Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 10, 2018 9:00am-10:00am GMT

9:00 am
and also, a dictionary in the 19805 and also, a very famous child psychologist, ask schulz repeated use the security blanket as an example of a transitional object, so he got through to different people. thank you. the heavens are coming up shortly, see you soon. —— the headlines. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. a weekend to remember.
9:01 am
world leaders gather in europe for events to mark 100 years since the end of world war 1. on the eve of the armistice we'll be live in paris and belgium looking back at the final hours of conflict. driving through the inferno. at least 9 people have died and a quarter of a million forced from their homes as three major wildfires burn out of control across california. more pressure on the prime minister. boris johnson's brotherjo quits the cabinet as he calls for another brexit referendum. the haka returns to twickenham. it's been four years, since england last met new zealand, but twice as long, since they last beat, the world champions. in the brain has cleared out of the way and today a brighter day, a mixture of sunshine and showers in the forecast, i will tell you at the
9:02 am
heaviest of the showers are expected to bea heaviest of the showers are expected to be a little bit later on. it's saturday the 10th of november, our top story. around 70 world leaders are gathering in paris for a weekend of special events to mark 100 years since the end of world war one. president trump arrived there late last night and will hold talks with president macron this morning. here, theresa may willjoin the queen for a festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall this evening. our correspondent robert hall has spent the week travelling across the western front, from where he sent this report. last post plays echoing over a tiny village near the city of combres, the clear notes of a bugle found on the battlefield by wilfred owen, perhaps britain's most famous first world war poet. owen was killed in the final stages of a conflict that drew to a close a few days later. this ceremony heralded a week of commemorations across france and belgium. theresa may, who yesterday joined her belgian counterpart
9:03 am
to lay wreaths at the graves of the first and the last british soldiers to die on the western front, flies home to attend the national festival of remembrance with the queen and other members of the royal family. the us president, donald trump, arrived in paris last night. he'll hold talks with president macron before joining other world leaders for armistice commemorations in the french capital on sunday. away from the centrepiece events, in towns and villages, at memorials and in cemeteries, visitors of all ages will pay their own tributes to lost relatives. as we move away from those with a living memory of the war, we need to ensure young people understand what their families did in the war. we all know that men went home and they never spoke to their families about what they'd endured and what they'd seen. i see it very much as the commission's role to continue to tell that story so future generations know what happened and keep alive remembrance. an estimated 19 million people, military and civilian,
9:04 am
were killed during four years of war. wilfred owen used his verses to express anger at the slaughter. he was trying to scream at the world, i think, to say, "for goodness‘ sake, let's stop this!" he wasn't a pacifist, but it's madness, isn't it? robert hall, bbc news, northern france. and robert is at the saint symphorien cemetery in mons in belgium for us this morning, where theresa may laid a wreath yesterday. on one hand we have these major events with world leaders and then there are very personal stories being laid out. there was really are right now. in the cemetery, which has hosted the sort of leaders event yesterday, theresa may was he with her belt and canada wreaths on the graves of the
9:05 am
two british soldiers who died in combat at either end of the four—year period, today it is the canadians turn to take centrestage year, final preparations are under way. there is a british contingent as well, it is very much a commonwealth event. they will remember canadians who died throughout the french and belgian combat across france and belgium on the various battlefields, that happen in membrane particularly the last, we'll soldier to die and was killed just a short distance from where i am here. i think this is one of those places where it is possible to step away from the big events and ta ke to step away from the big events and take a moment to reflect because it is very small and peaceful and once more it has graves of british and german soldiers visited here, —— buried here. some items by the audience are gathering for this morning's event. the cemetery was set up by the german army, it covered casualties from both sides
9:06 am
only then to rest here. there was a german contingent present for this ceremony, and it is all the competence from the first world war commented —— coming together. at least nine people have been killed and more than 250,000 have been forced to leave their homes, as three wildfires continue to burn out of control in california. five of those killed were found in their cars in butte county, where the town of paradise has been devastated by the flames. further south, the city of thousand oaks, where a mass shooting claimed the lives of 12 people on wednesday, is also at risk. our correspondentjames cook sent this report. heavenly father, please help us. please help us to be safe. it was a desperate dash for survival. pursued by a wildfire devouring the equivalent of 80 football pitches a minute. paradise sits on a ridge, and a few roads down quickly became choked with traffic. some motorists abandoned
9:07 am
their cars and ran for their lives, with children and pets in their arms. the hardest thing about this all is the people that may not have had the benefit that i had to get out when i got out. i started crying. the extent of the disaster here is not yet clear, but what we know already is grim. bodies have been found in the charred remains of vehicles. well, we're just driving into paradise now, and it's really a frightening scene. there are telegraph poles on fire, electricity has been cut. we've been driving past some houses which have been burned, and we're hearing disturbing reports from inside paradise itself about many deaths and injuries there. this is what we found. paradise is not just lost, but annihilated. in southern california,
9:08 am
two big blazes raged towards the pacific ocean. tens of thousands of people in their path had to flee. this fire burned on the edge of thousand oaks, a city already reeling from a mass shooting in a bar. the communities of calabasas and malibu have also been evacuated. the fire which consumed paradise was driven by hot desert winds rushing down to the sea. the air here is acrid. you can actually taste the chemicals as they smoulder. and it is eerie and frankly pretty awful to walk here in the ashes of people's lives. james cook, bbc news, paradise, in california. at least seven people are now known to have died as a result of flash—flooding in jordan.
9:09 am
rescue teams and helicopters are searching for five others whose car was swept away following heavy downpours. nearly 4,000 tourists have been evacuated from the ancient city of petra. it comes just two weeks after 21 people, most of them children, drowned in a flood in the dead sea area. the conservative mp jojohnson is being both praised and criticised by members of his own party after quitting as transport minister over the government's brexit plans. mrjohnson, whose brother boris also resigned from his cabinet post this year, is calling for another referendum. our correspondent tom bartonjoins us now from london. how damaging is this for the prime minister? when i first heard about this you could not help but think, is this the beginning of a wave, we have heard the discontent haven't we surrounding the impending brexit deal. is this the beginning of a wave? not quite. certainlyjo
9:10 am
johnson wave? not quite. certainlyjo johnson was asked this morning and said he did not know of any other ministers who are planning to resign, but certainly the timing of his resignation is incredibly damaging to the prime minister. it comes right at the end of this stage of brexit negotiations, just weeks away from the deadline for reaching away from the deadline for reaching a deal. if a deal can be reached. and in his statement resigning he was devastating about the potential deal that is on the table, saying it bea deal that is on the table, saying it be a terrible mistake to sign it and vowing to vote against it. he also said that the option of my deal or no deal that theresa may is offering mps would be a failure of political leadership. there is a bit questionable from brexit supporters and people who campaign for remain at the referendum for theresa may which is if she can agree a deal with the eu, can she get it through the house of commons? thank you. we'll have all the sport and weather
9:11 am
coming upa we'll have all the sport and weather coming up a little later. explaining the horrors of war to a child is difficult, but it's a challenge that author sir michael morpurgo has not shied away from. his book war horse became a film and a stage play which has been seen by millions around the world. now, to mark the armistice centenary, he's teamed up with the royal british legion to write a new book, called poppy field. before we speak to michael, let's hear an extract from it. my my name is martin merkel, i live on a farm my name is martin merkel, i live on afarm in my name is martin merkel, i live on a farm in flanders with my mother and my grandfather. all around is the battlefield of the first world war, which ended a long time ago in 1918. you wouldn't know it was a battlefield now. the trenches ran right through our farm, where the cows 110w right through our farm, where the cows now graze was right through our farm, where the cows now graze was no man's right through our farm, where the
9:12 am
cows now graze was no man's land. poppies grow here in their millions, so poppies grow here in their millions, so thick sometimes that in the wheatfield in the valley you can barely see the wheat from the poppies. it is very quiet here, you would only know there had ever been award here from the secretaries and memorials. most of my friends hardly notice the cemeteries because they are always there. part of the landscape. i noticed them but then i have good reason to, because that same or have good reason to, because that same or killed my father. that was 11 years ago in the spring of 2005. that is 87 years after the war ended. that was read by harry who is about the same age as martin, one of the main characters and sir michael moore purple's new book. we talk about marking a hundred yea rs we talk about marking a hundred years and armistice day, so many adults will be talking about this
9:13 am
and thinking about the emotions it brings up, it is an evocative time. the challenge to get children to understand the horror and yet the pride that also comes along with the forces that represented as is difficult, how do you tackle that?|j suppose difficult, how do you tackle that?” suppose in a way one mustn't talk about horror and pride in the first place, i think the great things to connect them to the story. it has to become personal in some way or another, it has to become a real link between the child and a history ofa link between the child and a history of a hundred years ago and the only way left us in our stories. you tell the story. the study of the people who were there and utility in such a way as i try to do with poppy field so way as i try to do with poppy field so that it links young people to the story because young people were part of the story. as my story as you know is really about the small girl in belgium. and that is what they we re in belgium. and that is what they were related. stay with us for a few moments and we will talk more about the book injust moments and we will talk more about the book in just a moments and we will talk more about the book injust a moment. this is
9:14 am
where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. many thanks to the viewers who stayed with us. we were just talk about the book poppy field. it is important that children understand what's going on. yes otherwise the p°ppy what's going on. yes otherwise the poppy becomes a strange flower that adults where once a year and you don't really know what it is about at all. it is good to know the story and regional why the poppy has become so important. and yes 100 yea rs become so important. and yes 100 years ago become so important. and yes 100 years ago there were people out there just like them, years ago there were people out therejust like them, 15, 16, 17, 18. and they went out there and why did they go? they wife of a country, their friends, they went because other people went, they went because they were told to, but the ended up in these fields were the poppies
9:15 am
grew in so many of them died and thatis grew in so many of them died and that is just on our side and that is an important message to get across, that was notjust on our side. in the whole war there was some ten or 20 million. they were also once father. and whether they were german or father. and whether they were german or italian australian new zealand or indian or african, or british, they we re indian or african, or british, they were all a member of family and when that person was killed the grieving goes on. that is the important thing, it is notjust that you cant up thing, it is notjust that you cant up the numbers and isn't it terrible and you wear a poppy, it is much more important than that. if you wa nt more important than that. if you want the young people to understand you have to tell the story and you can tell three horse like i did in warhorse, or you can tell three horse like i did in warhorse, or you can can tell three horse like i did in warhorse, or you can tell it in this case warhorse, or you can tell it in this case and you can concentrate on it, it is the people whose land over a war is fought, we have images on our screens all the time kids in syria, and the kids see this. they see what war does the children's lives as well. and it is difficult because it is on the screen, it is not part of
9:16 am
their lives but it is part of their lives in this happened to their families going way, way back. and built of course it was fought over land but there were farmers, there are villages, there were towns, and belgian children were being carried out of their houses just the same and it is important not to forget them in all of the business of uniforms and bugles and drums. there we re uniforms and bugles and drums. there were a uniforms and bugles and drums. there were a lot of civilians killed, a lot of children and children can relate to that always. that is not a problem. we talked quite a bit there for the past couple of days about 100 years but there has been an ad and flow as to how much interest there has been in the armistice. there were patches of 2030 years ago when i was not much attention so now people are asking after this 100 year mark—up point, how will it be, how will we handle it differently? what are your thoughts?” how will we handle it differently? what are your thoughts? i think you have to have something that looks to the future and to how we would after our peace rather than look back at
9:17 am
war. what these people fought for ff offer anything that was worthwhile, they fought for their families and they fought for their families and they fought for a piece of the future for their families and their countries. we have benefited from that piece and we must then keep it going. there is a wonderful project cold the western way whether following no man's land all the way from the swiss border to the sea, so 400 miles, and creating a pathway of peace, through sachar, this is being done by a colleague of yours cold tom heap, on the bbc, who great—uncle who was in the war and he left a letter and in the letter he left a letter and in the letter he said when this is over wouldn't it be just the most marvellous thing if what is now this horror, this no man's land, which will then be far mind again and woods, let's make a pathway. saw something you can actually go and do. you can go and ta ke actually go and do. you can go and take your kids and you can meet
9:18 am
people from all over the world and they will block it and it will be whether pilgrims way but without the religion, the religion if you like would peace and aren't we lucky to have this piece? how we got this piece, well i'm afraid here this dreadful thing that happened. i do what they say is to people who think that remembrance day qualifies war? that by the member in it you qualify? goal the trouble is that can happen. the soldiers i think that the time would be horrified if they thought we were doing that because it was not glorious. it was brutal. was vile. in many, many ways. but we have to remain realistic about it. yes he must honour and respect what they did turn the fact that these young men never grew turn the fact that these young men never grew to be fathers and grandfathers like me, i've had a whole life, 75 years of it, and some of them never got past 15, 16, 17, 18. it is the most dreadful thing to contemplate. but they didn't quite say i am sacrificing myself, they just wanted the war over with so they did what they had to do and then they were cut down their prime.
9:19 am
we must do our very best thing to do two things, to concentrate on reconciliation, understanding other people, making that if you like a piece which is worthy of them. can i just pulled up, i want to hold up the book, it is interesting as we're looking at that and the black—and—white images in the horror of war but a new book the imagery and the work of the book, and try to find work images, there is a charm. absolute charm. and i'm sure that seems, what you're saying, the way to approach to get people engaged is tell stories. that picture now is a picture of peace and if you go there andi picture of peace and if you go there and i have been there often to that pa rt and i have been there often to that part of northern france and belgium, thatis part of northern france and belgium, that is what it looks like. it looks like when i come from. it is the young boy cycling through fields where all this happened. absolutely, all this happened in the whole point of the stories that links us, to the story of venter this wonderful poem ofjohn gray is in flanders field at
9:20 am
the way that he threw away a little draft of it and someone picked it up and look at it and kept it, that pa rt and look at it and kept it, that part of it is true. in flanders fields the most famous poem of the first world war. and it is how someone found this scrap of paper which becomes iconic red entire family through this hundred years to this very day. and scrappers and someone's house? supposedly the story is that his sergeant saw someone's house? supposedly the story is that his sergeant sanohn mccrea sitting on the steps of an ambulance and he was scribbling away on his pat on the servers and what you doing? and he said i am writing a poem in his best thing to do is been killed and he was writing this poem. and he dropped the paper on the ground. the sergeant picked it up the ground. the sergeant picked it up and said it is quite good. and he said if you think it is good you can keep it. so someone somewhere there was a sergeant in the canadian army who walked away with the original draft of in flanders field in his pocket. we have no idea what
9:21 am
happened to that at all. so this what i do my stories, take something true and instead of it being a sergeant it is a little girl who comes along who is living there and selling eggs to the field dressing station. it is the story ofjohn mccrea writing the poem and of course you mccrea writing the poem and of course you died as well. what are you working on now?” course you died as well. what are you working on now? i am working on an idea for my next book which i am going to start writing injanuary, which can tell you about because of i tell you about it by publishers will be cross because it is supposed to bea will be cross because it is supposed to be a surprise. review, doctors about that? absolutely. it is a real passion for you, writing about these things and bringing it to the attention of more people, is it hard to move away from that angle by the dayjob? to move away from that angle by the day job? the problem is there is an expectation that you're right about the sort of thing and sort of, i have reached the stage now where thatis have reached the stage now where that is a sad world to live in when you're writing, you get very
9:22 am
involved with all these books written about the first and second world war and i feel now that it is time to step back and write stories which lift my spirits of that. i am not depressed miserable but i think you can dwell on it too much. although war horse has been extraordinary, i certainly don't wa nt to extraordinary, i certainly don't want to dwell in that all the time now. poppies are not my favourite flower. i think the r4 once a year rather by grocers. that is a perfectly to finish. thank you. lovely to see you. and the book is called poppy fields. it is now 22, let's look at the weather. it has been a real soggy weather picture over been a real soggy weather picture over the past couple of days, not just in wales but here where we have seen just in wales but here where we have seen 63 millimetres of rain, half a months worth of rainfall. we will also see some coastal flooding and
9:23 am
flood warnings in force. a combination of high tides unload weeks brigade risk to local communities but for many a glorious start to the day. plenty of blue skies around, but it won't stay that way because looking towards our southwest we have these big cloud sitting in. these are fun clouds and some of them working in two wheels in south—west england so sure is moving across these areas. there are widespread so what areas will see at least a shower to across wheels in south—west england. some of them will be very heavy so servers what a nswer will be very heavy so servers what answer be a factor well some of those fast hash—mac on some of those fast roads over hash—mac on some of those fast roads over the next few hours. this breaks into the south—east later on this afternoon and showers working into north—west england later this afternoon. that still leaves probably quite a few areas to the east of the pennines that we dodge the worst of the shower since they largely dry. another dry spot could be northern ireland, showers during the day and most of them speak —— speeding up through the day. there
9:24 am
will be some passing showers for the highlands and western isles. a lot of dry weather for north—east scotla nd of dry weather for north—east scotland with sunshine and temperatures here about 11 degrees. for many of those temperatures and above the board and will continue to stay by others who go through this evening and overnight. further downpours for scotland pushing northwards, more showers coming in towards the south—west of the uk as well. the rain heavy at times across the southern counties of england. in the southern counties of england. in the south 10 degrees also in london, 5 degrees for belfast and edinburgh we re 5 degrees for belfast and edinburgh were the weather but cooler overnight. for a member on sunday the see many of the pressure we have todayis the see many of the pressure we have today is still there on the chart so again we have south—westerly wind. a similar kind of weather today with south—westerly winds favouring showers across western and southern areas were some of showers across western and southern areas were some of there will be heavy with under. with the brisk wind around the showers will blow through fairly quickly in the sunshine will come out probably a rather greater chance of seeing
9:25 am
downpours edged in from the violent and western counties of the day. temperatures tomorrow looking at highs of 10—14d. if anything it can get a bit milder than that as we look at the forecasted to next week, again sunshine and showers around. temperatures could push up to around 15 or 16 degrees in london. that is about 5 degrees above average for the time of year so it is pretty mild with no end in sight. for the showers are expected. that glitters weather, back to you. from next april, thousands of people in england could face hefty taxes when their loved ones die and leave a home or other valuables in their estate. some newspapers have called it a ‘new death tax‘ and paul lewis of radio 4's money box programme has been investigating for us. he joins us now from our london newsroom. good morning. what is this about? it is in effect a new death tax and it will affect as you said anyone who inherits any significant amount of money from april, the estate as it is cold, the money left, the
9:26 am
house and anything else will have to pay a hefty charge for the very basic court permission to sort out the estate it is called a grant of probate. it only applies in england and were and will affect people who are probate is more, the value of the estate is more than £50,000 so just about everyone or a house or flat orfamily just about everyone or a house or flat or family home is just about everyone or a house or flat orfamily home is involved. a typical home and most of the uk the new charge could be £750. in london we re new charge could be £750. in london were average homes are more expensive, half a million, that'll be £10,000 for a family home in london it could be up to £4000. that is quite a chunk out of the estate before it is distributed to their heirs. can you explain how this is linked to inheritance tax? it isn't. you have inheritance tax so if you bequeath something seven years before you die then you don't pay
9:27 am
inheritance tax but... your mac yes. imean inheritance tax but... your mac yes. i mean inheritance taxes affect states that are over 325,000 or in many cases states that are over 325,000 or in many cases nearly £1 million in many cases, many cases nearly £1 million in many cases, so many cases nearly £1 million in many cases, so does not apply, only 25,000 people you have to pay inheritance tax on estate but this new inheritance tax on estate but this new tax will affect about 250,000 estates so it is ten times as many. it is elated to the size of the amount that left so that is why it has been called a tax. the government says most appropriate will never be more than half a percent of the amount left but a percentage of something always sounds a bit like a tax to people so it will affect the errors were at the estates, the amount left in the family all the property and will approve an overblown. it started to open 50 quid and can be as much as 6000 quid to more valuable estates. there is was the argument, if you have more why not pay more?
9:28 am
absolutely people have said that any, but what lawyers have said is that you might argue that if you have what you should pay more but this is just have what you should pay more but this isjust a have what you should pay more but this is just a fee for an administrative process, at the moment it costs a flat fee of £215, and that is roughly what it costs her the ministry —— administration of the process. it is all getting a letter that said you can now get this estates shorted out and they say it is quite unfair when in a of £10,000 on £1 million all costs the ministry ofjustice the same to sort out that they should then be imposing what they say is a tax. there's a hint that they might try and challenge it those grounds. but that would be in the future. from april of things cause we expect this will apply and associated england and wales, scotland and northern ireland keep their own low flat fee, 250, five quid something like that. thank you. go through that and more clarity on money box at midday. have
9:29 am
a good programme. thank you. we will have headlines in a couple of minutes. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. it's 9:30am. here's a summary of this morning's main news... around 70 world leaders are gathering in paris for a weekend of special events to mark 100 years since the end of world war i. president trump arrived there late last night and will hold talks with president macron this morning. here, theresa may willjoin the queen for a festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall this evening. there will be live coverage of the events to mark the centenary across the bbc this weekend. it begins later as huw edwards hosts the festival of remembrance from the royal albert hall tonight at 8.30 on bbc one. from the royal albert hall tonight at 8.30 on bbc one. and tomorrow david dimbleby, dan snow and tina daheley present
9:30 am
live coverage of the service of remembrance from the cenotaph from 10 o'clock. at least nine people have been killed and more than 250,000 have been evacuated from their homes, as three wildfires continue to burn out of control in california. five of those killed were found in their cars in butte county, where the town of paradise has been devastated by the flames. further south, the city of thousand oaks, where a mass shooting claimed the lives of 12 people on wednesday, has also been affected. at least seven people are now known to have died as a result of flash—flooding in jordan. rescue teams and helicopters are searching for five others whose car was swept away following heavy downpours. nearly 4,000 tourists have been evacuated from the ancient city of petra. it comes just two weeks after 21 people — most of them children — drowned in a flood in the dead sea area. the conservative mp jo johnson is being both praised and criticised by members of his own party after quitting as transport minister over the government's brexit plans.
9:31 am
mrjohnson, whose brother boris also resigned from his cabinet post this year, said theresa may's proposals are "a terrible mistake", and called for another referendum. downing street's ruled out another vote. dozens of outfits worn on—stage by the late singer aretha franklin will be sold at auction in new york today. the musician, known as the queen of soul, died in august at the age of 76 after being diagnosed with cancer. she won 18 grammys and sold more than 75 million records during a career which spanned seven decades. do any of those appeal to you, mike? yes, definitely the red number. those are the main stories this morning. time for the sport now. it is it i5a it is a big day today. huge day. new zealand have been dominating england, they have won two of the
9:32 am
te5t5. some have said this is the best ever young all blacks team coming to twickenham. formidable opponents but eddie jones, he loves being the underdog and has role of trying to spoil the party. england have been waiting for four years to face up to the haka again. the last time the haka fought it out with the sound of swing low, sweet chariot at twickenham, the all blacks won, and after england's narrow win over south africa last weekend, co—captain owen farrell is well aware what's to come. what we've got to make sure is that we don't dip our toe into the weekend and feel our way in. we got to make sure we're throwing ourselves into it and are pretty constant throughout the game with that. so, as i said, we've prepared well this week. we're looking forward to it and we can't wait for the game to come now. it's a three o'clock kick—off at twickenham and there's commentary on radio 5 live, plus highlights on bbc two at 7:30pm. now, you have to go back to 2008 to find the last time wales beat australia, and they've lost 13 in a row since then. however, they're on a six—match
9:33 am
winning run after brushing aside scotland last saturday, and head coach warren gatland is keen to put right their torrid record against the wallabies. to be honest, pretty gutted after a few games that we've been in positions to win them and throw those winning positions away and having lost on a number of occasions... we should have beaten australia on quite a few occasions over recent years and we haven't managed to do it. you want to put that ledger right. wales against australia is live on bbc two at five o'clock, but before that, you can watch scotland take on fiji at murrayfield — that's on bbc one at two o'clock. the scots will be glad to be back on home turf — they've won eight games in their last nine there — and losing their opening autumn international against wales last weekend will give them extra impetus today. and the six nations champions ireland are on a nine—game winning run at home, going into their match against argentina.
9:34 am
there's commentary on that one on bbc radio ulster. and flanker sean o'brien is back for the six nations champions ireland, a year after his last cap. we showed exactly the same pictures of him warming up yesterday. i remember because there was a moment when he was running back words and the screen changes behind him. it then looks like he is running for words! it then looks like he is running forwards! england's women crushed the usa 57—5 in the first of their autumn internationals. an early red card effectively ended the usa's challenge, with the roses running in eight tries, including one for katy daley—mclean on her 100th cap. football now... it's going to be an emotional afternoon at the king power stadium, for leicester city's first match since the helicopter crash that claimed the lives of their chairman and four others. thousands of fans are expected to march from the city centre to the stadium before kick—off
9:35 am
against burnley, and the club have announced they plan to honour vichai srivaddhanaprabha with a statue at the ground. we have to honour our chairman and to continue his dream and work for the future. but in this moment, of course, all the different support from everybody is very, very important, and we appreciate a lot, of course. sheffield united missed a penalty and their chance to go top of the championship as the sheffield derby ended goaless. wednesday goalkeeper cameron dawson had a great game, keeping out a host of shots, as well as that penalty. and in the fa cup there was heartbreak in the end for non—league haringey borough, as wimbledon of league one settled their first round tie in the last minute... mitchell pinnock with the goal. later on, the likes of the met police, stockport and billericay town will try to knock out league opposition. dan walker presents football focus live from the met police ground this lunchtime. now, aberdeen have moved up the scottish premiership table thanks to a thunderous strike from gary mackay—steven that gave them a 1—0 victory over hibernian. they're now five points behind the leaders hearts, who play kilmarnock this afternoon.
9:36 am
england winger raheem sterling has become one of the highest paid footballers in the world. his new contract with manchester city will earn him up to 300,000 a week! that's around 1,800 every hour. in fact, in the time it's taken me to bring you this news, he's earned about a tenner! lewis hamilton should be right in the mix in qualifying for the brazilian grand prix. he was fractions off the pace in both opening practice sessions. his afternoon in sao paulo went better than nico hulkenberg's — the renault driver wrecked his car. newly—crowned champion hamilton was just behind his team—mate valtteri bottas in second practice. after england's men beat sri lanka in their opening test match, england's women begin their quest to add the world t20 title to their 50—overs crown later and sri lanka are their first opponents. they're in st lucia, and england captain heather knight knows it's going to be tough. obviously, after winning the 50—over world cup last year, we probably can't expect to be underdogs all the time, like we were going into that competition. we've had to deal with that extra expectation. the success i guess that's expected of the team now. that match starts at 8 o'clock
9:37 am
tonight, and there's commentary on every ball of every game on 5 live sports extra. he stepped up to heavyweight twice to beat david haye and now tony bellew faces his biggest test yet in a world cruiserweight showdown at the manchester arena tonight. he takes on ukranian oleksandr usyk in a bid to become the first british boxer to hold four world titles in a single weight division. we're joined now by the telegraph's boxing correspondent, gareth a davies. morning, gareth. bellew says its his last fight whatever happens, how much of a motivatiion will that be? well, he already has three children with his childhood sweetheart rachel. his opponent alexander luhansk won all four belts in the cruiserweight division and he phoned
9:38 am
up cruiserweight division and he phoned up tony bellew while he was on honeymoon in greece. if he does not make this his last fight, i think he will have the divorce papers! quay has little choice. it is a very difficult fight. this is a man who isa difficult fight. this is a man who is a machine. we saw that in london for the first time at the london 2012 games, you were there, of course. 2012 games, you were there, of course. he was the heavyweight champion. he has just course. he was the heavyweight champion. he hasjust been untouchable as a professional fighter. supposing he does get those belts. boxing is notoriously the type of sport when they tell you we will collect and then they get a lucrative offer and it changes their minds, it is tricky knowing when to go. of course it is. but tony bellew is now going to be 36 in a few weeks' time. he has been through some very hard fights. he has won the world title already at cruiserweight, then he stepped up to fight was two mast locations against
9:39 am
david haye, who had been a world heavyweight champion in the grudge fights, the nastiness. he has made legacy money for his family. yes, of course, it is hard to step away, the big nights and the adrenaline. he calls himself a stal ‘s with a big gob. but he has become very affectionately held by the british boxing fans over the last few years. that adoration and support, how important is that going to be against the sky he had described as against the sky he had described as a robot. at the wien yesterday, tony bellew is normally into shenanigans and getting under people's skin, he is this crazy figure on fight week. he and aleksandar vucic had a hard and a handshake and a high—five yesterday and the board at the moment shouting into the crowd. he
9:40 am
beat his chest leigh howard. he is a rocky balboa story. he comes from kind of very hard working class talk. he has been any rocky movie himself, he has been any hollywood movie. rags to riches, frankly is what he is, tony bellew. he will go out on issue tonight. and if he does win, it will be one of the greatest wins we have seen on british shores. has there ever been a long hair and boxing world champion. roberto duran had the good shock of hair when he was fighting. few and far between now. was fighting. few and far between now. it does not go with the territory. not really. he is asking me, what is it got me about? why is he saying those things? so what is your head saying tonight?” he saying those things? so what is your head saying tonight? i think that alexander lu ha nsk your head saying tonight? i think that alexander luhansk —— oleksandr
9:41 am
usyk will win tonight. i cannot see tony bellevue and boxing him. he has to make it a rough and tumble and making it the kind of fight that naga munchetty will not be able to ms. what is a southpaw phaedra? -- phaedra? it is someone who boxes with the left hand. it is nice that you are also enthusiastic about this. often we have boxers on the sofa who are very nice people. thank you, nice to see you. thank you. chris has been keeping us up—to—date with the weather. what is happening?
9:42 am
hello, we have had a lot of rainfall. you will not need me to tell you that but in wales we have had flooding issues over the last 24 hours, half a month's worth of rain actually. lots of puddles on the road, tricky travelling conditions. most of us have guys like this to begin with, but do not be fooled by the calm, sunny start. it is a beginners on jinan showers the calm, sunny start. it is a beginners onjinan showers and look at those showers just arriving in a cross at those showers just arriving in a cross wales and the south—west of england. it is one of those days when the showers are widespread, most viewers will see one or two murk devenport ‘s for wales and the south—west of england and some will be heavy and dunmurry. quite a lot of spray on the faster routes. tricky to navigate. away from that dry and sunny weather but showers running along the south coast. over time the showers and wales and south—west of england will spread into the south of england and the midlands and we will start to see rain pushing into the west of england later this afternoon. the
9:43 am
north—east of england, not so bad, not so many showers until the end of the day when the risk increases. northern ireland will see showers. that will reach parts of southern scotland, dumfries and galloway looking soggy. a passing shower for the havertz the western isles but staying dry for the north—east of scotland. whenever you are it will be mild, blustery as well. temperatures between 13 and 14 degrees. overnight, more rain, could be heavy and under the across scotland, the imports for the south of england, particularly for the south—west. we could see some passages of localised flooding giving this wet weather. temperatures overnight, 10 degrees in london, mild year, could further north, four, five for edinburgh newcastle. remember on remembrance sunday we have the same area of low pressure and south—westerly winds driving in the downpours. because of
9:44 am
those winds we will see the showers mainly across southern and western parts of the uk. that said, the area of low pressure edges closer to northern ireland for a time. the chances of seeing gene sauers year increases, particularly through the afternoon, some could be heavy and lengthy and nature. another mild day with temperatures between ten and 14 celsius. rather unsettled sunshine and shower regime continues next week, it continues to be mild, temperatures up to 16 degrees in london. at this time of the year it should be around 11 degrees. that is 5 degrees warmer than it should be at this stage of november. mild, plenty of showers to come and over the next few hours they will be particularly heavy cross wales and the south—east of england. back to you. thank you for that come across. enjoy your weekend. time for a look at the papers now. investment managerjustin
9:45 am
urquha rt—stewa rt investment managerjustin urquhart—stewart is investment managerjustin urquha rt—stewa rt is our guest investment managerjustin urquhart—stewart is our guest this morning. good morning to you. the times leads on jo johnson's resignation as transport minister after calling the prime minster‘s brexit strategy a failure. there's also a photo of theresa may honouring the fallen ahead of armistice day. the guardian splashes on the same story and there's a picture of michelle obama, who's released a memoir — she writes about getting help with her marriage and undergoing ivf. often we forget, we know the
9:46 am
horrific numbers of people that were killed. remember our own. but look around the world at the other areas that were affected. there is a percentage of the population, 2.2% in the uk population was killed, horrific. fans, 4.3, but serbia, 16% of the population was killed. and in the ottoman empire, the middle east, we do not think that being involved. sorry to talk over you, we had tessa dunlop talking about this yesterday and she said the same thing, that region is often very much forgotten and she was keen to make sure we remember that. michael morpurgo, he said it was notjust ours. yes, i was in petra earlier this year and we think of them especially with the
9:47 am
flooding at the moment. they had horrific losses. all members of someone's family. scotland has a un envoy. yes, that is going to glasgow. we know that glasgow has some very poor glasgow. we know that glasgow has some very poor areas, glasgow. we know that glasgow has some very poor areas, but incredibly poor areas, and highlighting dad, who helps the poor? it is highlighting that life expectancy in the north of glasgow like craig end i5 the north of glasgow like craig end is ten years shorter than here is that we would know. and coming across a significant percentage of the population who admitted they had not seen that date or that they were in the position of running and food, 40%. look at the food banks, we are aware of that, but actually, at the desperate ends of our society we forget how bad that is. it did point very well made. in amongst the discussions of pro—brexit will affect everyone and the economy more generally, there are certain groups
9:48 am
of people for whom the variations in how will people are doing seems to make no difference at all. we have always known that that has been present and begin to whitewash that and we should remember that on days like this. this one is talking about, i have no idea. it actually shows you, it compares in europe what we are good and bad that. the dutch are least likely to eat fruit and vegetables, i find that highly unlikely. in terms of bruising, guest who is best that the —— drinking lots of buzz, gue55 guest who is best that the —— drinking lots of buzz, guess who is best at that? yes, it is us. very embarrassing. we always tend to come out the worst. did you see that at the bottom, the italians are islamist? yes, the people who gave us islamist? yes, the people who gave u5 past that and consume it in great numbers, very strange. that comes
9:49 am
down to the mediterranean diet. —— —— italians are the slimmest? yes, we are talking about a new vegetable. that seems to be having an effect. it is a root vegetable that was grown here but no one seems to have eaten it here for a long time. it looks a little bit lucky parsnip. you can clean it up and mash it up and it has a licorice taste to it. why have we not been eating it? just fallen out of fashion. it is one that we have not eaten for some time for some strange reason. it is the same as why
9:50 am
carrots are not the original colour. carrots were purple and the dutch king ponder them to orange. —— turned them to orange. we are obsessed with the idea of chocolate bars and biscuits and changing shape and size and all of that. this is a bit ofan and size and all of that. this is a bit of an old grumble. the other half of that picture has the cold alone, remember the gaps in the paul barron? at christmas, your meter of jaffa cakes suddenly gets shorter. gullit i suspect are going to be singular. chocolate orange, they have been shaved slightly with less
9:51 am
elements inside it. that is your tip for the day. see if you can buy that new for the day. see if you can buy that new vegetable as well. always a joy to have you on the sofa. thank you. the time is 9:52am. a century ago, london's corinthian football club was one of the best in the world, but during a tour of brazil in 1914, the first world war broke out. they returned home — dodging torpedo fire en—route — to fight on the battlefields of france. they lost more men than any club in the world. now, 100 years later, the name lives on in two very different corners of the world. corinthian casuals play beside a dual carriageway in london, while corinthians paulista are brazil's most successful club. in a new documentary, the two are brought together in a match neither side will forget. we'll speak to the director in a moment, but first let's take a look. the directorjoins us now. explain
9:52 am
the significance of that? in the line—up are the corinthian casuals, eastern polwarth, and you have danny bracken, a primary school teacher, jamie isa bracken, a primary school teacher, jamie is a scaffold for tooting. playing against the corinthians paulista, the world champions at the time. that is the moment in time now, but take us back to where and why it happened. this extraordinary journey to drizzle. an hundred years ago, the corinthian football club we re ago, the corinthian football club were the first real global icons of foot ball were the first real global icons of football and they are the cloud credited with popularising the game around the world. in 1914, they were going to drizzle wind the first world war broke out and they decided to immediately return home and they did not play the match that they we re
9:53 am
did not play the match that they were scheduled to play in 1914. they came back and the cops are the laws are record number of players in the first world war. so we decided to try and take the modern—day corinthian casuals back to brazil to the those matches that were played 100 years ago. you are a member and there are the corinthian casuals as well. yes, i have been a member since 1999. it got to the point in 2013 when the club is not particularly rich, it is a very pro—club and the chairman was worried about how to pay the bills and all that sort of thing, and i said, well, myjob i5 and all that sort of thing, and i said, well, myjob is primarily in media, could i try and make it on to tell the world the story before it i5 tell the world the story before it is too late? we set about that. that i5 is too late? we set about that. that is the 100 anniversary of the first world war and there is this incredible story in brazil, 13 million fans in brazil from corinthians paulista took to it and we re corinthians paulista took to it and were actually driving force to get it back to the big match in brazil. any club of corinthian casuals, are the family dynasty ‘s and links
9:54 am
between now and then? sadly not. we know of a few that are connected, but sadly not. it has fallen, that i5 but sadly not. it has fallen, that is perhaps the wrong word, but the clu b is perhaps the wrong word, but the club has changed a lot. 100 years ago the club where the greatest team in world and we know we are not that any more. we still have connections but there is no one in the team of that connection. shall we see more of the song? because they had come through oxford or university... the army then appointed a of their officers, they were the leaders of the men. and in french water in the first world war, it was those people that led the men across the line into the charge. it is properly by the corinthians lost more men than any other football club because as officers they were just wiped out. no one at the time understood how that whorwood work—out. no one understood that it was going to be a trench war and no one understood that it was the officers that were
9:55 am
going to be the first over the top. they were the first ones. they were the ones that make the hail of bullets first. we had to ride out the men. that was the role in society. that was the onr. —— that was the honour. they were leading to a certain extent. yes, the corinthians were public school guys and they were the officer class. that is why i think we a record numberof that is why i think we a record number of men. they were the first over the line. it was their duty to be the man. the club was decimated. that call regeneration that took the ball around the world sadly died. can they bring it up to date and this match? how did the tim field? you have not delivered a point, but you have made it clear that corinthians were not successful as
9:56 am
they once were. the problem notjust playing in front of crowd of thousands but when you played in brazil, that was a different story. absolutely, our average attendance i5 absolutely, our average attendance is probably 130 and the played in front of 30,000, two brazilian national televised —— television stations televised game live. we turned the result like the beatles. we we re turned the result like the beatles. we were seen at the airport. we came out of the plane and there was this crowd welcoming u5. out of the plane and there was this crowd welcoming us. it was extraordinary. you actually played a match. give us a ten second summary. do not spoil it. maybe we should not say. letwin 0—0 until 78th minute. that is the perfect place to leave. great tease. it has been great talking to you. good luck with the thumb. that is for us this morning. we will be back tomorrow with the special programme to mark the
9:57 am
armistice day centenary. enjoy your day. it back. —— goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines: after his shock resignation, former transport ministerjo johnson insists he's not seeking the removal of theresa may, but takes another swipe at the prospective brexit deal. in we are not going to get greater sovereignty, we are going to cede sovereignty, we are going to cede sovereignty and lose control over home that night the rules affecting our economy. it is not the british parliament that will gain control. it is the french and german parliament and the european parliament. president trump meets with emmanuel macron for talks in paris — as events continue to mark the centenery of the end of the first world war. this is the scene lies at the early isa this is the scene lies at the early is a power —— believes a palace. driving through the inferno.
9:58 am
9:59 am
10:00 am

32 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on