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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 8, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 2... a gunman opens fire in a packed bar in southern california, killing 12 people — police say they found the suspect dead inside. i was on the dance floor and i heard the gunshots, so i looked back and then, all of a sudden, everyone screamed, "get down." prince charles says he won't be ‘meddling' in issues when he becomes king. he says he's ‘not that stupid,‘ and understands that his constitutional role will be more restricted. you can't be the same as the sovereign if you're the prince of wales or the heir. but the idea somehow that i'm going to go on exactly the same way, if i have to succeed, is complete nonsense. within hours of hearing the results of the us mid—term elections donald trump fires his attorney general, and bans a cnn reporter from the white house... we'll ask — what's he up to? coming up on afternoon live all the sport — holly and john. john, how nice to
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see you. what are you up to? we are talking cricket this afternoon, keen to keep you on your toes. a great day for england against sri lankan, keatonjennings filling day for england against sri lankan, keaton jennings filling the day for england against sri lankan, keatonjennings filling the void left by alastair cook. more to come later. ben rich, the weather. if it hasn't been turbulent and offered you already this week there is something even more lightly on the way, we'll be looking at that and back five years to a time when one of the most powerful typhoon is on record hit the philippines. all the details on the way. see you later, ben, thank you very much for that. also coming up... as we approach the centenary of the end of the first world war we visit the small village that claims it sent more young men to fight than any other in the indian subcontinent. hello, everyone, this
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is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. another mass shooting in the united states and a dozen families are mourning the loss of loved ones at the hands of a lone gunman. this latest atrocity happened at a country music bar in thousand oaks — a0 miles north of los angeles in california. police have confirmed that at least 12 people are known to have died, including one police officer who was one of the first on the scene. officials say that more than 200 people were inside the borderline bar and grill — which was hosting a university student night at the time of the attack. officials say the suspect was found dead inside. with the latest, richard lister reports. they'd fled for their lives. some of the survivors from this nightclub shooting found safety behind police lines. it was the busiest night of the week at the borderline club, when a gunman dressed in black walked in and opened fire. i was just yelling,
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"get down, get down." there was quite a few girls in a group, young girls, and i think they all got out. they all got down. then he kept on moving to the right, he shot the front desk cashier. it was just semi—automatic, as many shots as he could pull, and then when it started to reload that's when we got people out of there and i didn't look back. we didn't know what was going on and then we heard more gunshots, and then these incredible humans justjumped up and started smashing out the windows. and everybody wasjust like, "jump!" because we were trapped, we were completely trapped on that side and so we jumped two storeys down to the ground. there followed a massive police response and a search for the gunman. sounds like they found someone matching the suspect down inside the building. it was eventually confirmed that he'd been killed, but so too had one of the first police officers on the scene, shot the moment he ran
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through the door. the sergeant passed away at the hospital about an hour ago. i only mentioned it might be a terrorist because that's where we all go these days when we have multiple shootings like this. there's no reason for it when we have this horrific death, i have nothing to lead me to believe, or the fbi, that there is any terrorism link here. the investigation to find out who the gunman was and why he did this is under way. but how to prevent more of these mass shooting is a question america seems unable to answer. richard lister, bbc news. let's ta ke let's take you to thousand oaks, the turning california. the latest town in the united states to be dealing with a mass shooting. in the last few minutes president trump pleaded
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saying he had been briefed, he described it as terrible and praised the bravery of the police officers involved. we can now speak tojoe curely — a reporter with the ventura county star newspaper. he's been at the scene of the shooting throughout today. the two questions, who did this and why? those are two questions we don't have an answer to yet. the last briefing we got, we know very little about the shooter from the last information. without that there is no motive yet but we expected to get that information later today. clearly his target, it was a packed bar full of young people. clearly his target, it was a packed barfull of young people. yes. he burst through the front door and wrecked mayhem on the bar, where upwards of 600 people picked up schools, chairs, they did everything they could to break the glass on the back of the bar to escape to safety.
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thousand oaks california is known as one of the safest places, it prides itself on its reputation as being one of the safest places notjust in california but in the country. a lot of people are waking up around here and are horrified by the news, with and are horrified by the news, with an event that is changing this town. just looking at you, it's quite clear that the shock is still very, very sharp for everybody particularly for those who have been to be seen. yes. from what we hear, it was gruesome inside. 11 lives lost, plus a sheriff's deputy who was one year away from retirement who leaves behind a wife and a son. and also the gunmen makes 30 lives.
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i suppose two questions that are asked, not here, not again, this is now becoming a grim regular report for you and your colleagues. —— makes 13 lives. i think what you hear whenever this happens is that if it can happen at this location it can happen anywhere. i'm sure that's what people are waking up in this community seeing if it can happen in the safest place in california, one of the safest places, it can certainly happen anywhere in this country. and inevitably again questions will be asked about gun laws in the united states. what is the view in california and make things change? that's the hope, but obviously there are two sides that are very entrenched on both sides of that issue. every time something like this happens you think some
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common sense will jump like this happens you think some common sense willjump into the fray and fix things, but to this day it hasn't happened so far. jill, a very difficult day for everybody there. we send our thoughts to you. thank you forjoining us. thank you. —— june. let's ta ke let's take you do live shots. are awaiting a news conference, possibly with a sheriff we've already seen, geoff dean, who was the one to tell reporters that a sheriff was among the casualties in that shooting. we're awaiting an update. as you can see, it is early morning dawning in the thousand oaks, california as the town wa kes the thousand oaks, california as the town wakes up to the news it is the latest venue for a mass shooting in the united states. as that reporter we re the united states. as that reporter were saying, thousand oaks regarded itself to be one of the safest towns
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in the united states. but that will all changed in the last few hours, 12 people dead. there is an update expected in the next few minutes. we will take you there when the police come to the microphone. you are watching afternoon live. the prince of wales says he'll stop speaking out on topics he feels strongly about, when he becomes king. in a bbc documentary to mark his 70th birthday, he acknowledges that consitutional parameters mean he won't be able say what he likes and that he won't be "meddling." in the past, the prince has campaigned strongly on issues such as the environment and architecture. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. he's filled his adult life thus far as prince of wales trying, as he puts it, to make a difference for the better. but as he approaches his 70th birthday, charles knows better than anyone that one day he will step into a new role as king. and with that role will come a particular responsibility — to curb his habit of speaking out on subjects about which he feels strongly. it didn't work, it didn't work.
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in the bbc documentary, charles is asked about his so—called meddling as prince of wales. he says he regards it as motivating people to take an interest in things like the inner cities and the environment. and then he draws this vital distinctin between the role of prince of wales and the role of king. i think it's vital to remember there's only room for one sovereign at a time, not two. so you can't be the same as the sovereign if you're the prince of wales. or the heir. but the idea somehow that i'm going to go on in exactly the same way if i have to succeed is complete nonsense, because the two situations are completely different. clearly i won't be able to do the same things i've done as heir, so of course you operate within the constitutional parameters. that undertaking, to abide by the constitutional parameters when he's king, is significant. it should mean an end to the sometimes controversial
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public speeches he's made over the years. on architecture, for example, his description in 1984 of a planned extension to the national gallery as a "monstrous carbuncle" is just one of his interventions on building design which have irritated some. more recently his speeches opposing genetically modified crops placed him in opposition to government policy. on other matters, such as his passionate defence of the environment, he's often said to have been ahead of his time. but once he becomes king, all public campaigning will have to stop. that is the future charles has always known will be his. his wife says he's relaxed about it. his destiny will come, he's always known it's going to come and i don't think it does weigh on his shoulders at all. slowly but surely the way is being prepared, for the moment perhaps still some years away when charles is king and the united kingdom has a new head of state. prince, son and heir
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— charles at 70, will be shown on bbc one at nine o'clock tonight. and it'll be avaliable afterwards on the bbc iplayer. emboldened by the success of senate republicans in this week's mid term elections, donald trump has fired his attorney general, jeff sessions, america's chief law enforcement officer. he's also now moved against the broadcaster cnn, claiming that one of it's correspondents was involved in a altercation, with a member of his staff. mr trump has on several occasions referred to cnn and the media in general as "enemies of the people." our washington correspondent chris buckler reports. jeff sessions was given a long round of applause by colleagues as he left the department ofjustice for the final time. he had been given thejob of attorney general in return for the loyalty and support he had shown donald trump, but his resignation letter made clear that he had been unceremoniously fired by a president who had long since lost faith in him.
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make america great again! mr trump never forgavejeff sessions for accusing himself from overseeing the investigation taking place into allegations of russian interference and collusion in the 2016 presidential election. democrats and even some republicans fear the president is trying to bring an end to the enquiry, which is lead by the special counsel robert mueller. it would create a constitutional crisis if this were a prelude to ending or greatly limiting the mueller investigation. i think it was a great victory... mr trump appears to be on the defensive, having lost the house of representatives to the democrats in the midterm elections. but if he's trying to fight back, it's journalists who have got caught in the crossfire. that's enough, that's enough. that's enough. pardon me, ma'am. excuse me, that's enough. the president ended up at a news conference in a furious row with the cnn correspondentjim acosta.
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that's enough, put down the mic. mr president, are you worried about indictments coming down in this investigation? i tell you what, cnn should be ashamed of itself, having you working for them. you are a rude, terrible person. you shouldn't be working for cnn. the white house has called this unacceptable behaviour and claimed that he placed his hands on the intern who was trying to take his microphone away. cnn say that's a lie and are standing by their reporter. this isjim acosta. i am in front of the white house, a secret service officer is asking for my hard pass. butjim acosta's press credentials have been suspended indefinitely and last night he was refused access to the white house. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. we can now speak to philippa thomas who is in washington for us now. as we speak, there is a supreme
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courtjudge who may have a problem. yes, news just coming through, courtjudge who may have a problem. yes, newsjust coming through, this is about ruth bader ginsburg, she is perhaps the most liberal voice on the supreme court. she is an icon for many on the left, she is also now 85, news just coming through that she's had a fall, she is in hospital, she may have cracked or broken three ribs. at her age this is very serious. that in itself becomes a news story partly because she is the leading voice of the left on the supreme court. as we've been reporting for much of the year, the balance of justice is reporting for much of the year, the balance ofjustice is on the supreme court, the main topical voices in the land, it's very important. donald trump has named two new supreme court justices over the donald trump has named two new supreme courtjustices over the last two years and certainly for a lot of democrats and liberals in the united
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states they are very anxious about the health of ruth bader ginsburg. that news coming from a court spokeswoman, i know you will bring any new developments. in the meantime, there is donald trump, he's got rid ofjeff sessions, he's had a row with the cnn reporter. what is he up to? in the next half hour rate is due to go to be sipping court because it is also the day for the investiture of brett kavanaugh who became such an issue in the mid—term elections with his battles over his confirmation. that's what is up to right now. but that was a wider question, wasn't it? i think the general answer is he is kind of circling the wagons comedies on the defensive because the bigger question here is, what's happening with that russia enquiry led by robert mueller? enquiry about whether russia meddled in the 2016 presidential elections, the white house is very concerned about what that enquiry will bring forward and whether it's gone further to look at
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donald trump's personal finances, his campaign finances, his money matters in general and those of his family, hence what you've got is the sacking of the top law officer, jeff sessions, and the replacement by matthew whittaker who's been on record as saying he thinks this probe has already gone too far and it should back off. the big question in washington is that robert mueller probe that could do potentially so much damage to donald trump is likely to be circumscribed, curtailed, even put an end to. and at donald trump tries to shut it down the democrats, they'vejust taken over the down the democrats, they'vejust ta ken over the house down the democrats, they'vejust taken over the house of representatives, will be straight back. that will be a really big fight. they gamble there is a democrat gamble because president trump may feel sufficiently emboldened to think, if they come at me it will backfire on them. yes, you can see the narrative is being set up, can't you? you could see that in the press conference yesterday for donald trump were seeing, you know, maybe i can work
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with the democrats on capitol hill, maybe we can get something together over health wealthier, infrastructure that's good for the people of america. and then in his second breath he was seeing if they come at me and step up their investigations, gosh i will get back and take them back hard. you can feel the battle starting. just to be a cynical reporter as well, that's partly because the battle for the presidency in 2020 started the day after the midterms were over. i know you've got an investiture to get to, philip. thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... 12 people including a police officer are killed after a gunman opens—fire in a crowded bar in california prince charles vows to keep his opinions to himself when he becomes king. in his own words — he's "not that stupid" to meddle. within hours of hearing the results of the us mid—term donald trump fires his attorney general. the paraplegic man who dragged himself through luton airport drops his legal action
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as the airport improves its disabled facilities in sport, a second test century from keatonjennings has put england on course for victory with the first test with sri lanka. winger chris ashton was start england for the first time in four years, he's one of three changes to face new zealand in the second autumn international on saturday. callum wilson earned the first call—up to the england squad, he could make his debut in the match is against the usa or croatia. a squad which also sees wayne rooney return for a one—off match. i will be back with more on all of those stories at around half past. let's get more on that story johnjust mentioned — the england football manager gareth southgate has been
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defending his decision to invite wayne rooney back into the england squad for a one—off appearance against the united states at wembley later this month. let's hear what he had to say. there have been ongoing discussions. his england career is phenomenal. he was our record goal—scorer as well. those discussions were started over 12 month ago. i was quite happy, wayne didn't want to be in the team at that time during the world cup. everybody respected that. may we have the opportunity with the game at wembley to pay that tribute. as a manager and my involvement is around, was i happy to play in part of the game? and i think yes, i'm
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still able to look to the future with the squad we've picked and the things i want to see. but i've spoke a lot to the players about the importance of the shirt and the history of the shirt, honouring former players, we've got former players in the squad, we've brought former players and to present shirts to the squad. i think all of the players will respect wiener‘s contribution and deserves the best possible sendoff. —— weighing in at? . i understand that has cost conjecture. but it's my way of appreciating what he's done. will keep an eye on that news conference and any more to come from that. i will let you know. official figures have revealed further evidence of pressure on the nhs in england. key waiting time targets are still being missed and prescriptions for diabetes are now costing the nhs more than a billion pounds a year.
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although there was a slight improvement in accident and emergency targets last month. a paraplegic athlete, who said he was forced to drag himself along the floor at luton airport, because there were no self propelling wheelchairs, is dropping his legal action against the airport. justin levene said his independence had been compromised, but now more self propelled wheel chairs will be made available. our legal correspondent clive coleman reports. the pictures from august 2017 were shocking. luton airport, thank you very much. justin levene, a paraplegic man, dragging himself through luton airport, after his wheelchair, which he pushes himself, was left behind by an airline. the airport offered him a rigid high—back chair like this, which had to be pushed by someone else. he declined and completed his journey on a baggage trolley. last friday he explained his actions to the bbc. i've worked very hard for a number of years to try and maintain my independence and one of the biggest problems i had was if i didn't have my wheelchair my legs had been
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taken away from me, all of my self—sufficiency and my independence was no longer there, and to be in one of those chairs made me feel humiliated and degraded. if you're in those chairs and they insisted on trying to strap me down on it i wouldn't have been able to adjust myself and then i'd have been at risk of getting a pressure sore. since the bbc covered the story, luton airport has confirmed it now has ten self propelling wheelchairs permanently based at the airport, a system to lend out equipment including wheelchairs in case a passenger has lost or damaged theirs, and where a passenger pre—notifies they need specialised mobility equipment, the airport will source it. justin levene is pleased with that. so for me the fact that they're saying they have ten self propelled wheelchairs and a loan system in place, which for me is the most important aspect, i'm absolutely delighted with. this is all that i've been campaigning for for the last year, and for them to have listened to all of this and learned from the situation i think is a wonderful result. this story has created a huge debate online and justin has received some
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extremely abusive comments, some of which we couldn't possibly broadcast. this is one of the less offensive ones. "he's an attention seeking self—importa nt child, "having a tantrum and then trying to sue people who offered him help." but others have been more supportive, like this one. "when you're disabled, being completely independent "is the most important thing in your life. "i agree with him." justin levene says he just wants to be able to travel around with as much independence and dignity as possible. clive coleman, bbc news. now it's time to catch up with the weather. then which has been forecast but you're also going to show us what was happening five yea rs show us what was happening five years ago. we're going to look back five years to what was at the time a huge weather story, one of the biggest storms ever recorded anywhere on the planet. one of the
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stronger storms. you can see the way that the storm gained strength over the warm waters of the pacific and then played its way into the philippines. this was typhoon haiyan. it brought winds are very close to 200 miles per as it made la ndfall close to 200 miles per as it made landfall and then it slowed its way towards vietnam and china also caused some impact. the worst was across the philippines. look at these pictures from november 2013. those winds up to 185 mph, that's the steady winds, the gusts were stronger. we had about 300 millimetres of rain, following in the space of about 12 hours. we saw big waves crashing on to the shoreline as well. this caused huge devastation. it's one of the biggest storms ever recorded anywhere on the planet. they get about 20 tropical storms every year in the philippines. you think they should be used but have a look at the seams. you can be used but have a look at the seams. you can see be used but have a look at the seams. you can see that storm was a lot worse than anything they've been
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used to before. and we've been covering in the last couple of weeks that were going to see more and worse such in future. that is one line of thinking. we can never take one event like this one and attribute it to anything bigger going on, but what we're looking for is the patterns and that. and with more heat going into the atmosphere that does give more potential for big storms to take place around the world. we've certainly had more than oui’ world. we've certainly had more than ourfairshare, not world. we've certainly had more than ourfair share, not only in world. we've certainly had more than our fair share, not only in that pa rt our fair share, not only in that part of the pacific but in the atla ntic part of the pacific but in the atlantic as well. but rarely do we get a strong quite as big as haiyan, wisdoms winds, 195 the winds —— wa kes wisdoms winds, 195 the winds —— wakes up to seven metres high, that caused huge coastal flooding, wakes up to seven metres high, that caused huge coastalflooding, 7000 people killed and nearly 2 million lift homeless. five years onto the day this storm hit the philippines. i thought was worth having a look back. let's look ahead to the
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future. it's pretty miserable here. it is pretty miserable. this week has already been quite unsettled. we've seen symbian and windy weather. but you've not seen anything yet. things are about to get a lot worse. people don't say that, you know? people don't say that. well, i just that, you know? people don't say that. well, ijust did. maybe no one does say that, i don't know. right on. here is how things are looking. getting quite turbulent, we seen some showers arraigned today but more general rain across parts of the west, that was a little bit earlier. some of the rain is on the happy side and tomorrow there's more to come. that cloud hatchling in every direction and will bring heavy breasts of rain, strong winds tomorrow. it's this area of cloud bringing the ring today. you can see the way the sabine has been spreading across parts of the south—west of england, parts of wales, buried within this mean band we've got some really intense bursts, thunder and lightning. that
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extending across many western areas. some spells of sunshine away from here. it is windy but males. through tonight it is the western parts of the uk that was the outbreaks of rain. away from that some clear spells but it would be too windy for it to get too cold. overnight lows of about four or 5 degrees. into tomorrow were going to have some showery rain to get that first of all that this is the main weather maker, this area of low pressure sliding from the atlantic. this frontal system will provide very heavy rain and very strong winds. to the second half of the day particularly there is the potential for travel disruption. your bbc local radio station is the place to check all the details from where you are. as we go on through the day after a fairly innocuous start, lots of dry weather and the few showers, things quickly clouding over from the west with outbreaks of rain from northern ireland, west wales and the south—west of england, strong and gusty winds but those coming from a mild direction. if you have travel
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plans for a friday afternoon, friday evening across the south—west on wales eventually, the west midlands, driving conditions will not be pleasa nt driving conditions will not be pleasant at all. north—west england, south—west scotland, northern ireland, you can see the wind gusts up ireland, you can see the wind gusts up to maybe 65 miles an hour in the most exposed spots. some rough weather during friday night. that clues away to the east but low pressure remains in charge to the north—west. that's going to fling some showers in our direction. saturday will see spells of sunshine but really big showers across the south—western corner especially those temperatures, ranging from 11 to 14 those temperatures, ranging from 11 to 1a degrees. through the weekend we will see some sunny spells but also some heavy downpours. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. reports say the gunman who opened fire in a packed bar in southern california, killing 12 people, was a 29—year—old armed with smoke bombs and a handgun. he was found dead at the venue. prince charles says he won't be
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‘meddling' in issues when he becomes king — he says he's ‘not that stupid' and understands that his constitutional role will be more restricted. within hours of hearing the results of the us mid—term elections, donald trump fires his attorney general and bans a cnn reporter from the white house. a serious blow to plans for a new nuclear plant in cumbria as toshiba withdraws from the project. the paraplegic man who dragged himself through luton airport drops his legal action as the airport improves its disabled facilities. sport now on afternoon live withjohn and we've heard from gareth southgate on his england squad, that includes wayne rooney one last time. and england's cricketers could be on the verge of a rare away win. the fa have defended their decsion to grant wayne rooney a farewell match in honour of his international achievements. southgate said talks had begun over a year ago with england's all time
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record goalscorer to come out of internatioanl retirement for one last game. it has split opinion. the fa accused of giving away caps too easily. with rooney is said to make a 120th appearance. but there is a huge amount of goodwill by gareth southgate. and the fa. following england must make efforts to get to the world cup semifinals. rooney is expected to come on as a second—half substitute in the friendly against the united states. callu m callum wilson, the bournemouth forward , callum wilson, the bournemouth forward, could be in line to make his first international appearance. his first call—up after impressing per bournemouth this season. scoring six goals in 11 games so far. there isa six goals in 11 games so far. there
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is a recall for everton defender michael keane. more significant, the appearance of wayne rooney. a fiver says that he scores! i will take that! let's talk about cricket, england could be on the verge of a rather unusual away when? it does not happen a lot. test matches away from home are very tough. it could be their first away win in 13 matches. keatonjennings, a player who's been much criticised of late, ending his two year wait for a test century with a brilliant 146 to put england on top and on course for victory in the first test with sri lanka. this is the scorecard... his innings alongside ben stokes, who made 62, saw england declare on 322—6 — a lead of 461. it isa
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it is a huge task for sri lanka to get to that. a62 needed. when you consider the highest run chase in galle is 99 — that's looking unlikely. as long as the rain stays away, england could be onto their first away test win for two years. plenty of tea m away test win for two years. plenty of team news... a big name back for england — chris ashton the winger hasn't started for his country in four years. but he's one of three changes in the starting line up to face new zealand in the second autumn international. jack nowell has been dropped to the bench. there's no place in the matchday squad for manu tuilangi, wales meanwhile have picked josh adams for saturday's test against australia — also one of three changes to their win over scotland. the worcester winger replaces luke morgan, who started the last test, and plays ahead of british and irish lions star liam williams. and scotland have received a boost with the news stuart hogg's been passed fit to face fiji. he only had ankle surgery eight
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weeks ago — he will play at full—back alongside finn russell and greig laidlaw, who also returns after missing last weekend's defeat to wales. gymnast louis smith has announced his retirement at the age of 29. the two time olympic silver medallist had planned to return to training in the lead up to the tokyo olympics. he says he's taking on other exciting opportunities, which includes starring in a musical in february. he competed at three olympic games and won two further bronze medals — the first at beijing in 2008. i will miss competing. i think no matter what i am a sports mad, bad as in my blood. i love competition and training hard. it was great to see some of the boys doing really well. but when you are done, you are done. and i have a different perspective of watching competitions
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now. quite a change from gymnastics toa now. quite a change from gymnastics to a west end show, something you might think about? you can wipe that smirk off yourface! might think about? you can wipe that smirk off your face! ask me where louis smith is at 3:30pm? he is on this show! i will be talking to him andi this show! i will be talking to him and i will not have those snide asides but you are offering! talk to you later on! confirmation from the news that ruth bader ginsberg is in hospital after she fell in her office. this happened last night. she has been in hospital this morning and has fractured three reds, she is 85. she initially went home after the fall last night but experienced discomfort and went to the george washington university hospital this morning, when tests showed she had fractured three reds on her left
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side. she has been admitted for observation and treatment. she served on the court since 1993 and is the oldest of the nine justices and one of the court's four liberals. the conservative majority of 5—a was restored after brett kavanaugh of 5—a was restored after brett kava naugh was confirmed of 5—a was restored after brett kavanaugh was confirmed after that contentious nomination process, backed by donald trump. that is a latest from the united states. the 85—year—old supreme courtjustice ruth bader ginsberg is in hospital. the international trade secretary, liam fox, says the government must have the right to decide when to leave any temporary customs arrangement put in place to avoid a hard border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland in the event the uk leaves the eu without agreeing a trade deal. our political correspondent, iain watson, is in westminster. bring us up to date. basically what
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liam fox has done is put a spanner in theresa may's works because what she wants to do is try to reach a deal with brussels before the end of the month on withdrawing from the eu, which she can then go to parliament and try to get agreement on that by the end of the year in a so—called meaningful vote. the problem is this... effectively, it comes down to this question of the so—called irish backstop, trying to avoid a hard border after brexit. what the eu is prepared to do is have the uk as a whole staying in some kind of customs arrangement for a period after brexit but long—standing leave campaigner is one to make sure there is a clear exit strategy from that and they wa nt exit strategy from that and they want britain to be able to withdraw from that unilaterally. the cabinet meeting earlier this week, it was clear on the advice from cabinet ministers that this would not fly in brussels, they would not accept that so some brussels, they would not accept that so some kind of mutually agreed mechanism would have to be devised.
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iam sure mechanism would have to be devised. i am sure that his further explanation but in a sense it says britain could not withdraw from this on its own. up pops liam fox, the international trade secretary, who says he is in no mood to compromise and insists britain should be able to pull out of any future customs arrangement with the eu whenever it feels like it. we have an instruction from our voters to leave the european union. that can't be subcontracted to somebody else. that needs to be an issue for a sovereign british government to be able to determine it. he says, they want to withdraw unilaterally, the sensor prime minister is getting is that might not be enough. for brussels. which might mean there is no special summit later this month to agree withdrawal deal and theresa may's countable is potentially derailed or she might end up losing some cabinet members that agree with liam fox.
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that is one issue that needs to be resolved and another is whether she is going to publish or even give all the cabinet members the full legal advice on this issue as some have been pressing for. that is unresolved and jeremy hunt, the foreign secretary, was in paris today and was asked how quickly he thought a deal would happen. he did not seem to think it was imminent. i think seven days is probably pushing it, but i'm optimistic. i am optimistic that there will be a brexit deal, but i wouldn't want to be drawn on a specific timescale. not being drawn on any specific timetable for withdrawal. some ministers felt might be another cabinet meeting even today to push this forward. we're pretty confident there won't be a cabinet meeting this week and behind—the—scenes theresa may has a lot of work to do to make sure her cabinet are onside when it meets, the next meeting would be next tuesday. she will need to get agreement from them very quickly if she wants to try to get
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that special summit on a deal before the end of november. thank you very much. iain watson. this morning on the today programme the former brexit secretary, david davis, said there could be some hiccups — though insisted "we can look after ourselves". with him in the studio was our reality check correspondent, chris morris. pick—ups? pick-ups? yes. he would say he does not think the deal will pass because he wants to look like a deal he would like. and this is a numbers game in parliament, how many tories might vote against the prime minister and how many labour mps might vote with the prime minister to avoid an no deal scenario but mr davies was pushed about what no deal could look like and what those hiccups might be. and he seemed firmly of the view that it would be difficult but we could survive. if there is a
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hostile relationship there will be friction and bumps along the way. but against that, that is why i have said all along and everybody in government has said that actually the best deal is a free trade deal but don't be terrified of the world trade organisation deal. after all, most of the rest of the world trade successfully with the european union and some will argue more successfully than we do under wto rules and that is what we will achieve. and that is what you want to happen? no. iwant achieve. and that is what you want to happen? no. i want a free—trade deal, canada plus plus plus. we would still not resolve the northern ireland problem? the northern ireland problem? the northern ireland problem? the northern ireland problem is capable of solution by the existing solution, the existing tax collecting arrangements and customs arrangements and customs arrangements and customs arrangements and buy a few additional things which we have done in the ports and not at the border. when you write your book there might
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bea when you write your book there might be a chapter on which you wish to pick up on that in the studio? you did say my bestselling book? yes! two things he said, if i had more time in that session i might have picked him on. the rest of the world trade with eu on basic world trade organisation rules... : he is talking about the bad —— the united states primarily and the thing about the us is it has a whole series of side deals, bilateral agreements, with the eu which cover a lot of important sectors of the economy, from memory it is more than 20 separate deals. if the uk left assembly gronk no deal terms, we have none of that so our economic relationship with our closest trading partners would be looser than almost any other country in the world. so when you see, world trade organisation terms will be ok, we need to be clear what we're talking about. and the other thing? i can't
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remember! it was my bestselling thing that you said... can you play that again?! hejust thing that you said... can you play that again?! he just thought and said on the radio that it'll be fine. wejust said on the radio that it'll be fine. we just need to calm down and the uk will handle it, we are grown—up? who was he trying to convince? i think he is trying to say the chequers deal does not work, the dealer by minister is putting together is a compromise and that does not work and his other, i have remembered, thank you for that...! he said what i want is a free—trade agreement and the problem with that is that it can potentially create trade which is as frictionless as possible but it is not the same as being in the single market and customs union and therefore we go back to this, which for everyone is a irritating issue of how do we keep the irish border completely as open as it is? which is an important part
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of the northern ireland peace process. on both sides people say why cannot we sort this out? it is difficult because to leave the border as open as it is right now would mean you are treating it com pletely would mean you are treating it completely differently would mean you are treating it com pletely differently tha n would mean you are treating it completely differently than any other external border of the eu single market and if free—trade agreements... even if you focus on the word free, if it is not as frictionless as it is right now, that would still be a problem.|j frictionless as it is right now, that would still be a problem. i got there in the end! i was once on air and somebody said something to me and somebody said something to me andi and somebody said something to me and i said the trouble with this is, and i said the trouble with this is, and there is always one more... and idid not and there is always one more... and i did not have it in there! you got there! with a little help from my friends! thanks for that. the main story is shooting of 12 people in california the gunman armed with a handgun and what is reported to be smoke bombs walking into a bar and opening fire. among the dead was a
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police officer, this is sergeant ron helus, a 29 year veteran of the police department. ron helus is a california highway patrol officer and was first to arrive at the bar. he went inside before 1130 and after 15 minutes more officers went inside and find the gunman dead of a gunshot wound and it is unclear at this stage whether he had killed himself was killed by officers but this is a photographjust himself was killed by officers but this is a photograph just issued himself was killed by officers but this is a photographjust issued by california ron helus, california highway patrol officer, the first to arrive at the bar. andy officer who lost his life in that mass shooting. plenty more from california a little later on. mps are calling for a change in the law so that flat owners don't have to foot the bill for replacing unsafe cladding in the wake of the grenfell disaster. more than 350 high—rise residential buildings in england still have the same type of flammable cladding used at grenfell. some leaseholders have been told
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they may have to pay for it to be changed. david rhodes reports. it's the nightmare that people living in a tower block fear. in february, a fire broke out in this leeds high—rise. we discovered that the cladding on the building is the same as the grenfell tower cladding. i'm pretty angry, because it's taken so long to sort it out and, you know, this is life—threatening. leaseholders like nick in skyline apartments say they have been told they might have to pay for the cladding to be replaced. £10,000 to £20,000 perflat, so i have no idea how i will raise that money, but they are asking for it up front. the company that runs the tower blocks says plans to remove the cladding are being developed and that no final decision about who will pay for the removal has been reached. after grenfell, where 72 people died, building owners were told they needed to check for acm cladding. in october, there were 358 residential buildings in england where acm was still present, and there are growing calls for the law to be changed so that
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flat owners or leaseholders don't have to pay. clearly, the money has to be found upfront to replace the cladding, and it needs to be done quickly for reasons of safety. but this absolutely cannot fall on the shoulders of the leaseholders. residents should not be obliged to pay. it should be for those owning the freeholds, owning those buildings, the developers. the association of residential managing agents says that the government should provide interest—free loans to leaseholders to cover the cost, but many are waiting to discover if they will have to pick up the final bill. david rhodes, bbc news, leeds. susannah is here. in a moment she will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. 12 people including a police officer are killed after a gunman opens fire in a crowded bar in california. prince charles vows to keep his opinions to himself when he becomes king. in his own words, he's "not that stupid" to meddle. within hours of hearing the results of the us mid—term elections,
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donald trump fires his attorney general. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. half—year results at sainsbury‘s have been boosted by its takeover of catalogue retailer argos. the supermarket said half—year underlying profits rose by a fifth to £302 million. accounting for one—off costs related to its tie—ups with argos and asda did, however, see profits decline versus a year earlier. burberry says it's on track to save £100 million this year in its half year results statement. the boss, marco gobbetti, said the reception of the new creative director's first collection for the house had been "exceptional". and dyson has won in its attempt to overturn eu rules on energy labelling for vacuum cleaners. the uk firm claimed tests to assess the efficiency of vacuum cleaners favoured rivals' models. what we know about the job cuts at
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bombardier? that is a big employer in northern ireland? globally differences 5000 jobs will be going across the world, it employs 70,000 people around the world, but 5500 in northern ireland. the production their accounts for around the tenth of northern ireland manufacturing export and a000 workers in belfast alone make it the biggest employer in the city. other are wrapped don murray, newtownabbey and newtowna rds. murray, newtownabbey and newtownards. we don't yet know where these job cuts will fall. the company says it will go within the next 12 to 18 months but they also said it is getting rid of the q series aircraft and the dehavilland trademark and earlier it sold the sea trademark and earlier it sold the sea series aircraft airbus. so
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production is scaling back. and on the company website does say that bombardier aerospace in belfast undertakes substantial partnership rules in all of the family of aircraft so inevitably there will be some impact. and the rest of them derby, bombardier transportation, the transport arm malefactors trains. we don't know whether many jobs will go but globally that arm of the company say that around 1300 jobs globally will go and actually we understand there is a really busy order book on that site so perhaps looking slightly less likely there. add a new chairperson for tesla? robyn denholm has taken the place of elon musk. he will stay as chief executive. of tweets sparked changes
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at the top, they sparked an investigation by the securities and exchange commission, who accused tesla of fraud and all of these changes are a result of that, possible fraud, i must point out... and it is still being worked out, some kind of settlement with the commission. and these changes at the top are part of this. kim gittlesonjoins us from the new york stock exchange. what happened with these tweets? what happened with these tweets? what was said and why has it sparked this investigation? it is a pretty colourful story! in august elon musk tweeted that he wanted to take tesla private and was annoyed at the number of investors betting against tesla here in new york on wall street so he said he had secured funding ata street so he said he had secured funding at a price of $a20 per share
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and that raised eyebrows, it was a significant premium over the price tesla was trading at and a20 is a code number for marijuana at canada's here, it was revealed that elon musk and find out this fact and he was using that number to impress his girlfriend, a musician. all of this came out when the securities and exchange commission later accused mr musk of fraud and the commission said he in fact did not have the funding to take tesla private, even though he had said he had talked to some investors from saudi arabia so as part of the settle m e nt saudi arabia so as part of the settlement agreement between mr musk and the fcc he agreed to give up his chair of the board of tesla, tesla agreed to appoint two new independent board members as well as agreeing to a commission to monitor mr musk‘s public communications, presumably code for his tweets, so he hopefully will not get into any
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more trouble when it comes to his erratic approach to social media. we have a new chair, robyn denholm? she has been in silicon valley for a while, the chief financial officer of telstra, an australian telecommunications firm, she worked at sun microsystems. she has been on the tesla board for quite some time so the tesla board for quite some time so she is not necessarily an outsider but it seems that investors are happy with the news and i checked the share price and it has increased by over 2% since the news was announced. presumably because investors feel she will bring a cool head in trying to figure out how to rein in mrmusk head in trying to figure out how to rein in mr musk to get him to focus on production because the company finally reported a quarterly profit and it has finally been hedging its production targets and that is what investors want, they want to see that tesla can deliver what it has promised, not just to that tesla can deliver what it has promised, notjust to would be buyers but the many, many tesla
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investors as well as long givers to the company. quite a bit of funding and it needs to be able to pay that backin and it needs to be able to pay that back in order to order to continue to produce these cars. has that oversight committee done its job? has been quieter on twitter? we don't have any reports about that committee and what they are doing, we have not seen committee and what they are doing, we have not seen as committee and what they are doing, we have not seen as many erratic tweets from mr musk although even after the settlement he did tweet a few sharp words at the fcc saying it held short sellers, investment speak for those who bet on tesla share prices falling, something he has been frustrated by it. so far we have not seen the sort of outbursts we saw over the summer have not seen the sort of outbursts we saw over the summer when he was inafight we saw over the summer when he was in a fight with a british cave diver, he accused him of paedophilia seemingly without any sort of basis in fact. that is the subject of a different lawsuit, claiming that mr musk was guilty of libel when he did
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that. so far we have not seen that same sort of behaviour and that is one of the reasons that tesla share prices have not been on such a wild ride in the same way we saw over the summer. many things. let's quickly look at the financial markets... positive for the ftse 100, positive for the ftse100, sainsbury‘s is up, rising on the board sainsbury‘s is up, rising on the boa rd after sainsbury‘s is up, rising on the board after the half year results show the takeover of argos has helped although like—for—like sales only rising by 0.6%. not up you might think. auto trader up by more than 2%, on the ftse 250 because profits really are roaring ahead...! to see the competition! ebay, for example... you would have thought that used car sales on ebay, that is a captive market. but auto trader is still probably very very very well. profits up by 9%. thank you very
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much. let's get the weather... the weather has not been quiet so far this week. but it is about to get even livelier. things up encoding over in western areas today, some odd bits of rain already and a stripe of cloud continues to feed in across western parts of the uk, particularly. another lump of cloud in the atlantic is hurtling towards us in the atlantic is hurtling towards us and promises to bring some very wet and windy weather during tomorrow. through the rest of this afternoon rain will become increasingly widespread across western areas, windy as well and the white winged arrows show average wind speeds a little bit stronger for western coasts. tonight, cornwall, west wales, eastern northern ireland, and a good part of scotland, some outbreaks of rain. elsewhere, clear spells but given the strength of the window will not get too cold, minimum temperatures between four and 10 degrees. this
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area low between four and 10 degrees. this area low pressure between four and 10 degrees. this area low pressure is lurking out west and this frontal system will approach, bringing some very wet weather and windy weather as well. likely to see gaels in places tomorrow. some travel disruption is possible and your local radio station will keep you up—to—date. having said that, not a bad start in many areas, some sunny glimpses and some showery rain creeping eastwards and through the afternoon it is this wet weather that we are concerned about. through northern ireland, wales and the south—west, strengthening winds coming from a mild direction. so temperatures all away up to 1a or 15 degrees. let's catch up on the rain through the afternoon rush hour. plymouth, cardiff, some really wet conditions, the rain fringing into birmingham, clipping into northern ireland, north—west england and western scotla nd north—west england and western scotland and the black arrows show the wind gusts of up to 60 mph,
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perhaps stronger for exposed coasts in the west. that wet and windy weather sweeps eastwards but low pressure is still in charge into the weekend so things are settling down a lot, still a few showers packing in on the south—westerly breeze. some towards the south will be heavy and thundery and it will be sunny spells as well and still quite mild at 11-1ad spells as well and still quite mild at 11—1ad and for sunday, remembrance sunday, similar, spells of sunshine but heavy downpours as well. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at three... a gunman opens fire in a packed bar in southern california, killing twelve people — police say they found the suspect dead inside. i was on the dance floor and i heard the gunshots, so i looked back and then, all of a sudden, everyone screamed, "get down." prince charles vows to keep his opinions to himself when he becomes king — in his words, he's "not that stupid". within hours of hearing the results of the us mid—term
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elections donald trump fires his attorney general jeff sessions, and bans a cnn reporter from the white house. 12 people killed at thousand oaks in california. let's go live here now. we can hear from the sheriff geoff dean who is about to give an update. let's hear from dean who is about to give an update. let's hearfrom him. dean who is about to give an update. let's hear from him. good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i have a couple of pieces of information i wa nt to couple of pieces of information i want to tell you. regarding the victims we are still working to identify them and to make modifications, we will not be releasing any victim's name at this time. we have identified the
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suspect, approximately an hour ago, the suspect was identified as ian david long. birth date of march 27 1990. he was 28 years old. we've had several contacts with mr long over the years, minor event such as a traffic collision, he was a victim of battery at the local bar in 2015. in april of this year deputies were called to his house for a subject disturbing. they went to the house and talk to him, he was somewhat i rate, acting a little irrational, we called out our crisis intervention team, our mental health specialist who met with him and spoke to him and clearly didn't feel he was qualified to be taken under 5150 and he was left at that scene last april. deputies are at the house
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now, the security residents and they are seeking a search warrant to do a thorough search of the house. the weapon used in this horrific shooting was a glock 21a5 calibre handgun. the handgun is designed to hold, in california, ten rounds and one in the chamber. this weapon did have an extended magazine on it. we do not know at this time how many rounds were actually in the weapon or how many rounds the magazine could actually hold because it is still being processed as part of the evidence. i'll be happy to answer any questions you might have. we believe that's the only weapon that was used was that handgun. do you know why he did this? we don't know if you... just leave it. sorry. we
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don't know if you've reloaded his weapon or not, we are still interviewing witnesses. there is not necessarily indication that that happened. it appears he walked up to the scene, he shot the security guard that was standing outside, he stepped inside. it appears that you turn to the right and shot several of the other security and employees there and then began opening fire inside the nightclub. we don't have any other details to confirm an exact chronology about what happened. we will provide that to you as happened. we will provide that to you as we happened. we will provide that to you as we bring all of our witness state m e nts you as we bring all of our witness statements together and we feel more co mforta ble statements together and we feel more comfortable talking about that. we have no idea what the motive was at this point. the incident in april
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happened at his home and he purchased the weapon legally. the 5150 was never placed on him. the mental health experts cleared him that day. he received a traffic citation and another running he was involved in a traffic collision. pretty minor interactions. he was a veteran, he was in the united states marine corps. i understand that was part of the discussion money deputies went out to the call with the crisis team, they felt he might be suffering from ptsd, basing that on the fact he was a veteran and had to be on the call. when sergeant ron
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helus and the sergeant patrol officer went in, the immediately exchanged gunfire with the suspect and that's when sergeant ron helus was shot several times. i have no idea about his service record. we believe he shot himself. when the officers went in and made re—entry the fountain already deceased. —— found him. he was found inside an office just adjacent to the entry of the bar. ron helus was having a conversation with his weight on the phone, as he does several times during his shift and said, i've got to go, i love you, i will speak to you later. not as far as we know at this point. he could have but we don't know. there is no indication
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that he targeted the employees. we haven't found any correlation. we will know when we execute the search warrant at his house, maybe there was a motive, but at this point we have no information leading to that at all. what was this guy wearying? there seems to be different accounts. —— wearing. there seems to be different accounts. -- wearing. all! know about his direction of travel is that he went in and turned right and fired at the employees that were standing there. my best recollection from serving hours ago, he was wearing a black sweater and i don't remember what kolarov wearing a black sweater and i don't remember what kola rov clancy wearing a black sweater and i don't remember what kolarov clancy was wearing, i apologise. remember what kolarov clancy was wearing, iapologise. —— remember what kolarov clancy was wearing, i apologise. —— what colour of pants. when we went inside he was not. 2.5 minutes. we haven't
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confirmed whether he used a smoke bomb but we have a couple of witnesses who have alluded to that. there was no reason to believe there was anything wrong with this person... you can see there is no reason to believe it but the three have something going on head that would cause him to do something like this. he obviously had some of issues. no. no. not that we know of. do you know about any pre—existing relations with the spire? there is no connection as of yet. —— this bar. we don't know. we know that one
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sergeant ron helus and the patrol officer engaged in, the shooting inside stopped then, we don't know if you went back inside the office and shot himself or how that transpired. he lives in newbury park. why do you think this keeps happening in the united states of america and not other democracies? that's a pretty challenging question. i think we see a fortunate and horrific actions that happen all over the world and i don't know if it happens more in the us doesn't. it does. why do you think that is? ifi it does. why do you think that is? if i knew the answer to that i would do something to stop it. as we talked about in the wee hours of the morning, posts the columbine shootings how we approach active
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shooters changed completing, instead of waiting and surrounding and bringing in the swat team, the officers are to immediately engaged and try to stop the target and the killing. that's exactly what happened here. there is no doubt that the saved lives by going there and engaging with the suspect. who knows. i've heard anywhere from 150 to 200 people in the area. not that the loss of 13 lives is good but it could've been much worse. how many people were in the bar?|j could've been much worse. how many people were in the bar? i don't know. inaudible he's a resident of this area, common sense would speculate there are some reason he went here. he properly knew about it, but i don't think he decided
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when he was driving down the freeway that he would just get off there. there is nothing to lead us to believe that that actually happened. it's just amazing. there were probably six off duty police officers in the area from a couple officers in the area from a couple of different agencies and i've already talked to a parent that said they stood in front of my daughter. it was amazing. inaudible. what's your words freddie community, what's your words freddie community, what's your advice? i went and spoke at a jewish synagogue after the tragedy on the east coast, when i talk to the parishioners there and i
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followed up on the rabbi, i said we've got to do something about the hate and we've got to do something to spread the love and reach out and tell people and be patient with them and understand them, because this will touch so many lives around our community. is there any connection with social media he might have been using? there is nothing to indicate that but we are looking at his social media sites which i'm sure all of you are also. none of them we re all of you are also. none of them were armed. can you give us any information about the law officer that passed away? sergeant ron helus, easy 5a 29 year veteran. he is married with a groin son. —— a growing man. he went in and made the
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ultimate sacrifice. inaudible. once they get inside, we use the word random, it appears to be random inside, i don't think he was targeting people. we can do further investigation and it could prove to be true but it doesn't appear to be that way at this point. do you know where he purchased the gun? my partners are currently in the process of investigating that for us. process of investigating that for us. i don't know exactly. there might have been four or five that i saw, i'm not sure how many were in there. at ten o'clock we will... at
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ten o'clock we will be moving his body from the hospital to the medical examiner's office and convoy in came over. this community has lost a hero, a great human being. it's part of the loss of the other 11 victims and as part of the suffering were going to go through as family members and parents and brothers and sisters on this tragic, sense of loss of life. —— senseless. he was within a couple of years of retiring. where labour appeared to go in there? we do active shooter training, also with the firefighters. if we need medical rescue firefighters. if we need medical rescu e we firefighters. if we need medical rescue we take the firefighters in
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with us. it's an ongoing training we've been doing for years. it's my understanding, but do not hold me to this, there is one other minor gunshot injury and there are somewhere between eight and 15 other injured, mostly cuts from jumping out of windows, diving under tables, relatively minor compared to everything else. we don't know that much yet. there are fire escapes, the patrons exited out of all of those. they ran doors, the head in the attic, the head in the bathroom, they jumped out the the attic, the head in the bathroom, theyjumped out the windows. u nfortu nately theyjumped out the windows. unfortunately our young people and people at nightclubs has learned that this might happen, the think
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about that. fortunately it's probably saved a lot of lives that they flooded the scene so rapidly. inaudible. he was the victim of battery in january inaudible. he was the victim of battery injanuary of inaudible. he was the victim of battery in january of 2015. inaudible. he was the victim of battery injanuary of 2015. it wasn't here, it wasn't at this bar, it was a different bar. i don't know which far it was. it was an thousand oaks, i can't remember which far it was. i'm not sure whose car it is, he drove there in a car, i'm not sure who it is registered to. we are still obtaining a search warrant, we re still obtaining a search warrant, were not allowed to go into his home without a warrant. are there any concerns with that car at the moment? we put the bomb dog by it
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and everything and we feel co mforta ble. and everything and we feel comfortable. i was just standing by it, were good. we will be here for 15 or 20 hours at least, we still need to go through and identify, a red fbi partners are doing a great job. the off—line people in from quantico. we will be here for a long time. —— the art flying people in. can you tell us the six of the victims, the ratio? we don't have those things yet. that is geoff dean, the wenger county sheriff, the latest on that shooting. the gunmen ian david long, 28 years old, a former us marine. he appears to have shot at random inside the club according to police using a glock a5 calibre handgun. he said he was an ex—marine who had minor run—ins with
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law enforcement in recent years, but as far as they can work out there was no law one motive for that shooting. the officer who we have heard much about ron helus, he was on the phone to his wife. he has a son. he was on the front of his wife when he cut the call short to say he had to go and deal with an incident ina bar. had to go and deal with an incident in a bar. he was one of the 12 victims in that shooting. we will bring you much more on that, the latest from california, but that news co nfe re nce latest from california, but that news conference just been held there in the ventura district. the japanese firm, toshiba, has abandoned plans to build a nuclear power station in cumbria. the company had failed to find a buyerfor its uk subsidiary nugen, which was set up to pursue the project, planned near sellafield. we can now get the thoughts of neil hirst, former head of the international energy agency and researcher with the grantham institute for climate change. thank you for your time. is this a
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huge surprise? no, i don't think it isa huge surprise? no, i don't think it is a big surprise. we know the company were having difficulties in the states. it is an enormous disappointment for the people involved in the project. for those who hoped with the skills from sellafield literally across the road there would be manyjobs secured in an industry they know so much about. that's absolutely right, it is a big disappointment. but i would emphasise this is not the end of nuclear power in the uk. there are other projects. nuclear power is one of the most important sources of low—carbon without greenhouse gases,
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electricity in the uk contributes about 20%. if we are going to meet our targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and playing our part in moderating climate change, its very possible we will still need more nuclear power stations. how does this leave us in terms of those targets now? well, we have a target of reducing our emissions by 80% by 2050 and i would say we are broadly on target for that, there is more to do in the future. but most recently the report of climate experts, the intergovernmental panel, have said maybe we need to do better than that and the government has no asks for a study of how we can do better than that. but if i return to nuclear power, let me say i think there are
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three big issues that will determine the next steps in nuclear power. one is the success of the big project thatis is the success of the big project that is already under way at hinkley point c, a huge project contributing our energy over a period of 60 yea rs. our energy over a period of 60 years. that needs to be a success, the latest report from edf is that thatis the latest report from edf is that that is going well. the second is how the element managers procurement of nuclear energy. they are looking at ways of procuring nuclear energy which might be more cost—effective and treats nuclear energy more like and treats nuclear energy more like an item of national infrastructure. that could be a more cost—effective way of funding that. the other big issue which will affect nuclear power is the future of renewables. most people would prefer that we relied entirely on renewables for our carbon energy, but the problem is renewables iberia bolam and we do
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not yet have the technologies to enable us to store enough electricity in an affordable way so that we can be entirely reliant on it. so we may need a new generation of nuclear, if we don't have a new generation, our existing plant which contributes 20% of our power today it will close around by 2030. the case for nuclear is there and the industry is still there. but it needs to make a success of it. good of you tojoin needs to make a success of it. good of you to join us. needs to make a success of it. good of you tojoin us. thank needs to make a success of it. good of you to join us. thank you for your time. some breaking news were getting from the shrewsbury trust, it was at the centre of a maternity scandal, it's been put into special measures. there are ongoing concerns about maternity care. in a letter to the health secretary, they have said
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in light of ongoing concerns about the quality and performance and a recent concerns raised by the sea qc, it says this is the right decision to ensure safe services for patients. the trust is already having to report weekly to the co seat following an unannounced inspection in august which raised concerns about the care of pregnant women who were deemed to be a high risk of sepsis, that means the trust will now receive extra scrutiny now it is in special measures as well as additional support. this follows more than 100 families who have come forward to allege they suffered serious harm or died as a result of maternity care between 1998 and last year. we will bring you more on that as we get it. the prince of wales says he'll stop speaking out on topics he feels strongly about, when he becomes king. in a bbc documentary to mark his 70th birthday, he acknowledges that consitutional parameters mean he won't be able say what he likes and that he won't be "meddling." in the past, the prince has campaigned strongly on issues such
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as the environment and architecture. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. in the bbc documentary, charles is asked about his so—called meddling asked about his so—called meddling as prince of wales. he says he regards it as motivating people to interest in things like the inner cities and the environment. and then he draws this vital distinction between the role of role of prince of wales and the role of king.|j think the bible to remember there's only room for one operatic not to. —— there is only. —— there is the
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only room for one operatic not to. —— there is the idea that i'm going to go on exactly the same way if i am to succeed is complete nonsense. the two situations are completely different. clearly i would be able to do the same things i've done as airto the to do the same things i've done as air to the throne, of course you operate within the constitutional parameters. that undertaking to abide by the constitutional para meters abide by the constitutional parameters when he is king of significant. it should mean an end to the sometimes controversial public speeches he's made over the yea rs. public speeches he's made over the years. an architecture for example his description in 198a of the planned extension to the national gallery as a monstrous carbuncle is just one of his interventions are building design which have irritated some. more recently his speeches opposing genetically modified crops placed him in opposition to government policy. on other matters such as his passionate defence of
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the environment, he is often said to have been ahead of his time, but once he becomes king all public campaigning will have to stop. that is the future charles has always known will be says, his wife says he is relaxed about it. his destiny will come, he's always know when it's going to come and i don't think it's going to come and i don't think it does we on his at all. slowly but surely the way is being prepared, freddie moment, perhaps still some yea rs freddie moment, perhaps still some years away when charles is king and the united kingdom has the new head of state. —— the moment. "prince, son and heir — charles at 70", will be shown on bbc one at nine o'clock tonight. and it'll be avaliable afterwards on the bbc i player. two—time olympic silver medallist louis smith has retired from gymnastics. the 29—year—old represented great britain at three olympic games — winning two bronze medals between 2008 and 2016.
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he won three world championship silver medals, two european golds and the 2006 commonwealth games pommel horse title. and louis smithjoins me now. is it congratulations, do you feel retirement at 29 is worthy of congratulating? i feel very happy and content with the decision to retire. it's weird in gymnastic turns 29 is quite old. in the general scheme of life, you're relatively quite young. take it from me, url. you're still young. was it just a moment when you thought i can't see myself ever doing that again. we all remember you on the pommel horse. is that something you're still do every now and then or physically can you? yes, i can, i've been touring in a dance show. i can still do it. the frustrating pa rt can still do it. the frustrating part about that retirement is that
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i'm still able to win an olympic medal. it's just the circumstances around having to try and qualify now are very around having to try and qualify now are very convoluted because they changed the rules. that mixed with the next year and a half will be unimpeded dedicated training in the gym. at 29, can i afford to do that? i got this opportunity to do a west end dance show over 16 weeks and it was like, do i choose between that and the dance show? and this is that it up. it starts next year, using? i sing a little bit. i'm doing it with harryjudd, ashton miracles, they are much more musically talented than i am. you can dance, you can do this, you can sing. what's not to like? if you want to come and have a look, the show is nonstop, it still
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energy. but this isn't as hard as the show. i swear to you. this is done show is the hardest thing i've ever done my life. many people remember you in strictly. is that the moment your life really changed? it was certainly a big catapult. i came out of the 2012 olympic games just being a sportsman and then i was kind of put into this entertainment world where, for me at the time, it was very crazy, wacky, ididn't the time, it was very crazy, wacky, i didn't know how to take it, the interviews i was doing with magazines were asking me very different types of questions i was used to. it was a very nerve—racking experience. that lodged my career in a different way. i've been trying to manage the two together, trying to carry on competing and keep things like this going. now an opportunity has arisen where i have to choose one or the other. you've gone down the showbiz route. yes, i have. have
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you always been able to sing?|j the showbiz route. yes, i have. have you always been able to sing? i can hold a toll, to set an extent. but you've actually got a song on this? it is chubby checker, twist it again. # come on, let's twist again, like we did last summer # let twist again, twisting time is here. # are usually have my director singing in my air, i'm not too traumatised by that. i wish you all the luck in the world. a lot of people with the 29 years old, was that the right decision? if you say you can still get a medal, isn't that still do think athletes want to do? this is frustrating. it didn't make it a very easy decision. it after each olympic games, the
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committee change the rules to mix things up. and they have changed the way that a gymnast like myself qualifies for the olympics, it has been the same for the last six olympic games. what would stop you? before it was five gymnasts in the tea m before it was five gymnasts in the team and all the time i have qualified, london, rio dejaneiro, five men in the team and that has changed to four and that less space means a lot, you cannot take a specialist like me in the team because we need people to cover all the apparatus. the only way i can qualify is on the individual world cup circuit and there are eight competitions that you have to compete out and win at least three of them. everybody in the world will be gunning for that single spot so china will send their best gymnasts that never get to the team competitions, japan, america, all
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the best in the world will go to these and only one person gets to go. i have to win at least three out of the eight. so by the time i am fit and back at my peak, i will only have five left to do and it is unrealistic to think... have five left to do and it is unrealistic to think. .. i have five left to do and it is unrealistic to think... i have have five left to do and it is unrealistic to think. .. i have only 20% chance of making it. we mentioned the london olympics, is at the moment that for the rest of your life it will be the highlight? the moment that for the rest of your life it will be the highlight7m was pretty impressive, london. being able to be at the peak of my career, 23 years old, and have my mum watching and my friends and family and the nation behind you, so... did you feel that? yes, and the nation behind you, so... did you feelthat? yes, you and the nation behind you, so... did you feel that? yes, you feel it! the most nerve—racking thing i have done in my life, i was terrified, i cannot explain the year that was running through my body. but it is in those moments where it defines
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you. you either crack under the pressure is all you say, look, for mei pressure is all you say, look, for me i was thinking there is no way on this earth i will ever make a mistake. i have got too much riding on this, my mum, my coach, they have sacrificed too much for me to mess up sacrificed too much for me to mess up so sacrificed too much for me to mess upsoi sacrificed too much for me to mess up so i was determined to do the routine of my life and for me, there are two types of athlete in that situation, the ones that do it and those that try and i was able to do with it. it was incredible. i can't explain. have you always had that self belief? under that pressure, most people would crack?|j self belief? under that pressure, most people would crack? i have a lwa ys most people would crack? i have always had that ability to turn it on in always had that ability to turn it onina always had that ability to turn it on in a high—pressure situation. but you cannot take that for granted. you have to put in the work and the repetition and physically you have to be ready. i don't think, sometimes gymnasts get the right
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balance between hard work and talent. which is sad because i have seen so many more talent. which is sad because i have seen so many more talented gymnasts and myself get to competitions and crumble, whether that is because they are not mentally strong enough or they have not done enough physical routines in training but i am byfar physical routines in training but i am by far not the most talented gymnast but i worked hard and when it came to the day, i was able to do it came to the day, i was able to do it nine times out of ten. which makes a decision to retire... do you question it? you are doing the interview is for everybody. is a bit of you going, what have i done? account of four to question it because i would then be questioning it for the rest of my life and this is not a decision i want to look back on with regret. i don't think there is a right or wrong decision to make. regardless of whatever decision, i have to go out with 100% commitment and dedication. who was the first person you called when you made that decision? the first person i spoke to really about it was my
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coach. i obviously was given the opportunity to do this show and i feel like my friends and family have quite a biased opinion and they would not think about things logically so the only person i spoke to was my agent... does that mean your mum and dad are not happy? my mum wants me to do the show and lot of friends want me to do the show and others want me to carry on as a gymnast. i listened to my coach and my coach is the head gb coach so if anyone will tell me the right advice it is him, and my agent. those are the people who look at things methodically and have my best interests at heart. well, we wish you all the luck in the world in your new career and thank you for all you have done in the last one. anybody who watched you at this olympics but remember because it was a thrill for everybody.
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congratulations and good luck! thank you very much. someone has to follow that, it is john you very much. someone has to follow that, it isjohn watson with the sport! fascinating interview. gareth southgate says the fa have been in discussions with wayne rooney for over a year to come out of international retirement to play a farewell match for his country in honour of his england career. the fa have been accused of giving caps away too easily and for limiting game time for players who need the experience more. rooney will make his 120th appearance for his country when, as expected, he comes on as a second half substitute to play against the united staes in a friendly at wembley later this month. southgate doesn't see the problem with honouring england's record goal—sccorer. we area we are a strange country in that we bemoan the fact that we haven't achieved as much as we would like and then we have a player who should
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be held in the highest regard. we are spending a lot of time justifying giving him that tribute. from my point of view, i am looking forward to seeing him, working with him for the next few days, giving him for the next few days, giving him the sendoff i think he deserves with england. i am sure the crowd will give him the reaction he deserves. this man could make his debut against the usa. bournemouth's callum wilson has received his first call up after impressing for bournemouth this season. he's scored 6 goals in 11 games this season. there's also a recall for everton defender michael keane. england also play croatia three days later. it could england's first away win in 13 matches — keatonjennings, a player who's faced criticism for his recent performances, ending his two year wait for a test century. his not out of 1a6 has put england in control. supported by ben stokes, who made 62. england declared on 322—6 — a lead of a61. jennings, who scored a test century on his debut in 2016,
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admitted today there've been times since when doubts about his game crept in. this is really pleasing and a big thank you to the people that have stuck with me, that have helped me over the last 18 months and have backed me. through some tough times. waking up in the middle of the night panicking and stressing and going through some tough times. like i say, iam really through some tough times. like i say, i am really pleased to be sitting here, having helped us get into a position where we can win the game. so sri lanka must bat out the last two days or reach a62 for victory. when you consider the highest run chase in galle is 99 — that's looking unlikely. and as long as the rain stays away, it looks as though england will earn their first test win away in two years. plenty of team news to bring you ahead of this weekend's autumn internationals. chris ashton will make his first start for england in more than four years against new zealand at twickenham. the sale winger comes in forjack nowell who's been
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dropped to the bench — it's one of three changes following saturday's narrow win over south africa. there's no place in the matchday squad for manu tuilangi. wales meanwhile have picked josh adams for saturday's test against australia — also one of three changes to their win over scotland. the worcester winger replaces luke morgan who started the last test, and plays ahead of british and irish lions star liam williams. and scotland have received a boost with the news stuart hogg's been passed fit to face fiji. he only had ankle surgery eight weeks ago — he will play at full—back alongside finn russell and greig laidlaw, who also returns after missing last weekend's defeat to wales. and bbc sport are streaming the games of remembrance live on the bbc sport app and iplayer right now. it's two football matches to mark 100 years since the end of the first world war. earlier there was a women's match between the british army fa and the german army, which the germans won
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by two goals to one. and taking place later at 7 o'clock is a men's game at nottingham forest. that's all the sport for now. i will have more in the next hour. thank you, john watson. this sunday marks 100 years since the end of the first world war, in which 16 million animals were put into service on battlefields across the world — more than a million dogs and eight million horses, mules and donkeys died. now the animal charity the society for the protection of animals abroad is asking the public to remember those animals killed in warfare both during the great wars and in conflicts today. joining me now is geoffrey dennis, chief executive of the society for the protection of animals abroad. those figures are horrifying. let's
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get things in perspective, armistice day on sunday, i have a son who is 20 years old, can you imagine, 103 yea rs 20 years old, can you imagine, 103 years ago he would be at the front and possibly would not have returned. the organisation i work for work with animals and as you say, there were an enormous number affected in the first world war and are still being affected in places like gaza and syria by conflict. when we talk about the first world war, the worst of all, because horses were very war, the worst of all, because horses were very much important to the role of battle? they were carrying ammunition and armies out there and the worst bit, it is in full story but they were putting bombs on some of them and sending them to the opposition to blow up. can you imagine? the thing with animals, i have springerspaniel can you imagine? the thing with animals, i have springer spaniel is at home, delightful but frightened over the last weekend with fireworks. can you imagine donkeys
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and horses in that scenario, with people shooting at them? enormous bangs and so on, it must have been horrendous for them. and as you point out, an enormous number never returned. for those of us who have seen returned. for those of us who have seen war horse, the michael morpurgo book, how much is that raised the profile of animals for your charity? it has, that is a delightful and very sad story that finishes positively in the end. but a large number of these animals, it did not. people throughout the country, i have been doing radio interviews in different regions and they say we had a centre where people were asked to send their animals in, mostly horses but other animals as well, and they were friends, part of the family, never seen again. and they were friends, part of the family, neverseen again. it and they were friends, part of the family, never seen again. it goes on still. the work that the society for the protection of animals abroad is doing is in a number of conflict areas around the world were to a
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lesser extent, it is still happening. and we do work in emergencies and over the next few days i will be looking at a really successful project were running in northern kenya which is to do with drug resistance weather has been rainfor drug resistance weather has been rain for three years. what examples either of animals being used in water? they are still insured because of crossfire and so on but they are still used and in many cases in some countries they are still used to carry ammunition and pull carts and so on. and sadly, some of this time of suicide bit as well, which is just some of this time of suicide bit as well, which isjust awful. they are still used, but as much as before and obviously going back to the first world war, that was a massive problem for the animals and human beings. but they are still used in conflict now and they suffer enormously in emergencies. and that is something i have spent a lot of my work life working with the red cross, ijoined my work life working with the red cross, i joined the my work life working with the red cross, ijoined the society for the protection of animals abroad because
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i also care about animals and the populations that rely on those working animals for their livelihoods, of which there are something like three quarters of a billion in the world and they tend to be the poorest communities that rely on those animals. i firmly believe that the vast majority of the people in the world actually respect animals and like them and they are not deliberately cruel. of course some people are cruel. so pa rt course some people are cruel. so part of the work that we do, they give free veterinary care but we teach people how to look after their animals better and be work in schools, we do education in schools to get children to understand that animals are great and when they are pa rt animals are great and when they are part of the family... animals are great and when they are part of the family. .. thank you very much. let's go back to those comments from prince charles that he is committing to stop speaking publicly about issues that feels passionate about and to uphold the politcal neutrality of the head of state when her inherits the throne. we can now speak to dani beckett, vice chair of republic, a group which campaigns for the replacement fo the monarchy with an elected head of state.
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shejoins me via skype. i suppose you don't really care what he thinks his role is going to belj he thinks his role is going to be” would love to not be able to care but the fact is, he is going to be our next head of state and for me this feels a bit like too little too late, this is quite a transparent pr exercise from the royal family to make the reality of king charles more palatable to the general public. we know the general public in the majority do not want him to be the next head of state. this -- the figures do not back that up. about 37% of people in a large—scale yougov poll said they would be happy with charles as the head of state but everyone else said no, thank you. if he stood in the election, he would not get elected. there is a caveat, another question was, would you like prince william to supersede him and there was a percentage get that. but in terms of the role of
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prince charles when he becomes king, isn't he right to just put out there what he feels that role should be? absolutely and i think it is clearly something he is saying to reassure the general public but what we have seen over the general public but what we have seen over the past number of decades is as prince charles he has made use of every single power available to him in that role to advocate for his own political agenda and we know the powers that come with being the monarch are much greater. he has a power in that role... sorry, what is his political agenda as far as you can see? allsorts, something she might agree with and some things you might agree with and some things you might disagree with point is point is he is not an elected representative for country so to lobby ministers to change government policy before the public has had a say on it themselves is a massive overstep of the mark.” say on it themselves is a massive overstep of the mark. i mentioned on twitter we would discuss this and a lot of people say that if he cannot
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speak out about things that he cares about, then who can? and this is someone about, then who can? and this is someone who was talking about plastic and the problems posed by that many years ago, to some people he is something of a visionary. to some people, yes. iam not he is something of a visionary. to some people, yes. i am not saying he should not have those opinions but then you are the head of state, using a position to directly influence government policy is inappropriate and on some things, plastic and energy, many people may agree and on other things, if you look at the way he runs as a landlord for the duchy of cornwall and his views on homoeopathy and relationships with saudi dictators, people are less impressed on those elements. it is not what his opinions are, it is a fact that he has been using his hereditary position to influence what the government do. the one thing you would agree with him on its ears right to say when he becomes king, in his own words he would be stupid to think he could go on and talk in
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the way he has been?” to think he could go on and talk in the way he has been? i agree with that, it is like he has read it from our own press release! good to talk to you. thank you for your time. mps are calling for a change in the law so that flat owners don't have to foot the bill for replacing unsafe cladding in the wake of the grenfell disaster. more than 350 high—rise residential buildings in england still have the same type of flammable cladding used at grenfell. some leaseholders have been told they may have to pay for it to be changed. david rhodes reports. it's the nightmare that people living in a tower block fear. in february, a fire broke out in this leeds high—rise. we discovered that the cladding on the building is the same as the grenfell tower cladding. i'm pretty angry, because it's taken so long to sort it out and, you know, this is life—threatening. leaseholders like nick in skyline apartments say they have been told they might have to pay for the cladding to be replaced. £10,000 to £20,000 perflat, so i have no idea how i will raise that money, but they are asking for it up front.
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the company that runs the tower blocks says plans to remove the cladding are being developed and that no final decision about who will pay for the removal has been reached. after grenfell, where 72 people died, building owners were told they needed to check for acm cladding. in october, there were 358 residential buildings in england where acm was still present, and there are growing calls for the law to be changed so that flat owners or leaseholders don't have to pay. clearly, the money has to be found upfront to replace the cladding, and it needs to be done quickly for reasons of safety. but this absolutely cannot fall on the shoulders of the leaseholders. residents should not be obliged to pay. it should be for those owning the freeholds, owning those buildings, the developers. the association of residential managing agents says that the government should provide interest—free loans to leaseholders to cover the cost, but many are waiting to discover if they will have to pick up the final bill. david rhodes, bbc news, leeds. susannah is here.
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in a moment she'll have the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the gunman who killed 12 people in a crowded bar in california is identified as 28—year—old ian david long. former marine with the us army. prince charles says he will not be meddling in issues when he becomes king, he says he is not that stupid. within hours of hearing the results of the us mid—term elections, donald trump fires his attorney general, jeff sessions. here's your business headlines on afternoon live canadian aerospace manufacturer bombardier has announced 5,000 globaljob cuts over the next 18 months. it will also sell its q series aircraft programme. bombardier employs about a000 people in belfast — though the company hasn't yet said where the job cuts will take effect. burberry says it's on track to save 100 million this year in its half year results statement.
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the boss, marco gobbetti, said the reception of the new creative director's first collection for the house had been "exceptional". and dyson has won in its attempt to overturn eu rules on energy labelling for vacuum cleaners. the uk firm claimed tests to assess the efficiency of vacuum cleaners favoured rivals' models. so tell me about some research out today showing discrimination in the housing market against people relying on housing benefit? there is a shortage of social housing at the moment and high house prices, the level rapidly growing and a lot of people who obviously rent homes rely on housing benefit. national housing federation in association with the charity shelter has done research which they say shows one in ten rentals are likely to be advertised unlawfully by explicitly discriminative against people on housing benefit. how did they come up with this? be analysed
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86,000 letting agents websites and find that 1710 different residential properties said no dss or no housing benefit and they said that these ones explicitly discriminated against people on housing benefit. this was just the tip of the asbo because others said things like professionals only, which they say is described in entry as well. kate henderson, chief executive of the national housing federation, is with us. what prompted you to carry out this research? we have growing concerns about the number of people they don't have access to safe, secure, affordable homes and our members are increasingly seeing people who are in refuge centres, at risk of homelessness, and we kept hearing stories again and again of people just not being able to find properties that would be available to them. many people rely on housing benefit in the private rented
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sector, 1.a million people at the moment they are renting privately have some form of top in terms of housing benefit. these people are disproportionately women, often single mums, and disabled. it is a real concern if they are excluded from properties that they can potentially afford. what does a lawsuit regarding how properties can be advertised? lawsuit regarding how properties can be advertised ? many landlords probably would say i did not know i was doing anything wrong? the legislation we have referred to is the 2010 equalities act and that says we must not discriminate against groups directly or indirectly and our worry is that by advertising something as no housing benefit or dss, we are inadvertently discriminating against women, particularly single mums, and against disabled people. what we wa nt against disabled people. what we want is for letting agents, landlords and banks to stop this
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discrimination. had been any test cases to prove this case in point? shelter is bringing some test cases forward and once we have that legal precedent, that will send a clear message to landlords and letting agencies and property websites that not only is this immoral, it is also unlawful. if you are a landlord and you know your property is currently marketed this way, people might say they need to make sure they have security of income and it could be that this is the advice i have been given? that this is the advice i have been g|ven? they that this is the advice i have been given? they might be worried about is doing something wrong which has not got any real president? what we are calling for is for landlords, property agents, for online websites, but advertise properties, to meet people on a case—by—case basis. to assess ability to pay. at the moment saying no dss or housing benefit really harks back to the 50s
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and 60s when we had outright racism and 60s when we had outright racism and discrimination against migrants, where landlords and agents said things like no blacks, no irish, no dogs. we have to move away from this culture and start accepting that people in this country because of incredibly high rent and a shortage of social housing will need some top of social housing will need some top of housing benefit is in many areas. were they have to rely on private rented homes. we are asking for eve ryo ne rented homes. we are asking for everyone to stop discriminating and assess people on a case—by—case basis, based on their ability to pgy- basis, based on their ability to pay. thank you. canadian aerospace manufacturer bombardier has announced 5,000 globaljob cuts — will this hit uk staff? it is not clear yet. we know that 5500 people are employed in northern ireland alone, a000 in belfast so there are real concerns, particularly given those people in
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belfast work in the aerospace sector of bombardier across a range of aircraft and bombardier have said they are getting rid of some of their other aircraft, aircraft brands, so they were scaling back in production which is a cause for concern. we can speak production which is a cause for concern. we can speak more on production which is a cause for concern. we can speak more on this as well with the representative from the unite union, susan fitzgerald, regional secretary. he represented many bombardier staff. thank you for joining us from the belfast studio. have you heard anything else about the impact on what will happen at the impact on what will happen at the belfast site? we spoke to the company today with our union representatives and effectively are sticking to the story in the press statement that it is 5000 jobs on a global basis and it is hard for us to believe that will not impact on belfast so we are preparing ourselves for them to make further announcements about how they see that having an impact on workers in
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northern ireland. is up because the firm will sell the q series aircraft and the havilland trademark on top of the sale of the sea series? they say this is an attempt over a number of years to cut costs and restructure in a way and we feel their restructuring to meet market demands at the cost of thousands of jobs on a global basis. cuts in belfast? absolutely and two years ago the company announced they would cut 7500 jobs and two years later they are looking for a further 5000. in northern ireland that is on the back of thousands ofjob losses. thank you forjoining us. thank you very much. let's get the weather update. the weather has not been quiet so far this week. but it is
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about to get even livelier. things have been fighting over in western areas today, we have seen outbreaks of rain already, this quite continuing to feed and across western parts and we have another lump of cloud here in the atlantic and that is hurtling towards us and promises to bring some very wet and windy weather during tomorrow. through the rest of this afternoon rain will become increasingly widespread across these western areas, windy as well and the wind arrows showing average speeds, the gusts will be stronger than that, particularly for western coasts and cornwall, west wales and eastern fringes of northern ireland tonight and scotland, we will see outbreaks of rain and elsewhere some clear spells. given the strength of the wind it will not get too cold with minimum temperatures between four and 10 degrees. but this area of low pressure is lurking to the west and asa pressure is lurking to the west and as a scrabble system approaches it will bring some very wet weather and some very will bring some very wet weather and some very windy weather as well, we are likely to see gales in places tomorrow so are likely to see gales in places tomorrow so some are likely to see gales in places tomorrow so some travel disruption
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is possible. your local radio station will keep you up—to—date. having said that, but a bad start for many areas, quite breezy but sunny glimpses and some showery rain dripping eastwards and through the afternoon it is this wet weather that we are concerned about. through northern ireland, wales and the south—west, strengthening winds but coming from a mild direction, the south, so temperatures up to 1a or 15 degrees. let's catch up on the rain through the afternoon rush hour, in plymouth and cardiff we will see wet conditions and the rain cringing into birmingham, clipping into the western side of scotland and the arrows show the wind gusts, 50 or 60 mph and perhaps stronger on exposed coasts in the west. that wet and windy weather sweeps eastwards but low pressure still in charge into the weekend. thinks not settling down a lot, there will still be a few showers packing in on the south—westerly breeze, some towards
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the south will be heavy and thundery and there will be sunny spells as well and so quite mild at 11—1ad after sunday, remembrance sunday, a similar day, spells of sunshine but heavy downpours as well. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at a:00. the gunman that killed 12 people in a crowded bar in california is identified as 28—year—old ian david long, a former marine with the us army. he shot the security guard that was standing outside. he stepped inside. it appears that he turned to the right and shot several of the other security and employees there. and then began opening fire inside the nightclub. prince charles says he won't be meddling in issues
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when he becomes king. he says he's "not that stupid," and understands that his constitutional role will be more restricted. within hours of hearing the results of the us midterm elections, donald trump fires his attorney general and bans a cnn reporter from the white house. we'll ask — what's he up to? coming up on afternoon live all the sport withjohn watson. gareth southgate will talk about faa talking about defending... thank you simon. we have turned weather on the cards. it is some inquiry this week but it is about to get a lot more lively. wet and windy weather which could cause problems if you have travel plans. all the details around a:30pm. ben, thank you. some years the mic —— news that
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might cheer you up. also coming up — could this be the future? could this connect hello, i am in artificial intelligence anchor. it'll never catch on. why would an artificial anchor need glasses? i don't have anything to worry about. hello, everyone. police have identified the gunman who opened fire in a packed bar in california killing 12 people as 28—year—old ian david long. he was a former marine with the us army and was known to local police. among those he killed was veteran policeman ron helus, due to retire next year. this latest atrocity happened at a country music bar full of university students in thousand oaks, a0 miles north of los angeles. richard lister reports. they'd fled for their lives, some of
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the survivors from this nightclub shooting found safety behind police lines. it was the busiest night of the week at the borderline club when a gunman just the week at the borderline club when a gunmanjust in black walked in and opened fire soto i was just yelling "get down" there were quite a few girls in the group, young girls. and i think they'll got out. but they'll cut down. —— got down and then he kept moving to the right. he shut the front desk cashier. it was just a semi automatic, as many shots as he could pull and when he started to reload a sign of people out there and we got out of there. we did not know what was going on and we heard more gunshots and these incredible humansjust more gunshots and these incredible humans just jumped up more gunshots and these incredible humansjustjumped up and started smashing out the windows. and everybody was just like jump because we we re everybody was just like jump because we were completely trapped on that side and we jumped two stories down
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to the ground stop what they're followed a massive police response and a search for the gunman. suspect in the building. it was eventually confirmed that he'd been killed but so confirmed that he'd been killed but so too had been one of the first police officers on the scene shot the moment he ran to the door. sergeant ron helus was 5a. he had been a police officer for almost three decades. the sergeant passed away at the hospital about an hour ago. i only mention it might be terrorist because that's where we all go these days and that's where we have multiple shootings like this, there is no reason for it and we had this to —— horrific death, i have no lead or the fbi has a lead that there is a terrorism link here. as morning came police focus on a car driven by the comment i an indian isa car driven by the comment i an indian is a terrorism link here. as morning came police focus on a car driven by the comment i man india's ian long, a marine veteran who was 28. our young people, people at nig htclu bs 28. our young people, people at nightclubs learned that this may happen. and they think about that.
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fortu nately happen. and they think about that. fortunately it probably saved a lot of lives that they fled the scene so rapidly somewhat dramatic night train normally quiet community. how do you prevent more these mass shootings is a question america seems unable to answer. richard lister, bbc news. here, the prince of wales says he'll stop speaking out on topics he feels strongly about, when he becomes king. in a bbc documentary to mark his 70th birthday, he acknowledges that consitutional parameters mean he won't be able say what he likes and that he won't be "meddling." in the past, the prince has campaigned strongly on issues such as the environment and architecture. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. he's filled his adult life thus far as prince of wales trying, as he puts it, to make a difference for the better. but as he approaches his 70th birthday, charles knows better than anyone that one day he will step into a new role as king. and with that role will come a particular responsibility — to curb his habit of speaking out on subjects about which he feels strongly.
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it didn't work, it didn't work. in the bbc documentary, charles is asked about his so—called meddling as prince of wales. he says he regards it as motivating people to take an interest in things like the inner cities and the environment. and then he draws this vital distinctin between the role of prince of wales and the role of king. —— draws this vital distinction. i think it's vital to remember there's only room for one sovereign at a time, not two. so you can't be the same as the sovereign if you're the prince of wales. or the heir. but the idea somehow that i'm going to go on in exactly the same way if i have to succeed is complete nonsense, because the two situations are completely different. clearly i won't be able to do the same things i've done as heir, so of course you operate within the constitutional parameters. that undertaking, to abide by the constitutional parameters when he's king, is significant.
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it should mean an end to the sometimes controversial public speeches he's made over the years. on architecture, for example, his description in 198a of a planned extension to the national gallery as a "monstrous carbuncle" is just one of his interventions on building design which have irritated some. more recently his speeches opposing genetically modified crops placed him in opposition to government policy. on other matters, such as his passionate defence of the environment, he's often said to have been ahead of his time. but once he becomes king, all public campaigning will have to stop. that is the future charles has always known will be his. his wife says he's relaxed about it. his destiny will come, he's always known it's going to come and i don't think it does weigh on his shoulders at all. slowly but surely the way is being prepared, for the moment perhaps still some years away when charles is king and the united kingdom has a new head of state.
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nicholas witchell, bbc news. "prince, son and heir — charles at 70", will be shown on bbc one at 9:00 tonight. and it'll be avaliable afterwards on the bbc iplayer. an nhs trust at the centre of a maternity scandal has been put into special measures. nhs regulators have ongoing concerns about maternity care and accident and emergency at the shrewsbury and telford nhs trust. more than 100 families have come forward to allege their babies suffered serious harm or died as a result of maternity errors at the trust between 1998 and 2017. emboldened by the success of senate republicans in this week's midterm elections, donald trump has fired his attorney generaljeff sessions, america's chief law enforcement officer. he's also now moved against the broadcaster cnn, claiming that one of it's correspondents was involved in an altercation with a member of his staff. mr trump has on several occasions referred to cnn and the media in general as "enemies of the people."
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our washington correspondent chris buckler reports. jeff sessions was given a long round of applause by colleagues as he left the department ofjustice for the final time. he had been given thejob of attorney general in return for the loyalty and support he had shown donald trump. but his resignation letter made clear that he had been unceremoniously fired by a president who had long since lost faith in him. make america great again! mr trump never forgavejeff sessions for recusing himself from overseeing the investigation taking place into allegations of russian interference and collusion in the 2016 presidential election. democrats, and even some republicans, fear that the president is trying to bring an end to the enquiry, which is led by the special counsel, robert mueller. it would create a constitutional crisis if this were a prelude to ending or greatly limiting the mueller investigation. i think it was a great victory...
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mr trump appears to be on the defensive, having lost the house of representatives to the democrats in the midterm elections. but if he's trying to fight back, it's journalists who've got caught in the crossfire. that's enough. mr president, i wasjust going to one other... that's enough. pardon me, ma'am... that's enough. the president ended up at a news conference in a furious row with a cnn correspondent, jim acosta. that's enough — put down the mic. mr president, ae you worried about indictments coming down in this investigation? i tell you what, cnn should be ashamed of itself, having you working for them. you are a rude, terrible person. you shouldn't be working for cnn. go ahead. the white house has called this "unacceptable behaviour", and claimed that he placed his hands on the intern who was trying to take his microphone away. cnn say that's a lie, and are standing by their reporter. this isjim acosta. i am in front of the white house. a secret service officer is asking for my hard pass... butjim acosta's press credentials
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have been suspended indefinitely, and last night he was refused access to the white house. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. us supreme courtjustice ruth bader ginsburg has been hospitalised after she fell in her office at the court last night. the 85—year—old justice initially went home after the fall, but experienced discomfort overnight. tests showed she fractured three ribs on her left side, and she was admitted for observation and treatment. we can now speak to philippa thomas who is on pennsylvania avenue between the white house and capitol hill, both of course full of political buzz right now. what is happening with the investigation into donald trump after this ofjeff sessions? investigation into donald trump after this of jeff sessions? that's
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the big question, simon. the feeling is that donald trump why we know he would very much like to limit or shut down this investigation, who will he appoint to replacejeff sessions on a permanent plate —— bases? that is still an open question anyone is at this point will be shut down the inquiry. that is all they thought about in the white house in front of me. behind me is capitol hill home of congress, the democrats of course now in charge of the house of representatives bowing, simon, not to let this investigation be shut down. they say it was paid for by american taxpayers money, american taxpayers need to know what has been unearthed. meanwhile, the president of the united states is picking fights with the press. that is not new, is that, but he has been pretty spectacular in the last 2a hours. this fight between president trump andjim this fight between president trump and jim acosta of cnn who was trying to ask a question about the migrant ca rava n to ask a question about the migrant caravan that ended up with a white
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house intern wrestling the mike back fromjim house intern wrestling the mike back from jim acosta has now been banned from jim acosta has now been banned from the white house. quite a lot of back—and—forth going on about that. cnn saying the white house is indulging in allies and fraudulent accusations. and there are more battles to come. i am on pennsylvania avenue but just battles to come. i am on pennsylvania avenue butjust want battles to come. i am on pennsylvania avenue but just want to show you some rather striking symbols here. these are the symbols of the two parties, the republican elephant and the democratic donkey. and there is this feeling we are only two days out from the midterm elections, well a presidential elections, well a presidential election 2020 is already under way between these two great political forces in america. and everything that happens that whether it is about the russia inquiry, the choice ofa about the russia inquiry, the choice of a new attorney general, even fights over legislation on capitol hill, that all should be seen through the prism of the coming fight. philpott, where they are in there did you bring them from the office? i have mine in my back
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pocket. now i havejust office? i have mine in my back pocket. now i have just spot them. i thought it would be a good idea to shade that this is all about.” thought it would be a good idea to shade that this is all about. i am convinced, still above. thank you very much. philippa thomas there in washington. jesus still laughing. —— she is still laughing. you're watching afternoon live on bbc news. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the japanese firm, toshiba, has abandoned plans to build a nuclear power station in cumbria. the company had failed to find a buyerfor its uk subsidiary nugen, which was set up to pursue the project, planned near sellafield.
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our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has the latest. the site that you can see here behind me is the toshiba plant. what should've been happening here over the next few years is the building of a brand—new generation nuclear plant here in the uk. the japanese company toshiba have been having big problems internationally, particularly with their american branch of the company. because they've made losses there, they've decided to pull out of all international investments outside of japan in the nuclear sector. so that's put this site under seriousjeopardy, and that's a concern particularly here in cumbria where so manyjobs are dependent on it. that site should've been the biggest investment by the private sector in cumbria. and it's a particular concern for anyone who's been working at that site. just the other side of the road here, that's the sellafield nuclear plant, which is being decommissioned at the moment. and the idea was that people would've been able to transfer from working in that plant, with all the expertise they've gathered over the years, and move to the new plant. the fact that's not going to happen is potentially putting thousands ofjobs at risk and the future,
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of course, of the industry here in the uk. big questions about that. the government say that they are still committed to nuclear as an energy source going forward but they're sticking to their plan of making international and private sector companies, the ones who do the big investments and the physical infrastructure. and that means that we are subject to the head winds of the global financial sector. so when companies have difficulties elsewhere in the world, we feel the knock—on implications here in the uk, and in cumbria they're at the raw end of that today. the gunman that killed 12 people in a crowded bar in california is identified as 28—year—old ian david long, a former marine with the us army. prince charles says he won't be ‘meddling' in issues when he becomes king — he says he's ‘not that stupid,‘ within hours of hearing the results of the us mid—term elections donald trump fires his attorney generaljeff sessions and in support glen major gareth southgate denies wayne rooney's... affair will match later. a second century has put england in victory. for a chris ashton will serve for
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his country for the first time in four years. he is one of three changes to face new zealand on saturday. i'll be back with more and all of those stories at around half past. the international trade secretary, liam fox, says the government must have the right to decide when to leave any temporary customs arrangement, put in place to avoid a hard border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, in the event the uk leaves the eu without agreeing a trade deal. our political correspondent jonathan blake joins me from westminster. what of cabinet ministers been saying today? the discussion is on the final piece of the jigsaw with the withdrawal agreement, the terms of britain's exit from the european union and it is the so—called backstop that is still the big sticking point, an insurance policy for how to avoid checks between northern ireland and the republic of ireland on goods if a trade deal can't be reached or put
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in place by the end of the transition period at the end of december 2020. both the eu and the uk agreed there should be a passed out but they can't agree on how long it should last or whether one site would be able to pull out unilaterally whenever it wanted to. some in cabinet are very much at the view that the uk should have that option two and a customs arrangement which the uk would be in with deq whenever it wanted. and we heard from the international trade secretary liam fox early aunt who is very much on that side of the argument. we have an instruction from our voters to leave the european union. that can't be subcontracted to somebody else. it needs to be issued from a sovereign british government to be able to determine it. now hanging over all this wrangling isa now hanging over all this wrangling is a very pressing timetable. the government says it's still possible and very much hopes that a deal can be done by the end of november. for that to happen all eu heads of
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government would have to convene at a special summit and you can'tjust do that at the drop of a hat. there are various timetables floating around but nothing official. and the foreign secretary jeremy around but nothing official. and the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt was asked earlier on in paris today how he sees the media timetable ahead. i think seven days is probably pushing it, but i'm optimistic. but i am optimistic that there will be a brexit deal, but i wouldn't want to be drawn on a specific timescale. the foreign secretary's words there in the next seven days would be pushing it. yeah andy brexit secretary dominic raab has been talking specific about what happens at the port of dover. he was speaking last night at an event for tech companies talking about the shape of the trade deal, the uk was it richer the eu and some of the risks of leaving the eu without a deal and specifically the amount of trade going between dover and calais every year. just have a listen to what he said in the short clip.
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we make clear that we want a range of goods that recognised a peculiar geographic economic entity that is the united kingdom. we are and i have quite understood the full extent of this but if you look at the uk and you look at how we trade in goods, we are particularly reliant on the dover calais crossing and that is one of the reasons why there's been a lot of controversy about this but we want to make sure that we have a specific and approximate relationship with the eu to ensure fresh in the street at the border. a lot of people are picking up on the press is secretary'sjoyce award said that he had not white understood the final trade between dover and calais. it is the main trade group between britain and eu, something like 2 million units or lorries crossing the crossing every year and has been a bit of reaction from the freight transport association saying that they are relieved to learn that the brexit secretary has finally recognised the
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importance of the port of dover for sea mless importance of the port of dover for seamless trade between the uk and eu. if you were ask those who wanted to give dominic picked —— dominic raab the benefit of the doubt, they would say this was one sentence in an hour—long event that he was talking to potential risks of a brexit and his words may have been taken brexit and his words may have been ta ken slightly out brexit and his words may have been taken slightly out of context. and cabinet ministers stay in a pub platform like that people will a lwa ys platform like that people will always be listening. and we will a lwa ys always be listening. and we will always find out aboutjonathan. thank you. a paraplegic athlete, who said he was forced to drag himself along the floor at luton airport, because there were no self propelling wheelchairs, is dropping his legal action against the airport. justin levene said his independence had been compromised, but now more self propelled wheel chairs will be made available. our legal correspondent clive coleman reports. the pictures from august 2017 were shocking. luton airport, thank you very much. justin levene, a paraplegic man, dragging himself through luton airport, after his wheelchair, which he pushes himself,
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was left behind by an airline. the airport offered him a rigid high—back chair like this, which had to be pushed by someone else. he declined and completed his journey on a baggage trolley. last friday he explained his actions to the bbc. i've worked very hard for a number of years to try and maintain my independence and one of the biggest problems i had was if i didn't have my wheelchair my legs had been taken away from me, all of my self—sufficiency and my independence was no longer there, and to be in one of those chairs made me feel humiliated and degraded. if you're in those chairs and they insisted on trying to strap me down on it i wouldn't have been able to adjust myself and then i'd have been at risk of getting a pressure sore. since the bbc covered the story, luton airport has confirmed it now has ten self propelling wheelchairs permanently based at the airport, a system to lend out equipment including wheelchairs in case a passenger has lost or damaged theirs, and where a passenger pre—notifies they need specialised
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mobility equipment, the airport will source it. justin levene is pleased with that. so for me the fact that they're saying they have ten self propelled wheelchairs and a loan system in place, which for me is the most important aspect, i'm absolutely delighted with. this is all that i've been campaigning for for the last year, and for them to have listened to all of this and learned from the situation i think is a wonderful result. this story has created a huge debate online and justin has received some extremely abusive comments, some of which we couldn't possibly broadcast. this is one of the less offensive ones. "he's an attention seeking self—importa nt child, "having a tantrum and then trying to sue people who offered him help." but others have been more supportive, like this one. "when you're disabled, being completely independent "is the most important thing in your life. "i agree with him."
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justin levene says he just wants to be able to travel around with as much independence and dignity as possible. clive coleman, bbc news. all this week, in the run up to the armistice day centenary, we're hearing the stories of some of the men who served in first world war. secunder kermani has been to one village, now in pakistan, that claims it sent more young men to fight than any other in the subcontinent. the village of dulmial, around two hours south of islamabad, has a proud military history that predates colonialism and still continues today. under british rule, manyjoined the army. hundreds from here served in the first world war. this is a gift box. 0k. it was a christmas gift box given in 191a. in a small makeshift museum, riaz malik has been building a collection of local memorabilia. around 50 of his own relatives took part in the fighting. a plaque in the local primary school
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pays homage to the a60 men who fought in the war. nearly every man of fighting age is reported to have signed up. in honour of the sacrifices made by the men of this village in the first world war, the british government awarded them this gun. even now, for many here, it's a source of huge pride. the village's links with the british army continued. when the second world war began, hundreds more joined up. they included rashid emmett, inspired by the memory of his grandfather, who had fought in the first world war. translation: there were six hindus, people from different races,
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fighting alongside us. we thought if we showed any weakness, we would be betraying the memory of our ancestors. our motto was to kill or be killed. around 7a,000 soldiers from british india lost their lives in the first world war. now, there's a growing desire to ensure their contribution is recognised. secunder kermani, bbc news, dulmial. now then, could this be the future of afternoon live? take a look and see what you think. hello everyone. i am an image artificial intelligence anchor. this is my very first day. my voice and appearance are modelled on a real angen appearance are modelled on a real anger. the development of the media
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industry calls for confused... and advanced technology. i will work tirelessly to keep you informed as tax will be tied into my system uninterrupted. i look forward to bringing you the news experiences. that's the latest in artificial intelligence from china, the virtual newsreader. it's been unveiled by the chinese state news agency xinhua, which it claims "reads texts as naturally and professionally as a professional news reader". the agency points out that it may be particularly useful for disseminating breaking news reports ina timely disseminating breaking news reports in a timely matter. but google professor earl —— professor wooldridge, michael wooldridge from the adversity of oxford, he says it is quite hard to watch. it does not have rhythm, pace or emphasis. he also points out that human news
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presenters have traditionally in many cases become highly trusted public figures. hang on a minute. sta rt. public figures. hang on a minute. start. if you're just a animation, that has completely lost direction to an anchor. he says will improve it over time but the promise it could be very dull. he says the same about al. right, let's have a look at the weather. then rich is i think he has personality doesn't speak back to the weather reporter, i think is the future to be honest. that's the weather. wait, i have a lot to tell about. al will not catch on and weather. because you need a lot of personality. but you are producing something that you're not sure about. well we can to be sure by what we have already had and our weather watches have been taking pictures. we have had some sunny
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scenes in east sussex. look at that beautiful picture from the misses key. but the view not so pretty from here this afternoon. body avarice of rain and quite a lot of rain in west wales. and here ask why is this going on... you just want a minute going on... you just want a minute going to what we are party scene. is there some point would be a forecast? at some point butjust i get. what pitches do have there? let's look back at the satellite picture. what time did this happen? this happened in the last 2a hours. you have the jet stream here, this happened in the last 2a hours. you have thejet stream here, a powerful jet stream driving you have thejet stream here, a powerfuljet stream driving what systems across the atlantic. one area of cloud we sought income on an share, the wind is higher than the atmosphere blowing at about 200 miles an hourat atmosphere blowing at about 200 miles an hour at the moment injecting a lot of energy and takes his club of cloud, spins it to a deep area of low pressure and it's that that will bring some really wet and windy weather for some of us
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during tomorrow. friday afternoon travel plans, not great news. what is the forecast? yes, the forecast is the forecast? yes, the forecast is wind and rain basically. i will fill in the last two minutes nonetheless. here's what is going on, the radar picture showing the rain we have had the seven has been having. he saw the picture from wales. typically along this line cornwall and parts of west wales will see parts of down pours. thunder and lightning. and as a gift to the first part of the evening that wet weather will not progress eastwards, it will hang around the west. moving into eastern present northern ireland and the hot —— heart of scotland. we will see clear smells through the night. and it will say quite breezy and because of that breeze it will not get desperately old. about as well as we will go is in new castle. this airflow pressure which is our weather maker. this frontal system
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will bring heavy rain and destructive winds potentially. there could be travel on the road, the road, the rails, flight delays perhaps. your bbc local radio station will keep you up—to—date with anything that happens in your area. but having said all of that, friday doesn't get off to a bad start. there will be dry weather and a little sunshine arrive but we also see showery here. and you can see behind me this big area of rain pushing into northern ireland, south wales and the wind coming from the south. it will be mild, 11 to 1a degrees. this is how it will look tomorrow afternoon. not a pretty good job for plymouth, for birmingham, for manchester, we will seek brainstorming in the northwest england, ireland and scotland. and the winds will be breast. these black wind arrows showing the wind gusts we are expected some places in the west could seat 60 or 65 mph costs. rough weather friday night and for saturday we are left with this big area of low pressure. that
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will continue to fling at showers into our direction with some heavy and torrential rain in some places with rumbles of thunder in the south. 11—1a degrees which is relatively mild. and then sunday a similarthing. relatively mild. and then sunday a similar thing. mixed to fair, we will see mixes of spell and spanish rain and sunshine. we will also see blustery showers working across the country. temperatures again 10—1a degrees. prater the weather of the next couple of days. strong winds and heavy rain to come through in tomorrow and then for the weekend it is next. there will be sunny spells, breezy and mild. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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the gunman that killed 12 people in a crowded bar in california is identified as 28—year—old ian david long — a former marine with the us army. he shot the security guard that was standing outside. he stepped inside. it appears that he turned to the right and shot several of the other security employees there. and then began opening fire inside the nightclub. prince charles says he won't be ‘meddling' in issues when he becomes king — he says he's ‘not that stupid'. within hours of hearing the results of the us mid—term elections, donald trump fires his attorney general, jeff sessions. shrewsbury and telford nhs trust in shropshire — at the centre of a maternity scandal — is put into special measures. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson.
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gareth southgate's named his squad for the games against the united states and croatia, and wayne rooney is still the big talking point. is the inclusion was predicted. the fa kannan —— coming under criticism forgiving nightca ps cheaply. england manager gareth southgate's denied wayne rooney's inclusion in his england squad devalues the achievment of playing for your country. the forward has come out of international retirement to play for england against usa at wembley later this month in honour of his international achievments. he is the country's record goal—scorer. the fa, who've been in discussions with rooney for over a year, have been accused of cheapening the feat and limiting game time for players who need the experience more than rooney. we are a strange country in that we bemoan the fact that we haven't achieved as much as we would like and then we have a player who should be held in the highest regard.
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we are spending a lot of time justifying giving him that tribute. from my point of view, i am looking forward to seeing him, working with him for the next few days, giving him the sendoff i think he deserves with england. i am sure the crowd will give him the reaction he deserves. this man could make his debut against the usa. bournemouth's callum wilson has received his first call up after impressing for bournemouth this season. he's scored 6 goals in 11 games this season. there's also a recall for everton defender michael keane. england also play croatia three days later. cricket, the first test in sri lanka and england at in a very strong position? england's cricketers could be set for their first test away win in 13 matches after moving into a commanding position in the first test against sri lanka. keaton jennings, a player
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who's faced criticism for his recent performances, ending his two—year wait for a test century. filling the void left by alastair cook. his not out of 1a6 has put england in control. supported by ben stokes, who made 62. england declared on 322—6 — a lead of a61. jennings, who scored a test century on his debut in 2016, admitted today there've been times since when doubts about his game crept in. this is really pleasing and a big thank you to the people that have stuck with me, that have helped me over the last 18 months and have backed me through some tough times. waking up in the middle of the night panicking and stressing and going through some tough times. like i say, i am really pleased to be sitting here, having helped us get into a position where we can win the game. england will feel confident of
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taking those sri lankan wickets to seal the win. plenty of team news to bring you ahead of this weekend's autumn internationals. chris ashton will make his first start for england in more than four years against new zealand at twickenham. the sale winger comes in forjack nowell, who's been dropped to the bench. it's one of three changes following saturday's narrow win over south africa. there's no place in the matchday squad for manu tuilangi. the all blacks side at twickenham will include prop karl tu'inukuafe. after a promising junior career he gave up rugby, but then four years ago doctors told him to lose weight, otherwise he might have a heart attack. so hejoined a local amateur club, progressed, lost six stone — but even at the beginning of this year he was only on the fringes for his club side and still working as a night club bouncer. but there was a load of injuries. he got his chance and all of a sudden he's an all black player. what a story that is! wales, meanwhile, have picked josh adams for saturday's test against australia — also one of three changes to their win over scotland.
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the worcester winger replaces luke morgan, who started the last test and plays ahead of british and irish lions star liam williams. scotland have received a boost with the news stuart hogg's been passed fit to face fiji. he only had ankle surgery eight weeks ago — he will play at full—back alongside finn russell and greig laidlaw, who also returns after missing last weekend's defeat to wales. some huge matches to come in those autumn internationals this weekend. that is all for now. we will have more in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to amy garcia in leeds, where up to 30 buildings in yorkshire still have the same flammable cladding as grenfell tower — more than a year on from the tower block fire.
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and in cardiff is colette hume, with the story of two ‘thankful villages‘ who didn't suffer any casualties during world war one or two. so, amy... how widespread is what clearly is a very worrying problem? absolutely, official figures show that over a00 residential buildings across england still have aluminium composite material attached to them, it is also known as acm cladding and it has failed safety tests and was blamed for the rapid spread of the blaze at grenfell tower. the total number of buildings in the country with unsafe cladding is likely to be much higher as the government figures don‘t count buildings were defects have been identified with non—acm cladding. one of the tower blocks in yorkshire identified as still having acm present is a
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structure on the 128 flat skyline apartments, a luxury complex in leeds city centre. the group which manages it says it has introduced fire wardens to make the building safer as steps have been taken to remove the cladding. but flat owners we re remove the cladding. but flat owners were left wondering who is going to foot the bill. a recent legal judgment ruled that freeholders can charge leaseholders to pay for dangerous cladding to be removed from buildings. whatever residents been saying? they are anxious, living in a building with cladding that has failed safety tests and they are angry that they face bills of thousands of pounds just to put that right. i am pretty angry because it has taken so long to sort it out and this is life—threatening. the housing minister, james brokenshire, agrees and says it needs to be addressed quickly and freeholders should put this right,
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not the leaseholders. it should be for those owning the freeholds, owning those buildings, the developers who have a responsibility to actually make the changes that are needed. as li hang, the government are supportive but they have given no indication if the law will change, putting the financial responsibility on freeholders. meanwhile, these flat owners are left waiting to hear who will remove the cladding and when. and plenty more on look bbc one at 6:30pm. cardiff, two doubly thankful villagers? well, i doubly thankful villagers? well, i doubly thankful village is a village in which every man who went to fight in both the first and the second world war returned home safe and well. this is incredible, if you think of the losses in the first world war, 800,000 people killed in that four—year conflict and yet every man from the tiny village here near aberystwyth in carole duggan came
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home safely and that happened again in the second world war. but you need to remember is most of these young men worked on farms, working with the animals and most were first language welsh speakers and the biggest time they had been too was probably aberystwyth and it was suddenly taken to london and across to france to serve in the battlefields of the somme and yet all of them came home. many of the people whose fathers and grandfathers served still live in the village, including sheila, the eighth generation to live here. and she told me the fact that they are doubly thankful is simply incredible. we are very fortunate. not to have a war memorial here. we are so not to have a war memorial here. we are so fortunate that not one of the eight boys who went to the first world war and again the boys who we nt world war and again the boys who went to the second world war all survived and came home. we are a doubly thankful village and we are thankful for that. we're clearly
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gearing up for the centenary events on sunday but this village doesn‘t have a remembrance sunday service or a memorial because everyone returned, so how the mark remembrance sunday? they don't have a memorial or a list of the fallen in the church because they are about doubly thankful village but they are very mindful in the village that the villages around were not so lucky. and they lost, over the course of the war in wales, a0,000 men. the parishioners at saint michael‘s will be going to other village churches in ceredigion to share their act of remembrance. they are a very close—knit community and everyone will have known someone who lost their life in the first and second world war. they do feel thankful because everyone came home but they are also very mindful of those who did not. and you can see more about this story here on bbc wales today tonight at 6:30pm and in welsh on sac at nine o‘clock. and on radio a
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on sunday afternoon at half past four there is a special programme in which a songwriter goes to all of the thankful and the doubly thankful villagers across the uk and that is on bbc radio a at a:30pm on remembrance sunday. do you want to run us remembrance sunday. do you want to run us through the itinerary next week as well?! all right, lovely to see week as well?! all right, lovely to see you! plenty more on bbc one tonight at 6:30pm. thank you both very much. nationwide. if you want to see more on any of those stories, you can access them on the bbc iplayer. and a reminder that beagle nationwide every weekday afternoon at a:30pm here on afternoon at a:30pm here on afternoon live. —— that we go. the bbc has obtained police data suggesting that recorded hate crimes against disabled children have more than tripled in the last four years.
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in once incident, vandals broke into a school in newcastle which caters for children with disabilities and left abusive graffiti aimed at the pupils. tim muffett‘s been to meet staff and students at hadrian primary school in newcastle to see how they were affected by the break—in. the school got vandalised. they smashed all this, and all this nice playground, and all the toys. we were very, very sad. there are no words. so this is the area that we discovered with the graffiti. the most offensive language that was written, describing our children. most of the graffiti that appeared at hadrian school in newcastle is too offensive to show. the school is for children with physical and learning disabilities. over the easter holidays, vandals broke in. they painted horrible words, and they did very horrible things. they've smashed the minibuses and smashed the side window here. but the thing that upset us all, the thing that kind of hit home,
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was the nature of the graffiti was targeting our children's disabilities. we've never actually experienced that sort of vitriolic nature of language. we contacted a0 police forces across the uk. their figures show that the number of disability hate crimes carried out against children each year has more than tripled. there were around 350 incidents four years ago. last year, around 1,100. it‘s partly better reporting. so it‘s always going to be down to improved reporting practices, but... dr hannah mason—bish is a criminologist from the university of sussex. alongside better police reporting, she believes other factors are also at play. unfortunately, the eu referendum gave some people the opportunity to act out their prejudices in a much more open way, and so we saw hate crime and hate incidents increase across all the different strands.
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we know that social media platforms, they encourage comments, and unfortunately some of those can be unpleasant, hate—filled, prejudicial comments. people won't go out at night... the headquarters of surrey police. to help tackle hate crime, the force has been working with mark brooks, from dimensions, an organisation that supports people with learning disabilities and autism. the issue where they most get attacked is either hometime, with the schoolkids, and also on buses, where schoolkids do make fun of them, callthem names, even throw things at them. the government told us that it was determined to tackle all hate crime. it said support for disabled victims had increased, and that the rise in incidents was largely driven by better police understanding and a greater willingness of victims to come forward. at hadrian school in newcastle, volunteers helped repair the damage. the podium is back to its rightful face. but, despite the best efforts of police, the vandals were never caught.
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so whoever you are, if you're watching, please do not come back. i don't like you. tim muffett, bbc news. susannah is here — in a moment she will have all the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the gunman who killed 12 people in california is identified as 28—year—old ian david long, a former marine with the us army. prince charles says he will not be meddling inissues charles says he will not be meddling in issues when he becomes king, he says he‘s not that stupid. within hours of hearing the results of the us mid—term elections, donald trump fires his attorney—general, jeff sessions. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live canadian aerospace manufacturer bombardier has announced 5,000 globaljob cuts over the next 18 months. it will also sell its q series aircraft programme. bombardier employs about a000 people in belfast — though the company hasn‘t yet said where the job cuts will take effect.
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burberry says it‘s on track to save 100 million this year, in its half year results statement. the boss, marco gobbetti, said the reception of the new creative director‘s first collection for the house had been "exceptional". and dyson has won in its attempt to overturn eu rules on energy labelling for vacuum cleaners. the uk firm claimed tests to assess the efficiency of vacuum cleaners favoured rivals‘ models. we‘re going to get the latest from the financial markets in a moment, but first, susannah, 5000 job cuts at bombardier. do we know whow many uk jobs will be affected? we don‘t bother is real concern in northern ireland whether at 5500 employees, a000 in belfast a long, the city ‘s largest employer. the output accounts for one tenth of northern ireland‘s production. manufacturing production. it is absolutely key for northern ireland,
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manyjobs at absolutely key for northern ireland, many jobs at stake. absolutely key for northern ireland, manyjobs at stake. but we do not know, we just know that out of the 70,000 global workforce, 5000 will be cut but also bombardier is scaling back production of aircraft, we know that, it has sold its q series aircraft and that will inevitably have an effect on where they decide these job cuts must go and we spoke earlier to susan fitzgerald, the regional secretary at the unite union and she told me that staff in belfast were concerned. we spoke to the company today with our on—site union representatives and they are effectively sticking to the story in the press statement that it is 5000 jobs on a global basis and it is ha rd jobs on a global basis and it is hard for us to believe that will not impact belfast. we are preparing ourselves for them to make further announcements about how they see that having an impact on workers in northern ireland. they say it is an attempt over a northern ireland. they say it is an attempt overa numberof northern ireland. they say it is an attempt over a number of years to cut costs. and restructure in a way
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where we feel they are restructuring to meet market demands at the cost of thousands of jobs to meet market demands at the cost of thousands ofjobs on a global basis. that was susan fitzgerald from the unite union. we will keep across a story. and the markets? the ftse100 has stayed in positive territory. pretty much all day. sainsbury‘s, it had its half—year results and they were boosted by the argos takeover, that has been very good for them. like—for—like sales growth was no .6% which disappointed some investors and auto trader is a bright spot on the ftse 250, it is racing ahead. which is great for auto trader but profit before tax grew 9% so the shares are up and shares in fashion brand burberry have also risen. tom stevenson, investment director at fidelity worldwide investments, can talk us through. we can start with burberry, we had
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this from the company saying the new creative director, reaction has been exceptional to his new collection and burberry needs and? burberry is and burberry needs and? burberry is a company that is under new management, christopher bailey, the former creative director, moved on. we have the new chief executive and creative director and the company is trying to reinvent itself, it is going even more upmarket, trying to become an ultra luxury brand. selling its products into markets where that is popular, places like china. they are selling £300 t—shirts and there are lots of people in china for home that does not seem as stupid an idea as it does to me, for example! it is a company in transition, it has been a very good investment and the shares have done well over the years but had suffered in the recent market route. two around 2% today.
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had suffered in the recent market route. two around 296 today. auto trader, that is a bright spot, and you would think that ebay, with the power it has in the online marketplace, it would be stealing business from auto trader? these results do not show that? ebay is trying to steal business away from auto trader. otto trader is a great example of what you can do when you dominate a market place. the new car market is dreadful at the moment, you sales are down around 20% in september. otto trader is getting around that by dominating the market place and all the traffic goes there, four times as many people going there as to other sites and that means it can attract lots of very lucrative advertising revenue. that is what it is doing. and focusing on the used market, which is in focusing on the used market, which isina focusing on the used market, which is in a better state than the new market. sainsbury's, its takeover of argos has been good with the numbers out for the half year. they show it
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has really boosted profits? sainsbury‘s is operating in a very difficult sector, the retail sector as we know is having a dreadful year and the grocery business is not immune to that. figures this week from morrisons and marks & spencers yesterday showed just how difficult it is. sainsbury‘s is buying itself out of trouble, the argos acquisition has been very good, it has increased footfall through the stories of the game changer for sainsbury‘s is the proposed as the acquisition, we will hear in the new year from the competition and markets authority whether that will be allowed. that‘ll make sainsbury‘s, along with tesco, the dominant player in british groceries. thank you very much. i think we can take a look at the latest market? no, we cannot. the ftse100 did stay in positive territory today. otto trader shares
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up territory today. otto trader shares up by territory today. otto trader shares up by 2.2%. sainsbury is up as well and burberry have risen after that really good reception from the new creative director. thank you very much. a rescue operation is underway in a fjord in western norway to try and save a norwegian navy frigate from sinking. the ship was returning from a nato military exercise when it collided with an oil tanker. the damage to the frigate — now listing heavily to its side — was to such an extent that the captain was forced to run the ship aground to stop it from sinking. all those onboard were evacuated — eight people are being treated for minor injuries. the ea rliest—known painting of an animal has been identified in a cave on the island of borneo. the faint reddish image dates from a0,000 years ago and was drawn using iron oxide pigment. it‘s thought to depict a type of wild cow that still lives in the region. victoria gill reports. these mountain forests have been
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hiding a secret of our human past — a secret that scientists have now set out to reveal. this australian and indonesian team spent days travelling by canoe, then trekking through the jungle. it was all to reach this one limestone cave in east kalimantan. its walls are covered in some of the world‘s first paintings. among hand stencils and human figures are three large depictions of what appear to be cattle. they‘re faded by millennia of water dripping over their surface, but that‘s also dripped chemical traces onto them that allowed scientists to date them. the analysis confirmed that, at at least a0,000 years old, they‘re the earliest depictions of animals ever found. this is 35—a0,000 years old... along with carved figures found in other caves, these animals appear to be a crucial part of our past. this is very, very exciting because it really pushes back the art in that region to the same age as the earliest art we can pick up that represents animals, at least, in europe.
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what do you think it means for the story of our ancestors, for the human story, what these people were choosing to depict and paint on these cave walls? people are representing, first of all, the animals that were important to them. animals that were important for food, or because of their power, because of maybe their magical power. while we‘ll never completely understand the lives of people who lived here thousands of years ago, they‘ve allowed us a glimpse with ancient stories they told on these walls. victoria gill, bbc news. clive is coming up at five o‘clock. now let‘s get the weather. the weather has not been quiet so far this week. but it is about to get even livelier. things have been fighting over in western
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areas today, we have seen outbreaks of rain already, this quite continuing to feed and across western parts and we have another lump of cloud here in the atlantic and that is hurtling towards us and promises to bring some very wet and windy weather during tomorrow. through the rest of this afternoon rain will become increasingly widespread across these western areas, windy as well and the wind arrows showing average speeds, the gusts will be stronger than that, particularly for western coasts and cornwall, west wales and eastern fringes of northern ireland tonight and scotland, we will see outbreaks of rain and elsewhere some clear spells. given the strength of the wind it will not get too cold with minimum temperatures between four and ten degrees. but this area of low pressure is lurking to the west and as this system approaches it will bring some very wet weather and some very windy weather as well, we are likely to see gales in places tomorrow so some travel disruption is possible. your local radio station will keep you up—to—date. having said that, not a bad start for many areas, quite breezy but sunny glimpses and some showery rain dripping eastwards and through the afternoon it is this wet weather that we are concerned about. through northern ireland, wales and the
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south—west, strengthening winds but coming from a mild direction, the south, so temperatures up to 1a or 15 degrees. let‘s catch up on the rain through the afternoon rush hour, in plymouth and cardiff we will see wet conditions and the rain fringing into birmingham, clipping into the western side of scotland and the arrows show the wind gusts, 50 or 60 mph and perhaps stronger on exposed coasts in the west. that wet and windy weather sweeps eastwards but low pressure still in charge into the weekend. things not settling down a lot, there will still be a few showers packing in on the south—westerly breeze, some towards the south will be heavy and thundery and there will be sunny spells as well and so quite mild at 11—1ad and for sunday, remembrance sunday, a similar day, spells of sunshine but heavy downpours as well. today at five, a former marine opens
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fire with a hand gun in a music bar in california, killing at least 12 people. he‘s been named as ian david long, and was 28. his body was later found at the scene. he walked up to the scene. he shot the security guard that was standing outside. he stepped inside. it appears that he turned to the right and shot several of the other security and employees there and then began opening fire inside the nightclub. a sheriff‘s deputy is
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among the dead, we‘ll have the very latest. the other main stories, on bbc news at 5... prince charles says when he becomes king, he won‘t be "meddling" in issues that, in the past, have been close to his heart. you can‘t be
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