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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 11, 2018 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

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beach he had once left to meet war and death. for wilfred owen, what had been a shoreline of embarkation, this morning became a canvas of commemoration. the project has been organised by the film director danny boyle, who says that the face is a metaphor for tragedy. look, it is wonderful that there are permanent structures that will outlive and outlast us, but i thought it was a good way to reflect on our own time here. you know, which is temporary, really. as the tide ebbed away, 30 artists crafted the contours of the face. hundreds of people lined the shore to take in the imagery and the symbolism. it feels very much like he is here and he is alive and he is, as you say, representing so many people, really special. really special. people. very special. the stairs of the fall and gazed out from the beaches also. in scotland, captain
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charles sorley, in northumberland, private william jonas, who perished at the somme. and in five, doctor elsie inglis who helped wounded soldiers. eventually, the waters of inpatient tides rolled in across each face, like the tears of a lost generation. masked by the waves, but enduring in memory. duncan kennedy, bbc news. that's it. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel, and i'll be back with the late news at 10.30. now on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. bye for now. good evening. i'm simon mccoy at the cenotaph. the headlines at 5pm: got engaged in this.
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prince charles laid a wreath at the cenotaph on behalf of her majesty the queen, followed by senior politicans and members of the armed forces — including the german president — for the first time. translation: long live peace among peoples and states. long live the free nations of the world. long live friendship among peoples. long live france. areas in the north of england. engines were switched off and the l45s flew 20,000 feet over the capital. i'm lukwesa burak. the other stories on bbc news: 25 people are now known to have died in wildfires in northern california. firefighters are still trying to bring them under control. two of the four people who died
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in a crash in sheffield are named as adnan ashraf jarral and his one—year—old usman. good evening from the cenotaph in whitehall in london. war veterans have taken part in a procession past the cenotaph in london to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of the first world war. earlier, the prince of wales and senior politicians laid wreaths at the monument — watched by the queen and other members of the royal family. millions of people across the uk observed a two minutes' silence. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell looks back at the day 100 years ago when the guns fell silent. the cenotaph this morning as the
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nation prepared to mark the time the century go win at 11am, the war ended. 800,000 or so british lives had been lost. it was in their remembrance that the cenotaph was originally constructed. and in timeless fashion and largely unchanging form, the ceremony of remembrance has taken place in whitehall in every peacetime year since. on this more than usually significant day of remembrance, the nation's leaders took their places around the cenotaph, led by the prince of wales. as was the case last year, the queen watched from a balcony above as big ben signalled the start of the national two minutes' silence in memory of all those from britain and the commonwealth who lost their lives in war. big ben chimes the hour.
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music: last post. in whitehall, after the last post sounded by royal marine buglers, the prince of wales placed the queen's wreath of poppies against the cenotaph‘s northern face. and then, for the first time, a german wreath was laid at the cenotaph by germany's head of state, president steinmeier. 100 years after the end of the first world war, in which an estimated two million germans lost their lives, an historic gesture of reconciliation. after the politicians, it was the turn of the veterans to march past and lay their wreaths.
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today, the collective remembrance was for those who never came home from a terrible world war which ended 100 years ago. nicholas witchell, bbc news, at the cenotaph. in a special tribute today, there was a departure from the normal armistice commemorations. the cenotaph saw 10,000 members of the public file past the memorial, to show their thanks to those who served in what was thought to be the war to end all wars. daniela relph joined those who took part in the people's procession. 10,000 people, some with military connections but many with none at all. united in a desire to take part in the public over members. it was an event that lacks formality but was filled with personal touches. the homemade wreaths to be laid at
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the cenotaph. descendents were in the cenotaph. descendents were in the middle of those long gone and the middle of those long gone and the family photos of a generation who fought and often did not come home. in 100 years' time, none of us are going to be able to do it again so are going to be able to do it again so it feels very special to be here. if we don't remember, there will be i'io if we don't remember, there will be 110 one if we don't remember, there will be no one else to remember. especially the next generation. having members of the family who served in both world wars and lost them, and serve myself. an honour to be here today. there is a rhythm to remembrance sunday that is so familiar but this is something quite different, a procession for the people, all of whom are walking to remember. the last time there was a people's procession was 1919. then, thousands walked past the cenotaph to pay their respects. just like today, as this peoples procession near the end, the wreaths laid at whitehall. coming
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together for a wreaths laid at whitehall. coming togetherfor a single wreaths laid at whitehall. coming together for a single purpose... i've enjoyed talking to everybody, hearing from everybody, talking about everybody's hearing from everybody, talking about eve rybody's stories. hearing from everybody, talking about everybody's stories. and the people's possessions has left its mark. each wreath meeting in memory of someone lost. in paris, leaders from across the globe gathered at the arc de triomphe for the centenary commemorations, with the french president emmanuel macron urging them to build hope for the future, rather than playing on fear. he said the scars of the first world war were still visible on the face of the world. lucy williamson reports now, as europe remembers its sacrifice. this was a world war the world came to honour. 70 heads of state and government gathered at the arc de triomphe today, a united nations of
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murmurings. a reminder with nationalism rising once again that piece is not made alone. translation: patriotism is the opposite of nationalism. nationalism is treason. if we think our interest thumpers and do not care for others committed treason of our values. the trail of all moral values. at the tomb of the unknown soldier, mr macron provided the flame over members before leading the nation in a moment of silence. —— the flame of remembrance. the sounds and symbols of this anniversary echoed across the world. in the belgian town of ypres, the ceremony ended with the fall of poppies. this is a very special place to remember. i feel proud that there are names of sikhs
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up proud that there are names of sikhs up there who sacrificed themselves in the first floor. -- in the first world war. in paris, the commemorations also marked a new beginning, in animal piece form spearheaded by mr macron —— in annual piece for him. a recall to the diplomacy. notjust about the past but the present—day challenges faced by leaders here. new threats, new divisions, the ghosts of future wars. the only prominent guests to excuse himself from the peace summit, donald trump. across paris, another much smaller, angrier international gathering. to protest his presence here at all. we call him a proto— fascist. he is triggering a lot of nationalist movement in the united states and all of the world as well. as dusk
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fell, british and commonwealth vetera ns, fell, british and commonwealth veterans, survivors a fell, british and commonwealth veterans, sui’vivoi’s a more fell, british and commonwealth veterans, survivors a more recent conflicts, held a service of her member is inside the cathedral of notre dame. across europe, both governments and government reflect on their history and the role of individuals in world peace, world war. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. the scene there in europe. today's ceremonies were watched by people in towns and cities around the uk — all of whom played their own part in world war i. men from the lancashire town of accrington and places nearby enlisted together. the accrington pals, one of the first volunteer battalions raised in the early months of the first world war. it suffered devastating losses on the first day of the battle of the somme. adina campbell reports on a town's sacrifice. with the rain beating down on one of lancashire's most imposing war memorials, hundreds of people young
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and old circled accrington cenotaph to remember lives lost. and 100 yea rs to remember lives lost. and 100 years on from that armistice day in 1918... years on from that armistice day in 1918. .. taking shelter under a sea of umbrellas, side by side to this community paid its respects. ijust i just feel really ijust feel really bad the soldiers have died for us, and grateful. it's representing them. thanking them for what they did. we come from an army background, and my brother was killed in ireland when he was 21 years of age. and for former serviceman, today was even more poignant. i became aware of the significance of the losses in this town in the accrington pals, and the interest
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group throughout my military career. and it's only now when i got time i can adequately honour them. he ward eight have also been commemorated in church. 0verlooked by these tiny silhouettes, a symbol of remembrance. this is a community which suffered devastating losses. of the more than 1000 men who enlisted and took part in a farewell service in this church, more than 850 never return. they made the ultimate sacrifice, a sacrificed this town says it will never forget. adina campbell, bbc news, accrington. today's commemorations saw a unique memorial to those who lost their lives, with portraits of servicemen and women etched into the sand along britain's coastline. among the areas paying beach tributes to the fallen, was folkestone in kent, from where duncan kennedy reports. the piercing eyes of a celebrated war poet, today etched onto the very beach he had once left
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to meet war and death. for wilfred 0wen, a shoreline of embarkation this morning became a canvas of commemoration. the project has been organised by the film director danny boyle, who says the face is a metaphorfor tragedy. it's wonderful that there are permanent structures that will outlive and outlast us, but i thought it was a good way to reflect on our own time here. you know, which is temporary, really. as the tide ebbed away, artists crafted the contours of the face. hundreds of people took in the imagery, the symbolism. and reflected on loss and sacrifice. it feels very much like he is here and he is alive and he is, as you say, representing so many people, really special. really special.
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the stares of other beaches stared out too. at murlough in county down, john mccance, who died at passchendaele. in fife, doctor... who helped heal injured soldiers. by mid—morning, the impatient tides returned to roll in over the faces like tears of a lost generation. the masked by the waves but injury in our memory. —— in duncan kennedy, bbc news, in folkestone. the tradition here at the cenotaph in london is big ben‘s dale steyn. ..
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ben‘s dale steyn... john maguire has been to visit one woman in dorset who's been keeping up the tradition of bell—ringing where she lives. the bells have been wringing out from the tower of saint mary's church in the tower of saint mary's church in the dorset town for centuries. but just over 100 years ago, during the great war, the bell—ringers lost one of their own. we were up here two days after he landed on a can assure you... everything smashed to smithereens. debbie is reading a letter from the ford smithereens. debbie is reading a letterfrom the ford field. it's one of many written home by her great uncle. he fought in france, in greece, but was killed in palestine. 1400 greece, but was killed in palestine. 11100 bell—ringers died during the first world or any campaign has been under way to replace them with the
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same number of new ringers. people like debbie, who will today stand in the same place where her great uncle used to ring. it's very emotional. it really is. it's making the link with the past. and i think it's very important to keep those links and to keep the conditions going.|j important to keep those links and to keep the conditions going. i think i'm only a i will do my bit and do it well and if they are looking down, i hope they will be proud of me. the tower captain shows me the church's records, which date back to the 19th century. they include details of debbie's great—uncle. and also, a record of how his bell—ringing friends commemorated his death. half muffled peel was rung. we put a
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muzzle on one side of the clapper. i find it very moving. for me, it's the dead talking to a living. it's a gentle ring and a clear ring and is lovely. today, st mary's will join with bell towers across the country as they all, in unison, ring to honour remembrance day. a momentous occasion that will bring together friends, communities and families both from the presence and from the past. a little earlier, we heard a report from the kennedy at folkestone. 0ne of the speeches they engraved the face of one of those who served in the first world war in the... the
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person who manage that project was director danny boyle. earlier, he spoke about was behind his vision. with garden rakes. they like... to ta ke with garden rakes. they like... to take all these patterns and scrub the sand into shade. they treated shade with the sun etiquette is beautiful images. this one up at the moment in scotland's is absolutely beautiful loss of one of the first black officers who serve in the army. we tried to go to around 30 beaches around britain. they're still going around in some. we finished your because the tide. we tried to personalise the numbers, so numbing, so extraordinary, so it is trying to personalise their connection, individualstories, through the imperial war museum. so you get back in touch with the individuals involved. sometimes they
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are very significant and wilfred 0wen is a very significant person in history. certainly in terms of the speech where he left from the survey in france. what gave you the idea? i've seen, look there, the half face as the tide comes in. i've never seen as the tide comes in. i've never seen this kind of drawing of the sense that —— drawing on the same. when they asked me to do it, you associate the beaches with the second world war. you think of dunkirk, the christopher nolan film recently. in the first world work everybody left from the beaches and the harbours because there is no train transport of any significance there. this would have been their last side of home. for many of them, of course it was the left side of home. we make a temporary portrait. asa home. we make a temporary portrait. as a reminder of your own and their mortality. it's also wait the
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community together in a public space that does not have the association the cenotaph has of solemnity. we came together, the noise, the tide... repeated around the other beaches. we cannot see them all, but who were the people you chose committed 30 or so people you chose to represent on the beaches? they were. there's a munitions worker and a nurse, but mostly soldiers, yes. including two footballers, which as a football fanatic myself... there was another guy who played for leyton orient. you try to great
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connections with people. they go, "he's a footballer!" and 100 years disappears ina "he's a footballer!" and 100 years disappears in a blink of an eye. it's gone. this allows you to reconnect with these people, and i think it's also that we... i think it's... when i started the project i was, i thought i was going to do, recommend through its a line in the sand ina recommend through its a line in the sand in a way of finishing commemoration, because 100 years, we no longer commemorate the boers war, and should we stop that at the ce nte nary 7 and should we stop that at the centenary? because my research into it, i but, more important —— i think is become more important anyway. the connection with the consequences of this kind of behaviour is more important than ever in a way, so for me, it really enforced the value of
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these people and how necessary it was for us to her member them. and you had 30 of them. when will the last one be washed away today? you had 30 of them. when will the last one be washed away today7m has to end at dark because we cannot recommend people to go out after dark, obviously, because... we finished your now. the other thing you get to know is the tides in britain. which is so very is all over the place. extraordinary sites in scotland at the moment as well. and in the republic of ireland. there will be going on tonight full of different places. if you go to the website, you can follow the pattern of the day there, i'd also leave your questions on what you're watching. that was danny boyle a little earlier. 0ur correspondent robert hall
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is at the menin gate in ypres. it will be different in 2018. just a bit different. chaos as they get ready to have the ceremony at 8pm. the belgian royal family ready to have the ceremony at 8pm. the belgian royalfamily coming. you're here to lay across. very briefly, what brought you here? basically, our parents are buried in belgium and we have come here every yearin belgium and we have come here every year in commemoration of the novemberii. year in commemoration of the november 11. today was an extra special day because i was bringing across for somebody from the village where we live. it's been a tremendous experience, one i can never sort of replace. particularly 100 years after the events of the war, amazing. thank you. they're pushing us out of the way. thank you
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for talking to us. simon, this has been a very busy, a very crowded date and yet still a very personal day as it always is. big ceremonies but a way from the big ceremonies, so but a way from the big ceremonies, so many families or individuals, looking for their own stories, looking for their own stories, looking at the walls. the thing about the scale of the losses here. robert hall in ypres. we will be returning to robert for that ceremony. at the cenotaph, crowds still milling around. millions of people today following stylist or member those killed and wounded in conflict as the nation commemorates 100 years since armistice day, 1918. we will be back a little later on but let's get a weather update. hello again. it's been one of those weekends where the weather has been changing hour by hour. most of us has seen several downpours through
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the weekend interspersed by some drier weather. 0vernight, with those winds continuing to blow, showers in the southern and western parts of the southern and western parts of the uk. showers becoming more likely in northern ireland. temperature wise, it never gets that cold here, but temperatures quite chilly for the north. temperatures dating down into low single dictators. —— low single figures. monday's forecast, we maintain the south—westerly winds. for showers across western and southern areas. some of them have ian hendry at times but interspersed by some spells of sunshine. in the sunshine, temperatures on the mild side across the board. temperatures for most of us the board. temperatures for most of us between 12 and 1a celsius. that is your latest weather. bye for now. prince charles led tributes. in paris, world leaders put aside their
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differences to unite in remembrance, while keir, political and military leaders werejoined by while keir, political and military leaders were joined by thousands of members of the public, giving their thanks. and images etched in sand along britain's cosigned. —— written's coastline. —— britain's coastline. good afternoon. the 100 anniversary of the armistice that ended the first world war has been commemorated today. prince charles let the tributes at the cenotaph in london on behalf of the queen. local leaders and for the first time the president of germany were all in attendance. in paris, around 70
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world leaders, including president trump, gathered to pay their respects and effect on the conflict which claims 20 million lives. we will be reporting from paris in a moment, but first, a look at how britain's memory remains of world war i. 800,000 or so reduce lives were lost in the warand 800,000 or so reduce lives were lost in the war and it was in there no remembrance of the cenotaph was originally constructed. in timeless fashion and a largely unchanging form, the ceremony of remembrance has taken place in whitehall in every peacetime year since. so on this more than usually significant day of remembrance, the nation's leaders took their places around the cenotaph, led by the prince of
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wales, as was the case last year, the queen watch from a balcony above as big ben signalled the start of the national two minute silence in memory of all of those from britain and the commonwealth who lost their lives in war. big ben chimes the hour. in whitehall, the prince of wales placed the queen's wreath of poppies. 100 years after the end of the first world war in which an estimated 2 million german troops we re estimated 2 million german troops were lost, and historic gesture of
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reconciliation from the german president. after the politicians it was the turn of the veterans to march past and lay wreaths. today, the collective rembrandts of those who never came home from a war which ended 100 years ago today. and a special tribute today, there was a departure from the usual armistice commemorations. the cenotaph saw 10,000 members of the public file paths to the memorial —— memorial to show thanks. 10,000 people, some with military
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connections, but many with none at all. united in a desire in his public show of her membranes. it was an event that lacked formality, but was filled with personal touches. the home made wreaths. defendants wearing the metals of those long gone, and the family photos of a generation who had fought and often not come home. in 100 years, none of us not come home. in 100 years, none of us will be here to do this again, so it feels very special to be here.“ we do not remember then there will not be anyone else to remember, especially the next generation. having members of families who have served in both world wars, it is a real honour to be here today. there was a rhythm to remembrance sunday thatis was a rhythm to remembrance sunday that is so familiar, but this is something quite different, a procession for the people, all of him are walking to remember. the
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last time there was a people's procession was 1919. then, thousands walked past the cenotaph to pay their respects. just like today, this people's procession neared the end, and at whitehall there were laid wreaths. everyone is coming together for a laid wreaths. everyone is coming togetherfor a single laid wreaths. everyone is coming together for a single purpose to commemorate. i enjoy talking to everybody, hearing about everyone's stories. and the people's procession has left its mark and the personal memory left behind, each... and paris, leaders from across the globe gathered for the centenary, rations, with the french president urging them to build hope for the future rather than playing on fear. he said the scars of the first world war was
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still is a ball on the face of the world. europe remembers its sacrifice. this was a world for the world came to honour. 70 heads of state and government gathered today, a united nations of remembrance. a reminder, with nationalism rising once again, that piece is not made alone. pages hazem is the opposite of nationalism. nationalism is treason. if we think our interests only come first and we do not care for others it is a treason of our... the french president provide the flame of her membranes before leading the nation in wind minute of silence. —— the president provided the flame of remembrance. the signs and symbols of this anniversary echoed across the world. in one of
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belgian town, the ceremony ended with a fall of poppies. this is a special place to remember. i feel proud that there are names of six up there who certifies themselves in there who certifies themselves in the first world war —— sacrificed themselves in the first world war and die hope they remember this place. and paris, the commemorations also marked a new beginning, and annual peace forum spearheaded by the french president. behind the symbolism of today's ceremony buys a call to the hard task of diplomacy, not just call to the hard task of diplomacy, notjust remembering call to the hard task of diplomacy, not just remembering the call to the hard task of diplomacy, notjust remembering the past but thinking about the present date challenges faced by leaders here, new threats, new divisions, the ghosts of future wars. the only prominent guest to excuse himself from the peace summit, donald trump stopped across the paris, another smaller, angrier international
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gathering to protest his presence here at all. the client may present fascist. —— we call him a proto— fascist. —— we call him a proto— fascist. he is making reactionary movements in the united states and all over the world as well. as dusk fell, survivors of more recent conflicts and other veterans held a service of her membranes inside the cathedral —— of remembrance inside the cathedral of notre dame. history was reflected upon and the role of individuals and world peace, world war. today's ceremonies were watched by people across the uk and in other cities and towns, including accrington. severe casualties were suffered and now a report on a time's sacrifice. —— eight talanoa's
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sacrifice. with the rain beating down on one of lancashire's most imposing war memorials, hundreds of people, young and old circled accrington cenataph to remember lives lost. and 100 years on from that first armistice day in 1918. taking shelter under a sea of umbrellas, side by side, this community paid its respects. last post plays ijust feel really bad for the soldiers that died for us and i'm grateful. it's representing and thanking them for what they did. we come from an army background and my brother was killed in ireland when he was 21 years of age. and for former serviceman, steve 0'leary, today was even more poignant. i became aware of the significance of the losses in this town and the accrington pals and that interest grew throughout my military career and it's only now, when i've got time, as a retired
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serviceman that i can adequately honour them. the war dead have also been commemorated in church, overlooked by these tommy silhouettes, a symbol of remembrance. this is a community which suffered devastating losses. of the more than 1000 men who enlisted and took part in a farewell service here in this church, more than 815 never returned. they made the ultimate sacrifice. a sacrifice this town says it will never forget. later this evening the queen will attend a special service of remembrance at westminster abbey, where she will lay flowers at the grave of the unknown warrior. sarah kamber —— sarah campbell is at westminster abbey for us now. this really is the finale to this he
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can't of commemoration, the 2000 strong congregation have now taken their seats, many of them have been specially invited because they have been heavily involved in projects commemorating the great war over the last four years. the queen is due to arrive in the next half—hour and prince harry will be taking their seats later on. the prince of wales will read from the bible and the queen will lay flowers on the grave of the unknown warrior, as well children from across the united kingdom. at seven o'clock, the first of 1000 begins will be lit here in the grounds of westminster abbey. the organisers say these begins will symbolise the emergence of light after the darkness of war. the commemorations today saw a unique memorial to those who lost their lives, with portraits of servicemen and women at steven to
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the sound —— say and along... 0ne servicemen and women at steven to the sound —— say and along... one of these tributes was held in folkestone. the piercing eyes of a celebrated war poet, today etched onto the very beach he had once left to meet war and death. for wilfred 0wen, what had been a shoreline of embarkation, this morning became a canvas of commemoration. the project had been organised by the film director danny boyle, who says that the face is a metaphor for tragedy. look, it is wonderful that there are permanent structures that will outlive and outlast us, but i thought it was a good way to reflect on our own, um, time here. you know, which is temporary, really. as the tide ebbed away, 30 artists crafted the contours of the face. hundreds of people lined the shore to take in the imagery and the symbolism. they reflected on loss and
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sacrifice. it feels very much like he is here and he is alive and he is, as you say, representing so many people, really special. really special. in northumberland, private william jonas. and a doctor who helped wounded soldiers. eventually, the waters of inpatient tides rolled into across the chase, like the tea rs of into across the chase, like the tears of the lost generation. they we re tears of the lost generation. they were masked by the waves but injuring in memory. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel, but for me and the team, goodbye.
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