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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 10, 2018 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a weekend to remember. world leaders gather in europe for events to mark 100 years since the end of world war 1. on the eve of the armistice we'll be live in paris and belgium looking back at the final hours of conflict. and i live at the cemeteryjust outside the belgian city of mormons we re outside the belgian city of mormons were the first and last british soldiers to die in the first world warare buried. soldiers to die in the first world war are buried. heavenly father please help us. driving through the inferno. at least nine people have died and a quarter of a million forced from their homes as three major wildfires burn out of control across california. more pressure on the prime minister. boris johnson's brotherjo quits the cabinet as he calls for another brexit referendum. the haka returns to twickenham. it's been four years, since england last met new zealand...but twice as long, since they last beat, the world champions.
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good morning, the overnight rain has cleared out of the way and today is bright enough with a mixture of sunshine and showers in the forecast, i will tell you where the heaviest of the showers are expected to bea heaviest of the showers are expected to be a little later on. it's saturday the 10th of november, our top story, around 70 world leaders are gathering in paris for a weekend of special events to mark 100 years since the end of world war one. president trump arrived there late last night and will hold talks with president macron this morning. here, theresa may willjoin the queen for a festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall this evening. 0ur correspondent robert hall has spent the week travelling across the western front, from where he sent this report. last post plays echoing over a tiny village near the city of combres, the clear notes of a bugle found on the battlefield by wilfred 0wen, perhaps britain's most famous
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first world war poet. 0wen was killed in the final stages of a conflict that drew to a close a few days later. this ceremony heralded a week of commemorations across france and belgium. theresa may, who yesterday joined her belgian counterpart to lay wreaths at the graves of the first and the last british soldiers to die on the western front, flies home to attend the national festival of remembrance with the queen and other members of the royal family. the us president, donald trump, arrived in paris last night. he'll hold talks with president macron before joining other world leaders for armistice commemorations in the french capital on sunday. away from the centrepiece events, in towns and villages, at memorials and in cemeteries, visitors of all ages will pay their own tributes to lost relatives. as we move away from those with a living memory of the war, we need to ensure young people
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understand what their families did in the war. we all know that men went home and they never spoke to their families about what they'd endured and what they'd seen. i see it very much as the commission's role to continue to tell that story so future generations know what happened and keep alive remembrance. an estimated 19 million people, military and civilian, were killed during four years of war. wilfred 0wen used his verses to express anger at the slaughter. he was trying to scream at the world, i think, to say, "for goodness' sake, let's stop this!" he wasn't a pacifist, but it's madness, isn't it? robert hall, bbc news, northern france. and robert is at the saint symphorien cemetery in mons in belgium for us this morning, where theresa may laid a wreath yesterday. it is hugely important notjust for
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those big events but it is all about individuals, families, groups and friends as well, all over europe and all over the uk communities are arranging their ceremonies, putting together the final details. back over here in belgium you heard liz suite in that report from the commonwealth war graves commission, the director—general of the commission is here now. this is a busy time have you seen over the four years things beginning to change? have we seen a change in the patterns of people visiting? absolutely, at the beginning people came for battlefield anniversaries, people already knew and understood what is going on. in the course of the four or five years we have seen people develop a family understanding, work has been done in communities or art project and have brought people who we would not have
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expected to become interested in the first world war because they are interested in the people and personal stories so we are seeing more people coming along and experiencing it as part of their own identity and their own history. and i gather very briefly fewer men and more women getting involved? women are more interested in genealogy, the keepers of the family history and coincidently the only people who broke the family holiday so they say if we are heading off to france then let pass parity —— pass the battlefields. and on other, celebrations for —— preparations for another celebration here, canadians getting ready to commemorate those who fell in the sector in the first world war. at least nine people have been killed and more than 250,000 have been forced to leave their homes, as three wildfires continue to burn out of control in california. five of those killed were found in their cars in butte county, where the town of paradise has been devastated by the flames. further south, the city
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of thousand oaks, where a mass shooting claimed the lives of 12 people on wednesday, is also at risk. heavenly father, please help us. please help us to be safe. it was a desperate dash for survival. pursued by a wildfire devouring the equivalent of 80 football pitches a minute. paradise sits on a ridge, and a few roads down quickly became choked with traffic. some motorists abandoned their cars and ran for their lives, with children and pets in their arms. the hardest thing about this all is the people that may not have had the benefit that i had to get out when i got out. i started crying. the extent of the disaster
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here is not yet clear, but what we know already is grim. bodies have been found in the charred remains of vehicles. well, we're just driving into paradise now, and it's really a frightening scene. there are telegraph poles on fire, electricity has been cut. we've been driving past some houses which have been burned, and we're hearing disturbing reports from inside paradise itself about many deaths and injuries there. this is what we found. paradise is not just lost, but annihilated. in southern california, two big blazes raged towards the pacific ocean. tens of thousands of people in their path had to flee. this fire burned on the edge of thousand oaks, a city already reeling from a mass shooting in a bar. the communities of calabasas
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and malibu have also been evacuated. the fire which consumed paradise was driven by hot desert winds rushing down to the sea. the air here is acrid. you can actually taste the chemicals as they smoulder. and it is eerie and frankly pretty awful to walk here in the ashes of people's lives. james cook, bbc news, paradise, in california. we can speak now to buzzfeed reporter, brianna sacks, whojoins us on the line from malibu. thank you very much for talking to us thank you very much for talking to us this morning here on bbc brea kfast. us this morning here on bbc breakfast. you grew up in malaga, tell us what the situation is like an hour. -- grew up in malibu. i
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just left and saw the fire is still burning very much and contained. there is a lot of homes that are just totally gone, i am not sure how many yet but it feels like half the town is really just many yet but it feels like half the town is reallyjust been destroyed. what is this going to do to the community there? we were talking to another reporter in the area in california, saying that people are used to wildfires, they are accustomed to this, but this feels and looks so devastating. yes, it is funny because i remember as a kid evacuating from the 1993 fire which was historic at that time and we are used to these types of fires but recently we have been feeling a lot more catastrophic than they are moving a lot faster, their behaviour isa moving a lot faster, their behaviour is a lot more unpredictable. just with the conditions and the wind and climate change and everything, so people are very stunned and shocked
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and he always think, 0rwell, is another fire, we will be fine. but this one has really bore down on malibu very fast. in terms of where people are, have most of the people in malibu been evacuated? the entire town was ordered to evacuate earlier today, yes, there were some, one police officer told me maybe 100 or so police officer told me maybe 100 or soi police officer told me maybe 100 or so i may do more, people who stayed behind, and people do that out here, they think they're going to stay with their homes and it will be ok. there are people scrambling once the fla mes there are people scrambling once the flames would kick back up and when they got too close for comfort they hoppedin they got too close for comfort they hopped in a car which was already packed and ready to go but there we re packed and ready to go but there were definitely still residents walking around, people love golf ca rts walking around, people love golf carts with bandannas over their face driving around, really strange to
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see. it must be pretty difficult to look ahead but what do you think the future is in terms of what will be left behind now for people and their homes as they have been destroyed? it is hard because we don't not the extent of the damage yet, but people are very resilient and this community has been through this before, i feel like so community has been through this before, ifeel like so many community has been through this before, i feel like so many southern californian and california in general, it isjust picking back and eve ryo ne general, it isjust picking back and everyone feeling the same thing that you are feeling, losing a home, or a friend who has lost the home and you arejust kind of rebuilding. friend who has lost the home and you are just kind of rebuilding. thank you very much for talking to us, we wish you of course and your family all the best. the conservative mp jo johnson is being both praised and criticised by members of his own party after quitting as transport minister over the government's brexit plans. mrjohnson, whose brother boris also resigned from his cabinet post this year, is calling for another referendum. 0ur correspondent tom barton joins us now from london. how damaging is this for the prime minister?
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0n on one hand we have people saying we are on the final straight, we are getting very close to a deal, and the other hand we have a senior member of theresa may's cabinet has resigned, having seen what is on the table. how damaging is this? like you say it is really timing of joejohnson's like you say it is really timing of joe johnson's resignation which like you say it is really timing of joejohnson's resignation which is so joejohnson's resignation which is so damaging to theresa may. the final leg of these negotiations, the deadline by which the government has to reach a deal, if a deal can be reached is just weeks away. and joe johnson is devastating about that deal which is on the table, colin is a terrible mistake, vowing to vote against it but also saying that the choice being presented by theresa may between her deal or no deal is a
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wrong choice, he says that presenting that choice is the worst failure of political leadership since the suez crisis and like you say he has become one of a handful of tory mps to back the idea of holding another referendum. video being finalised at the moment in brussels and across whitehall is so radically different to what was proposed in the referendum campaign that i think it is really important that i think it is really important that the public is given a chance to confirm that this is indeed the extraordinary basis on which they wa nt extraordinary basis on which they want to leave the eu. now he is the seventh minister to resign from theresa may's government over wrexham, and really she is starting to face a pincer movement from remain supporters like him on one side and people like his brother boris, brexit backers on the other. that has been exacerbated today by the dup, their leader once again raising concerns about this deal and the big question remains that even if theresa may can reach a deal with
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the eu, as you get through parliament? and we'll be speaking to jojohnson's dad, stanley, shortly. it is 40 it is a0 minutes past eight. she was the teenage school girl who stood up to the taliban, survived an assassination attempt, and went on to become the world's youngest nobel prize winner. so where did malala yousafzai get herfighting spirit? her father ziauddin can surely take some of the credit, as he's also a long—term campaigner for girls' education. we'll speak to him in a moment, but first let's remind ourselves of malala's story. in pakistan the taliban said it was responsible for the gun attack on a 1a—year—old schoolgirl, malala yousafzai who has campaigned for girls to be educated and has been nominated for an international peace prize was on her way home from school when she was fired on. incredibly she survived and was flown to britain for treatment, now her campaign has gone global. it
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remarkable recovery. hard to believe as she walks out of the hospital, but it was just last october that she was shot in the head in a taliban attack. today she addressed more than 500 people at the un in new york is calling for better access to education around the world. i am the same malala yousafzai, my ambitions are the same, my hopes are the same. and my dreams are the same. an extraordinary accolade for a young woman still in school, today malala yousafzai's efforts to shine a spotlight on millions of out—of—school children were awarded by the nobel committee. out—of—school children were awarded by the nobel committeelj out—of—school children were awarded by the nobel committee. i think it is changing, it definitely is changing ina is changing, it definitely is changing in a positive way. women are stepping forward. so i think when women come out and say that women can be pilots are engineers or mothers are sinners and when you see the usual model six hash—mac the inspire modern more
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women. malala's father is here. what a lot of people don't realise about it she was campaigning for women's education long time before she came into the spotlight of the western world. what do you think you could stir to have that voice? what started that? it is so important to note that she was an education campaign, and it came out of those difficult circumstances when from 2007-2009 the difficult circumstances when from 2007—2009 the taliban bombed more than a00 schools and then injanuary 2009 girls education was completely banned, so in these particular situation she had to reserve ice. i was an education campaign and myself and like father like daughter. that was why she had to raise her voice.
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and the reason for the attack was that her voice was so powerful, it was more powerful than the bombs of the taliban, they wanted to silence her. but thankfully she spoke at the time for 50,000 girls his education was banned and now she is speaking for hundred 30 million girls. was banned and now she is speaking for hundred 30 million girlsm was banned and now she is speaking for hundred 30 million girls. it is remarkable how devices having this effect but half of this is a family story and at the moment in time when usa family found out that she had been shot, and injured, can you take is back to that time? what are your memories of when you found out? is back to that time? what are your memories of when you found ounm was the most difficult than most tragic day of her life, and the retrospection and be collection of it is very dramatic, to be honest. i was ina it is very dramatic, to be honest. i was in a really... i was the leader
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of the private school association and at that time i was about to speak and my friend whispered in my ear that your school bus has been attacked. and then after my speech we rushed to the hospital she was on the bed and ijust on the forehead, and her cheeks and then i said, you're my daughter, and it was the most difficult time of her life. yes indeed. she has come on leaps and bounds since, but what is the situation back home now and the valley intensive education? in terms of what she is fighting for? tha nkfully of what she is fighting for? thankfully it is going so well, i can last 20 years i can say that more girls are going to school, and at that time even 50,000 girls wearing school but it was a taliban banned girls education and things are changing very positively. and you go back? yes, we went to pakistan this year in march and it was so pakistan this year in march and it
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was so exciting and it was a great moment in our family life. you're watching some of those images, are you must be so proud of what she has achieved. but she have a plan? long—term, what are her intentions? what a sheep in to do? you like for the future? it is up to her, like a father i will always support as they have been doing. she is in oxford and this is her second year. it is up and this is her second year. it is up to her whatever she wants to do. my up to her whatever she wants to do. my role as a father is to support her in every way. what about his siblings? it is interesting when your father and a pedant when you with your children and one is perhaps shining publicly, how did her other siblings... i think it is very normalfor them, her other siblings... i think it is very normal for them, better to ask them. i cannot answerfor them when
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i see them their very normal and they were having this experience of having a sister, they fight with each other and reason with each other and their families very democratic family, they are chatting and teasing each other. this is how the family goes, the family goes. and teasing each other. this is how the family goes, the family goesm is lovely to see you here this morning. thank you for your time. it isa morning. thank you for your time. it is a fascinating story and salad people will be familiar with. thank you. you're welcome. ziauddin's book is called let her fly. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. looking back at how the weather has been over the past couple of days,
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and 63 millilitres has folau norfolk island. we have seen flooding issues in wales and a large puddles on the road so there are spots with tricky travelling conditions out and about this morning. despite that many areas starting with sunshine this morning, but it is going to be a day of sunshine and showers in the showers are already beginning to move in. these are big cloud turning into wales in south—west england where there will be thunderstorms around with probably the heaviest rain heading into wales in the next hour or so. we could see issues on the faster roads lead to him for, lots of surface water and spray coming up as the big showers and thunderstorms head in. lots of downpours, two wheels in south—west england, but away from that we have showered running into the south coast. through the day after a dry and bright start we see showers bricking it across the midlands, central and southern england and the southeast generally. north—east england not doing too badly and not too many showers for northern ireland and scotland were you might
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get away with a lot dry day and sunshine. there will be showers from time to time in the western isles and highlands, and later in the day southern scotland particularly dumfries & galloway a few will move in here they will be heavy as well. temperatures in the mild side, i is between ten and a0 degrees, dusty southerly winds bring a risk of coastal flooding in some communities, large rise and high tide causing 12 issues here. as we go through this evening and overnight showers will continue to affect scotland but the heaviest downpours focus on the southern counties of england. that is what will have some of the highest temperatures overnight, 10 degrees in london, coolerfurther north and five the these foreign dell fascinating graph. 0n five the these foreign dell fascinating graph. on sunday will pressure is still with us, we continue with the feed of south—westerly wind and again the south—westerly wind and again the south—westerly wind and again the south—westerly wind really are the driverfor south—westerly wind really are the driver for where gets the showers. we continue to see the downpours working into western and southern parts of the uk in particular, not ina parts of the uk in particular, not in a decent areas seeing generally
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fewer showers and more in the way of sunshine. if you get a shower that should not last too long because of the brisk winds that blow the showers across the sky, temperatures still mild, and 10—a0d. any changes over the next few days? not significant, still a brisk south—westerly wind that will feed a showers in from time to time and it will continue to be on the mild side as well. 16 degrees in london next week, highs of around 11 degrees is all 5 degrees above normal. it was a pretty mild. that is things shape up this weekend. theresa may's hopes of winning parliament's backing for her brexit deal have been dealt another blow after the resignation of transport minister, jo johnson. it comes four months afterjo's brother boris quit as foreign secretary, also over brexit. the siblings campaigned on different sides of the eu referendum, but are now united in their criticism of the prime minister's handling of the negotiations. sta nley
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stanley joins us now stanleyjoins us now from london is to co m plete stanleyjoins us now from london is to complete the family set. good morning. i miss you mean you have had a chance to talk tojoe have you? i haven't had a chance to talk to him,i you? i haven't had a chance to talk to him, i have exchanged a couple of text messages but i have had a chance to listen to him on the radio this morning and they have to say i do agree with his analysis, i agree with what he said yesterday and i agree with what he said this morning. i reminded myself of denison ‘s fantastic pawn the charge of the light brigade, canada the left of her, cannot do the right but the prime minister charges onwards into the jaws of death. it has to stop and i think that is whatjoe has done, he has said we have two get out of this brexit, this check list deal, it is the wrong deal, it is the wrong deal on the wrong time. we should pause and go somewhere else. and theresa may's words, the referendum in 2016 was the biggest
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democratic exercise and come to's history. we will not under any circumstances have a second referendum. she could not be more categorical. lets not get hooked up on the second referendum, let's not get hooked up, the crucial thing is to realise that the proposal the government appears to be putting forward is the wrong proposal, bad proposal isjoe has said. we would be locked into vassalage three yea rs. be locked into vassalage three years. the europeans have an expression, if you are not at the table you are on the menu, and that is where we are going. let's not get hooked up, the crucial thing is for parliament to throw out the brexit checkers deal. and i missing something? i thought thatjoe had said that he thought the answer will bea said that he thought the answer will be a second referendum? is that not what he said? what he has said is that yes we need to go back to the
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people and say to the people, look, we need to say to the people this is what the government has managed to deliver, is it what you want? if the people say it is not what they want then other options are there including staying in. of course he has said that. what i've seen from my perspective is the crucial urgent thing now is to make sure the government's proposal does not go ahead because it is the wrong proposal. why is it acceptable to ignore the referendum? ever think you are ignoring the referendum, what this government is proposing does not give effect to brexit, this is not brexit, how can it possibly be brexit when four years we would be brexit when four years we would be staying in tighter eu? giving money are not able to develop own trade policy and so on and so forth. this is not brexit, if it is it is brexit in name only. this is not giving effect to the democratic will of the people. was in cabinet have
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the advantage of all as it's much as they have seen more information and has been made public so far about what the deal might entail. but it begs the question as to whether and not their other people sitting round the cabinet still who have not taken the cabinet still who have not taken the decisionjoel has to leave they cannot accept what is currently being talked about. what do you understand to be the situation around that? there are probably some of the brexit site to see what i have just of the brexit site to see what i havejust said, it of the brexit site to see what i have just said, it certainly doesn't deliver brexit. there are those on the remain tied to say this is not where we want to be. so i think it is perfectly feasible that there are those around camera to resign from the text. but my reporting and that is when it goes to parliament itself, and then i think it is crucial that people come out of the woodwork and say this is a decision so woodwork and say this is a decision so much more important than party politics. it is more important even
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than he wins the next election. this isa than he wins the next election. this is a decision that will affect the future of the country for a0 or 50 yea rs. we future of the country for a0 or 50 years. we can't take it lightly. is a rather curious position because i feel i should be asking joe these questions but i will ask, do you think it was always his position during these months of looking at the various documents that are referendum should have been the a nswer referendum should have been the answer anyway? and that he is just waited until now to say so?|j answer anyway? and that he is just waited until now to say so? i can't speakfor waited until now to say so? i can't speak for him but waited until now to say so? i can't speakfor him but i have read in very great detail the pc put out yesterday and i'm perfectly sure that as time has gone on a dusty dimensions of the proposed check this agreement become clear, it has become apparent to do as too many others that this simply does not cut the mustard. it is not whether country needs to be we have just a few days left to make sure that the coalition parliament turns it down. thank you very much for your time. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with
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naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up before nine, we'll speak to an artist and a curator involved in an exhibition celebrating the popular peanuts comic strips, which follow the adventures of much—loved character, charlie brown. but first, a summary of this morning's main news... around 70 world leaders are gathering in paris for a weekend of special events to mark 100 years since the end of world war one. president trump arrived there late last night and will hold talks with president macron this morning. here, theresa may willjoin the queen for a festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall this evening. there will be live coverage of the events to mark the centenary across the bbc this weekend. it begins later as huw edwards hosts the festival of remembrance from the royal albert hall tonight at 8.30 on bbc one. and tomorrow david dimbleby, dan snow and tina daheley present live coverage of the service of remembrance from the cenotaph from 10 o'clock. at least nine people have been killed and more than 250,000 have been evacuated from their homes, as three wildfires continue to burn out of control in california.
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five of those killed were found in their cars in butte county, where the town of paradise has been devastated by the flames. further south, the city of thousand oaks, where a mass shooting claimed the lives of 12 people on wednesday, has also been affected. james cook sent this report from northern california. the devastation here in paradise is almost complete. houses for block after block have been destroyed. it is actually quite difficult to identify a lot of the debris that is lying around, such was the intense ferocity of this believes. power ca bles ferocity of this believes. power cables and trees are both down. still smouldering as well. we have seen a few emergency still smouldering as well. we have seen a few emergency workers here and police have liked through the rubble, checking, soon, we expect search teams to come through and see if anyone was left here. there are concerns that people are missing. it
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is eerie and frankly pretty awful to be walking here in the ashes of people's lives. we have seen some activity from power crews who are trying to make this area a little safer, there are power cables down all around. as we go then we had to be careful weaving around them and that was a power company carjust driven past at the moment. as you can see, it really, really bad messier. 27,000 people lived in paradise and as they fled from this community which is on a rich, they we re community which is on a rich, they were jammed onto roads that were not designed to get people out any hurry. some people had to abandon their cars and flee on foot with children and animals in their arms, carrying their pets. not all of them got out and unfortunately we are learning about bodies that have been found in charge cards and the fear is that we will hear more about that
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in the coming days. that was james cook reporting from northern california. at least seven people are now known to have died as a result of flash—flooding in jordan. rescue teams and helicopters are searching for five others whose car was swept away following heavy downpours. nearly a,000 tourists have been evacuated from the ancient city of petra. it comes just two weeks after 21 people — most of them children — drowned in a flood in the dead sea area. the conservative mp jojohnson is being both praised and criticised by members of his own party after quitting as transport minister over the government's brexit plans. mrjohnson, whose brother boris also resigned from his cabinet post this year, said theresa may's proposals are "a terrible mistake", and called for another referendum. downing street's ruled out another vote. dozens of outfits worn on—stage by the late singer aretha franklin will be sold at auction in new york today. the musician, known as the queen of soul, died in august at the age of 76
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after being diagnosed with cancer. she won 18 grammys and sold more than 75 million records during a career which spanned seven decades. the royal mail has released a set of stamps to celebrate the 70th birthday of the prince of wales. two of the six images show prince charles with his sons, william and harry, one in their military uniform and another in their polo kit. another shows charles with his wife, the duchess of cornwall. the prince's birthday is on wednesday. those are the main stories this morning. time for the sport now. yes, it involves all the nations
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from home. england have to try to beat new zealand. it does not happen very often. but japan got the then touching distance. they are beatable. eddie jones inspired touching distance. they are beatable. eddiejones inspired that win against south africa as the coach of japan win against south africa as the coach ofjapan which is win against south africa as the coach of japan which is now win against south africa as the coach ofjapan which is now being made a movie out. he has said they have got to be in the movie rather than sitting back and eating the popcorn and admiring new zealand, quite a nice analogy. it's a mammoth day of rugby union ahead, not least for england, who take on world champions new zealand at twickenham. eddiejones' side are chasing their first victory against the all blacks in six years. joining us now to talk through this afternoon's autumn international action is world cup winner and commentator, maggie alphonsi. thank you forjoining us. you know what it means to score against the new zealand team. what does it mean for a player to do that? it is amazing to score against new zealand because you idolise them growing up. in the women's team i wanted to almost beat them and when i saw the men's team i thought, wow, i would
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love to have the chance to take them on. to score against them is one of the things you will never forget. for those new england players facing them for the first time, how do you deal with the haka, what is the tactic, a when it comes to the beginning of the match? there are many theories about how you should approach it, some have said that you should look down and ignore it, others have said you should turn your back, but others believe you should acknowledge and respect it, but also why they did it. i acknowledge that. i love it, it is a really did you see something like that in our country and you should feed off it just like that in our country and you should feed off itjust like the all blacks do. i do not see why they cannot do that. i am do. i do not see why they cannot do that. iam hoping do. i do not see why they cannot do that. i am hoping that england will utilise it to get them started and be upfor utilise it to get them started and be up for the game. england have an ex—kiwi, brad shields, finds this tea m ex—kiwi, brad shields, finds this team is moving back to berkshire committee will be facing the haka as an england player today. yes, he
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knows new zealand very well, used to play for the hurricanes. regardless of the team he is playing against gemili will give his all. he played well against south africa. he has the knowledge and physicality and he knows barrett very well. he will try to attack that number ten jersey. knows barrett very well. he will try to attack that number ten jerseym is charlie in the studio gear, good morning to you. this confrontation regarding the skill and intensity of this match. do you think that with the absences in the england team at the absences in the england team at the moment that they have the players to deliver that kind of performance? most definitely. again south africa there were many questions going into that game that with the injuries, where england going to be able to be physically confrontational again south africa will stop but the dead that they could be given the breakdown and the set—piece and i think they have the potential to do that against new zealand. again south africa england give away a lot of penalties and against new zealand you cannot do
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that. you cannot give them any opportunities to get into the game. if england can be smart and can beat against the breakdown against new zealand, i think england have a chance of winning this game. but they have to remain within touching distance at half—time and the second half will be its own story. but i think they have the potential to possibly win this game. england's women had an impressive victory against the usa. katie winning her 100th appearance. yes, great, a true servant of the game. he scored 1a points for the team. there has only been five players to achieve 100 caps for the country and the woman sir denis this good to get —— to see her get that recognition finally. england against new zealand, i remember that try, jonny may against new zealand. to remember that when he ran around the whole of the new zealand team ? that
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he ran around the whole of the new zealand team? that was a moment when you thought, anything can happen. yes, he skipped over a few players and we've done the outside to get in for the try. that is what we want to see from jonny may but also creche aston. people forget about him. four yea rs aston. people forget about him. four years since you last that against england. he will be an absolute finisher. people forgot what he did a few years ago against australia, that sensational try from the 22 ya rd that sensational try from the 22 yard line. ashton and jonny may will be key threats against new zealand today. yes, you are correct, chris ashton, if back to his best, england have a chance. thank you for that, maggie alphonsi. it's a three o'clock kick—off at twickenham and there's commentary on radio 5 live, plus highlights on bbc two at 7:30pm. now, you have to go back to 2008 to find the last time wales beat australia and they've lost 13 in a row since then. however, they're on a six—match winning run, after brushing aside scotland last saturday,
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and head coach warren gatland is keen to put right their torrid record against the wallabies. to be honest, pretty gutted after a few games that we've been in positions to win them and throw those winning positions away and having lost on a number of occasions... we should have beaten australia on quite a few occasions over recent years and we haven't managed to do it. you want to put that ledger right. wales against australia is live on bbc two at five o'clock, but before that, you can watch scotland take on fiji at murrayfield — that's on bbc one at two o'clock. the scots will be glad to be back on home turf — they've won eight games in their last nine there — and losing their opening autumn international against wales last weekend will give them extra impetus today. and the six nations champions ireland are on a nine—game winning run at home, going into their match against argentina. there's commentary on that one on bbc radio ulster. foodborne mal. .. ——
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foodborne mal... —— football now... it's going to be an emotional afternoon at the king power stadium, for leicester city's first match since the helicopter crash that claimed the lives of their chairman and four others. thousands of fans are expected to march from the city centre to the stadium before kick—off against burnley, and the club have announced they plan to honour vichai srivaddhanaprabha with a statue at the ground. we have to honour our chairman and to continue his dream and work for the future. but in this moment, of course, all the different support from everybody is very, very important, and we appreciate a lot, of course. sheffield united missed a penalty and their chance to go top of the championship as the sheffield derby ended goaless, while in the fa cup there was heartbreak in the end for non—league haringey borough, as wimbledon of league one settled their first round tie in the last minute... mitchell pinnock with the goal. later on, the likes of the met police, stockport and billericay town will try to knock out league opposition. dan walker presents football focus live from the met police
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ground this lunchtime. now, aberdeen have moved up the scottish premiership table thanks to a thunderous strike from gary mackay—steven that gave them a 1—0 victory over hibernian. they're now five points behind the leaders hearts, who play kilmarnock this afternoon. england winger raheem sterling has become one of the highest paid footballers in the world. his new contract with manchester city will earn him up to 300,000 a week! that's around 1,800 every hour. in fact, in the time it's taken me to bring you this news, he's earned about a tenner! tony bellew will fight for the last time tonight, as he bids to become the first britain to hold four world boxing belts in one weight division. he's up against unbeaten, ukrainian 0leksandr usyk at the manchester arena and, as underdog, he says he's ready to shock the world. i'm honoured.
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i'm humbled that so many people around the world are supporting me, so many in my country, my city. i feel like it's all come at once, it's kind of overwhelming but i can't believe it's happening. so thank you. saturday night, i'll give my soul in that ring. i'll give my soul. and in the process of giving my soul, iwill take his. it needs to be the fight of his life if he is to stand any chance against his opponent. and charlie was very impressed with that number of belts. after england's men beat sri lanka in their opening test match, england's women begin their quest to add the world t20 title to their 50—overs crown later and sri lanka are their first opponents. they're in st lucia, and england captain heather knight knows it's going to be tough. obviously, after winning the 50—over world cup last year, we probably can't expect to be
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underdogs all the time, like we were going into that competition. we've had to deal with that extra expectation. the success i guess that's expected of the team now. that match starts at eight o'clock tonight, and there's commentary on every ball of every game on 5 live sports extra. the west indies host australia, the favourites — they've been three times victorious. that's all for the moment. thank you for that sports update. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather... this is what has come away the last few days. 63 millimetres of rain in wales. that has led to some flooding issues. there have been issues elsewhere on the south coast where a large ways bringing the risk of flooding combined with high tides. but for most of us it is a beautiful start to the day with plenty of
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sunshine. but it will not remain like that because it is a day of sunshine and showers and we are monitoring these big thunderclouds heading across wales and the south—west of england, and we can see the rain arriving on the bigger picture, across particularly south of wales. if it is not raining at the moment there, it probably will be very soon. the rain is coming down heavily and the surface and spray if you're heading out on the roads. that will spread quickly this morning across the midlands and the south of england. the south of england seeing an increase in chilly cavity later in the afternoon. at least pa rt cavity later in the afternoon. at least part of the north—east with the weather will not be too bad, largely dry with spells of sunshine. northern ireland and most of scotla nd northern ireland and most of scotland having decent weather with sunshine. showers temp to be restricted to the west of scotland this morning, particularly highlands and the western isles, but we will study this mean moving into the south—west later. temperatures, it is on outside for the time of year.
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this evening and overnight expect further downpours to become widespread across scotland, more rainfor widespread across scotland, more rain for southern counties of england and that is likely to be heavy and could be sundry acts well. gusty and temperatures staying mild. cooler for the north. highs gusty and temperatures staying mild. coolerfor the north. highs for aberdeen, glasgow and belfast. on sunday the it looks similar to the weather today. low pressure to the west of the uk, prisk south—westerly winds, for the showers expected, the south—westerly winds mean that most of the showers because at the west of the showers because at the west of the showers because at the west of the country. they will be moved by brisk winds which means any shower should not last too long in any one place, they will be blown across the sky is followed by sunshine and the temperatures, some alan kennedy, highs of ten and 1a celsius. if anything, as well as to the weather into next week, temperatures could rise a few more degrees, so mild weather.
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temperatures at 1a, 15 degrees for belfast, similar in edinburgh and cardiff, which could reach as high as 16 degrees in london. the average for this time of year in london is 11, that is five above normal and we will have sunshine and passing showers as well. that is how the weather is shaping up. back to you. thank you, chris. this is breakfast. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when matt tebbutt takes over in the saturday kitchen. i hope the situation been sorted. they are actually taking over at ninth 15 am, not ten o'clock. ——
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9:15am. matt, what's on the menu for us? i have no idea what you're talking about charlie, but thank you! aled jones, what is your favourite food heaven offered help?” jones, what is your favourite food heaven offered help? i love ravioli. —— food heaven offered help? —— food heaven or food hell? i really did not like lobster and bananas. ok, what's on the menu today, john? we're going to make a beautiful source and we will have some wonderful seasonable vegetables. thank you, i look forward to that. good shirt and
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trousers combination. what are you doing, sir? i will be trousers combination. what are you doing, sir? iwill be doing trousers combination. what are you doing, sir? i will be doing a beautiful combination involving meanies and capers and any family size carpaccio of charred celeriac and some travel. lovely, nice, simple dish! you are in charge of the drinks trolley. we should get one of them. are you suggesting i should dress up like an air hostess? yes. but we will go into that later! it looks like you're talking about a different kind of sauce this morning, matt? did you see what i did there? say at 9:15am. cameras
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restored. we will have a look at the paper now. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. investment managerjustin urquhart—stewart is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good to see you. do you have a sta ple good to see you. do you have a staple at home? is it one of those big, industrial ones? yes, you can end up with staples of you use them incorrectly. i have about four. i am trying to make this meter, because sometimes the papers flap about. you need a stapler. and this is why because we have to talk about this. yes, broadband world. it is one of
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the things about being a good consumer. we have been duped by the broadband companies because you sign up broadband companies because you sign upfor it broadband companies because you sign up for it and think you have a good deal and lo and behold, the longer you remain with them the more you end up paying. it isjust like the insurance companies. it is so boring having to try and change all of the time, but if you look at the percentage changes, one of them was that 90% increase, 90%! it is not a small rip—off, there are significant ones. so please read and learn. but there is a suggestion that we should be more aware ourselves. yes, we have to be better consumers. this is another consumer related story. solar panels, a good thing, you think? is it worth having a solar panel? smart meters are partly a good thing to have. will you make sure you have a properly measured power system that you're using?
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a p pa re ntly power system that you're using? apparently did not work properly with the smart meters, the solar panels! fantastic! e.on and npower refused to install smart meters were solar parlours exist, and that affects a lot of the population. i will have to look at what is happening here. so this is a p pa re ntly happening here. so this is apparently not a good idea. what is this about, picking up a free so far with your loan? —— free sofa. this about, picking up a free so far with your loan? -- free sofa. well, one is offering you to be put into a free draw left you win and you will have your mortgage paid off. another building society is paying for your legal fees and property valuations.
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this is both quite the significance of money. this is not surprising that people not taking all loans and mortgages because interest rates are so low? consumer debt is rising so i thought we were taking more runs out. rates are starting to rise. that is where they will be going. people are pulling back. all of these companies which are geared up to make sure that they have lots of money flooding your way find themselves in the position that they cannot do that any longer. so there will be a huge change in the way that the scent of the finance industry changes. on the thing about having a free and tee, this one is not in the best of condition. perhaps we should consider that. not in the best of condition. perhaps we should consider thatm building society might be able to get rid of this and give you a mortgage. interesting thought. you will be back in 30 minutes. thank you for the moment. it's one of the most popular and influential comic strips of the 20th century, with a global readership of up to 355 million. created by charles m
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schulz, peanuts first appeared in newspapers in 1950, featuring the loveable characters of charlie brown, snoopy and friends. now, an exhibition's opened celebrating the eternal appeal of the illustrations. we'll speak to two of the people involved in a minute, but first let's remind ourselves of why peanuts has been such a success. lunch break, lunch break! lunch break?! there is no time for foolishness. we have got to get on with our play. that is right. what about my part. what about the christmas queen? are you going to let all of this beauty go to waste? you do think i'm beautiful, don't you charlie brown? you did not answer me right away, you had to think about it first, didn't you? if you really thought i
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was beautiful, you would have spoken write—up. i know when i'm being insulted! degree. -- good grief. we're nowjoined by claire catterall who curated the exhibition and artist mira calix. good morning. why do you think there is this enduring affection for these characters? for me, it is because the script is completely timeless. schulz was very good at speaking about the small things in life because there is no great epic story going on in peanuts, it is the little details of life. some is so releva nt little details of life. some is so relevant today, but i think the appeal is so enduring. you are a fan of the artist, and a fellow artist, what was so special about the characters and the way we were drawn? i became quite obsessed with
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how he dealt with the music, there isa very how he dealt with the music, there is a very helpful and this behind us and how the... are sticking by the graphics and as i got older, the text and the art meets philosophy grabbed me and it always resonated and made me smile. it was not silly. it was quite bittersweet. you have done some audiovisual work with this. tell me about that. it is a performance piece and i did the sand with sculpture by the idea that schulz influenced me forever and the fa ct schulz influenced me forever and the fact that music is an object and i use the characters in a sort of game of consequences. as we use the characters in a sort of game of consequences. as we move use the characters in a sort of game of consequences. as we move through the space, i've made my thumb in the art gallery and put it back into the art gallery and put it back into the art gallery and put it back into the art gallery so we can see it behind us, and you can see those lovely big headed people are wearing
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beethoven's piano sonata will. schroeder, the characters obsessed with playing the piano and beethoven. so they intervene with this string players and try to change the way that they move through the space. talk to us about the history of peanuts. 1950 was the first script. was it an immediate success or was it a footnote at the time? firstly it was indicated to seven time? firstly it was indicated to seven newspapers time? firstly it was indicated to seven newspapers throughout america by very quickly and took off. by 1960 it was pretty huge throughout america. it was in the paper, so what influence do you think it had over society? well, schulz was very clever as to what was happening in contemporary society but in a very gentle way. he talked about things like the vietnam war and introduced the black character franklin. but very gently, so it trickled through
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society and culture and he was very clever. almost the way that we see in the front pages today. you have matt on the front page, for example. yes, he was never quite going for the political point, schulz, anyway that matt wood. but he was perhaps more effective. it is amazing when you look at the figures. 355 million people in 75 countries have read this. whatever the magic was, it clearly tra nslated this. whatever the magic was, it clearly translated into different cultures. i think that is because of how it looked but also the text, he had the two things happening. look at them, snoopy, you have something happening visually and then in the text, two things are working together. what if you don't know anything about peanuts, what will this exhibition mean to you? well, we have asked 20 artists who respond
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to peanuts and in fact many of them have already done this. the great thing about this sure is that we have 80 original strips from the charles m schulz museum. they are such a beautiful thing to behold.” remember the blanket. why did he need that? it was the security blanket, he needed that to represent himself. it is interesting, although schulz did not invent the term security blanket, he was the one that made it popular and because of him, it into the oxford english dictionary in the 1980s and also, a very famous child psychologist, ask schulz repeated use the security blanket as an example of a transitional object, so he got through to different people. thank
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you. the heavens are coming up shortly, see you soon. —— the headlines. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today.
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