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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 11, 2018 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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good morning, this is breakfast with naga munchetty at the cenotaph in central london exactly 100 years since the end of world war i as a very special remembrance sunday begins. the battle's over plays. in cities and towns across the world, pipers are sounding the battle's over to mark the end of a conflict that claimed almost 20 million lives. on the 11th hour of the 11th day, the fighting came to an end and exhausted relief turned tojubilation. last post plays.
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last night, the queen led the royal family in a festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall. after four years of war, this was the day a century ago when the guns fell silent. this morning, we'll be live at armistice events across the uk and europ —— across the uk and europe as we reflect on the sacrifice of the fallen. also this morning: the death toll climbs in the california wildfires as m bodies are found in the decimated town of paradise. in sport, over and out for tony bellew. he loses his world title fight and retires from boxing. good morning. the weather today will bea good morning. the weather today will be a mixture again of sunny spells and showers. showers will become quite widespread later on, some of which will be heavy and under b. i will give you a heads up a little later on on where the heaviest of those showers all likely to be. hello and welcome to a special edition of breakfast. we're live here at the cenotaph for remembrance sunday. this year marks 100 years to the day
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since the end of the first world war. it was a truly devastating conflict which claimed the lives of an estimated 20 million people. at 5 o'clock in the morning on the 11th november, 1918, the armistice was signed, bringing about the conclusion of a conflict that had raged not only in the trenches of the western front, but in africa, the middle east and asia. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell has been looking back at that historic day. bell tolls. london at 11 o'clock on monday november 11 1918. as the news spread of the armistice, the crowds came out to celebrate. at buckingham palace, the king george v, appeared on the balcony with queen mary and other members of the royal family. the prime minister, lloyd george,
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went to the house of commons to make a statement. at 11 o'clock this morning, he said, came to an end to the cruellest and most terrible war that has scourged mankind. in many homes and in the trenches on the western front, many said they felt numb, the happiness that the war was over was accompanied the anguish of bereavement. it is thought something light 800,000 british lives had been lost. for like. the nation returned to peace and mourned its dead. the following year to restructure was built on whitehall. it was known as the cenotaph. it was the focal point for a parade attended by many thousands of people that had come from across the united kingdom, some we re from across the united kingdom, some were former soldiers, many others we re were former soldiers, many others were wives and parents who have lost members of their families. they came to place their wreaths and remember. so striking was the impact that a
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decision was taken to rebuild the cenotaph in permanent form as britain ‘s national law more real to war dead. it was unveiled by the king on the second anniversary of the armistice in november 19 20. and in every piece ten year since then in almost unchanging form, the ceremony of remembrance has taken place at the cenotaph. this was 1952, the first year of the queen's rain, and by then the dead of two world wars were being remembered. last year of the first time, the queen watched from a balcony overlooking whitehall, the same thing will happen today. that original armistice which ended the first world war will be recalled. at 11 o'clock on the 11th day of the 11th month, the prince of wales will lead the nation's tribute. nicholas witchell, bbc news. 0vernight, crowds have fallen silent across the commonwealth to commemorate the centenary of the armistice. thousands gathered for a national
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service of remembrance at the australian war memorial in canberra, whilst large crowds also attended new zealand's national war memorial park in wellington. more than 200,000 commonwealth troops were killed in the conflict. here, the main remembrance events started moments ago with a dawn chorus of pipers across britain playing the poignant lament that signalled the end of battle. at the same time, danny boyle's moving tribute to the fallen began. huge portraits of some of those who lost their lives will be etched onto 32 beaches before being washed away by the tide. 11 o'clock is when the guns stopped firing 100 years ago. this morning, the queen will attend the national service of remembrance here at the cenotaph, and two minutes of silence will be observed. then, at 12:30, big ben will lead bells of remembrance across the world. and later this evening, the royal family will attend a special service
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at westminster abbey before more than 1,000 beacons are lit around the uk to symbolise an end to the darkness of war. let's find out a bit more about today. brea kfast‘s graham satchell is at horse guards parade. good morning. we are a couple of 100 yards away from where you are, the cenotaph is behind that building there which is halls gap, this is horse guards parade, and it is here that the veterans and former servicemen and women will gather this morning, probably from around half past eight, nine o'clock —— horse guards. babel then process from here, there will be 9000 of them in total this morning, process from here to the top of whitehall where they will observe the two—minute silence and spend from around 11:30 this morning they will start to process past the cenotaph and going on last year's timings, that process normally takes the best pa rt that process normally takes the best part ofan that process normally takes the best
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part of an hour. there are service men and women who have come from all over the country today to commemorate this, the 100 year anniversary of the end of the first world war and from all over the world, 97—year—old jeff wilkinson was in the raf is coming from san diego in california and the oldest person to process today will be private donald smith who was 98 and he will be with the queen's own highlanders. armistice day, remembrance sunday, an opportunity for civilians like me to commemorate the past but for the service men and women, babel also, of the past but for the service men and women, babelalso, of course, be remembering lost colleagues and friends. —— babel also. —— they will also. around 70 world leaders, including president trump and russian president vladimir putin, will gather for commemorations in paris later. 0ur correspondent mark lowen is there for us. mark, good morning. good morning, i
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hope it is rather warmer where you are at the cenotaph in here in paris where it is a chilly november morning but at the arc de triomphe behind me, it will be the centre of the commemorations today with some 70 or so world leaders and heads of government and state about to join resident macron in the official commemoration of the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month 1918 when the guns fell silent on the western front president. the armistice being signed a few moments earlier at ten minutes past five o'clock at a place in northern france, a forest, where we watched the commemoration yesterday between the commemoration yesterday between the french and german leaders, a poignant image of post—war europe. they will pay homage at the tomb of the unknown soldier at the arc de triomphe but contains the eternal flame and a homage to some of the 10 million soldiers who lost their lives in the four—year war. then later on this afternoon there will be the opening of the paris peace forum, a new three—year and three—day annual event that will be start of a president macron that promotes collaboration, the things
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that he wants to invite into their‘s commemoration. this is not a celebration of what he calls mass slaughter, it is a commemoration to all of those who died and is looking forward to the future of an inclusive europe. mark, thank you. last night, on the eve of armistice day, the queen led members of the royal family in a special festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall. here's sarah campbell. hallelujah plays. 0n the eve of the hundredth anniversary of the 1918 armistice, the audience stood to give thanks to all those who fought and died in the great war. the sounds and stories from conflicts past were played out. 100 years of
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the royal air force celebrated. watching, as she does every year, the queen, surrounded by members of herfamily. the queen, surrounded by members of her family. they came because country called. because they knew it had to be done. but unless they went to fight, there could be no peace. last post plays. thousands of poppy petals, a silent tribute to all those who served and made the ultimate sacrifice. sarah campbell, bbc news. an emotional evening, as much of today will be as well. at 10 o'clock this morning, here on bbc one, david dimbleby, dan snow and tina daheley will bring you coverage of the nation's remembrance sunday commemorations. time now for the rest of the morning's news with chris. good morning to you.
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more bodies have been found in california as the state continues to battle the latest wildfires. the death toll now stands at 25 with the town of paradise almost completely destroyed. officials say the blaze is the state's most destructive in history, although some evacuation orders have been lifted, allowing people to return to their homes. peter bowes has the latest from los angeles. the scale of the devastation is overwhelming. this is all that remains of paradise, a quiet retirement community to the north of sacramento. thousands and thousands of homes reduced to rubble. the brits are strewn with burned—out vehicles were some people were ove 1120 m e vehicles were some people were ove rco m e by vehicles were some people were overcome by the flames trying to escape. others made it but only just. 0h! escape. others made it but only just. oh! oh my god! are my god! —— oh my god!
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iamso i am so scared right now. so terrified. in southern california so many homes to race —— destroyed in homes close to thousand oaks, the city were a gunman went on a rampage earlier in the week killing 12 people in a bar. the authorities are still trying to assess how many homes have been destroyed here, some people have been allowed to return to their neighbourhoods, often not prepared to what they are going to find. there is how the battle for the motorcycle up at the house made it so the motorcycle up at the house made itsoi the motorcycle up at the house made it so i was just coming the motorcycle up at the house made it so i wasjust coming up the motorcycle up at the house made it so i was just coming up the street to see my neighbours and i didn't realise my house is gone too! there has been a lull in the strong winds which have been fanning the fla mes winds which have been fanning the flames at a forecast to pick up speed again and may last until tuesday. the statewide emergency is farfrom tuesday. the statewide emergency is far from over. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. labour's sir keir starmer says the government has no mandate for leaving the eu without a deal.
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writing in the sunday times, the party's brexit spokesman said it would be "politically unsustainable" for the prime minister to deliver a no—deal brexit without the consent of parliament. meanwhile, conservative brexiteers and the dup are warning they couldn't vote for the government's vision of brexit as it currently appears. a downing street source said the government aimed to conclude an agreement as soon as possible, but it would not be at any cost. three men have been arrested following a fatal crash in sheffield which involved a car that was being pursued by police. a 1—year—old boy is among four people who were killed in the incident on friday night. a 3—year—old girl was also taken to hospital with life—threatening injuries. the independent office for police conduct has opened an investigation. the former chief executive of the house—building company persimmon is facing further criticism, despite giving up part of his £75 million bonus following a public outcry. analysis by the bbc has found
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that although jeff fairburn handed back some shares, he held onto the most beneficial stocks. he was forced out of the company last week. it's almost 6:15. good morning to you. the sunday telegraph carries an image of the tower of london which features the silhouette of a world war i soldier and the headline "we shall never forget". the paper also warns that mps are ready to block theresa may's brexit deal with an alliance the observer leads with claims that mrs may faces a "pincer movement" of tory remainers and leavers unhappy with her brexit plan. the paper also features an image of the german and french leaders, angela merkel and emmanuel macron, embracing during an armistice service. the sunday times has an image
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of a world war i soldier and the headline "the guns fall silent 100 years on". the paper also quotes a whitehall source, saying that the eu has turned off the government's "life support" by rejecting mrs may's plan to prevent the uk being trapped, as some see it, in an indefinite customs union. an image from the candlelit vigil at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire dominates the mail on sunday's front page. the headline simply says "remember" as the paper promises the day's commemorations will be "momentous". let's have a look at the inside pages in the sport pages. catters here. a lot of rugby yesterday. i was watching the highlights last
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night. we are still debating a downstairs. the consensus is if you can see the right camera angle, courtney was clearly offside, the try that won the match for england shouldn't have counted, didn't count and therefore england lost by one point but the camera angle is so obscure, it so far away and so hard to see whether or not he was offside. but what a story it would have been. it's been taken as a really poll is —— positive sign. everyone had written them off. there we re everyone had written them off. there were just everyone had written them off. there werejust going to everyone had written them off. there were just going to be trounced. they we re were just going to be trounced. they were within a point, the all blacks absolutely dominant in world rugby. all positive for england. the point is, they didn't really score any points. they got their 15 points and
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that was it. against the all blacks it's tough. but you can't beat the best in the world by not scoring. i think there are positives. but the overall message is that england have made some huge improvements. also a big debt to manchester. the city will be crammed with people in red and blue shirts. this is the message from pep guardiola to his players. keep calm. that is the big game in the premier league today. there is so the premier league today. there is so much rubbish in the sunday papers. also, a huge weekend of remembrance because it is remembrance because it is remembrance sunday. leicester have been holding their own remembrance service in a way. a very kind of serious an almost religious feel to it. the owner of leicester was
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remembered yesterday. it was their first home game since that horrific helicopter crash in a very sombre moment with thousands of fans marching. really emotional scenes at the stadium yesterday. let's check in on the weather. chris is here. we see that naga is in possession of an umbrella at the cenotaph. how is it looking? she is going to need that umbrella. another showery kind of day. sunshine, yes, but there will be plenty of rainbows. this, is ca ptu red be plenty of rainbows. this, is captured yesterday over the skies of saint leonards. a bit of a dog ‘s dinner. quite a mess. showers pushing northwards. that's what's bringing the rain across the central
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london —— central london area but the rain is or is going to be heavy across wales. we do have some showers working northwards across scotland. some heavy rain per wales, north—west england are plenty of heavy downpours further east stretching across the midlands, moving away from the london area. the weather will improve the time in the south before further heavy showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon across wales and particularly southern coastal counties of england. northern ireland, not entirely getting away with it. a few early morning showers, showers late in the day could affect western counties but the scotland, early morning showers. his band of rain will be affecting southern and eastern areas were the rain could be heavy and thundery at times so that the changeable day. also moulding quite windy. overnight, further showers will continue to roll in, particularly
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across western and southern areas of the uk. further downpours on and off through the night. temperatures by and large similarto through the night. temperatures by and large similar to what we had last night. around five and 10 celsius. for much of the week ahead, low pressure to the north and west of the uk. that will maintain the south—westerly wind and the risk of further hefty showers. it will stay on the mild side. as the wins for later in the week, we may see some fog patches start to develop as the weather turns quieter. monday, another showery day. there will be gaps between those showers. we are looking at some sunny spells in those temperatures stay on the mild side. 1a degrees in london. it should be about 11 degrees. if anything, over the next few days, those temperatures will be rising.
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that's how the weather is shaping up. we will go to naga in the cenotaph were we are seeing the use ofan umbrella. cenotaph were we are seeing the use of an umbrella. but hopefully the weather will improve for her over the next hour or so. in 1919, a year after the first world war ended, thousands of people came here to the cenotaph to remember those who lost their lives, since then generations have continued to come and pay their respects. to discuss this, i'm joined by the historian, kate williams. let's just think back to the end of the war. that moment. it was five o'clock in the morning, the armistice was signed and 11 o'clock when the guns fell and the fighting stopped. how is that celebrated? five o'clock, the armistice was signed and there was fighting which continued, then 11 o'clock when the time sounded, it was all over for the war across the world and in the
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streets, here in london and the big cities, all across britain, absolutely joyous cities, all across britain, absolutelyjoyous celebrations. people were overjoyed. it's recorded the trams didn't work because people we re the trams didn't work because people were so the trams didn't work because people were so excited they didn't go to work but on the fighting front, the western front, the men were almost too shocked to celebrate. they were emotionally drained. they talked to the germans, they shook hands and bowed but it's almost as if they we re bowed but it's almost as if they were overwhelmed with what they saw was the future of reconstruction. jubilation to some extent but also exhaustion. accurate home, the socio—economic situation was quite bleak. struggling to understand what the future held. they had been living with rations and poverty, a struggle on the home front to survive. i don't think there's a single family in this country that
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wasn't touched by what had happened, what was going on, there was great suffering so people were joyous and jubilant and thrilled at the other side of the coin, how are we going to survive? they knew there was huge reconstruction to be done across europe. we should talk about the role that women played in the war. there was great support back at home. initially the government was quite resistant to using women in the war. but when full conscription was brought in, it was accepted that women were needed. they set up to assist the army, the navy, the air force. they did all kinds of incredibly important jobs, signalling, organisation and we have to remember the incredible bravery of the female ambulance drivers, driving the wounded man, and the bravery of the women on the western front across the fonts, and here at
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home and they were working in all kinds ofjobs that they had never worked in the fourth and they really kept the country going, kept the world going. this is a great time to talk about one woman in particular, particularly poor ignorant, grace jones is the oldest person in britain, 112 and was just a schoolgirl when world war i broke out. she vividly remembers the euphoria of the war ending, and the pain of losing her brother. david garmston went to meet her. lovely to meet you. this is grace jones, the oldest lady in the united kingdom at 112 years. i went to see her at her home in the cotswolds. that's my father and that is me. she is one of the very few with personal memories of 1914, when war was declared. i can remember people saying the war had started and people crying and then, of course,
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it was the husbands or boyfriends, they had to go to war. the conflict touched every family, including grace's. her brother thom signed up and served in gallipoli. there are no surviving pictures of the dashing young man who went to war. he was a lovely brother. he was in australia when the war started. i can always remember, my father had a letter saying that he should join up. he joined up and he was killed. that was a very sad time. 100 years ago
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this weekend, on november the 11th, the nation erupted in relief as the guns fell silent and grace was there on that first armistice day. people with union jacks, screaming on that first armistice day. people with unionjacks, screaming and laughing. singing. my eldest sister took me down to where the cars were, and to see the people dancing all in the road, and on the tram cars, the open ones, singing away. it was lovely. i remember that. gracejones talking there and remembering. it's so important to hear stories and hear the memories of people like grace 100 years on. a whole generation. it's so important
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to hear from whole generation. it's so important to hearfrom grace and whole generation. it's so important to hear from grace and what she went through and suffered, that brilliant footage you were showing of the joy and excitement but also the a cce pta nce and excitement but also the acceptance that things were going to change and that is so much of the point today, but we are celebrating the war, the end of the war and the sacrifice. it was war that people expected to be over by christmas. sacrifice. it was war that people expected to be over by christmasm was called the great war, seen as the war to end all wars. the many people who crop in the book taurean period, it was something that happened overseas. conscription, the home front, there were attacks on people in britain, it was a real shock. people suddenly realised what they had in terms of what they thought was security was gradual. it
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was a movement towards fragility. what happens is, there is incredible optimism and feeling. putting an end to war forever. we will be talking to war forever. we will be talking to you throughout the morning. we should tell you what's going on here at london. police getting the area ready will see prince charles with commemorations outside the cenotaph. processions throughout the country as well. chris will have the headlines with you shortly. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason in the studio and naga munchetty at the cenotaph. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. events are already taking place to mark 100 years to the day since the end of the first world war. the battle's over plays.
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at 6 o'clock, pipers at locations across the uk and around the world, including lichfield and ayr, performed ‘battle's o'er', a traditional song played at the end of conflicts. overnight, crowds have fallen silent across the commonwealth to commemorate the centenary of the armistice. thousands gathered for a national service of remembrance at the australian war memorial in canberra, whilst large crowds also attended new zealand's national war memorial park in wellington. more than 200,000 commonwealth troops were killed in the conflict. last night, on the eve of armistice day, the queen led members of the royal family in a special festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall. the dukes and duchesses of cambridge and sussex, along with the prime minister joined the audience. poppies fell from the ceiling as the last post was played to commemorate those killed in the war. here, the main remembrance events started moments ago
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with a dawn chorus of pipers across britain playing the poignant lament that signalled the end of battle. at the same time, danny boyle's moving tribute to the fallen began. huge portraits of some of those who lost their lives will be etched onto 32 beaches before being washed away by the tide. 11 o'clock is when the guns stopped firing 100 years ago. this morning, the queen will attend the national service of remembrance here at the cenotaph and two minutes of silence will be observed. then, at 12:30, big ben will lead bells of remembrance across the world. and later this evening, the royal family will attend a special service at westminster abbey before more than 1,000 beacons are lit around the uk to symbolise an end to the darkness of war. at 10 o'clock this morning, here on bbc one, david dimbleby, dan snow and tina daheley will bring you coverage of the nation's remembrance sunday commemorations. more bodies have been found in california as the state continues to battle the latest wildfires. the death toll now stands at 25
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with the town of paradise almost completely destroyed. officials say the blaze is the state's most destructive in history, although some evacuation orders have been lifted, allowing people to return to their homes. labour's sir keir starmer says the government has no mandate for leaving the eu without a deal. writing in the sunday times, the party's brexit spokesman said it would be "politically unsustainable" for the prime minister to deliver a no—deal brexit without the consent of parliament. meanwhile, conservative brexiteers and the dup are warning they couldn't vote for the government's vision of brexit as it currently appears. a downing street source said the government aimed to conclude an agreement as soon as possible, but it would not be at any cost. three men have been arrested following a fatal crash in sheffield which involved a car that was being pursued by police. a 1—year—old boy is among four people who were killed in the incident on friday night. a 3—year—old girl was also taken to hospital with life—threatening injuries. the independent office for police conduct has opened an investigation. the former chief executive
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of the housebuilding company persimmon is facing further criticism, despite giving up part of his £75 million bonus following a public outcry. analysis by the bbc has found that althoutheff fairburn handed back some shares, he held onto the most beneficial stocks. he was forced out of the company last week. that is a full round—up of the news at 6:33. kat's here with the sport. interesting developments overnight. it also happens later night and it is difficult for us who have to get up is difficult for us who have to get up early to follow but tony bellew, thatis up early to follow but tony bellew, that is how his entire career finishes. he will not be remembered for that moment because he has had a fairytale career, culminating in him starring in one of the rocky movies.
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the man from liverpool has had a glowing 20—year career but last night, a great free was too powerful. it was the sheer strength required of tony bellew to concentrate because he is so tactically kind of clever —— oleksandr usyk. but in the end, he was in it for the first four rounds or so was in it for the first four rounds orso and was in it for the first four rounds or so and then it was the big punch from oleksandr usyk that floored him and that was it. tony bellew knocked out in the eighth round of his world title fight last night at the manchester arena. oleksandr usyk, the 2012 olympic gold medallist, had brought all four of his belts with him. it would have been the perfect end to bellew‘s career if he'd upset the odds to claim them, but he confirmed immediately after the fight that he's now retired from boxing. after being on the right side of a narrow match last week, england were just beaten by new zealand in a captivating autumn international at twickenham. our sports editor dan roan was there. new zealand represents the ultimate
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test in rugby, perhaps in all of sport, but it was clear twickenham was in no mood to be intimidated. the haka, symbol of all—black potency, defiantly drowned out amid the downpour. not to six years had england's tasted victory against the all blacks up with in two minutes they were ahead, winger chris aston celebrating his recall to the team in perfect fashion. england however we re in perfect fashion. england however were not satisfied, an unstoppable ball ending with dylan hartley crashing over. 15— the rate down the world's no i in team was rattled by the response was inevitable, bowden ba rrett‘s the response was inevitable, bowden barrett's sleight of hand putting damien mckenzie through, game on. momentum had shifted, new zealand claiming the lead after the restart through the boot of barrett. but in a tight match and with time running out, it was england who appeared to have made the decisive breakthrough, a charge down by courtney laws picked up by the superb sam underhill. but as twickenham
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celebrated, the referee looked again, the trai eventually disallowed for offside. england cruelly denied what would have been a historic victory. new zealand win again, albeit byjust one point. but what was expected of england coming into these autumn internationals amid poorform into these autumn internationals amid poor form and into these autumn internationals amid poorform and plenty of injuries. the pressure was mounting on coach eddie jones injuries. the pressure was mounting on coach eddiejones but after beating south africa and the performance against new zealand to build on, the mood among the team and their fans has lifted. dan roan, bbc news, twickenham. so many positives for england to ta ke so many positives for england to take from that. it was a great day for wales, who kicked their way to a first win over australia in a decade. the wallabies had won all of the last 13 tests between the sides, but dan biggar‘s late penalty wasjust enough to edge what was a nerve—shredding match. scotland were far too strong for fiji. the visitors made a positive start but eventually faded away and were well beaten 54—17, tommy seymour scoring a hat—trick of tries for the home side. leicester city played their first home match since the death of the club's owner and four others
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in a helicopter crash two weeks ago. many supporters marched to king power stadium to pay their respects to vichai srivaddhanaprabha. after the premier league game against burnley, which ended in a 0—0 draw, the players walked around the pitch applauding the fans. elsewhere, southampton continue to struggle — although they felt hard done by following a 1—1 draw with watford. this charlie austin goal would have put them 2—0 up but it was ruled out, much to his dismay. it's ridiculous. that should have been the game. get a point, we scored a perfectly good game, we should have been 2—0, done and dusted. explain, can you explain why the goal was disallowed ? dusted. explain, can you explain why the goal was disallowed? he says offside, twice it hit me and that is why i don't foster it is a joke, all the officials out, clearly they need
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help, clearly we play in the premier league, the most watched leak in the world, give them all the help they need because clearly it cost them two points today it is a joke. need because clearly it cost them two points today it is a jokem need because clearly it cost them two points today it is a joke. it is good to see a player with a bit of passion, isn't it? newcastle united are on a good run and are pulling clear of the relegation places. salomon rondon scored twice as they beat bournmouth 2—1 — his first goals for the club. and how about this for a winner? sol bamba snatching a last—minute win for cardiff city over brighton. just cardiff's second win of the season, but they're still in the bottom three. chaos! as are huddersfield, who couldn't quite follow up their first premier league win of the season with another. alex pritchard put them in front against west ham before felipe anderson scored a late equaliser for the visitors. the big match in the premier league today comes from the etihad stadium as manchester city host manchester united. the derby is always a huge match for the fans but both pep guardiola and jose mourinho are playing down its importance at this stage of the season. of course the games against the
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contenders are special because if you win they don't win but we're in november so maybe the game in old trafford will be, will decide, is more important than this one, but of course we are in a good run. if you want to put that much into the context of where we are, where we can be, then it becomes even more difficult so ijust want to play the match as an isolated event, difficult match against a very difficult match against a very difficult team, but i think they think it is an easy match for them. they always play down but i know i will be watching this afternoon. england's opening match of the women's world twenty20 was a complete washout. the game against sri lanka in st lucia was abandoned without a ball being bowled, meaning both sides get a point. look at the weather! look at the outfield! england's next game is against bangladesh tomorrow. a shame because they would have been
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expected to beat some —— shall i go and pick up some points. more than just one point. it's the brazilian grand prix this evening and lewis hamilton, as he has for half the races this season, will start from pole position. the newly crowned 5—time world champion just pipped sebastian vettel in sao paolo, although vettel driver is expected to have the better pace in the race. it was a tough qualifying session and obviously the weather was going up and obviously the weather was going up and down and we didn't know what to expect but obviously ferrari are incredibly quick this weekend and a lot of work on the background with my engineers to make sure we got the ca i’s my engineers to make sure we got the cars to the best place we could. my engineers to make sure we got the cars to the best place we couldlj think you will enjoy this, chris. great britain's elliott browne took the silver medal at the tumbling world championships in russia. wouldn't you just? i dream of being able to do this. he won a world bronze last year. do you ever look at a hotel corridor
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and looked down the length of a... it is my dream to do consecutive backflips all the way down a hotel corridor. you wonder if the competitors think as they are walking to the bus stop i could do a spot of training down the pavement. just what they can do with their bodies is unbelievable. it is definitely a sport that has its name firmly on the tip. tumbling. you know exactly what you are getting. cheers. speak to you later on. our focus this ourfocus this morning is our focus this morning is the commemorations100 years on from the end of world war i. around 9,000 veterans will attend a special parade to honour those who served and fell in battle. brea kfast‘s graham satchell is at the horse guards parade for us this morning. good morning, graham. morning, chris. it is here that the veterans will be gathering this morning from around about eight o'clock, we
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think, before they process up to the top of whitehall for the two—minute silence and then they will march past the cenotaph and that will take 9000 of them will take around one hour or so. i have two former service people here with me, both of whom were in the royal navy, good morning. morning. we have ever burns. and so we dream. —— emma burns. —— zoe green. burns. and so we dream. —— emma burns. -- zoe green. i was a weapons officer tom at first joined as a reserve and then went on to hollywood to training in the services. both of you i know have family connections to the first world war and obviously this being the 100 year anniversary, the first world war very much in our minds this morning so tell us about your family connections. the great uncle and he was charles henry goodwin and he was a drummer boy in the world
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warand he was a drummer boy in the world war and what we do know is he sadly passed away in belgium. that is all we really know about him. he was 16? it was too young to sign up. that is why he was classed as a drummer boy and he apparently went over the hurricane, when he shouldn't have done, and he didn't come home. lost in action. what about you? my great—grandfather, he was progressive in the fact that he did not blame anybody, he just thought it was politicians. he came back wounded, missing limbs, but he brought up my mothers i got to his stories from her about his life. the full horror of what happened in the first world war i think has been relieved, hasn't it, this year, because there has been programmes and commemorations. do you think that today, people do fully appreciate what happened now in world war i? i think so, it is important what went on in world war land important what went on in world war
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i and world important what went on in world war land world war two and what is still going on at the moment and we still going on at the moment and we still have service men and women serving today as well which is why iti serving today as well which is why itlam serving today as well which is why it lam marching today. serving today as well which is why it i am marching today. do you think that, it is interesting when the quys that, it is interesting when the guys came that, it is interesting when the guys came back from the first world war that a lot of them were ostracised and were not allowed jobs. i do not know what they would make of this today. i great—grandfather was convinced that nobody would remember them so in a way, i think it would be pleased that they are remembered without celebrating war. it is very much a commemoration. do you think that is the thing today? the fact that these people went to google war and lay down their lives. like emma said it is celebrating that they came home. we are in the world they are in today because of that. you have done this comely times before? once or twice, yes. you're on time? and this is your first time? you can twice, yes. you're on time? and this is yourfirst time? you can explain what it is like and what it means? one of the things i love about the
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march past is people remember those who are left behind and those who died and it is seeing people that you have not seen in a long time and amazed that we are all still alive and it is sombre and the fact that we are remembering who has been lost but also who is still here. and it is that camaraderie that you cannot beat. i know that you are both with the charity help for heroes. how has that been? it's really hard, having that been? it's really hard, having that come rather read and not having it there any more. it gives you the feeling back, and there are a lot of events see can meet other service personnel, you can feel like you're pa rt personnel, you can feel like you're part of a community still and that's really important, especially when days can be hard, typically backup again when you are in it together so help for heroes has been very
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important. this doesn't feel like the 100- important. this doesn't feel like the 100— year anniversary. important. this doesn't feel like the 100- year anniversary. we will still remember that people who have gone before us and remembering those who are still here with us and l think to end that would be a defeat, ina sense, think to end that would be a defeat, in a sense, because we would eventually forget them. that's why i've done it so many times. i feel pa rt of i've done it so many times. i feel part of something. when you leave the forces, that can end. thank you very much. ifeel like i want the forces, that can end. thank you very much. i feel like i want to say something, enjoying the day, i'm not sure that is the right word. the veterans will be gathering here, 9000 of them before they had to whitehall. back to you, chris. we will speak too late to ron. this is the scene in folkestone, one of the 32 beaches across the uk where huge portraits of some of the people killed
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in the first world war will be etched into the sand, before being washed away. it's called the pages of the sea project, and it's the brainchild of the director danny boyle. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. we are looking at another unsettled day. the broad picture, quite similarto at another unsettled day. the broad picture, quite similar to what we had yesterday when we spotted lots of these rainbows. so my picture, a bit of a dog ‘s dinner. areas of showers pushing northwards. that is a trough, and it's bringing areas of rain. probably what would happen, it will get the rain working across wales and north—west england.
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heading across to lincolnshire and east anglia. the rain will clear through followed by some sunshine but as we head into the afternoon, wales and southern counties of england will see further downpours and those showers will be quite frequent across parts of sussex in kent. the risk of some sun under. we will see a band of heavy rain working into scotland is the day goes by. much of the day, northern scotla nd goes by. much of the day, northern scotland not seen to me showers, the weather largely dry hair. we will see some sunshine at times. brisk winds and mild. urbanites not come with the south—westerly winds continue to blow across the country, further showers coming and going across western and southern areas. some of showers will turn out to be quite heavy, particularly near irish sea coasts. the bit colder across
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more northern areas. the much of the week ahead, low pressure is going to be to the north—west of the united kingdom. what that means is, will continue to feed in those showers, particularly across the north and west and it will stir on the mild side. we'll see some sunshine but later on in the week, we may fog developed. monday looks like this. another showery day. showers, developed. monday looks like this. anothershowery day. showers, heavy in bunbury, blowing across the skies quickly thanks to the brisk winds. the greater threat of seeing showers into northern ireland. temperatures 12-14 into northern ireland. temperatures 12— 14 degrees. it is mild and the mild theme, temperatures in london will peak at 16 later this week. it should be about 11 degrees at this time of year. that's how the latest weather is looking. it is back to you, chris. good to see temperatures in the teens at this time of year.
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some other events. big ben will sound 11 times. it will sound a further 11 times at 1230 with bells across the uk and the world to mark the end of the first world war. around 1,400 bell ringers were killed during the conflict. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been to a church in dorset to meet a woman who is carrying on a family tradition. the bells have been ringing out from the towers of st mary ‘s church in the towers of st mary ‘s church in the dorset town of bridport for centuries but just over the dorset town of bridport for centuries butjust over 100 years ago, during the great war, the bellringers lost one of their own. we was up here two days after we landed and i can assure you, it is a rack and ruin its place, everything smashed to smithereens. debbie
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follett is reading a letter from a foreign field, one of many written by her uncle, william hardman. he fought in france and greece but was killed in palestine. 1400 bellringers died during the first world war and the campaign has been under way to replace them with the same number of new ringers, people like debbie who did they stand in the same place where her great uncle used to ring. it's very emotional, it really is. it is with the past andi it really is. it is with the past and i think it's very important to keep those links and to keep the tradition is going. i am only a beginner. i will do my bit and hopefully i'll do it well and if they are looking down, i hope they'd be proud of me. this is a summary at the end of the quarter... the tower captain, as he's known, shows me the church's records which date back to the 19th century and include details
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of debbie's great uncle and also a record of how his bell ringing friends commemorated his death. half muffled peal was wrong for her late father, corporal hardman, who lost his life at the front in palestine. we put a full on one side of the clapper so we get this clear ring and a muffled ring and ifind it very moving. to me, it the dead talking to the living. it's a gentle ring and then a clear ring, it's lovely and we ring it for remembrance service is specially. today, st mary ‘s willjoin with bell towers across the country as they all, in unison, ring to one remembrance day, a momentous occasion that will bring together friends, communities and families, both from the present and from the past. and that's all there is to it. john maguire, bbc news, dorset. this
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is the view of the cenotaph in central london. naga is there for us all morning. it's clearing up a little bit today ahead of all the commemorations and processions taking place here and of course across europe as we remember 100 years since the armistice. thousands of people came and since then, generations came to pay their respects. we talk to kate williams, the historian. its appointment date, 100 years on. —— it is a poignant day. it's an incredibly poignant day. it's an incredibly poignant day. it's an incredibly poignant day. it's very hard to get exact records but we do estimate that about 10 million soldiers were
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killed across the world and empire soldiers and everything, but were caught up in the war, and we estimate about 8 million civilians so the toll it took on people across the world is almost unimaginable.“ we break down those who were involved in the war, a remarkable number of young men were on the front. when the call came out when the war broke out for young men to volunteer voluntarily, we did have a huge amount of young men, and the actual age was 19. we estimate about 250,000 of the british army, a huge contingent were under 19 and in fa ct, contingent were under 19 and in fact, the first british soldier killed in world war i was actually a young man who was just 17. killed in world war i was actually a young man who wasjust17. we'll talk more about the programme, thank you. one of the most famous stories of the great war is when on christmas day 1914, british and german soldiers had a brief truce and had
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a game of football. what is less known is that while the men were away fighting, many women began playing the beautiful game. hayley hassall has been finding out more. the last post plays. what an honour and privilege it is to be part of this huge, huge occasion. the last post plays. football and war is inextricably linked then and it is now. thousands of people have come here today to see these women. they are all members of the royal armed forces and today they are playing a football match. why? because that's exactly what hundreds of women did during world war i. during world war i. during world war i. during world war i, as women were called upon to do factory jobs i, as women were called upon to do factoryjobs in place of the men who had gone to fight, they also filled the boots of the football players. but after the men returned home on the fifth of december 1921, the
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football association banned women from playing on fa — affiliated pictures which means the girls teams could no longer play on grounds of spectators. the fa at the time said the game of football is not suitable for females the game of football is not suitable forfemales and the game of football is not suitable for females and ought not be encouraged. it wasn't until 1971 the ban was lifted following the formation of the women's football association. just to give you some context of how popular these matches were, when the ladies from preston played saint helen ‘s on boxing day in1918, played saint helen ‘s on boxing day in 1918, they had a crowd of 53,000 people. today's men's matches at everton dashed everton pull an average of about 36 county and here at notts county, they get about 7000 per match so clearly the nation were behind these women's efforts and they were behind them in their thousands. all those years ago, all those people who came out and supported, it's lovely to see the game evolve into that to happen,
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while i'm still alive. can we draw those kind of attendances? what have got to do is, keep raising standards in pushing boundaries. got to do is, keep raising standards in pushing boundarieslj got to do is, keep raising standards in pushing boundaries. i will let you get back to watching the game. i'm missing it. finds a great finish back into the corner. becker is on side. this is a great chance. and the honoured go to the german women. it was a disappointing match for the british army but the point was to remember what happened 100 years ago. this play‘s grandfather served in the army. it was great to have an opportunity to follow in his footsteps. let me tell you what's happening
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here, as a map type —— outside the cenotaph in central london. big ben's chimes, which have been reactivated to the day, will sound 11 chimes at 11 o'clock and then again at 12:30pm and will lead chiming across the world. two minute silence will be observed when that concludes, prince charles will lay a wreath, the first traditional poppy wreath, the first traditional poppy wreath at the cenotaph. veterans are going to march past year at 11:30 a.m.. and of course, there will be a people's recession, 10,000 members of the public chosen at random will be marching past the cenotaph. the royals, leading politicians, with
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much more coverage for you on bbc brea kfast much more coverage for you on bbc breakfast throughout the morning. headlines coming up. good morning, this is breakfast with naga munchetty at the cenotaph in central london exactly 100 years since the end of world war i as a very special remembrance sunday begins. the battle's over plays. in the past hour in cities and towns across the world, pipers have sounded the battle's over to mark the end of a conflict that claimed almost 20 million lives. bells toll. on the 11th hour of the 11th day, the fighting came to an end and exhausted relief turned tojubilation. last post plays. last night, the queen led the royal family in a festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall.
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