ways. people are having less access to food, medicine, jobs are being cut, and rising prices, so there is a lot of anxiety and uncertainty. but iran‘s president says his country won‘t be cowed. translation: the americans should be punished forever, they are bullying a great nation
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with an old cultural heritage, it is unacceptable to our state. president trump says he wants a new dealfor the iranians can which will see them stop there nuclear programme and abandon proxy wars in the middle east. so far though there seems little sign of that happening. naomi grimley, bbc news. you are watching afternoon live, these are the headlines. scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of the capital after the 100 and eighteenth homicide this year. james torbett — founder of celtic boys‘ club in glasgow — is found guilty of sexual offences against three boys in the 1980s and 1990s. iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed once again by america, with the iranian president declaring his country is in an "economic war". taoiseach leo varadkar has told
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theresa may that ireland will consider a "review mechanism" to the controversial northern ireland backstop plan. but he has said that any backstop that is agreed can not be time limited — and it should only be possible to end it with the agreement of both the uk, and the eu. the phone call between the two came amid reports that brexit secretary dominic raab is pushing for the backstop arrangement to have a break clause that could limit it to just three months. it is a complex state of affairs — and who better than our brussels correspondent adam fleming helped us untangle it? it is getting very confusing, even i am confused by it sometimes, and i study at 24—7, maybe not the full 24, but definitely seven. at the moment, in the withdrawal agreement, which is the legally binding brexit divorce treaty that has to basically be agreed in the next few weeks, certainly in the next few months, with the irish backstop, so avoiding
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a hard border being reintroduced between northern ireland and ireland, if that problem is not solved with the future trading relationship, we now think there will be three options. number one, a northern ireland only option, where northern ireland only option, where northern ireland only option, where northern ireland would stay in the customs union and elements of the single market, so the cross—border trade could continue as it does now, that‘s the original backstop proposed by the eu at the start of the year, which we have all become very familiar with. the uk government hate that idea because they think it threatens the constitutional integrity of the uk, so it has proposed a second option, which was a uk wide customs arrangements between the uk and the eu that would go some way to solve the problem, though you would also have to deal with the rules and regulations of the single market separate layers well. then option three, this idea of extending the transition or implementation period that runs from brexit day next march until the end of december 2020. what is happening is that the eu side are
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taking the option under two, the uk wide backstop, really quite seriously. they are looking to see to what extent, how much detail they could put into it in the withdrawal agreement to satisfy the uk, but what the uk wants, what theresa may needs,is what the uk wants, what theresa may needs, is for option one, the northern ireland only option, to be struck out of the withdrawal agreement. so what we are waiting for, all this talk about the uk option, whether there is a review clause or not, whether it could be ended by both parties or unilaterally, what really matters is whether that northern ireland only option will still be there at the end of the day. around 180—thousand people can expect a pay rise of £9 per week because their employers have signed up to the voluntary ‘real living wage‘ scheme. it‘s based on what a full—time worker with a family needs to survive — and it‘s over a pound an hour more than the minimum wage. but there‘s concern it could cause employers to push up prices. our economics correspondent andy verity reports. an inexpensive way to
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satisfy hungry customers. part of the reason it‘s cheap is the staff at this award—winning chippie in south london are paid modestly, and might themselves struggle to afford a more expensive meal. i look round for bargains, especially on meat. because i think meat has gone out of proportion in prices. about 5,000 employers, including a third of the biggest companies in the country, have signed up to a voluntary scheme to pay what‘s described as a real living wage, worked out by the charity the living wage foundation. it is substantially more than the legal minimum wage set by the government of £7.83 per hour if you are over 25. employers signed up to the voluntary scheme will raise wages by 25p an hour to £9 an hour. and by 35p per hour for staff working in london. this year, we‘ve seen private rental costs go up, council tax go up, public transport has got more expensive, and the basic price of the sort of basic goods you buy in your supermarket shop has also gone up.
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all of that has come together to mean that people need more this year to meet their basic costs of living. other costs have been rising, such as in the case of a chippie, potatoes, squeezing employers‘ profit margins. the price of your fish and chips pays for a lot more than just fish and chips and may have to rise to fund living wages for staff. we need to increase our staff salary, because the cost of living is going up. and it‘s london prices, london rents, transport, travelling — it is expensive. and it‘s not fair on them. we want quality people to work here, and we need to pay a fair wage. premiership football clubs are under pressure, because what they pay top players, up to £300,000 per week, it‘s nearly a thousand times as much as they pay to casual and contract workers on minimum wage. while four premiership clubs have signed up to pay all staff the living wage, many top playing clubs, such as manchester united
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and manchester city, still haven‘t. andy verity, bbc news. now let‘s returned to the issue of knives. for more on this we can now speak to two young men involved in grass roots efforts in sheffield, to combat the growth of knife crime. anthony olasenday‘s work in the community led him to establish the anti—violence keep sheffield stainless campaign. as part of that work anthony has collaborated with terence campbell, with the two joining forcing on a project to address the public perception of violence in grime music, organising a special anti—knife crime club night which debuted last week. they both join they bothjoin me now. thank you for your time. ijust they bothjoin me now. thank you for your time. i just want to start with your time. i just want to start with you anthony, because what is it about graham, drill music that so many people, in fact there is a special programme on bbc london tonight looking at the link of this type of music and knife crime. it gets a bad press. i think it's
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because they talk about their life, what they're living in graham and drill music, and if they are living that sort of life, that is what they will talk about. it is up to the people that are listening, and the parents that are allowing their kids to listen to this music to make a judgment on if that is ok or not for their kids to be influenced by this sort of music. and you insist that there is no language that might be seen to encourage any sort of attacks like this when you play the music? there might be some lyrics there, but as i said, it's their life. you watch soaps, you see a lot worse on soaps, do you watch your favourite soap and act out the things you see? no, you don't. you need to understand right from wrong. terence, we are talking about sheffield, there have been eight deaths through knife crime there this year as well. there is no part of this country that isn‘t affected,
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and everybody who doesn‘t understand what goes on is at a loss as to how to stop it. what advice do you give? imean, i to stop it. what advice do you give? i mean, i do know exactly, like, there is no one route answer, but things like giving youth opportunities and things to do where we can engage with them and keep our eye on them. so there is the element of notjust the eye on them. so there is the element of not just the youth that the parents as well, we can keep an eye on what they are doing and mediate what is going on, i think that is pa rt of what is going on, i think that is part of the solution for sure. but the fact that you two are just sitting there now suggests it is this crucial issue having male role models. the music as an influence but a la turbie will say there is a lack of influence within a family or without groups of yours setting up. that is definitely part of it. it is all good pointing out the years but there is a part of this where the grown—ups have to take responsible
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at it, and that is why we did the event how we did it, so that parents could come with the use and understand the popular culture that their kids are into, and start getting involved and help guide them to the future as well. put them at ease. also backed up with other workshops, educational workshops to give them skills and experiences they can use in other part of their lives as well. anthony, who said put them at ease, do you think it does, do you think anything does put terence at ease when they hear this sort of thing? i think it is good to know. you should want to take an interest in what your child does. they play football, you go to the foot ball they play football, you go to the football match, you go to the foot ball football match, you go to the football matches, you support them, they listen to the music, why not think that they are getting up to badness by listening to this music, the event was there so you could go and see that your child is in this venue and it is not what you may think it is like. you almost put at ease because you will see first hand
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it is not what is glamorised on the tv. and terence, when it comes to the young people, many of them feel they need a knife if they want to feel safe on the streets, having a knife is part of standard protection. you are shaking your head, anthony, but is that the experience you come across, terence? a lot of the stigma comes from media, i believe. there is a lot of kids carrying knives for protection, we can‘t hide from that but there area we can‘t hide from that but there are a lot of kids who are saying i am going to take a stand, i am not carrying a knife and i don‘t want any involvement in knife crime. the stigma and the rumours flying around has everyone panicked me he that every single kid is walking around with a knife with the aim of stabbing each other. however i will say there are a lot more children now that are carrying these for protection than used to be, definitely. anthony you are both there in a bbc studio talking to me,
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but for you, does that actually get to those whose message, they need to hear this. is there a generation gap, what is the gap here where so many of us don‘t understand what‘s going on on our own streets? we're here, well, i'm here, and i'm sure terence is as well. we want to get parents on board. we want to do all we can with the youths who are able to get to us. that is ourjob, we are passionate about making the difference to these youths. we are trying to educate them on what will happen if they get caught with a knife. we have means to do that. being here is for the parents. you don't need to be worried, we are here doing what we can, come on board, find out what we're doing, find out what were about, can you help? your kids are growing up in this day and age, you could guide them towards us. and terence, if that doesn‘t happen, if the parents
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aren‘t there, presumably there is a vacuum, matters where gangs would like to take advantage of these young men, that is where that vacuum is created. i think that's the part of this that everybody misses, all of this that everybody misses, all of the stuff has been around for yea rs of the stuff has been around for years and we have not had nearly as much violence as we are seeing now, andi much violence as we are seeing now, and i think part of this event was we should get behind the young ones, we should get behind the young ones, we should get behind the young ones, we should support them. the fact we have parents in their mixed with toddlers and teens, it all added to the valley of the event because eve ryo ne the valley of the event because everyone was looking after each other, the community came together, if anybody got a bit rowdy they said hang on, we‘ve got younger ones here thatis hang on, we‘ve got younger ones here that is exactly how it should be, instead of running away from it and turning a blind eye, because it doesn‘t change anything. but by embracing it and mediating it, definitely. for me, mayi embracing it and mediating it, definitely. for me, may i add that
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asa parent, definitely. for me, may i add that as a parent, you have to ask yourself is your child vulnerable to this? when they finish school and they are hanging on the streets or just playing with their friends, they are vulnerable. this is what we are trying to show. they might only be playing with their friends but if you play so many times in the same area, people might pick up on this, and the vulnerability is real. but how do you then respond? if you are worried as a parent that that is happening, if you just go to the school gate and wait for them or whatever, that can be counter—productive, can‘t it? how do you manage that situation, how do you manage that situation, how do you get your son, sometimes your daughter, how do you get them not to feel that you are becoming interfering and becoming part of the problem? that is a fair point you make but it is about everyone playing their part. what me and anthony are doing, we are just playing our part. i am a youth leader as well in the use area of
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sheffield. i‘m tired of that other opportunities out there so that youth can engage with them. the other part of that puzzle is the pa rents other part of that puzzle is the parents getting involved, sourcing out these opportunities and getting them engaged with them. it is a thing where we all need to come together to help solve this problem. we can only do our part for the opportunities out there. in the past, we have had kids do work experience with us and they have gone on to university, that had so we can‘t, the more that youth are engaging with that, the same like when me and anthony were younger, because we had things to do, and now look at us, business owners and doing well for ourselves. and many people watching you will have full respect for that. finally, anthony, this club night, it depends obviously on people going to it, you get a sense it is capturing the imagination of the people you want to attract to it? 10096. i think you
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have to be there to believe the atmosphere. i have not been in a clu b atmosphere. i have not been in a club come of that kind of atmosphere, for a long, long time and feel safe. there was a lot of emotions kicking around, the mc, very, very talented mcs, they were getting very emotional, and it was good fun, you know? it was good, good fun, you know? it was good, good fun, you know? it was good, good fun, and everybody that was there, everyone was clapping and cheering people on, everyone was eating involved. a perfect place for you to see your child. even if your child wants to get involved in music, that is a terrific showcase for them. can ijust music, that is a terrific showcase for them. can i just add that there we re for them. can i just add that there were people here who hadn‘t talked to each other for years that had issues with each other, all solved because of this event. everybody focuses on the negative but, man, there are so much positive that can come from events like this. it was brilliant. it was. really good to talk to you both and i wish you all the luck in the world with a club
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night and your future work. thank you both very much indeed. you are watching afternoon live. rules on who can join the british armed forces are set to change, partly to try to address a recruitment crisis. currently commonwealth citizens can onlyjoin the army, navy or air force if they have lived in the uk for five years, but that limit is set to be scrapped — meaning any commonwealth national will be eligble to join up. conservative mp mark francois is a former territorial army officer and released a report last year looking at recruitment problems within the british army... thank you forjoining us. so, what is the problem here? is it that there are not enough people who want tojoin the armed there are not enough people who want to join the armed forces, or is there are not enough people who want tojoin the armed forces, or is it the process of joining? tojoin the armed forces, or is it the process ofjoining? it's tojoin the armed forces, or is it the process of joining? it's the process. there are still a lot of people applying, but the difficulty is that back in 2012, the army outsourced its recruitment to a firm called capita. and that contract has
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been an unmitigated disaster. and since then, the army have been thousands of recruits short every year, and the first couple of years they were about 2000 short, the last few years each year they have been about 3000 short, and this year in evidence to the defence committee on which i serve, they admitted they had between 4000 and 5000 short. so the contract is a complete dog‘s brea kfast, the contract is a complete dog‘s breakfast, and because of that the army is now very slowly beginning to disappear in front of our eyes, because it hasn‘t got the recruits it needs to top it up. but that's the case, is it, that people are out there, it is just they are waiting to fill in an extra form, and in the meantime the problem gets worse? yes, capita‘s process is broken. on average, it is taking a youngster who wants to join the army about a year to join who wants to join the army about a year tojoin the process. if who wants to join the army about a year to join the process. if you are looking to recruit large lumbers of
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18,19 looking to recruit large lumbers of 18, 19 and 20—year—olds, they don‘t wa nt to 18, 19 and 20—year—olds, they don‘t want to wait a week for anything, they are certainly not going to wait a year. so there is quite a lot of people making an initial application, filling in a form online, that the process is so broken that lots of those people walk away. the other problem is the medicals are too restrictive, lots of potential candidates are being failed for a stream the minor ailments, like childhood asthma or very mild eczema, and that means that people who want to serve their country in uniform have been binned when most other armies around the world will willingly take them. so on the one hand it is the mod‘s medicals fought, and on the other hand perhaps even more gravely, it is capita‘s fought. capita are hopeless and they should be sacked. do we need to go back to the days of the army recruitment office on the high street, you walk in, there is a
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bloke full of medals, who asked you a few questions, and if you answer them in the right way, you are on them in the right way, you are on the parade ground within weeks?m worked pretty well, didn‘t it? the royal air force and the navy did not ta ke royal air force and the navy did not take on capita, they continue to do it in the old traditional way, as you have described, and whilst eve ryo ne you have described, and whilst everyone is having trouble hitting targets because we have nearly full employment in this country, which is a good thing for the economy but makes it more difficult for the armed forces to recruit, nonetheless the royal navy and the royal air force, doing at the old way, are pretty close to hitting their targets. if you go in and try to join the army now, you won‘t get a quy join the army now, you won‘t get a guy with a chest full of medals, exactly as you say, you will have a civilian. if you are a youngster and you join the army, you want the senior nco who has been there, seen it and done it, but someone who has been doing thejob it and done it, but someone who has been doing the job six months and is now the difference between a tank and a helicopter. thank you for joining us, good to talk to you. now
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i look at the weather was, as with a rather beautiful image. —— tomasz is here. err this was last night in shetland, the northern lights. they are very nice, these. this is another one presumably from shetland as well. they were very final. there is another one, from shetland too. these seemed to be mostly green, sometimes we get some reds and oranges. beautiful 60 degrees north. just explain to us how this works. this is when charged particles from the sun, that is one from moret gunn electrons, protons, and they basically leave the sun‘s
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atmosphere, they escape the gravity and they hurtle towards earth at goodness knows how many miles per second. then they hit the upper reaches of our atmosphere. they excite the gas that is higher in our atmosphere, and then the gas basically gets very excited itself, and it releases photons, which are basically packets of light, and we usually see these greens and the reds, and that is to do with the caracol composition of our atmosphere. i have never seen it but eve ryo ne atmosphere. i have never seen it but everyone who has, you neverforget it, do you? iwent everyone who has, you neverforget it, do you? i went to iceland a few yea rs it, do you? i went to iceland a few years ago, and it was completely overcast. that was a shame. you should have checked the weather forecast! i know! i can tell you now that the forecast tonight suggests, this is our aurora forecast, and basically where you see the red scam thatis basically where you see the red scam that is the very high probability of
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catching a glimpse of it. this is about 11pm, pretty much certainty, so folks in reykjavik will get a considerate and in the north of scotla nd considerate and in the north of scotland once again. sometimes these greens and yellows can be as far south as... we should have an aurora forecast every day. this is the time of year to go to iceland, i don‘t work for the tourist board by the way. you can see them in norway and finland. we are not always sure you walk but anyway... quite spectacular the weather in the uk in terms of the temperature. it is november. it has not been so awesome towards the south across the mediterranean. they‘ve had stormy weather and poor weather across spain. these weather systems have been pushing warm weather in our
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direction. temperatures were mostly around the mid at 3pm. this is the forecast for anybody that is out marking bonfire night. there was a lot going on over the weekend but tonight is the night traditionally. it looking drive. there might be a few showers in some eastern areas. a chance of some rain in the west. but generally speaking the forecast is suggesting a lot of dry and misty weather. tomorrow it‘s going to be another mild day. some sunshine in central and eastern areas once again and it will feel mild. add towards the west the weather continues to be pretty unpleasant. tuesday into
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weather front is going to stall across some western parts of the uk and we are anticipating a lot of rainfall in south—west england and the, western scotland and northern ireland. on wednesday that is a big split between the west and the east. in the east there will be some rain but the showers will be hit and miss. towards the west it will be pretty unpleasant. temperatures are still pretty high. as we head towards the rest of the week it will pick back up in london to 14 celsius. the average this time of is around 11. overall for the rest of this week it is not going to be particularly cold but the weather is going to turn rough for more of us as we go towards the end of the week. today, 17 degrees, that is
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really not bad for the beginning of november. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: four people stabbed to death in five days in london. scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of the capital. james torbett, founder of celtic boys‘ club in glasgow, is found guilty of sexual offences against three boys in the 1980s and 1990s and sentenced to six years in prison. iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed once again by america with the iranian president declaring his country is in an "economic war". our country needs you. the mod is scrapping the need for commonwealth citizens to have lived in the uk for at least 5 years before they can enlist. sport now on afternoon live with katherine downes. the spice girls making a comeback. and so too wayne rooney and not everybody is convinced it‘s a good idea. is it isita is it a good idea to come back?
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it's it‘s fine for wayne rooney but i‘m not sure about the spice girls.” think it will be an excellent show and if! think it will be an excellent show and if i get a ticket i will definitely go. i would also pay further —— to see wayne rooney play at wembley on last time. some people say it‘s not a good idea for him to come out of retirement. the fa want to give him a sendoff to thank him for his dedication and the performances he has put in for his country. he is england‘s leading goal—scorer. but the criticism is, all the money from that match will go to the wayne rooney foundation, the criticism is he has not earned his place on the team. lots of people say it‘s cheapens an international friendly and turns it into a testimonialfor international friendly and turns it into a testimonial for one player. also what does it mean if you give
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them a cap just so they can celebrate their career. peter shilton, england‘s most capped player, has said the fa should not be giving away caps like gifts and that this is an indulgence too far. it has caused real division among fa ns it has caused real division among fans and football experts. let's talk terrace. when will we get to see rafael nadal? he is undergoing ankle surgery as we speak. he pulled out of the paris masters last week. he hadn‘t abdominal problem and still has that but while he‘s recovering he has taken the chance to have an operation on his ankle. he is currently under the surgeon ‘s knife. it‘s a shame because he would have done battle with novak djokovic at the atp tour finals next week at
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the 02 at the atp tour finals next week at the o2 in london. that is now not to be so it means that novak djokovic will been born at the end of the season. rafael nadal is 32 years old now. he says he only has another couple of years playing tennis so he is doing what he can to be fit for next season. he will be replaced by john isner. in rugby league, george burgess will appear at a disciplinary hearing on tuesday evening after new zealand cited an incident during sunday‘s second test at anfield. the england foward is seen to have his fingers in the eyes of new zealand‘s captain. england won the match 20—14, to take an unassailable lead in the 3 match series. good and bad news for eddiejones as his england side prepare to face new zealand at twickenham this weekend. starting with the bad news, forward tom curry has been ruled out with whatjones has described as a "severe ankle injury". he was part of the inexperienced back row that helped england beat south africa on saturday
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the good news is that co—captain owen farrell is free to play. he‘s not going to be punished for this thumping tackle at the end of their match against south africa. it was the last play of the match and helped england hold on for a hard fought win. lots of commentators and former players felt it was at least a foul, but the authorities disagree. liverpool midfielder xherdan shaqiri will miss the side‘s champions league game against red star belgrade in serbia tomorrow. he‘s been left out of the squad in order to "avoid any distractions" that may be caused by his albanian heritage. that is all the sport from me. now on afternoon live let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk.
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let‘s go to dominic heale in nottingham, where investigators are looking into the cause of a major fire which destroyed several buildings overnight. and in southampton is edward sault, with an update on arij altai who we featured last week on nationwide, an iraqi woman diagnosed with terminal cancer who has flown home for the final time after a huge fundraising campaign. let‘s talk about nottingham and this huge fire. explain to us where it was. it was the cattle market on meadow lane which is at the edge of the city centre. next to the notts cou nty football the city centre. next to the notts county football ground. it was one of the biggest fires seen in nottingham in recent years though tha nkfully nottingham in recent years though thankfully nobody was hurt. it started around 5:30pm yesterday. no
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livestock has been sold at the cattle market since 1993 but it is home to a wide range of industrial buildings. the flames spread rapidly and they could be seen right across nottingham. residents also reported hearing several loud bangs. a lot of people initially thought it was fireworks. this is an industrial area so there are a lot of gas cylinders around the building. there is the potential for those to explode so the explosions heard last night were gas cylinders. at its height 85 firefighters from three counties were involved in tackling this blaze. they had some problems with water because of water pressure from the mains so a lot of water had to be pumped from nottingham canal.
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people living in the area were advised to keep their doors and windows closed. what about people who run the businesses there?‘ number of businesses have been badly damaged. four have been destroyed. one of those which suffered minimal damage was a firm called internet reptiles. with the flames threatened the back of the building a rescue operation was launched to evacuate the animals and one of the rescuers was bitten by a venomous snake although he is said to be fine. one order of a business says she fears the market may never recover. the other big question is how did it start. an investigation is already under way. a fire officer was bitten? so i understand. but he's fine. hazards of the job,
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bitten? so i understand. but he's fine. hazards of thejob, i guess. i‘m not sure he would expect to be bitten by a venomous snake. let‘s go to edward salt because we have been talking about arij altai and the need to raise money for this very important trip and she flew at the weekend. she did. if you'd told a weekend. she did. if you'd told a week ago she would be back in iraq i don't think she would have believed it. over the weekend she flew back to iraq for the last time. we spoke about her last week because she had terminal cancerand about her last week because she had terminal cancer and was diagnosed with it earlier this year. she was faced with dying alone in the uk because both her and her husband had come over here to study for a ph.d. at southampton university and her husband had finished and had to go back to iraq. now her friend said this was not good enough and started a crowdfunding campaign to get her back home to iraq on a private medicaljet. they got the money they
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needed. saturday morning she was taken from needed. saturday morning she was ta ken from southampton needed. saturday morning she was taken from southampton hospital to southampton airport and transported onto that medical aeroplane to begin the seven and a half hourjourney back to iraq. she has been reunited with her family and is in an iraqi hospital. i heard from them late la st hospital. i heard from them late last night and arij altai is in a hospital close to her home. she is doing 0k. she needs to recover from the flight because it was tiring and it took a lot out of her. when we talk about this last week i walked out of the studio and had hundreds of m essa g es out of the studio and had hundreds of messages asking how to give money to get her back home. how much was raised in the end? 62,000 pounds. they needed £56,000. when we spoke the figure was around £4000.
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throughout the day on tuesday that figure went up and on wednesday by the evening it had exceeded that target. i think they are still stunned even now about the generosity of people, not just on the soldering them but around the uk and around the world. her husband foist how grateful they were for the generosity of strangers. to be honest, i don't know who to thank them for what they did for us. our dream is about to become true. god bless you and i hope all your dreams come true. thank you so much. she has been reunited with her son but she is back in hospital. she is but she is back in hospital. she is but she is back in hospital. she is but she is over the moon to be reunited with her son. some good news this
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afternoon, i have heard that the medics in iraq are hoping that arij altai might be able to go back to the family home now to see out the la st the family home now to see out the last few weeks. we know there is not going to be a miracle but it's a miracle in itself that she has managed to get back home. thank you both forjoining us. if you would like to see more on any of those stories you can access them through the bbc i play. we go nationwide at 4:30pm every day an afternoon live. a cash—strapped council has set out
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for the first time what it believes is the minimum level of services that residents should expect it to deliver. east sussex has warned that it is several million pounds short of being able to afford even that. ?the council has made 129 million pounds of savings since 2010. our political correspondent helen catt has the details from bexhill—on—sea in east sussex. it has made cuts across a range of services and it says this is not sustainable. it has been warning for some time it is not have the funds to keep funding everything it does. so it has come up with what it calls it core of and that is the minimum services it believes residents should be able to get from the council. that is basically all the things it has to provide bylaw plus a bit extra but it does mean reducing some of the services it currently offers so for example east sussex says it will safeguard children but will withdraw some of the early help it gives to families. it will still undertake special educational needs assessments and it
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warns they could be slower. it will amend the roads but not so many of the footpaths. this is a more sustainable approach looking forward to the next three years to what it should be able to fund. however, this takes about £12 million of the cost of the council on services over the next three years and that still is not enough to balance the books. it's is not enough to balance the books. it‘s warning that on the current levels it would still be on a worst—case scenario, £33 million short within three years. the idea of this is to take this to the government to say this is the minimum service our lives should get and you need help give us the funds to do it. how likely is that to happen trusting mark in the budget last week the chancellor promised more funds for social care and more funds the fixing potholes. share of that will to east sussex but how much of that will take some of the pressure of we don‘t know. there is
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a spending revolt next year with a lot of uncertainty so i think this is somewhere of east sussex trying to plant a marker to try and make sure whatever the financial uncertainty is the case definitely gets looked at because it has specific demographic issues. a quarter of the population here is over 65. compared to 18% in england. it also already charges high council tax, the highest in the country so it has limited ways of raising more money. vishala sri—pathma is here. in a moment she will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: scotland yard say hundreds more officers will be deployed on the streets of the capital after the one hundred and eighteenth homicide this year. james torbett — founder of celtic boys‘ club in glasgow — is found guilty of sexual offences against three boys in the 1980s and 1990s and sentenced to six years in prison. iran vows to defy the sanctions imposed once again by america with the iranian president
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declaring his country is in an "economic war". here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: britanny ferries has revealed that uk holidaymakers are delaying booking channel crossings for next summer amid concerns about the consequences of brexit. forward bookings were down between 4% and 5% from some of its regular customers. a spokesman for the ferry operator said people were worried about the impact on areas such as pet travel, health insurance and driving licences. activity in the uk‘s services sector slowed in october compared to september. that‘s according to the ihs markit survey. the services sector, which includes banks, hotels and retailers, accounts for around 76% of the uk economy. the survey says it lots of companies were concerned about brexit uncertainty and the economic outlook. sales of new cars in the uk recovered slightly in october, although they were still down
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on a year previously. according to the society of motor manufacturers & traders, sales were down around 3% on last year. although this is an improvement on september, when there was a 20.5% decline. sanctions back on iran. what is it doing to the oil price? it has meant a loss of about a million barrels of oil per day so that lack of supply is having an impact on the price and we have seen the oil price higher today. but we have anticipated this for some time and the major oil producers have not —— have made some provisions for it. but how does it impact as when we go to the petrol stations? let‘s find out. joining us now is richard dunbar, investment director at aberdeen standard investments.
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the oil price has increased quite considerably over the course of the year. where is it going? and what it going to do when it comes to petrol? over the recent past it's come down by 1520% from the highs we saw a month ago when the sanctions were announced last week but they are not quite as harsh as many feared. the likes of japan quite as harsh as many feared. the likes ofjapan and india and china will still be allowed to buy oil from iran. these sort of levels, there are big incentives for us producers to produce more oil and the expectations of global growth are a little lower than they were a few months ago. so that lowers the expected demand for oil. there is still an incentive to produce and ascension is not as harsh as was
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feared. some people are saying that $80 a barrel could be something that is realistic by the end of the year. an insurer ‘s company has not done too well today because of loss of events and a lot of us hurricane ‘s this year. they were impacted by an expected claims because of hurricane is in the us and asia. they also had one significant marine claim that was unhelpful. that is what these insurers companies are set up for. part of theirjob is to pay these claims and they will do
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so. but they will be cautious as they set premiums into the year ahead. that move onto currency. the pound has had a good start to the week against the euro. it has strengthened on the back of some encouraging movements in terms of brexit. where is that going this week? finance ministers are meeting in brussels today about italy. sterling has been one of the... obviously we had better news with regard to brexit feel at the end of the last week. we have been reminded today that the risks on the irish border issues are not solved but thatis border issues are not solved but that is some time pressure to get the ministers grouped together
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fairly soon. sterling is expecting some kind of deal between all sides. thank you very much. let's have a look at the markets. the pound is higher against the euro can last week. when steel company has done well today and is up 6% because of higher steel prices in china. thank you very much. the spice girls are reforming and are set to tour the uk next year
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minus victoria beckham. the announcement was made on their official twitter page — proving that friendship never ends... do you think i‘m too old for bunches? hello ladies, i'm ready. jerry, what is that? we said we are all going to be in black tuxedos. is that a black tuxedo? you will find you are wearing a sparkling dress. we are going on tour, people need to see it to believe it. seriously, we can fall out now if we are going out on tour. joining us now is the spice girls
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with the shock announcement of their uk tour. i asked our reporter chi chi izundu how the band is likely to fare without posh spice i don't think the music will suffer without victoria but it won't feel like the original line—up and everyone had their favourite spice girl. she will be missed on tour but mel b said earlier they are leaving the door open for her tojoin mel b said earlier they are leaving the door open for her to join them at any time. i should have prepared
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for this. there are some questions, this is a big deal is net? let‘s go back a decade or so, they were big. you don't have to go back that far. they were part of the closing ceremony of the olympic games in london 2012. that was the last performance. everyone loved it. everyone loves the spice girls. they we re everyone loves the spice girls. they were a particular era in our history whether we like it or not. they did in powera whether we like it or not. they did in power a lot of young women into believing girl power. there are bands that have reformed and made millions. take that came back came back and made millions from going on tour. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today. next, the bbc news at five with ben brown time for a look at the weather.
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we have some exceptionally mild weather out there today, particularly in southern parts of the uk. temperatures around 16 or 17 degrees in one of two spots. tonight it‘s going to be mild and foggy. it's it‘s going to be mild and foggy. it‘s a very important night because of his bonfire night. these are the temperatures. it‘s going to be mild for november with southerly winds. a lot of dry weather across most of the country. by the end of the night and into tuesday the temperatures are still around double figures. so are still around double figures. so a mild start with those southerly winds tomorrow but in the west later on the weather is going downhill and we are expecting rain and the following 24 hours will be very wet in south—west england and were. ——
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wales. today at five — police says they‘ll step up patrols on the capital‘s streets — after four fatal stabbings in the last five days. the mayor of london warns that progress on tackling knife crime could take a decade... we‘d better actually focus on a generation. and the reality that it may be a generation before we get the levels of violent crime that are acceptable to our society. we‘ll be finding out how authorities in glasgow tackled knife crime after it became known as the murder capital of europe ten years ago. the other main stories on bbc news: mass protests in iran as the united states reimposes sweeping sanctions. the us secretary of state says "fall in line or see your economy crumble". donald trump and barack obama both on the campaign trail —
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