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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 13, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: within touching distance — a change of mood as theresa may tells her cabinet there are just a "few outstanding issues", but further problems could lie ahead in parliament this afternoon. we know that there's still issues with the backstop, we're working to resolve those, and we'll wait and see what we get. 13 more bodies have been recovered in california, taking the death toll in the us state's deadliest wildfire to 44, with hundreds still missing. we will rebuild, one step at a time. we will rebuild our home and we will be a part of rebuilding that town, because it's a beautiful town. new york in lockdown — notorious mexican drugs boss joaquin "el chapo" guzman appears in court amidst unprecedented security, each juror getting their own armed protection team, in what they're calling there the "trial of the century". coming up on afternoon live, all the sport: ben stokes takes up the number three
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spotin ben stokes takes up the number three spot in the batting order. that is what we're leading with as england names and unchanged side to face which will —— device sri lanka. and susan powell has all the weather. also coming up: the water companies getting bogged down by wet wipes, the scourge of the sewers, as tests show that al those sold as "flushable" in the uk are not. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. theresa may has told her cabinet good progress has been made in the brexit negotiations, as ministers say they are cautiously optimistic that a deal between the uk and the european union can be reached.
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the prime minister briefed her cabinet on the latest developments this morning, as talks between officials continue. the cabinet office minister, david lidington, said that a breakthrough is possible in the next 48 hours, but that is not a given. this afternoon in the commons, labour will try to force the government to publish the full legal advice about brexit. in the last hour, the dup says it will vote in support of that opposition motion. from westminster, our political correspondent, chris mason, reports. an autumn morning in westminster. competing ideas for what it should look like constantly flying through the air. it withdraw agreement isn't agreed yet, and even some cabinet ministers can't bring themselves to say yes to questions like this with the view still support the brexit plan? i don't know why you stand outside my flat every morning, due never get anything from it. do you still support the plan? so how are the
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negotiations going with the european union? i thought i would grab a work with the man who is effectively the prime minister's deputy. it's a deal imminent? there is cautious optimism. we're down to a small mother of the difficult issues. the negotiators worked long into the night last night and having been up to 2:1i5am the night before. we're not there yet. it is not a delight any price. nothing is sorted yet, and so cabinet ministers were not signing up for and so cabinet ministers were not signing upfora and so cabinet ministers were not signing up for a signing on the dotted line moment. there is a lack ofa dotted line moment. there is a lack of a backstop to keep the border between northern ireland and the republic as it is now, and given how complex that is, this man is absolutely crucial. the government's chief legal adviser, the attorney
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general. his advice is seen as so important is that labour and others don't want him to share it in private, they want him to publish it so everyone can see private, they want him to publish it so everyone can see it before they vote on any withdrawal agreement. the shadow attorney general told me seeing that legal advice is essential because... at this stage in the so—called endgame that theresa may has been discussing, there is a real danger that she comes back with something that the deal is a bit of a fudge so disraeli important —— so it is really important —— so it is really important that before mps are required to vote on this potential fudge, they understand what it means to stop is it time to walk away from the talks? as the cabinet meeting wound up, the questions keep coming. the time for any answers keeps coming. let's go now to our chief political correspondent,
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vicki young, who joins us now from westminster. it does feel as if we're inching towards a deal, although that means that uk officials have managed to maybe come to some arrangement with eu officials, of course at that point it would then need to come back to the cabinet to be signed. that is not what happened today but if you listen to the language we are getting, theresa may talking about the endgame in these negotiations, that a downing street saying that some small differences still remain. it is clear that progress has been made overnight, i think. it doesn't mean it is done and they will not say that because of course they don't want to get ahead of themselves. suddenly it feels as if a deadline of tomorrow night in order to get that november special summit does seem to be concentrating minds. a cabinet meeting would have to happen before it is all signed
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off. this is what liam fox at the say when he came out of cabinet today. well, negotiators are still working and the cabinet will meet before any decision is taken. we are not at that point yet. and do you think it's so important that britain can exit the backstop unilaterally? will that be part of any deal that is reached ? well, we know there are still issues with the backstop, we're working to resolve those, and we will wait and see what we get. we had an update in cabinet, but naturally i'm not going to talk about what cabinet was briefed upon. it's very important that we maintain the confidentiality of cabinet, because the eu also listens to the answers we give. it would be quite irresponsible for us to accidentally or otherwise give away our negotiating position. was the prime minister right to say that she won't do a deal at any price? the prime minister's made it very clear at all times that the judgment on this will be what is in the country's interest rather than what is in the conservative party's interest or her personal interests. in that, she is absolutely right. is an exit from the
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backstop is a red line? we know we have a number of these difficult discussions to have. we have made very clear what our positions are on them. thank you. this afternoon in the commons, the discussion is all about the legal advice, their legal advice that the government will get, particularly relating to the idea that northern ireland might be treated separately from the rest of the uk, that the uk could stay in this customs arrangement. people want to know for how long, if it is temporary, if the uk could get out of it. there is a lot of pushing for the legal advice to be published so they know what they are voting on weight happens. that is going on right now. let's discuss this now. what do you think david liddington was saying that? it sounded as though he was suggesting the government would be willing to publish something. government would be willing to publish somethinglj government would be willing to publish something. i have just come
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out of the chamber to do this interview and he gave the implication that the government is listening to the opposition parties and evidential rebellion for conservative backbenchers like me and is there to give a form of statement, some of the legal protocols that they have received once the deal has been done so that parliamentarians are briefed before we vote on the matter. and why do you want to see that advice? why is that important? i think because of the nature and magnitude of the constitutional decision we will be taking. there are still a lot of questions from northern ireland mps, there are still very intricate details aspects of this agreement that will be signed up to by our government, to do with the customs union, to do with the transition period, and i think that parliamentarians want to make sure before they finally sanction the deal that they have got some semblance of the legal advice that
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the government has received. this will be something that changes our constitution and our engagement with the european union for potentially generations to come. when you are making a decision of this magnitude, you want to make sure you have dotted all of the eyes and crossed all the love that sees. —— crossed all the love that sees. —— crossed all of the tees. generally, legal advice, all of the tees. generally, legaladvice, people want to give options and opinions and publishing it, the government would say, would tell the eu were thinking. absolutely. it is very rare for government to give the legal advice they have received. what has resonated with a lot of mps is the sheer and bang that you'd —— sheer magnitude of what is happening at the moment. what mr dinkins said in the chamber just at the moment. what mr dinkins said in the chamberjust now is in terms
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of trying to get a compromise, they will, once the deal has been done and secured, and pencilled in, then and secured, and pencilled in, then a d raft and secured, and pencilled in, then a draft analysis of the advice is something they will be well into share. is that enough for you to not defeat the government? that is enough for me, but we will be in discussion with cabinet ministers who will be afforded something more in—depth. we'll be having discussions with them to match they are happy. we will be looking very much to supporters brexit in the to give us the green light that the additional legal advice they have received satisfies them. thank you. that debate will go on. the dup are saying that they will vote for the full legal advice to be published, which could spell trouble for the government. we will see how that suggestion of a compromise goes down with mps.
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there has been advice that the government abstains from the vote this afternoon. because this is a debate put forward by labour, the government in the past has actually sort of decided not to vote, if you like. the issue that would mean that it would be passed, potentially. it is tricky for them. if they have offered this compromise, they might hope that that might be enough, rather than what labour want, which is the full legal advice to be published was a what sort of time we looking at for a result on that boat? about 4pm this afternoon. i will talk to you then, if not before. the company which owns well—known food brands such as bisto and mr kipling has said it intends to stockpile raw materials in the run—up to brexit as fears grow of gridlock at uk ports. premier foods said it has set aside up to £10 million for preparations because of what the firm said was "an absence of certainty".
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the company insisted it was purely a precautionary measure. just have a look at what is happening on twitter, it seems that it is bad manners to bad—mouth your host after leaving a party. a flurry of tweets from donald trump in the last couple of hours. emanuel macron suggesting what was required to take on russia, and he said that even america, which got donald trump's goat. he says it was germany in world war i and two, and how it worked out for them pay for nato or not, he says. an hour later, he attacks the trade position, saying
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that france makes excellent wine but so that france makes excellent wine but so does the us. the problem is that france makes it hard for the us to sell its wines in france and charges tariffs, whereas the us does the opposite. he then has a more personal go at the french president. he says that he suffers from a low approval rating in france, 26% and an unemployment rate of almost io%. he was trying to get on another subject. he says that there is no country more nationalist than france. he then says make france great again. then he tries to justify that decision over the weekend not to attend a particular memorial service because it was raining. he says, by the way, when a helicopter could not fly to the first cemetery because of almost zero visibility, i suggested driving. the secret service said no
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because of the distance and a shutdown in paris. he then says it was fake news. we actually reported on that. what emanuel macron said about an army was actually a european army, not just a french army was actually a european army, notjust a french one. anyway, a flurry of tweets from the american president. we would normally put to report together on that, but frankly there is an time because we know there is an time because we know there will be more coming. we will just keep an eye on twitter for you. the french response in the last few minutes has just come the french response in the last few minutes hasjust come in the french response in the last few minutes has just come in from reuters. the office of the french president said it had no comment to make after donald trump said those tweets. asked to comment, the officer said, we have nothing to say about the tweets but they added that mr macron had made his comments very clear to trump during talks they had
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on saturday in paris will stop any developers and that, i will let you know. 44 people are now known to have died in the worst wildfires in california's history, and hundreds of people are still missing. most of those killed were in and around the town of paradise, which has largely been destroyed. president trump has declared a major disaster in the state, making federal aid available to affected residents. from california, david willis reports. the seafront mansions of the rich and famous prove little match for some of the worst wildfires here in living memory. the first people in the celebrity enclave of malibu knew about this blaze was when a ball of fire came barrelling over the hillside, devouring everything in its path. we never saw a fire truck probably until an hour or two after the fire went through. police, same thing, you know? it's not their fault, they were just inundated somewhere else. amidst a sea of ash and charred metal in the retirement town
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of paradise, a search is under way for hundreds of people who are missing. some died in their cars as they sought to flee the flames. those who escaped have lost everything but a sense of stoicism. i have... my clothes and i have a backpack, and that's pretty much it right now. so... it's freedom, kind of a freedom. not one you would seek, but it's there, though. we will rebuild one step at a time. we will rebuild our home and we will be a part of rebuilding that town, because it's a beautiful town. criticised for his initial response to the disaster, president trump took to twitter last night to say he'd approved a request to allocate additional funds to fight the fires. with hot, dry winds expected
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to return today and no sign of rain in the forecast, experts say it could take weeks to get california's latest wildfires fully under control. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. our correspondent, dan johnson, has been alongside emergency crews as they continue to tackle the fires. well, this is the latest fire teams have had to deal with, an intense blaze on this hillside here. and they'rejust bringing in more workers now to try and stop it flaring up again, to stop it spreading. if you just take a look down into the valley, you can see how close this fire came to the homes here. to this neighbourhood. and that's why there are so many firefighters here, on the ground and in the air as well. they've been dumping water and powder to try and put this fire out.
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this embankment was completely ablaze in the last hour, and the people who live here have been on their roofs with their garden hose is trying to protect their homes if the flames spread any further. but it looks like they've had success here in beating back the flames and dying down the fire, but the winds are blowing again, there are still communities at risk and there are lots of people across california who are going to have to rebuild. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: cabinet ministers are told good progress has been made in the brexit negotiations, as pressure mounts for a deal. 44 people are now known to have died in the worst wildfires in the history of california. hundreds are still missing. one of the worlds most wanted drug traffickers, el chappo, will appear in court in new york this afternoon amidst unprecedented security. ben stokes will bat at number three
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against sri lanka. there is no change to the side. joe cole has announced his retirement from football. and the double defender kieran trippier has withdrawn from the england squad with a groin injury sustained against crystal palace last week. i will have more other stories just after 2:30pm. the trial of one of the world's most powerful drug traffickers will get under way in new york shortly. joaquin guzman, known as el chapo, was extradited to the united states last year, after twice escaping from prison in mexico. there is huge security in place for the trial — the brooklyn bridge will be closed when el chapo is driven to court and jurors will be escorted by armed guards. joaquin "el chapo" guzman was the us authorities‘ greatest prize in the war on drugs.
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he is known internationally as the leader of the world's most powerful and violent drug cartel. his extradition to the united states from mexico almost two years ago set the stage for what is good to be the biggest trial for narcotics crimes in us history. prosecutors accuse him of trafficking drugs such as cocaine and heroin worth $14 billion into the country through the sinaloa cartel. but his defence attorney says his reputation doesn't match the reality. he is the perfect scapegoat. you'd think that he was the only drug dealer in mexico, that he was the only leader. there are leaders of the sinaloa cartel that are as big as him, bigger than him, alleged to be. you don't even know their names. before his capture following this dramatic raid, el chapo guzman was a mythicalfigure because of his ability to evade law enforcement in mexico for decades. he twice escaped from maximum security prisons,
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once through a mile long tunnel from his jail cell shower. peter vincent, a former justice department official, says it was el chapo guzman‘s own mistakes that led to his arrest. he ultimately was undone by his own arrogance and his own sense of ability to get himself out of anyjam. it's said he was planning to make a film about his life. after a secret meeting with actor sean penn, he agreed to record an interview. the tape will likely feature in his trial, alongside evidence such as wire taps, drug and weapons seizures and testimony from rival cartel members. joining us live from outside the court is our correspondent nada tawfik.
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he was extradited in 2015 but it is the security aspect that is staggering. absolutely. he read the court, many of the hearings dealt with the extraordinary measures that had we put into place to make sure that el chapo was secure, as well as the safety of the jurors. his trial is taking place behind me in brooklyn's district court, so every time he is transferred from prison, the brooklyn bridge is shut down. that has created so many concerns, creating gridlock in new york, is the us marshals separately, with a solution to limit the number of times he has to be transferred here. also, security is extremely tight in the court. they have bomb sniffing dogs, and agents are many agencies securing the court. because he is
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still seen as a powerful member of the cartel. we heard that the jurors are getting armed guard. he says that he poses no threat to them. exactly. his defence attorneys argued that the spectacle of closing the brooklyn bridge down, the fact that juries will the brooklyn bridge down, the fact thatjuries will remain anonymous and have to be escorted to and from court by armed marshals will create the impression he's a dangerous man which might influence the jury. the impression he's a dangerous man which might influence thejury. the judge ultimately sided with prosecutors, saying that the measures were necessary because he has a history of intimidating those who work with law enforcement in the past. we know thatjurors during the selection process, some of them did cite fear of being on this case. one woman reportedly cried when she found out she was picked to be part of thejury found out she was picked to be part of the jury pool. all of these issues, during the hearings, but
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these tell people will ultimately decide el chapo's fate. a french fishing boat has been stopped in uk waters with 17 suspected migrants on board. the craft entered the port of dover without notifying authorities shortly after midnight. the home office says border force officials found 1a men and three children on board the boat who are believed to be iranian. let's speak to our reporter, leanne lawless, who is in dover for us now. what we know about what has happened here? the alarm was raised just after midnight last night after a fairly large fishing boat was spotted trying to enter the western docks over there, but it wasn't communicating with the port authority. the dover harbour patrol sent out about, and the rnli said a vote as well. it was then that the deadline under this boat and pulled it into the port. 17 iranian
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migrants were found on board and the home office have confirmed that 1a of those are meant, and three children. the boat is currently being held further down the port in a dark, and i could see it from a viewing point. you could see border force officials inspecting it. the home office say that the men will have their cases progressed under the immigration rules, while the children have been referred to social services will stop there is a sense that this is a growing problem. 0n sense that this is a growing problem. on friday, their work seven uranium migrants found just off the coast, clinging to a dinghy who had to be rescued. the saturday before that, there were seven iranian migrants who had to be rescued just off the coast here. the dover mp has said today that the government should not be taking its eye off the ball when it comes to this brazen attempt to try and break into the country. he says they need to be more patrol vessels along this coast. all of this comes on the day
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that a report published by the chief inspector ‘s borders and immigration highlights the point that jack went along borders are weak and understaffed. —— checkpoints along borders was up they can be exploited by migrants who want to enter the country illegally. thank you. doctors have saved the life of an unborn baby after his mother was shot dead with a crossbow. the heavily pregnant woman, 35, was fatally injured at her home in ilford, east london, on monday, but medics managed to deliver her son in hospital. a fifty year old man has been charged with her murder. i'm joined now by our reporter navtej johal. what has happened? the details are still coming in. the woman was allegedly attacked with a crossbow on monday morning in front of her
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five children at their home in ilford in east london. this incident occurred at around 7am and following the attack she was taken to hospital, where she later died. her babyis hospital, where she later died. her baby is described as being in a sta ble baby is described as being in a stable condition after an emergency ca esa rea n stable condition after an emergency caesarean section at the hospital. a 50—year—old is set to appear at the 0ld 50—year—old is set to appear at the old bailey on thursday, charged with her murder. her husband described her murder. her husband described her as a wonderful mother and wife. the couple had been together, we understand, for around seven years with the any developers on that, i know you will bring them to us was that thank you. wages have grown at their fastest rate in ten years, according to figures from the office for national statistics. they show average earnings rose by 3.2 per cent in the three months to september compared with the same period last year. but after taking inflation into account, they're still growing only modestly — by less than one per cent. and there's been a small rise in the number of people out of work. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity has the details.
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african's biggest supplier of water softeners in woking, business is flowing in but there is a blockage in the pipeline. the labour market. its products are in demand but it has found it harder and harder to get the skilled people it needs to do the work, meaning it is not expanding as fast as it might. for a growing business like this, the challenge is not the traditional one of finding the sales, it is getting the staff to meet the orders are coming. in the ultra—tight labour market, employers have to offer better pay and benefits to attract and keep the right staff. in two yea rs, and keep the right staff. in two years, the firm has doubled its workforce but it is only able to find enough plumbers by offering better pay and benefits, a pattern repeated across the economy. to recruit the volume of plumbers we need, we looked hard at what their requirements are reserved what we realised is we were competitive in the market. we have made sure our salaries are correct, and we also increased our holiday entitlement to
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make us more competitive with other industries. although an implement is estimated to have risen slightly, it is still a rate ofjust 4.1%, close to its lowest in 42 years. injuly to its lowest in 42 years. injuly to september, wages rose more than expected, up 3.2% on the year before. that coincided with the number of eu workers falling by 132,000, the biggest drop in years. we can never be complacent, make sure that the jobs market remains buoyant. we need to make sure we help people through the job centre network to get those jobs and increase their earnings. with the economy and wages growing faster than expected, interest rate setters at the bank of england may raise interest rates to stop it overheating. the bank of england is keen to raise interest rates, they have indicated that already. the higher wage numbers suggest that
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maybe inflation picks up in the coming years and they need to raise interest rates. but there is other stuff going on in the economy, including a lot of political uncertainty at the moment. the betting in the city is that the bank of england will raise interest rates again byjune next year. her some breaking news. cnn the american broadcaster has filed a lawsuit against donald trump and top aides, they have tweeted... you may remember the altercation between donald trump angelo da costa in a white house briefing last week. —— andjim da costa. that is white house briefing last week. —— and jim da costa. that is about white house access becausejim
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acosta had his press accreditation withdrawn as a result of that fracas the president. this is not fake news. cnn is taking legal action against donald trump. we will bring you more on that later on. time for a look at the weather. susan powell is here with some rather strange clouds. it looks like how you would draw cartoon flowers. they are mematis clouds. and i think, they make me think of udders. 0ur weather watchers yesterday was m, 0ur weather watchers yesterday was in, that the showers are nuts, but normally need to get a good old thunderstorm to cds to see this overturning of the cloud and the lumpy
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overturning of the cloud and the lu m py texture overturning of the cloud and the lumpy texture underneath. it is quite an alien looking sky. what causes them? no one actually specifically knows. you commonly get dimmer thunderstorms, hanging out of the bottom of cumulus clouds, and sometimes you can see them with volcanic ash. some think it is to do with the ice crystals in the cloud, others to do with the circulation is developing at the bottom of the cloud, nobody exactly knows, so maybe when you retire, simon, that could become your life's work. sold?! what is happening for the rest of us. clear blue sky, not much to worry about, that is what i'll be able to manage when i retire, and thatis able to manage when i retire, and that is what most of us are seeing. yesterday, dramatic thunderstorms, today, we have a little break in the weather, the showers or off across the continent, this will rumble away later tonight. but certainly for
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now, enjoy the day while the sun shines. a lovely afternoon to come. it is all so mild, still not really hacked and love weather,‘s around 1a celsius. this evening and overnight, some rain returning to northern ireland, piling into wales and the north of england soon after midnight before pushing into southern and eastern scotland. a mild night again, temperatures in single figures, perhaps more chilly in a sheltered far north—east of scotland. dry skies to the south and east even overnight and posting tomorrow. and this clearer weather will try to push its way further north across the uk to wednesday. a dry afternoon for wales and northern ireland and by the end of the afternoon, northern ireland and scotla nd afternoon, northern ireland and scotland stuck with some low cloud, maybe a bit of drizzle but comparatively much drier compared to the morning. and warm, temperatures up the morning. and warm, temperatures up to 15, maybe 16 degrees. at the end of the week that is how we will
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carry on with lots of mild air around but settling down. we will lose the weather fronts that are trying to push their way in, getting pushed out by high pressure across the continent. 0n pushed out by high pressure across the continent. on thursday, as that whether front grazes the north—west, that could be the last significant rain we see that the best part of a week. this high pressure will park up week. this high pressure will park up and it will grind the weather to hold, if you like. there is the rain on thursday grazing northern ireland and scotland, and this will be a more common problem in the days ahead, lingering cloud and fog. not too extensive on thursday, the sunshine in the south—east, 17 degrees london, i kid you not, it will feel positively springlike rather late autumn. 0n will feel positively springlike rather late autumn. on friday, more cloud around and some patchy fog, then on into next week, we pick up more of an easterly wind, so with those grey skies it. to turn cooler thanit those grey skies it. to turn cooler than it has been recently. some changes on the way in the coming days. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. cabinet ministers are told good
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progress has been made in the brexit negotiations, as pressure mounts for a deal. we know that there is still issues with the backstop. we are working to resolve those. and we will wait and see what we get. 44 people are now known to have died in the worst wildfires in the history of california. hundreds are still missing. one of the worlds most wanted drug traffickers, el chappo, will appear in court in new york this afternoon amidst unprecedented security. doctors save the life of an unborn baby after his mother was shot dead with a crossbow in east london yesterday. at 50—year—old man was charged with murder. sport now on afternoon live with reshmin chowdhury. hello, right, good! that got your attention! let's just talk about
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cricket. england still looking for a number three. three is a magic number. yes — it is often the most important position in the batting order. some argue it is where you put your best batsman. england have struggled to fill it for a number of years, since jonathan trott left the side. in the last test match moeen ali was given the task and it didn't work out. he was out for a golden duck in the first innings and only scored 3 in the second. so ben stokes will move up the batting order and be the next player to give it a go. the rest of the team remains unchanged for the second test against sri lanka in kandy. ben foakes will keep wicket, meaning there's no place in the side for fit—againjonny bairstow. it's a squad packed with options, providing a bit of a selection headache for captain joe root. that solves a decent place to be.l great position to be in, the fact that we turn up here, full of confidence as a group, as a squad,
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we have got the opportunity to play the same team if we feel that the service requires it, but also we have got a group of guys that have been sat on the sidelines chomping at the bit ready to take the opportunity if it looks like they could be the guys to exploit that pitch. that second test gets under way on wednesday morning — england lead the series 1—0. joe cole, announcing his retirement. he's been out of the limelight for a while, plying his trade in the us for the past couple of years, but what a player he was in the uk. formerly of england, west ham and chelsea, midfielderjoe cole won three premier league titles, two fa cups and a league cup during a 17—year career. he's now 37 and retires after a stint with the tampa bay rowdies. cole says his career has been "a dream come true", and that he hopes to stay in the game as a coach. tottenham defender kieran trippier has withdrawn from the england squad with a groin injury, sustained in the win
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against crystal palace last weekend. england play a friendly with the united states on thursday, before hosting croatia in the nations league next week. rugby: england's george kruis is out of the final two autumn internationals because of injury. he's got a calf problem, after being taken off in the second half of england's defeat to new zealand at the weekend. it's a blow for head coach eddiejones, who's already without a raft of other forwards for the matches against japan and australia. meanwhile the scotland full—back stuart hogg has confirmed he'sjoining premiership side exeter next summer. he leaves glasgow warriors and has agree a two—year deal at the chiefs. another retirement for you. the british modern pentathlete samantha murray is bringing her career to a close. she won a silver medal at the london olympics in 2012, and also claimed world championship gold in 2014. she's been speaking to our 0lympic reporter nick hope. it is really hard actually, it has probably taken a year to fully make my mind up that i'm going to move on. i have been in olympic cycles
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for london and rio and now i don't think i felt the same connection approaching a third 0lympics. i also feel in a really natural way that i've done as much as i can do as an athlete in modern pentathlon. you have a fist full of medals, which is your favourite? world gold? 0lympic silver? everybody loves the olympic medal, and it is definitely the best. how special was that, looking back? i got it and i kissed it because it felt like a child to me! it was amazing. a home olympic games with all of those brits, families and friends and unions jacks everywhere. i was overwhelmed. what does the future hold? wedding, for one? i'm getting married nextjuly which i'm enjoying planning and i'm looking forward to. in terms of what i'm going to be next, i enjoy public speaking, going into schools. by
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by some youngsters, i was a role model. i definitely like talking about sport a lot! it will be a while until i can find exactly what my next passion is going to be. i am taking each day at a time and embracing it as well. the atp finals match between kei nishikori and kevin anderson is under way, you can watch that on bbc two or on the bbc website dennis page. that's all the sport for now. jean—claude juncker is addressing the european parliament, he is saying we are not in an aggressive mood on the future relationship with britain. we will keep an eye on that for you. seemingly conciliatory noises coming from him. angela merkel as you can see addressing the parliament in what is her last major
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speech on the future of the eu in the post brexit world. our political correspondence micky young joins us from westminster. all eyes are there this afternoon because that is where we will first hear if there is some sort of deal or not. the first row is about legal advice being published if some kind of withdrawal agreement document comes back. negotiations are going on and stop they went late into the evening, last night and into the early hours of the morning the night before, and it is clear from the mood music that they are inching closer to have something on paper to bring back to the cabinet, but after that, we don't know if cabinet will accept it and it will eventually have to go to parliament for a vote. today's row is about legal advice, when that might or might not be published, will mps get to see it, before they get to vote on it or not? there did
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seem to be some compromise in the airfrom the seem to be some compromise in the air from the cabinet seem to be some compromise in the airfrom the cabinet minister, david lidington, today, partly because the democratic unionist party have already said they would vote for publication of the full legal advice along with labour so the writing was on the wall for the conservatives slightly with some rebels on the roadside, also. this is what david lidington have to say a few minutes ago. we will make available to all members of the house, following the conclusion of negotiations, and head of the meaningful vote, april recent position statement leaving —— stating out the government legal position on the proposed withdrawal agreement and position on the proposed withdrawal agreementand any position on the proposed withdrawal agreement and any protocols that might be attached to it. let's discuss the ramifications of that with the westminster leader of the democratic unionist party, nigel dodds. would you say that david
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lidington was accepting that the argument is lost slightly, and rethink what he's saying would be enough for you? what is important is what has been passed by the house of commons later this afternoon, and from our understanding the government are now going to abstain so government are now going to abstain so the motion will be carried, and thatis so the motion will be carried, and that is the important thing, what is in that motion, i think that david lidington may have started out like to be some kind of agreement but whilst the chief whip had done the numbers game he realised they could not win this vote. i think it's important the legal advice is out there, so that when this agreement, which is going to be put into an international treaty and be legislated for in the house of commons, it is important that mps have the full legal advice as given to the cabinet by the attorney general. the particular aspect you will be looking at is about the backstop, about what happens if there is no trade deal, to stop that ha rd there is no trade deal, to stop that hard border and how northern ireland
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is treated, whether you are treated differently to the desk of the uk. this is a matter notjust differently to the desk of the uk. this is a matter not just for politics but for politicaljudgment, but also a matter of what was this legally bind the united kingdom to? this could operate for a long time and once it is put into an international treaty, then the government of whatever hue and complexion is bound by it, so this could have long reaching, far— reaching could have long reaching, far—reaching implications, and that is why we were so keen last week to call for the publication of the legal advice and i'm glad that, today, parliament has asserted its will and that's what's going to happen. it does feel like we are inching towards the possibility that the eu and the government will come up the eu and the government will come up with some kind of withdrawal agreement, some kind of paper that people can look at. what will you be looking at particularly, presumably, to see what rules and regulations northern ireland might have to abide
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by in the backstop scenario? looks like the negotiators and brussels are inching their way towards some kind of compromise. what we are looking at is the overall future trade relationship, what does the government say about that, where are we headed for? that is, is it going to be chequers, chequers minus, because part of the withdrawal agreement is to handle the 39 billion pounds of are money and we need to know what we are getting in exchange for that. on the average backstop it is important notjust for northern ireland, because the uk will be entering into commitments that are uk wide and, if it commits toa uk that are uk wide and, if it commits to a uk wide customs arrangements to instance, in which there is no unilateral like —— right forthe united kingdom to get out of, then that will be a very serious situation. be harder to get out of that arrangement than it is to get out of the eu itself. there will be a lot of questions about what is the
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price we pay for this arrangement, in terms of the regulations and rules that we have to abide with, and for northern ireland, it is going to be an issue of, is this a possibility that it could lead to the break—up of the union? are there are dangers in that? we will be watching that closely because we have said that the united kingdom needs to leave the european union as one kingdom, not separately. nigel dodds, thank you very much. that message will be going loud and clear to the prime minister, she knows all too well what the dup thinks about that. and if there is some kind of deal, some kind of progress towards a deal, by the end of this week we are talking about tomorrow night, being a deadline for getting that november summer, then all of these questions will very much come into play. thank you very much, vicky young. so, as the prime minister briefs
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close colleagues at downing street on the developements, what are the next steps on the road to brexit? 0ur reality check correspondent chris morrisjoins me. so we know that? negotiators?from the uk and the eu are close to?agreeing?the text of an agreement. but are they close enough? the last? bits?are always the hardest bits, and the? politics? is complicated. ? but if an agreement emerges, the cabinet in? london?would need to approve it. there would also be a meeting at some stage between?the brexit secretary dominic raab and the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier to seal the deal. but in the meantime other eu member states would want to ensure that they too are happy with any last—minute compromises. if all that? happens? pretty quickly, a special summit of eu leaders could be called at the of the month. otherwise there is already a regular?summit?scheduled? in mid—december. ? any agreement would then need to be ratified in both the uk? parliament?and the european parliament. the government?would ?also have to pass legislation making
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the withdrawal?agreement?a formal part of uk law. but if nothing is agreed, or parliament votes an agreement down, we could be heading for a no—deal?brexit. and if there's no deal by january 21st next year, the government has to make a statement to parliament about the next steps it plans to take. exactly how mps might be able to affect or change the brexit process at that stage, is the subject of fierce political debate. the issue of fake news is a global problem, challenging the way we share information and perceive the world around us. all this week we're examining the impact it's having in different countries. in the philippines, supporters of the late dictator ferdinand marcos have been accused of using facebook to rewrite the country's history — and it's happening as the marcos family is trying to make a political comeback. howard johnson reports. even in this secluded idyll, fake
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news abounds. 24—year—old anna lisa isa news abounds. 24—year—old anna lisa is a teacher. she uses facebook to catch up on news from the mainland. she says that fake news is ubiquitous and confusing. in the philippines some people say that this is the hero, so who really is the one telling the truth? to add to the one telling the truth? to add to the confusion social media is now being used to revise the country's most contentious history. back in the 1970s and 80s, president ferdinand marcos imposed martial law. many people were arrested, and tortured, with thousands killed. his son has posted this interview of a video with his father's defence
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secretary in which he denied there we re secretary in which he denied there were political arrests during the martial law era. namely one person that was arrested because of political or religious belief during that period. none. iwas electrocuted, that was horrible. this eight—year—old woman is living proof of the dark side of martial law. in 1976 she was arrested, detained and tortured for being an activist against marcos's one—man rule. she is outraged by the claims made. to understand the motives behind his recent statement in the video, i met him in his home in manila. he recently made a video with bonbon marcos and you said there were no political arrests. with bonbon marcos and you said there were no political arrestslj was not saying that. re is living in a post—truth world where people can
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tell lies and get away with it? history tells me that that has or has been the case. the story, a decade later, can it be assessed? what really happened during that period? in the past leaders used divide and rule as a way of sub during their subjects. now in the philippines it appears that fake news is the new weapon to confuse and control. you can also follow the debate and research on ‘fake news' on our website — that's all at... egon cossou is here. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. in the brexit negotiations, as pressure mounts for a deal. 44 people are now known to have died in the worst wildfires in the history of california.
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hundreds are still missing. one of the worlds most wanted drug traffickers, el chapo, will appear in court in new york this afternoon amidst unprecedented security. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. there was a slight rise in the number of people out of work betweenjuly and september this year — to around 1.3 million, but wages grew by 3.2% — the fastest rate rise in almost a decade. the company which owns bisto and mr kipling plans raw materials in the run—up to brexit because it's worried about gridlock at uk ports. premier foods says it will spend up to £10 million doing this. meanwhile, the boss of the company, gavin darby, is stepping down next year. bad news for vodafone. the company racked up losses of £6.8 billion in the first half of the year. it's blaming the cost
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of selling its operation in india — and a fall in the value of other assets. it plans to slash cost by "at least" £1 billion by 2021. tech shares are in focus. things are not going well. yes, we saw steep falls yesterday led by apple. i couple other suppliers has suggested might be a slowdown in demand for the iphone, which is a massive brand for the company. apple is such a massive company when it comes to tech stocks, but once it sneezes, the rest of the sector catches a cold so people start to look rather more minutely at the rest of the sector. let's find out what tech stocks are doing right now. it is a mixed picture. if you
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look at apple the sell—off continues. 20 odd minutes into the trading day, a short while ago there share price was done half percentage point, just a few seconds ago down one percentage point, so there are concerns about how well sales are doing, certainly of its latest iphones, confirms spark as you mentioned by worries about supplies and how well they are doing. whether or not that means anything when you consider how many suppliers apple has, investors may be reading in a bit too much, or perhaps they are right, we don't yet know. amazon's share prices up, the company has confirmed that it is choosing its second site for its hq to, a year—long competition in which cities across the us were buying to try and sort them attract the company. it turns out that the second headquarters will be split into two locations just outside
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washington, dc in virginia and also here in new york city, long island, so we here in new york city, long island, so we expect here in new york city, long island, so we expect more news on here in new york city, long island, so we expect more news on that later but that hasjust been confirmed by the company. talking about the technology sector, is there an element of panic that sometimes sets in with investors in this sector? people always talk about buying stocks, the acronym for companies like facebook, amazon, apple, netflix and google, owned by alphabet, they have such an outsize weight on the tech market, that what those stocks do can drive the whole index down, and that's why people pay so much attention. that being so, it is a broader story. investors are trying to understand how long growth will continue, should they be worried or not, how healthy is the us economy and the global market? individually, day—to—day, we are
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seeing some individual worries about individual stocks and a falling market and that is what is worrying investors at the moment. the ftse 100 giving up some on this earlier gains, one of the reasons for that is that the pound has been creeping up is that the pound has been creeping up against the euro as there is rising optimism about a possible deal and that makes exports more expensive and difficult for companies, so we are seeing a little bit of a tempering of activity on the ftse100. premierfoods, its shares are going up. this comes possibly because of the departure of its chief executive. he has had quite a fractious relationship with shareholders and only narrowly avoided a shareholder rebellion a few months ago. vodafone have a huge loss but their share prices going
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up, because the chief executive says he's going to really slash costs and the markets quite like that. more on that in the next hour, now, let's get a look at the weather with susan powell. good afternoon. after all the showers of the past few days, prospects through today have been drier and brighter. and we will stay with clearer skies for the remainer of the afternoon and into the evening. beautiful pictures from the hampshire coast earlier today. the satellite picture shows clearly where we sit at the moment between the weather fronts and showers we saw yesterday and the next weather system waiting to move in for tomorrow. this afternoon, largely clear skies and mild once again that rise of 13, 1a degrees. the satellite picture shows just the rest of us, by the time you get into this evening, cloud starting to thicken, the wind picking up and then overnight, rain pushing into
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northern ireland across wales, some heavier downpours across northern england before the rain surges into southern and eastern scotland for the end of the night. clearer skies tonight, a mild night again, temperatures in double figures for many, single figures in the odd spot. first thing on wednesday, sunshine for central and eastern england, more cloud around elsewhere, brightening as the day goes on, with some sunshine in the south—west and wales, rain clearing northern ireland and northern england as the day goes on. just taking that bit longer to pull away from the north—west of scotland. another mild day, temperatures into the mid teens, 5 degrees above average for the time of year. as for the rest of the week, we will be seeing less and less of the rain as high pressure starts to build with the weather situation settling and, as it does so, some more autumn favourites the content with, and into friday, moral issue with lingering mist and fog. 0n
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into friday, moral issue with lingering mist and fog. on thursday that weather front glances off the north—west of the uk so they could be some rain for a time for northern ireland and the north—west of scotla nd ireland and the north—west of scotland but on the whole, a lot of dry weather, decent spells of sunshine anywhere from yorkshire through the midlands to the south—west could be stuck with persistent cloud on thursday, quite a dank day with diesel at times but look at the temperature, 17 london, again very mild. that'll be the story for the week, going into the weekend, and easterly breeze and things turning a little cooler as we go into next week. hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 3pm: the government says it will outline its legal advice on brexit once a deal with the eu is reached, as theresa may says there are just a "few outstanding issues" in the negotiations. 13 more bodies are recovered in california, taking the death toll in the us state's deadliest wildfires to 44, with hundreds still missing. new york in lockdown — notorious mexican drugs boss
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joaquin "el chapo" guzman appears in court amidst unprecedented security, each juror getting their own armed protection team in what they're calling there the ‘trial of the century'. a man is charged with murder after a pregnant women is shot through the stomach with a crossbow. the baby survived after an emergency caesarean section. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with reshmin chowdhury. ben stokes takes up another three spotin ben stokes takes up another three spot in the batting order as england named an unchanged side to face sri la nka named an unchanged side to face sri lanka in their second test. we'll be joining you for a full update just after 2:15pm. and we have all the weather. good afternoon. widespread sunshine across the uk today was yesterday, those were the keen —— with a keen eye on the side were treated to these unusual clouds. we will take a look at those in the next half—hour. also coming up — the water companies
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getting bogged down by wet wipes, the scourge of the sewers, as tests show that all those sold as "flushable" in the uk are not. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. theresa may has told her cabinet good progress has been made in the brexit negotiations, as ministers say they are cautiously optimistic that a deal between the uk and the european union can be reached. the prime minister briefed her cabinet on the latest developments this morning, as talks between officials continue. the cabinet office minister, david lidington, has said mps will be shown detailed legal analysis of any brexit deal before they're asked to vote to approve it. the concession was offered during a commons debate in which labour is trying to force the government to publish its full legal advice on leaving the european union.
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from westminster, our political correspondent, chris mason, reports. an autumn morning in westminster. the noise of brexit is ever present, competing ideas for what it should look like constantly flying through the air. a withdrawal agreement with brussels is not agreed yet, and even some cabinet ministers can't bring themselves to say yes to questions like this. do you still support the brexit plan? i don't know why you stand outside my flat every morning, you never get anything from it. do you never get anything from it. do you still stand by the plan? so how the negotiations going with the european union? i thought i would grab european union? i thought i would gmba european union? i thought i would graba word european union? i thought i would grab a word with the man who was effectively the prime minister's deputy. is a deal imminent? we're getting close to it. the mood is cautious optimism. we down to is one other of the really difficult issues. the negotiators worked late
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into the night over the past two night to adopt the prime minister is clear that it is not a deal at any price will stop the cabinet ministers were not turning up for a sign on the dotted line moment. there are still issues around a backstop in northern ireland. even how complicated that is, this man is absolutely crucial, the government's chief legal adviser, the attorney general. the attorney general was macro advice is seen as so important, they banned others don't wa nt important, they banned others don't want it just to important, they banned others don't want itjust to be shared in private with the cabinet, they want to publish it so everyone can see it before they vote on any withdrawal agreement. the shadow attorney general told me seeing that legal advice is essential, because... at this stage in the so—called endgame
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that theresa may has been discussing, there is a real danger that she comes back with something but the deal is that of a fudge, so it is really important that before mps are required to vote on this potentialfudge, mps are required to vote on this potential fudge, they really understand what it means. is it time to walk away from the talks? is no deal better than a bad deal? as the cabinet meeting wrapped up, the questions kept coming. the time for a nswe rs , questions kept coming. the time for answers, any questions kept coming. the time for a nswe rs , a ny a nswe rs questions kept coming. the time for answers, any answers those nearer. —— draws nearer. let's go now to our chief political correspondent, vicki young, who joins us now from westminster. this is less about what we know then what we feel at the moment, isn't it? yes, i think having sat through lots of briefings by downing street when things haven't been progressing well, even though they didn't say much today, it was clear that some progress has been made in those intensive talks overnight for the
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last two night. there is a deadline that both sides say is a true deadline that, by tomorrow night, thatis deadline that, by tomorrow night, that is the cut—off point if you are going to get this emergency summit in november. if you don't, you are running into december which neither side wants. that doesn't mean it will definitely happen, but they are inching towards that. that is not the deal done, itjust means that enough progress has been made that it can come back to cabinet who can look at it and decide if they want to go to the next stage of that summit. none of that is completely certain. it certainly feels as though there is progress, at least a little bit. the row has been about the legal advice, and who gets to see it. david lidington, who was doing this on behalf of the government today, was responding to labour pressure. this is what he said he was going to offer. we will make available...
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we will make available to all members of the house, following the conclusion of negotiations and ahead of the meaningful vote, a full, position statement laying out the government's both political and also legal position on the proposed withdrawal agreement and that includes any protocols that might be attached to it. labour, the dup and some conservatives wanted it to go further than that. they want full legal advice to be published, and the government has decided not to vote, to abstain later on today, which means it will pass will stop let's work out what all of this means. i enjoyed by tony lloyd, labour's northern ireland spokesman. what does this mean? this mission will go through, is it binding? with the kit is now binding. what that means, quite rightly, is that our parliament, there presentation of the people of the united kingdom, will have the same legal advice about the withdrawal agreement as
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the cabinet sees. this is the most important decision i will have seen in my whole life. it is right and proper that the full legal advice is there, not some half written essay by those who potentially can disguise the real impact. it is important and interesting that the democratic unionist party, normally willing to vote with the government, have made it clear that they will fight would labour on this, such is the impact of the vote will make in half an hour's time. the publication of the attorney general‘s legal advice hasn't happened over the yea rs, advice hasn't happened over the years, because they need to take advice from lawyers knowing that it would be made public. what about breaking that president? this is a different situation. the legal advice when there are many different courses of action that are on offer
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may contain different caveats, different nuances. that is normally practice. —— that is the normal legal practice. this withdrawal agreement will have ramifications that will last for many years to come, who knows how long. 0n that will last for many years to come, who knows how long. on this occasion, it is possible to say that the government has to make an exception to ensure that the country asa exception to ensure that the country as a whole is properly informed as to what impact they will be. in my particular area of interest, northern ireland, will there be a guarantee that there is no hard border? we have demanded that and it has been promised that that will happen. we'll be good friday agreement still be in place? it is not something that can be speculated on. we need certainty to make sure it is there. i think it is the right
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decision of labour to put this motion down, and i'm glad that the government, for whatever reason, has seen sense and apparently they will not oppose this, which means that that advice will now be available on behalf of the whole of people of this country. thank you. that legal advice will be seen by mps, together with other reports, political and economic assessments before they hold any vote on any kind of deal that does come back. thank you. let's get the thoughts now from our europe correspondent, damian grammaticas, whojoins me now from brussels. a change in the mood music slightly, we have heard from jean—claude yunker and angela merkel. yes, they are in strasbourg today at the european parliament session there. we have mrs merkel addressing there. we have mrs merkel addressing the parliament. they have been
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watching closely what has been happening here with those negotiations, and the negotiators tried to nail down those difficult last few points. all of this revolves around how to resolve that issue around the irish border, the uk's idea of a customs union arrangement, the eu demands that go with that for a level playing field in future. and the difficult things about britain mean the uk had to accept. jean claude juncker, speaking a while ago, this is what he had to say. this is not a reason to leave the great history between the islands and the european union. in fact, i think that to leave is a tragedy, an error, a mistake. we
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have to do the best out of it, and the european commission, together with michel barnier, is moving in that direction. those sentiments also echoed by the german chancellor addressing the european parliament. she called brexit a wound, but she too also stressed that the eu is acting mr barnier. we have seen this solid position on the eu side, with full confidence in mr barnier. translation: we experienced a series of crisis. we have experienced international terrorism, violence, armed conflicts and migration movements, which have had a serious impact on us in europe. and we are seeing our values called into question. the united kingdom is a country which is soon going to leave the european union. this is a deep wound and i think that turning now to michel barnier here for the work that he's done, i think that we can all applaud him for it.
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so warm —ish words there, but in the meantime, the european commission has published its details of what happens in the event of a no—deal brexit. that is interesting, because it addresses the idea of whether people from this country will need visas to go there and vice versa. exactly. these are the no deal preparations, and the eu has been engaged in these four months now. we have had more today addressing that issue about what paperwork with the required. what the european commission is proposing is these free travel for uk citizens to the
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eu in the event of no deal. this would be from march next year. that would be from march next year. that would be from march next year. that would be for the purpose of holidays and brief business visits. so less than 90 days in any six month period. crucially, only if the uk reciprocates. as debbie did to mr jean claude juncker said, he reciprocates. as debbie did to mr jean claudejuncker said, he said that basically we want visa free travel, and it is down to you, you should reciprocate. the thing to remember that is that this applies to holiday travel, working for permanent moves to work are separate. they are subject to separate. they are subject to separate negotiations and would still, even if these free travel came in, there will be other issues that come up. the eu is bringing in
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a travel authorisation system. even if you have visa free travel, you would have to go online, the latter preauthorisation form to get security clearance which would cost between five and 7 euros was up things like moving your pet passport in the uk, it would no longer be an eu one, you would need new documents will stop your car insurance might be invalid. you would have to check that. vat would be a big issue because you fall outside of their customs regime. only a small number of goods could be imported duty—free. there are many effects that the eu is pointing towards in preparation of no deal. if you're unsure about the various terms surrounding brexit, then you can go to the bbc news website and look for the brexit jargon—buster your guide to all the key terms. a man has been charged
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with the murder of a pregnant woman who was shot through the stomach with a crossbow. heavily pregnant devi unmathallegadoo, 35, was fatally injured at her home in ilford in east london, on monday. doctors managed to deliver her son in hospital after an emergency caesarean section. he's currently in a stable condition. our, reporter navtejjohal, told me what more was known about the case. the 35—year—old was allegedly attacked with a crossbow on monday morning in front of her five children at their home in ilford in east london. this incident occurred at around east london. this incident occurred ataround 7am. east london. this incident occurred at around 7am. following the attack, she was taken to hospital, where she later died. her baby is described as being ina later died. her baby is described as being in a stable condition following an emergency caesarean section by doctors at the hospital. meanwhile, a 50—year—old man is set
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to appear at the old bailey on thursday charged with her murder. her husband described her as a wonderful mother and wife. the couple, we understand, had been together for around seven years. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the government says it will outline its legal advice on brexit once a deal with the eu is reached — as theresa may says there are just a "few outstanding issues". in the negotiations. 44 people are now known to have died in the worst wildfires in the history of california. hundreds are still missing. one of the worlds most wanted drug traffickers, el chapo, appears in court in new york amidst unprecedented security. also coming up: an increase in average earnings — wages rose at their fastest rate in nearly a decade, in the three months to september and in sport, ben stokes will bat at number three in england's second test against sri lanka. the england side remains unchanged as there is no place for fit againjonny
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ba i rstow. no place for fit againjonny bairstow. joe cole has announced his retirement from football. he won three premier league titles, and a league cup, jutting his 17 year career. and kieran trippier has withdrawn from the england squad withdrawn from the england squad with a groin injury sustained during a match against crystal palace last week. we were just hearing what angela merkel saved to the european parliament in strasbourg. she has been talking about the comments made by emanuel macron over the weekend, who suggested that europe needed its own army. angela merkel said the eu should work on the vision to one day create a real european army. that will not please donald trump, who has been tweeting about all of this. this is what it had a short time ago. he entered the line, pay for nader
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or not. then he turns his attention to trade. he says france that makes excellent wine, but so does the us. france makes it difficult for france to sell its wine into france and charges are kate harris, whereas the opposite is the case for the us. then he goes on to a more personal attack on emanuel macron. he says that he suffers from a low approval rating in france, 26% and an on implement rate of almost 10%. by the way, he says, there is no country more nationalist than france, very proud people and rightly so. then he
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says make france great again. then he responds to the criticism he faced for not attending a ceremony due to the rain. he says he suggested driving but the security service said no, it was too far from the airport and there was a harris shutdown. he said that the big speech the next day with little reported and it was fake news. that, by the way, was reported live on bbc news. emmanuelle macron have responded, saying basically that it was no comment. a spokesman for the president said he had made his point about the european army and defence
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clear to mr about the european army and defence clearto mrtrump in about the european army and defence clear to mr trump in talks ahead on saturday in paris was up a little spat between the two residents across the atlantic. 44 people are now known to have died in the worst wildfires in california's history, and hundreds of people are still missing. most of those killed were in and around the town of paradise, which has largely been destroyed. president trump has declared a major disaster in the state, making federal aid available to affected residents. from california, david willis reports. the seafront mansions of the rich and famous prove little match for some of the worst wildfires here in living memory. the first people in the celebrity enclave of malibu knew about this blaze was when a ball of fire came barrelling over the hillside, devouring everything in its path. we never saw a fire truck probably until an hour or two after the fire went through. police, same thing, you know? it's not their fault, they were just
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inundated somewhere else. amidst a sea of ash and charred metal in the retirement town of paradise, a search is under way for hundreds of people who are missing. some died in their cars as they sought to flee the flames. those who escaped have lost everything but a sense of stoicism. i have... my clothes and i have a backpack, and that's pretty much it right now. so... it's freedom, kind of a freedom. not one you would seek, but it's there, though. we will rebuild one step at a time. we will rebuild our home and we will be a part of rebuilding that town, because it's a beautiful town. criticised for his initial response to the disaster, president trump took to twitter last night to say he'd approved a request to allocate additional funds to fight the fires. with hot, dry winds expected
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to return today and no sign of rain in the forecast, experts say it could take weeks to get california's latest wildfires fully under control. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. our correspondent, dan johnson, has been alongside emergency crews as they continue to tackle the fires. well, this is the latest fire teams have had to deal with, an intense blaze on this hillside here. and they'rejust bringing in more workers now to try and stop it flaring up again, to stop it spreading. if you just take a look down into the valley, you can see how close this fire came to the homes here. to this neighbourhood. and that's why there are so many firefighters here, on the ground and in the air as well.
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they've been dumping water and powder to try and put this fire out. this embankment was completely ablaze in the last hour, and the people who live here have been on their roofs with their garden hoses trying to protect their homes if the flames spread any further. but it looks like they've had success here in beating back the flames and dying down the fire, but the winds are blowing again, there are still communities at risk and there are lots of people across california who are going to have to rebuild. a french fishing boat has been stopped in uk waters with 17 suspected migrants on board. the craft entered the port of dover without notifying authorities shortly after midnight. the home office says border force officials found 1a men and three children on board the boat who are believed to be iranian. our reporter, leanne lawless, sent us this update from dover. the alarm was raised here just after
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midnight after a fairly large fishing boat was spotted drank to enter the western docks over there, but it wasn't communicating with the port parity, so the dover harbour board send out their boat and a tug, and an rnli boat was deployed because of the wet and windy weather here. we understand that it was then that a line onto the vessel and pulled it into port. 17 iranian migrants were found on board. in the last half—hour, the home office have confirmed that 13 men and three children. the boat is being held further down the port in a dark, and i could see it from a viewing point earlier, and you could see border force officials inspecting it. the home office say that the 1a men will have their cases progressed and the normal immigration balls, while the children have been referred to
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social services first of there is a sense that this is a growing problem here. on friday, there were seven iranian migrants found off the coast, clean to wait any had to be rescued. saturday before that, there we re rescued. saturday before that, there were seven iranian migrants who again had to be rescued just off the coast here. the dover mp has said today that the government should not be taking its eye off the ball when it comes to this brazen attempt two break into the country. they should be more patrol boats, he believes so stop a report published by the chief inspector of borders and immigration highlights the fact that checkpoints along borders are weak and understaffed. he says they can be easily exploited by migrants who are looking to enter the country illegally. the trial of one of the world's most powerful drug traffickers is beginning in new york this afternoon. joaquin guzman, known as el chapo, was extradited to the united states last year, after twice escaping from prison in mexico.
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there is huge security in place for the trial — the brooklyn bridge will be closed when el chapo is driven to court and jurors will be escorted by armed guards. nada tawfik sent us this update from new york. joaquin "el chapo" guzman was the us authorities‘ greatest prize in the war on drugs. he is known internationally as the leader of the world‘s most powerful and violent drug cartel. his extradition to the united states from mexico almost two years ago set the stage for what is good to be the biggest trial for narcotics crimes in us history. prosecutors accuse him of trafficking drugs such as cocaine and heroin worth $14 billion into the country through the sinaloa cartel. but his defence attorney says his reputation doesn‘t match the reality. he is the perfect scapegoat. you‘d think that he was the only drug dealer in mexico, that he was the only leader. there are leaders of the sinaloa cartel that are as big as him, bigger than him, alleged to be.
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you don‘t even know their names. before his capture following this dramatic raid, el chapo guzman was a mythicalfigure because of his ability to evade law enforcement in mexico for decades. he twice escaped from maximum security prisons, once through a mile long tunnel from his jail cell shower. peter vincent, a former justice department official, says it was el chapo guzman‘s own mistakes that led to his arrest. he ultimately was undone by his own arrogance and his own sense of ability to get himself out of anyjam. it‘s said he was planning to make a film about his life. after a secret meeting with actor sean penn, he agreed to record an interview. the tape will likely feature in his trial,
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alongside evidence such as wire taps, drug and weapons seizures and testimony from rival cartel members. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with susan powell. good afternoon. after many of us have been caught in hefty showers in recent days, today is offering very different in glorious sunshine. you can see the clear skies here in the satellite picture. look towards the worst boat and you can see another system waiting in the wings to head our way for tomorrow. so enjoyed the fine weather through what remains of today. mal story with a light breeze, highs of up to 15 celsius. the evening, not looking too bad but when we get into the small hours of wednesday, the rain does start to push across wales. some heavy downpours for northern ireland for a time, for northern england and to close the night, pushing into southern and eastern scotland. to the south, a drier story with clear skies and it‘s here that we will get the best of wednesday morning‘s sunshine. but as the hours go by,
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we will tend to see things clearing up from the south so wales moving into the sunshine by midday along with northern england. northern ireland, much drier for the afternoon and scotland too. the rainjust lingering to the far north. once again, some very favourable temperatures up into the mid—teens. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the government says it will outline its legal advice on brexit once a deal with the eu is reached as theresa may says there are just a "few outstanding issues" in the negotiations. 44 people are now known to have died in the worst wildfires in the history of california. hundreds are still missing. one of the world‘s most wanted drug traffickers, el chappo, will appear in court in new york this afternoon amidst unprecedented security. a man is charged with murder after a pregnant women is shot through the stomach with a crossbow. the baby survived after an emergency caesarean section. sport now on afternoon live
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with reshmin and we‘re due to hear from wayne rooney on his temporary return to the england squad? we are about to hear from him. he we are about to hearfrom him. he is due to give a press conference any moment ahead of his return to international football. there moment ahead of his return to internationalfootball. there has been some debate over whether he should put on the england shirt again. the england manager said it was all right to running‘s all—time top goal—scorer on thursday against the usa. it is now billed as the wayne rooney foundation international, raising funds for his charity. he now plays in america for dc united. he scored 53 goals for england when he last featured for his country against scotland in november 2016. we can see he isjust walking in right now. lots of
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anticipation ahead of what he is about to say. i am sure everybody is looking forward to hearing from him. 0k, looking forward to hearing from him. ok, we move on. he isjoining and eve ryo ne ok, we move on. he isjoining and everyone else, kieran trippier has withdrawn with a groin injury sustained in the win against crystal palace last weekend. england played the united states on thursday ben hall croatia in the nation‘s league next week. i want to hear what wayne rooney said but there are some issues. but let‘s talk about cricket. we won the first test in sri lanka, so we are now rejigging everything, that make sense? why not shakeit everything, that make sense? why not shake it up. it is all about the number three. we can hearfrom shake it up. it is all about the number three. we can hear from wayne rooney now. we‘ll go back to the cricket a moment. when it was announced you were going to be coming back for this final performance, how did this all come about? we wear speaking, obviously i
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have stayed in contact with the fa and we were speaking probably for about 12 months over different ideas. there is an opportunity before the world cup, which i didn't feel was right to do that. we both felt this was the right time to do it. my season is over in america and obviously the game against the usa and it is a friendly match before obviously the lads play croatia on sunday. we all felt it was the right time and the right game. why didn't you want to do it before the world cup? i think because the players are obviously preparing for the biggest tournament in football and i don't
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think personally, i didn't feel it was right to get in the way of that. i think it was the right decision. it has been quite a controversial decision, a lot of people, everybody seems to have an opinion and some people for it on some against. do you understand where people are coming from when they say they don‘t think it is a good idea, they think it devalues the game and it devalues the england cap? everyone is entitled to their opinions. i think the most important thing is, you know, speaking with the fa, we both felt it was right. the players who i have spoken to, the fa has spoken to them, they agreed and they think it is right. i think as a country, obviously we haven't done anything like this before. it is the first time. i hope in ten or15 years, we
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are sat here for someone, say harry kane, who could possibly go on and get the goal—scoring record. it would be something which will happen again. of course, it's something different and i'm not asking people to agree with it, but i think what's important as well is when it was said the game is going to go ahead and obviously i was going to come and obviously i was going to come and take part, there would be money raised for the children as well in the wayne rooney foundation which was important to me also. we know you are not going to start the game, you are not going to start the game, you will come on in the second half, but what do you think it will feel like to come on for the final time at wembley wearing an england shirt? it will be strange, but something i am looking forward to. i had my
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first training session with the team yesterday. it was strange obviously getting back in with most of the players and training. but to run out at wembley again it will be something i am extremely proud of. it will be a special moment for sure. do you feel you are good enough, fit enough to start the game? would you have prepared to start again? as i said to gareth, whatever he wants, whatever he wants from me in the game is what i will try and give him. it is important. i know this is the last game for me andl know this is the last game for me and i am not putting any pressure... i have seen bits saying should he wear the i have seen bits saying should he wearthe numberten, i have seen bits saying should he wear the number ten, should i have seen bits saying should he wearthe numberten, should he where the armband. i am not making any demands, iwant the armband. i am not making any demands, i want to do this or i want to do that. my message to gareth was
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you get what you feel you need out of the game from your players and when you feel it is right to bring me on, that is fine for me. hopefully he can do that, gets daily— macro get what is hopefully he can do that, gets daily—macro get what is right for the players and during the second half i can come on. we know this will be the last time you play for england, will it be the last time you play in england? will we see you back here again in the future? no, i made the decision to go to the states and i am sure you know, when i make states and i am sure you know, when imake a states and i am sure you know, when i make a decision i tend to stick with it. it is important to me that i give my full commitment to dc. i have seen talk about a loan move back here, which i am not prepared to do. finding my feet in the states and my children obviously go to
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school there. it wouldn't be fair on them for me to come back and have me moving back and forward. good to hear from wayne rooney ahead of the friendly against the usa on thursday. he did address some of the negative comments as to whether he should return to the england fold. he said it will be a special moment to return to wembley. back to you, simon. it is good to know he has found his feet. finally. more now on the trial of one of the world‘s most powerful drug traffickers which is beginning in new york this afternoon. joaquin guzman, known as el chapo, was extradited to the united states last year, after twice escaping from prison in mexico.... from prison in mexico. we can talk now to mike vigil. he‘s the former chief of international operations for the us drug enforcement agency and spent years living and wokring in coutnries like mexico and columbia looking in to drug cartels like the one el chapo ran. this trial, they are calling it the
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trial of the century. in terms of drug enforcement, how big a deal is this? this is probably the biggest trial in the history of the united states when it comes to criminal jurisprudence. the only other one i can remember is the oj simpson double homicide. but when you take into consideration that el chapo has headed the most powerful crime syndicate in the world, this trial is going to be something to be held, given the security, given all of the evidence that will be presented. i am sure his defence attorneys will have a lot of witnesses and a lot of exculpatory evidence, they will also present in this case. given what you have seen, which very few of us are likely to all wish to, during your
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work, how dangerous is he? el chapo isa work, how dangerous is he? el chapo is a very, very cunning and violent man. other cartels in mexico have been responsible for the murder of over 100,000 people and a lot of those deaths have never been reported because mexico is pockmarked with unmarked cemeteries. the cartel does everything in its power to protect itself from mexico security forces, from us law enforcement. so they are extraordinarily violent, simply because they protect their empire, which is generating probably between eight and $10 billion a year. he was at one stage, the world‘s richest
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man. i wonder how brave it must be for someone to stand up in the court and try to give evidence against him? thejuror is, i am sure have a lot of concern. therefore, the judge has decided they are going to be anonymous, they will not disclose their identities because they are afraid that el chapo‘s cartel can either threaten them all murdered them. so the security is really tight in terms of preventing an escape, protecting the judge, tight in terms of preventing an escape, protecting thejudge, the judiciary and also the witnesses against el chapo‘s men. judiciary and also the witnesses against el chapo's men. thank you for joining against el chapo's men. thank you forjoining us, i am afraid we are out of time but thank you for joining us from washington. thank you. 44 people are now known to have died in the worst wildfires
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in california‘s history, and hundreds of people are still missing. most of those killed were in and around the town of paradise, which has largely been destroyed. president trump has declared a major disaster in the state, making federal aid available to affected residents. let‘s speak to frank hilscher, who owns a food truck. he‘s driven to one of the makeshift camps to help feed people who have been evacuated from their homes. how would you assess the mood at the moment? can you hear me? i think he is determined to carry on with what he‘s doing. is determined to carry on with what he's doing. we will try and establish contact with him in a moment. in the meantime... wages have grown at their fastest rate in ten years, according to figures from the office for national statistics. they show average earnings rose by 3.2% in the three months to september compared with the same period last year. but after taking inflation into account, they‘re still growing only modestly — by less than 1%. and there‘s been a small rise in the number of people out of work.
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our economics correspondent andy verity has the details. african‘s biggest supplier of water softeners in woking, business is flowing in but there is a blockage in the pipeline. the labour market. its products are in demand but it has found it harder and harder to get the skilled people it needs to do the work, meaning it is not expanding as fast as it might. for a growing business like this, the challenge is not the traditional one of finding the sales, it is getting the staff to meet the orders are come in. in the ultra—tight labour market, employers have to offer better pay and benefits to attract and keep the right staff. in two years, the firm has doubled its workforce but it is only able to find enough plumbers by offering better pay and benefits, a pattern repeated across the economy. to recruit the volume of plumbers we need, we looked hard at what their requirements and what we realised is
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we were competitive in the market. we have made sure our salaries are correct, and we also increased our holiday entitlement to make us more competitive with other industries. although an estimated to have risen slightly, it is still a rate ofjust 4.1%, close to its lowest in 42 years. in july to september, wages rose more than expected, up 3.2% on the year before. that coincided with the number of eu workers falling by 132,000, the biggest drop in years. we can never be complacent, make sure that the jobs market remains buoyant. we need to make sure we help people through the job centre network to get those jobs and increase their earnings. with the economy and wages growing faster than expected, interest rate setters at the bank of england may raise interest rates to stop it overheating. the bank of england is keen to raise interest rates, they have indicated that already. the higher wage numbers suggest that maybe inflation picks up in the coming years and they need to raise interest rates.
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but there is other stuff going on in the economy, including a lot of political uncertainty at the moment. the betting in the city is that the bank of england will raise interest rates again by june next year. let‘s return to california. we have established the link with frank who owns a food trip and has driven to wa nt owns a food trip and has driven to want up the makeshift camps to feed people who have been evacuated from their homes. how bad is it the people you are helping? there are so many people who have lost everything. it is crazy when the fire came through. 7000 homes went up fire came through. 7000 homes went up inflames. fire came through. 7000 homes went up in flames. you are pushing a chairaround, up in flames. you are pushing a chair around, what is going on around you ? chair around, what is going on around you? sorry, ijust walked out of the walmart. i know you have
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loads of things to do, but can you explain. what is happening at the moment? i am trying to figure out how to flip the camera. right now, this turned into a camp almost overnight. we got here on friday. it was all spread out and will mark this morning have tried to get everybody to move into more confined spaces. they cleared out some of the stuff in the parking lotjust to make it safer for everybody. what are people most in need of at the moment? the small things, all the big stuff will come in time, but toiletries, pet food, deodorant, things you leave your house without and don‘t think about in an emergency like that. you coming to a small town like this with 30,000 people, not enough to go around. i
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went to eight stores to data fine tents. many people must be in shock? they all live in a small town where you don‘t expect anything like this to happen. they always say to prepare for it and obviously you should, but the reality is, most people don‘t. should, but the reality is, most people don't. frank, iwill let should, but the reality is, most people don't. frank, i will let you get on with what is an important job. you guys are fine, i am just showing you round the camp. we are getting right back into the main part. i will let you get on with that and maybe talk to later on or certainly later on in the week because there is concern for the terrible scenes we have been witnessing. we wish you well and thank you for your time so far. absolutely, thank you. egon cossou is here
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in a moment telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live the government says it will outline its legal advice on brexit once a deal with the eu is reached — as theresa may says there are just a ‘few outstanding issues‘ in the negotiations 44 people are now known to have died in the worst wildfires in the history of california. hundreds are still missing. one of the worlds most wanted drug traffickers, el chappo, appears in court in new york amidst unprecedented security. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. amazon plans to build major new hubs in new york and in virgina. the decision comes more than a year after it announced it was looking for a "second headquarters" location. the contest drew 238 bids from cities across the us and canada. there was a slight rise in the number of people out of work between july and september this year, to around 1.3 million, but wages grew by 3.2% in that‘s the fastest rise in almost a decade. owner of bisto and mr kipling plans
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to stockpile raw materials in the run—up to brexit because its worried about gridlock at uk ports. premier foods says it will spend up to £10 million doing this. meanwhile, the boss of the company, gavin darby it stepping down next year. apparently we‘re spending a more time commuting? yes, according to the tuc we are spending five minutes more commuting. how do you come in by the way? commuting. how do you come in by the 7 i commuting. how do you come in by the way? i drive. commuting. how do you come in by the way? idrive. it commuting. how do you come in by the way? i drive. it is notjust car drivers feeling the impact of longer commutes, rail commuters have the longest commute of all, two hours and 11 minutes. bus commuters spend
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79 minutes commuting, up by seven minutes. that is average? yes. if thatis minutes. that is average? yes. if that is average, two hours on a train, five or six hours a day? it isa train, five or six hours a day? it is a terrible thought. they wouldn‘t have a job i wouldn‘t have thought. who do you think has the shortest commuting? people walking? yes and those cycling but even they are facing longerjourneys. the tuc says the government is to blame because they are not spending enough on infrastructure. let‘s go to a representative from the tuc, lynn collins. surely this cannot be all the government‘s false? collins. surely this cannot be all the government's false? it is a combination of factors that affect travel times. there is the infrastructure available for people to travel on and we have seen over the last few months, and further
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back, long delays in trains, cancellations and overcrowding on trains. we have seen 3000 bus routes cut back. also the pattern with which we work. not only are we travelling for longer, we are trying to do it at exactly the same time. weeping employers have a responsibility to look a flexible working options. so people can travel outside the rush hour. doesn‘t that put an added burden on businesses, the whole flexible working thing? i don't think it is, it is this time of day working pa rents a re it is this time of day working parents are sitting at their desk, having and not in their stomach about the journey home and whether they will be home in time to pick kids up from school and after—school clu bs kids up from school and after—school clubs and the like. i think more productive workers are those who have the stress lifted. by having a flexible working pattern, i think employers give an indication to their staff they understand the pressures they have balancing work and family life with the transport systems we‘ve got. people will
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generally have that weight lifted off them and are more productive and it is known to reduce stress levels. if we can reduce the levels of commuting, we can reduce stress at work. doesn't the more active more vibrant economy just work. doesn't the more active more vibrant economyjust naturally result in more traffic, more delays in commuting? that is not necessarily the case. we cannot the ways in which we can spread it out. greater manchester have just introduced £1 flat fares on metrolink for off—peak travel. that is great, let‘s get employers behind it and give people an opportunity to travel a bit more in those off—peak times. it saves money and time and the employers as well as employees will both benefit. lynn collins, thank you very much indeed. let‘s look at the markets. the pound is progressing against the
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euro. renewed optimism about a possible brexit deal. premierfoods also. both of these companies have lost their chief executives or are losing them? with premier foods, the chief executive has been at odds with a lot of the shareholders so his departure has helped to boost the share price. for vodafone, despite racking up really bad losses, it is cutting costs. also their prediction is it will boost revenue said that is why the markets are liking that. you will be back in an hour. thank you very much. cctv has been released of the moment a man was pushed by another pedestrian into traffic on a busy london road following an "exchange of words". he was almost hit by a minicab
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after being shoved from the pavement on new bridge street near blackfriars. the attacker was then confronted by members of the public who took a photo of him. it has been released alongside the footage. the hope is somebody will recognise him from that image. that has just been released by the city of london
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police. the uk‘s first specialist wound research centre has opened in birmingham. it will treat injured military personnel, as well as civilians hurt in terrorist attacks and road accidents. the centre will develop new techniques with the aim of achieving scar free healing within a generation, as our defence correspondent jonathan beale reports. hundreds of british service personnel suffered life—changing injuries while fighting in afghanistan and iraq. and many are still living with the visible scars from battle. josh bodge lost both his legs and his right arm when he stepped on a roadside bomb in helmand in 2010. here i have some scarring down the bottom. he still suffers from heavy scarring, susceptible to tears. he now has hope that these wounds can be healed with the help of new pioneering techniques at queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham. the issues i have with scarring is where it breaks down and the skin is not joined together, it‘s not used to weight—bearing.
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anything that will help myself or other injured guys or anyone in society that has a lot of scarring, anything that‘s out there is going to help. at the scar—free foundation centre for conflict wound research, scientists are already using laser technology to reduce the scarring on old wounds. they‘re also developing new treatment to deal with burns on the battlefield and elsewhere. patients and medical staff have taken their inspiration from the treatment of raf crews who suffered serious burns during the second world war. it speeds up the healing process and reduces the scarring. patients and medical staff have taken their inspiration from the treatment of raf crews who suffered serious burns during the second world war. the goal now is to achieve scar—free healing within a generation. we think it‘s doable, particularly if you can treat the wound very quickly and prevent the scar in the first place then yes, it should be possible.
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the hope is that techniques developed will notjust help wounded soldiers but also civilians who might have been the victims of a bomb or an acid attack. now, do you remember the first time you saw snow? well, these two eritrean refugee children havejust experienced it for the very first time. they and their family arrived in their new home in wintry canada last week. the video, which shows the siblings dancing in light snowfall, was filmed by a refugee group in toronto. time for a look at the weather, here‘s susan powell. good afternoon. after all the showers of the last few days, prospects through today have been a good deal drier and brighter and we‘ll stay with some clearer skies for the remainder of the afternoon and on into the evening.
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beautiful pictures from the coast of hampshire from earlier today. satellite picture showing very clearly where we sit at the moment between the two weather fronts and showers we saw yesterday and our next weather system waiting to move in for tomorrow. to this afternoon, largely clear skies, and light breeze and mild once again. highs of 13 or 1a degrees. but, as you saw from the satellite picture, and as you can see just to the west of us, by the time we get into this evening, cloud will be starting to thicken, the wind will pick up once again and overnight rain will push into northern ireland across wales, heavier downpours for northern england for a time before the rain surges into southern and eastern scotland for the end of the night. clearer skies to the south. a mild night again, temperatures in double figures for many, single figures just in the odd spot. first thing on wednesday, some sunshine for central and eastern england. more cloud around elsewhere but it will brighten as the day goes on for the south west. for wales by the afternoon, some sunshine here. rain clearing northern ireland and northern england
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as the day comes to a close. just taking that little bit longer to pull away from the north—west of scotland. but a mild day again, temperatures into the mid—teens. a good four or 5 degrees at least above average for the time of year. as for the rest of the week, we‘ll be seeing less and less of the rain as high pressure starts to build across us. the weather situation settling down and as it does so, more autumn favourites to contend with, shall we say. on into friday and particularly the weekend, more of an issue with lingering mist and fog. thursday, a weather front does try to glance into the north—west of the uk so there could be some rain for a time for northern ireland and for the north—west of scotland, but on the whole, a lot of dry weather. decent spells of sunshine but anywhere from yorkshire through the midlands and into the south—west, could be stuck with more persistent cloud on thursday. quite a dank day with maybe drizzle at times, but look at the temperature, 17 in london. again we said in some very mild air. that will be the story to finish the week. taking us into the weekend,
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we pick up a bit more of an easterly breeze and things will turn cooler as we go into next week. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4. the government says it will outline its legal advice on brexit once a deal with the eu is reached — as labour insist they should publish it in full. a man is charged with murder after a pregnant women is shot through the stomach with a crossbow. the baby survived after an emergency caesarean section. 13 more bodies are recovered in california — taking the death toll in the us state‘s deadliest wildfires to 44 — with hundreds still missing. new york in lockdown — notorious mexican drugs boss joaquin "el chapo" guzman —
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appears in court amidst unprecedented security. each juror getting their own armed protection team in what they‘re calling there the ‘trial of the century‘. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with reshmin chowdhury. wayne rooney is the top story. he says it is great to be back with england and they got a fantastic reception from the players ahead of his one off return to international football. he will feature in the friendly against the usa on thursday. thanks, reshmin, and susan powell has all the weather. we will take a look at the clouds doing funky things and then we will look at how cloud is becoming a bigger part of our forecast. thanks, susan. also coming up — sunken treasure. the staffordshire pottery retrieved from a ship that went down off the coast of kent more than 150 years ago. hello, everyone.
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this is afternoon live. downing street says that at a small number of outstanding issues in the brexit cox. theresa may has told her cabinet good progress has been made in the brexit negotiations, as ministers say they are cautiously optimistic that a deal between the uk and the european union can be reached. the cabinet office minister, david lidington, has said mps will be shown detailed legal analysis of any brexit deal before they‘re asked to vote to approve it. in the last few minutes mps have agreed labour‘s decision. let‘s go to our chief political correspondent vicki young who is in westminster. you get the sense things about to
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happen? the argument today is slightly different to the bigger picture. this of course means the government will have to publish legal advice. the motion put down by labour and passed without a vote means they will have to do so all the labour make it clear they don‘t expect it be published now. this will be after some kind of deal is done and dusted mps get a meaningful vote. the crucial thing is that mps have to be fully informed about what they asked to sign up to. the broader picture, the mood music if you like coming from downing street, although they are being very cautious is that they are inching towards some kind of text of the withdrawal agreement from the eu. that means the text is there and they have gone as far as they can 90, they have gone as far as they can go, the two sides. that text has to
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come back to london to be seen by cabinet ministers and we expect that if they get to that stage there will be an emergency cabinet meeting. possibly tomorrow night. maybe early on thursday morning, but this deadline of wednesday night as their because both sides say they need to know by tomorrow night if they can give the go—ahead to this emergency summit at the end of november, which is what both sides seem to want. so it seems as though things are moving. as theresa may said last night, negotiations are in the endgame and the suggestion from whitehall sources today is that the deal is close today than yesterday after a very long talks by officials in brussels which went on until the early hours of the morning. just talk us through the timing of this. with those announcements over the last few minutes it becomes a bit of a formality? how much of a role will be speaker have and what goes on in the next hour or so? on the legal
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advice this is all about the motion labour put down. in the end that is what is past. it is a binding motion, and that is probably a little bit of confusion because keir starmer got up to see that he was not asking for everything or the legal advice to be for all the back published in one go. he wants the final legal advice. people are trying to put any compromise. that didn‘t get selected but the truth of this is, and the broader and more important picture, that the democratic unionist party made it clear they wouldn‘t support the government on the legal advice. once a few conservatives said they couldn‘t then the government knew it would lose so they didn‘t have anywhere to go, so they got up and said they would publish something but in the end the labour motion carries, so they must decide when the time comes what the hell advice
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they are going to publish. the sense has always been that the issue of the irish backstop will be central to any change. this is from tony connelly, he is quoting a senior source saying it would be wrong to say negotiations are concluded, but it is understood that is one over backstop it is understood that is one over ba cksto p to it is understood that is one over backstop to avoid a hard border, in the form of a uk wide customs arrangements and it will have deeper provisions for northern ireland on the customs and regulatory site, which would suggest that the one real problem in all the negotiations, there does seem to be a breakthrough? this is, if it is true, and it does chime with the other things we have been hearing over the last couple of weeks, this is the idea of a uk wide backstop. we knew that the eu was considering this. it was asked for by theresa
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may and the government will view this as a concession by the eu, the idea that the whole of the uk can stay in a customs arrangements. this is to avoid any border checks between northern ireland and ireland. this is if a trade deal was not in place which solves this whole issue. so it is a fallback position but it would seem the eu have accepted that, the overall backstop could be a uk wide customs arrangements. there are many issues with that. on the eu said they will wa nt to with that. on the eu said they will want to know what rules and regulations the uk would sign up to when it comes to environmental laws, and what eu countries are very worried about is the uk being able to undercut them on things, because we would still have this customs arrangements, which is good for trade and businesses in this country. but would they still have to abide by the same rules that eu
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countries and businesses would have to. the other issue is the arrangements for northern ireland and that has been absolutely crucial. the government needs the support of the dup, and speaking to them earlier it was very clear that they have deep concerns about exactly what they will be expected to sign up to and how different that‘ll be for the best of the uk because they do not want to be treated any differently. theresa may has said all along she does not want the united kingdom to be broken up in any way at all. and as ever, the details of this document when it comes, could be hundreds of pages long. the deed deal could be of crucial importance along with that legal advice as well. very quickly, tony connelly, i am quoting him, and the irish are as interested in this process as we are. he says a review mechanism is understood to be part of the text. that will strike some asa of the text. that will strike some as a phage but does mean things move
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forward. -- fudge. it depends whether the uk can get out of that arrangement of its own volition. that has been the worry of many in the cabinet. brexit years and those on the other side of the argument. the idea that the uk could be trapped in this customs arrangement with no way out and that is why you need a review mechanism. the details of that mechanism, who decides and who is the main arbiter, is that the european court of justice? who is the main arbiter, is that the european court ofjustice? something that would not get through this place. is it a dual mechanism we‘re both sides are looking at it. it is ha rd to both sides are looking at it. it is hard to know without seeing the full text but that is what people will be looking at and again the uk government will be saying we have got this review mechanism, it means it is only temporarily. others on the other side including the irish government say that if it is temporarily and you can cancel the
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arrangement, how can that be an insurance policy only backstop, sue will have to see exactly what form that ticks. it is the nature of this whole brexit negotiation that you andi whole brexit negotiation that you and i at 2pm focusing on what will happen in the house of commons in terms of this vote on the legal analysis. it would appear that events could be overtaking that? even though the uk government has been extremely careful about what it is saying that things leak out from the other side, and it has been all the other side, and it has been all the way through this process dubbed in the irish government clearly who have such a steak and all this, who are concerned about what happens, about the return of border checks with northern ireland, something they don‘t want to see. that goes back to the bad old days of the troubles. they don‘t want that and they have watched this extremely carefully a nd they have watched this extremely carefully and we have been consulted on all of this all the way along. there are 27 other countries
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involved sought a slightly inevitable that some details will lea k inevitable that some details will leak out through other routes, but we have to be pretty careful at this stage. people will be putting out the details that they want and that is one side of the argument. a com pletely is one side of the argument. a completely different side of the argument when the phil pritchard is known. when it happens, when the cabinet gets to the doubtful document. they have been allowed to lead one that existed already, all that issue of the backstop, the fallback position that was so controversial. it is the details of that, when the scene, that will decide whether cabinet says yes, we are happy to rubber—stamp this, and also whether parliament will be happy to do so. it is worth saying that downing street have been stressing this is just about getting sufficient progress to get another summitand the sufficient progress to get another summit and the end of november. they are very careful to say this is not the deal, that negotiations would
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still go on, but if you have got that text of the wet parole agreement, most people will see that asa agreement, most people will see that as a significant step forward and that should get them to the summit at the end of november, which both sides have said would only happen if they felt they were pretty close to a deal. because you were there and we will all looking at this legal advice motion as being crucial, mps have approved the legal advice motion, labour proposal, without the need for a formal vote. just explain what has actually happened and where that leaves the government at the moment. that hasn't been a vote because the government decided to tell its mps not to take part. they we re tell its mps not to take part. they were going to abstain so they don‘t ta ke were going to abstain so they don‘t take part. the reason is presumably because they thought they were going to lose. once the democratic unionist party and several conservative mps said they would not fought with the government, they knew they could not get it through. that is why it has gone through with it being opposed but it is what is
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on that motion that counts and labour are calling for the release of legal advice to do with the withdrawal agreement. that document, which could run to hundreds of pages long, the legal advice that goes along side that. mps want to be able to see it before they have to take an extremely crucial decision. that meaningful vote that should and could happen here in the next few weeks about whether they decide to go along with the terms of withdrawal from the european go along with the terms of withdrawalfrom the european union that the government is going to put before them and they want to now legally where it stands and what it means and what the repercussions are four issues such as northern ireland, and that will be in the end extremely important. thank you. our europe correspondentjoins me now from brussels. we are obsessed with the minutiae here, but what we
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do know is that seems to be a change in the mood music and we have heard that directly from jean—claude juncker and angela merkel? we have all been watching closely to see as the negotiators have been honing in on those final tricky legal points and suggestions coming and that they may have hammered out some sort of text that could be presented to both london and the 27 eu countries, and our te cultivate a text that addresses the irish border and the questions the uk have wanted a better customs arrangement for the uk and the new mechanism for the uk to exit that in future. the devil of courses and that really difficult legal bto. 500 pages of the real thing that politicians have to sign off on what ever the negotiators managed to agree. in the context of that, the pressure has been building
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with this deadline approaching for the ratification process. what we have seen today in strasberg at the european parliament, jean—claude juncker addressing the parliament, talking about the eu‘s desire to see ideal to conclude this process for this orderly withdrawal, and this is what he told the parliament. this is not a reason to leave the great history between the islands and the european union. in fact i think that to leave is a tragedy. a historical error, a mistake. we have to do the best out of it and the european commission together, is moving into that direction. and this has been the eu‘s position
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from the beginning, regretting brexit and not wanting to see the uk's brexit and not wanting to see the uk‘s departure but keen to sort out the details through its withdrawal agreement that has been negotiated here. angela merkel also addressed the parliament today, and she put brexit in the context of a whole series of crises that have been confronting the union, and again talked about her desire to support michel barnier. we have experienced a cd5 we have experienced a cds of crises. we have experienced a cds of crises. we have experienced international terrorism, violent, armed conflicts, and migration movements, which have had a serious impact on us in europe. and we are seeing our value is called into question. the united kingdom is a country which is soon going to leave the european union.
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this is a deep wound. and i think that turning now to michel barnier here for the work that he has done, i think we can all applaud him. i don‘t know about you butjust listening to this and seeing what has gone on for the last 48 hours seems to be a real mood in the air that something is about to happen? certainly, because and this is the crucial thing, the timing of this. the issue is to get all of the steps that will need to be done to happen in time and comfortably in time for the uk‘s exit at the end of march next year. things have to start moving right about now and that has focused everybody‘s minds, so what we have seen are the negotiators working really late into the night, the past two nights, so last night and the night before. they have done
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that way from the scrutiny, in secret, which is why we have not been able to know what is going on in there, but all of that has led to focusing of mines and what appears now to be this homing in on the final text, the critical thing to say is what the negotiators agree here is one thing and may have taken months and months to get to, but the really difficult letters to the political bet, back in london particularly early in the cabinet. can they agree on whatever is put on the table to do with tying the uk into customs arrangements in the future? how the uk might exit from that, all those provisions, and then the eu said, what do they think of what the eu negotiators have given up what the eu negotiators have given up on fishing rights and all sorts of things like that, so that many still in play, however closely the text is to being finished.
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still in play, however closely the text is to being finishedlj still in play, however closely the text is to being finished. i hear that, but there are a lot of rumours and westminster right now, only a couple of newspaper websites, that there will be a cabinet meeting here tomorrow, sojust there will be a cabinet meeting here tomorrow, so just through the timing because the focus goes to the cabinet tomorrow and then switches back to where you are? yes, so what would have to happen is the text agreed goes to the cabinet in the uk, critical discussion to see whether theresa may can get approval around her cabinet table for that. then it comes back here and has to be presented to the eu ambassadors here, so the countries are all fully briefed. the process then has to go through which is to send that to eu capitals itself, so they can scrutinise the text and have input to that, and they are clear that the
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uk is on board and is moving in the direction of accepting what has been thrashed out by the negotiators. all of that then leads to the calling of an eu summit, a special summit of the eu leaders which will take place year and theresa may would come here. the thought is that all those processes on the eu side alone make it takes 7—10 days, possibly quicker but could easily be that long, beef ora but could easily be that long, beef or a special summit held to try to seal that final deal. so we are still looking at quite a few days and quitea still looking at quite a few days and quite a lot of manoeuvring to come, and all of that then would enable things to be cleared for the beginning of ella december to start going through the parliamentary ratification processes on both sides. that is the time pressure for eve ryo ne sides. that is the time pressure for everyone to try to get a deal signed off this week. i just want to bring
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you some news. i off this week. i just want to bring you some news. i am off this week. i just want to bring you some news. i am just looking at twitter and this is from tom newton dunn and he is breaking the news that cabinet ministers have been called into ten downing st to see the prime minister one by one tonight, he says, ahead of the full cabinet meeting tomorrow to sign off the brexit divorce deal and is in the brexit divorce deal and is in the words of tom newton dunn, endgame is beginning. i am going to return to vicky young in westminster shortly because obviously things are moving by the minute here. watching afternoon life and that other news. a man has been charged with the murder of a pregnant woman who was shot through the stomach with a crossbow. heavily pregnant devi unmathallegadoo, 35, was fatally injured at her home in ilford in east london, on monday. doctors managed to deliver her son in hospital after an emergency caesarean section. he‘s currently in a stable condition. let‘s go to our correspondent who
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isn‘t guildford four is now. just tell us what has happened. police we re tell us what has happened. police were called yesterday morning at about 7:40 a:m.. when the got here they found severely injured with an abdominal injury. she was taken to hospital, eight months pregnant, and when she got to hospital doctors we re when she got to hospital doctors were able to save the life of her unborn son but unfortunately they we re unborn son but unfortunately they were not able to save her life and she died. a 50—year—old man was arrested on site and appeared before magistrates this morning charged with her murder. he will appear again before a judge at the old bailey on thursday. police have said he was known to mrs mohammed in this
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neighbourhood. her husband was also here with their five children aged between one and 17. they are now staying at a hotel somewhere, but he has spoken to the evening standard newspaper saying that his wife was a wonderful mother and wife. he said he was heartbroken and that they we re he was heartbroken and that they were inseparable. donald trump has launched a series of scathing tweets about the french president emmanuel macron — he began by criticising his proposals for a european army. he said: "macron suggests building its own army to protect europe against the us, china and russia. but it was germany in world wars one & two — how did that work out for france? they were starting to learn german in paris before the us came along. pay for nato or not!" he continued — "france makes excellent wine, but so does the us. the problem is that france makes it very hard for the us to sell its wines into france, and charges big tariffs, whereas the us
quote
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makes it easy for french wines, and charges very small tariffs. not fair, must change!" then it gets personal. he then turned his attention to his much criticised decision not to visit the french cemetery over the weekend — by the way, when the helicopter couldn‘t fly to the first cemetery in france because of almost zero visibility, i suggested driving. secret service said no, too farfrom airport & big paris shutdown. speech next day at american cemetery in pouring rain! little reported—fa ke news! it was in fact covered live by us on the news channel. let‘s go to our
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washington correspondent. there is a serious point because he has only just left france having been hosted by france and then turns on them. just left france having been hosted by france and then turns on themm a sense, he started it before he even got there when he appears to have confused a speech that emanuel macron made about european rapid reaction force, an army if you like, what is warnings about cyber crime. he seems to be interpreting the first as a reason for america to be worried, and it is some confusion, we understand, certainly as the french are spinning this, and then it spirals out of control. we know he is incredibly sensitive, if anyone suggests he is a bit soft or not particularly manly. the idea floating around that he didn‘t go because it was raining, that has really got under his skin. and then
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the stuff that nationalism, he will see as directed at him because he made that part of his pitch using the mid—term elections. he can only be glad that he didn‘t see the tweet from the french army which had a picture of a french soldier in the rain and if you will excuse my french he said... which roughly translated is a better brain around but not that serious. i missed that one, must have a look. also, when he gets home donald trump then faces what looks like legal action from cnn? this is the continuing saga withjim cnn? this is the continuing saga with jim acosta, cnn? this is the continuing saga withjim acosta, the chief white house correspondent, who has had his past taken away because of a fracas with the post mid—term press conference. they have accused him of laying hands on a female and her. the white house intern has been
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accused of doctoring the video and it has got right out of control. in a sense, it served as both sides of that spat quite loyal. —— quite well. the white house keeps up the pressure on the so—called fake news, and cnn, let‘s put it this way, i think we are making the most of it in terms of their level of indignation. they are saying it is a free speech, first amendment issue, andi free speech, first amendment issue, and i think we‘re planning on suing the white house over this. as ever, thanks for talking to us. things are moving in westminster. laura kuenssberg has just tweeted political editor. source confirms, divorce deal text agreed at a technical level and she says cabinet to meet early afternoon tomorrow. as you can see, might be an official
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confirmation soon. she tweeted earlier that they seem to be lining up earlier that they seem to be lining upfor earlier that they seem to be lining up for cabinet to sign off on the text tomorrow. not confirmed yet but you can see they are expecting some confirmation. let‘s go to vicky youngin confirmation. let‘s go to vicky young in westminster. my word, things are moving fast. so as we said earlier it was clear that had been progress. there have been these long talks, and when they say at a technical level, officials, one from the uk said, one from the european commission said. they have been in negotiations for two years. they have been doing toxin into the night. the night before last and late yesterday evening and started this morning, so it appears that they were all agreement has been agreed at a technical level and that is what it means. it means they feel they have gone as far as they can go ata they have gone as far as they can go at a technical level and have put a text together and now the next stage
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means cabinet ministers have to look at it and they have to look at a lot of what is already in existence, that was made a 5% of the weapon all agreement. the bet that was missing. the all—importa nt issue agreement. the bet that was missing. the all—important issue of what happens to prevent border checks between northern ireland and southern ireland that is no trade deal arrangement in place, and that is what everyone will be looking very closely at. i am just going to try... iamjust very closely at. i am just going to try... i am just going to try and get a guest to talk about this but he will be back in a second. so it does seem the text is there and the next stage is cabinet and we think that will be happening tomorrow early afternoon, possibly when the cabinet sit around and they decide whether that agreement, what they can see in writing, is something that they can agree to and if they do, iam that they can agree to and if they do, i am sure there will be a corneal graft acceptance. dominik rab would probably go to brussels. they will talk about it and this is all about getting to the next stage
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which is a summit at the end of november. the european commission a lwa ys november. the european commission always said that they would call an emergency summit if they felt sufficient progress had been made. this suggests the fact that a text has been agreed at a technical level would suggest enough sufficient progress has been made for that to happen and then you would have that summit. this all depends on the cabinet now deciding whether this is something they can go along with and we know that many of them have deep reservations about the plans, as they thought they were. they will now be looking at the fine print, the detail, to see if that is an flower. it is a compromise, we know that, and they have been told they will not get everything they want but can they go along with the compromise? as you say that i am looking at a tweet from tom newton dunn. he is suggesting that cabinet ministers will be called into ten downing st tonight individually. theresa may needs to know how they‘re going to respond tomorrow. yes, she will want to speak to them
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individually to find out what they think. they will want to see the detail, that will be the crucial thing. the crucial detail and the other person i was trying to speak to at the dup, they haven‘t seen any of the text. they told me that earlier. they were called in to see what was there previously but they will expect to be kept in the loop at some point to see that. as you said earlier, some of the detail coming out of ireland, the irish government is of course have been closely involved in this. this last 596 closely involved in this. this last 5% of the withdrawal deal, the bit they couldn‘t get agreement on. the main cause of concern for people in the cabinet here, is whether the uk will be stuck in some kind of customs arrangements, unable to do its own deals, unable to break free from the eu and have no way out on their own. but they have to make that decision. if brexit was all
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about bringing back control, there are some in the cabinet who said this would leave us no control whatsoever over our destiny. what is the mechanism they might have come up the mechanism they might have come up with? some kind of compromise. the irish government has always been concerned the uk could walk away from that arrangement at any time and for them it is not an insurance policy, is because if one psycho just cancel it, how cannot work? cabinet ministers want to see the detail and that is what they could be shown overnight. tomorrow morning will be the all—important cabinet where we will see whether cabinet with reservations can go along with what is put in front of them or they might decide to resign if they can‘t. might decide to resign if they can't. has the government managed to dodge a bullet by not having this vote on the issue of the legal advice? because nigel dodgson, i
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know that needs you are trying to talk to a moment ago, but there was a suggestion the dup were thinking of breaking the confidence of supply agreements and voting with labour on that issue. have the government managed to dodge that by effectively not opposing it? they may have them, but they now have two published the legal advice. the dup said they couldn‘t support the government over this and that is why the government decided that in the end they were going to abstain from the vote and allow the labour motion to go through saying they do have two published legal advice at some point before parliament has a meaningful vote. we a re before parliament has a meaningful vote. we are talking about a withdrawal agreement, text being agreed at technical level. there are many hurdles to go through. notjust the cabinet, then the meaningful vote in the house of commons about whether parliament passes a compromise that the by minister has
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been negotiating and the ratification has to happen on the other side as well. there are some hurdles for the prime minister to get over and it has been looking very precarious in recent weeks with people increasingly agitated about what they were haring about what was going to be in the withdrawal agreement. notjust those on the brexit side who were worried about the uk being too tightly close to the uk being too tightly close to the european rules are not being able to escape, but alsojoejohnson who resigned on friday, saying we have none of the benefits of being in the eu but we have to go along with the rules don‘t have a say over those rules. vicki, i know you are itching to get away to talk to people. thank you for your updates so far. i suspect we will be talking again later on. vicky young in westminster. the company which owns well known food brands such as bisto and mr kipling, has said it intends to stockpile raw materials in the run—up to brexit
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as fears grow of gridlock at uk ports. premier foods said it has set aside up to £10 million for preparations because of what the firm said was ‘an absence of certainty‘. the company insisted it was purely a precautionary measure. let‘s get the thoughts of andrew opie, director of food and sustainability at the british retail consortium. i will come onto what is going on in the moment, but in broad terms, what is going on in the real world in preparation for the end of march? because clearly companies now need to get ready? planning has switched towards what might happen in no deal situation and that is difficult, as we have heard from premierfoods today. they will have to spend money they can find the capacity, which not all companies can, to store products. it is with fresh products where the problem lies. the uk is importing a lot of its fresh produce from europe before we switched to produce from the uk. the produce is
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mostly brought through the dover calais route and calais is likely to be the worst affected through brexit. that will have a significant impact on the products on our supermarket shelves. what sort of impact? if you think about we are importing about 90% of letters and 70% of soft fruit from europe. you can immediately see if you wander down the fruit and veg isle, what the impact may be through problems of availability, shelf life might be shorter and prices are likely to rise. we have been talking about the queues this side of the tunnel, lorries trying to get out, presumably when imports are that big, the number coming back will be horrendous? it is a circular system and it works well at the moment and the supplied chain to europe is integrated. you put any blockage in that system, which will be calais, and that is back in to dover and you will see how quickly the system
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brea ks will see how quickly the system breaks down. let's talk about what we are seeing at the moment, adam fleming in brussels hasjust tweeted, at the eu 27 are meeting in brussels tomorrow evening. that is to talk about a no deal plan and they have issued a leaflet on that. but given the news we are hearing a possible cabinet meeting tomorrow in the uk, they may have other things to discuss and a possible general affairs meeting with ministers on monday. so many roads to cross before we talk about a deal being done, but this will be music to the ea rs of done, but this will be music to the ears of people who need to know what is going on? it is the uncertainty getting to be the problem. as we get closer to the no deal, that uncertainty is a problem for supermarkets and their suppliers, not knowing if they can get produce across the borders in march. the
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more certainty we have, the better and the longer this period goes the worse it is. when we get into december, the food retailers and their suppliers will beginning up for the biggest time of year when they make their biggest profits, which is christmas. it is difficult to get of conversation around no deal planning in december. so you have the added complication for the supermarkets. when you talk about the food, all those units have been booked for that period? the capacity for the south of england has already gone. it is used by other industries across the uk. it is notjust about food,it across the uk. it is notjust about food, it is about key ingredients. if you remember earlier this year when we ran out of co2 and the impact it had on the wider supply chain. it is notjust about getting ingredients across—the—board it is about getting key inputs like co2
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and packaging as well. it is all about money, this is costing?m and packaging as well. it is all about money, this is costing? it is, we have seen that from premier, it affects their cash flow and money they are paying up front. retailers and their suppliers are investing in no deal preparations. but there is a limit to how much you can do because every time you come back to the dover calais route, and that is the big problem in the equation. looking at the possibility of some sort of deal might be in the offing in the next day or so, the argument of no deal is better than a bad deal, is there a sense butjust to get something on paper which can be worked out in detail after march the 29th, is that preferable? no deal is the worst option. no doubt about that. 80% of imports come from the eu and we haven‘t even talked about
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tariffs. if the government start to apply tariffs to products, which is possible because the eu is likely to do that with our exports, that will add extra cost as well as the extra cost from trying to get the product across—the—board. cost from trying to get the product across-the-board. if we took the politics out of this and i know it is impossible, but on the basis of money talks, in the long run business will sort this out because europe needs the uk and the uk need european retail terms? europe needs the uk and the uk need european retailterms? business europe needs the uk and the uk need european retail terms? business is doing everything it can to mitigate, but this is a political decision. we will do everything we can to mitigate potential problems, but we can tell politicians on both sides of the channel, it is spanish and portuguese and french suppliers who will be affected if we cannot get our product across the channel, this is the best thing for everyone and british consumers is to have a deal. so if you are standing there tomorrow, you would say, ladies and gentlemen, get something on paper?|j gentlemen, get something on paper?” would want to avert the chaos we
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would want to avert the chaos we would see in a no deal. andrew, it is good of you to talk to us. as we have been hearing, eu ambassadors are scheduled to meet 5pm tomorrow afternoon. sources are suggesting it was to discuss and no deal contingency plan document which was published today and included in that document, was the promise that for short—term visits, uk citizens would be allowed into europe, even with a no—deal brexit as long as the uk government made a similar commitment. things are moving and there could be a meeting on monday. adam fleming has been confirming
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that. movement in brussels, movement here, let‘s talk to chris morris who is with me now. i hope you can give us appraising on where we are right now? legal text on the withdrawal agreement, the document designed to set the terms for the uk leaving the european union, that has been agreed that technical level between the two teams of negotiators. is the precise language that appears there will be keenly bruised by everyone. there is a second much shorter document which will be the outline of a political declaration. that is expected to be only a few pages at this stage and the idea is that that will set some broad outlines for the kind of
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relationship we might have in the future of things like security and foreign policy. most importantly, the trade and economic relationship. but the idea will then be for that document to expand, to have a bigger document to expand, to have a bigger document which eu leaders can agree, perhaps not at a summit this month but maybe next month. the irish border issue, they are te europe correspondent was treating earlier that he thinks something has been put down that will be acceptable but with a review clause so it can be reviewed afterwords. it has been clear that is what they are looking forfor a few days, clear that is what they are looking for for a few days, a review mechanism. the preview mechanism is means that as a backstop comes into play in the future to avoid a hard border in ireland, part of that arrangement will be eight temporary uk wide customs unions, solicitors
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temporarily that begs the question, how do you get out of it. the uk said said we would like the ability to withdraw unilaterally and they say you cannot unilaterally with the rock from something that‘s important. then the review mechanism. does that involve the two sides, is the early third party? we don‘t know that yet. 1.i sides, is the early third party? we don‘t know that yet. u know the eu side has been absolutely insistent on is that if there are points of eu law involved in the ultimate arbiter has to be the european court of justice. that is the sort of language we have seen treating months now. tends to set some alarm bells ringing in london. it is those technical legal issues which i think have been some of the very last thing is they‘re trying to resolve. i know you have your with you and i need you to stay for a minute. back to you in a moment butjust confirmation that theresa may is to chaira confirmation that theresa may is to chair a special cabinet meeting tomorrow to discuss a draft brexit
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withdrawal agreement. the source has confirmed that the text has been agreed at a technical level. every minister is being asked to see the prime ministerfor minister is being asked to see the prime minister for one—on—one talks later this evening. let‘s go to our europe correspondent who is in brussels. and as chris was just explaining, we talked about the technical side of this, but whatever side you‘re on and however you view it, it is a breakthrough? absolutely. this is a breakthrough that has taken months to work out how to get to this stage. remember, we have been talking about this ireland issue. at the core of the negotiations since last december. it was last december when they agreed that they would have a deal including some sort of provisions for avoiding border between northern ireland and ireland, and it has taken until now to hammer out a way
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that both sides may find that acceptable. i see me because as you we re acceptable. i see me because as you were saying, the technical side of things is what has been going on here, the legal, the drafting, negotiations on this building here. working through, trying to write and rewrite and find an acceptable solution. they have done that and it goes now back for the political side of things to happen and that is the crucial step know when it could all still fall apart if the politics of it doesn‘t come together properly. that has been a real concern for the negotiators year. now, the devil will be in what the politicians and the uk side and the eu side think when they see those legal texts, 500 pages of text now laid out from them, and crucially what it says about those issues, about the irish border. so the provision that it
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seems they have found a solution to the furthest customs arrangement, a uk wide temporarily customs union for the uk wide temporarily customs union forthe uk, uk wide temporarily customs union for the uk, which would kick in in just over two years‘ time, that it would be the way the uk wants to avoid this but what conditions does that come with? the eu has made very clear that would come with all sorts of conditions that the uk would have to follow to ensure a level playing field, that the uk businesses wouldn‘t just have free access field, that the uk businesses wouldn‘tjust have free access then to the eu market without having to follow eu rules. so how much has been put in there, what will uk politicians think of that, what will be cabinet think and as chris was talking about, that exit mechanism, that review mechanism, that the uk could then see, if this arrangement kicked in, how it could try to get out of it in future, how does that
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play? is at getting the uk enough of a sort of say for it to be a cce pta ble a sort of say for it to be acceptable to the cabinet as well? is that is the one side than the other side, the eu 27 countries, they will look at this too and think, are they happy with what is being conceded and what has been agreed to? so there is still the technical side, which may have reached some sort of conclusion and the text may be stable, but that doesn‘t mean the politicians won‘t come back with changes. as sta ble as stable as icahn be —— camby is the quote. it will be in the form of auk the quote. it will be in the form of a uk wide customs arrangement but have deeper conditions for northern ireland. as you have been saying, eve ryo ne ireland. as you have been saying, everyone of the 27 eu governments has got to agree to this. ireland is going to be crucial with that? yes,
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absolutely but ireland has been deeply involved all along right at the heart of these negotiations. bit interest have been put front and centre since the beginning, which is why this irish border issue is there now and has been such a focus. but interestingly, that point you just mentioned that rtr saying in their understanding, these clauses, this pa rt understanding, these clauses, this part of the deal that focuses on ireland will have in it, measures that deal with northern ireland‘s specific issues. that will be a difficult political area for the uk because that takes us back to the original idea of the eu‘s for this backstop, it was called, this legal arrangement where northern ireland can remain under eu customs on single market rules. but the eu have said that must still be there for
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any eventuality, what ever happens with these customs arrangements and whatever else, there must be this fallback plan. that has been difficult politically for the uk. the uk agreed to it in december but has found it difficult to agree to. has that been smuggled in as a sub—clause at the bottom of the irish issue, is it essentially still there? and does it then mean again, political problems for theresa may back with the cabinet? the uk and ireland have insisted on this all—weather backstop that applies u nless all—weather backstop that applies unless and until any other solution is found. we know a uk wide customs solution does not address all of the problems that have to be addressed to keep the border open in ireland. the regulatory issues and that will be in there to address those regulatory issues and if the uk did trigger that option to exit the customs arrangement in the future.
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it is probably still in there and i think that will be another sticking point. damien, thank you very much. iamjoined by point. damien, thank you very much. i am joined by chris morris here. you sense on twitter and others there is a palpable sense of relief things are moving, but this is the pressure that will now be on the politicians, the pressure tojust get it done and yet, and it is huge, there are still many but still? once you trigger article 50 and say we are leaving, it is a two—year process which ends on the 29th of march next year. it could in theory be extended but the uk government saying it has no plans to do that. that is why the pressure of time is there. if you take a step back, a few months ago the eu was saying temporary uk wide customs union as pa rt temporary uk wide customs union as part of this backstop was out of the question. the uk has pushed that
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idea forward successfully. what the brexiteers fear is the temporary solution, a uk wide customs union with the eu by default becomes the permanent solution. which is what the eu does want. a slightly different dealfor the eu does want. a slightly different deal for northern ireland seems to be the sense of it? with a slightly different deal for northern ireland. if the agreement which was first made between the uk and the eu, signed up by theresa may and her cabinet, would have been under all circumstances no re—emergence of a ha rd circumstances no re—emergence of a hard border in northern ireland, the eu wanted buried in there somewhere and i‘m sure the lawyers will find it quickly, as a last resort in the worst case scenario, there could be a circumstance in which northern ireland only would have to stay in some sort of customs arrangement and follow single market rules for a period of time. the government will dou btless period of time. the government will doubtless say, we have these provisos to say this will never
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happen. but if it is there as a theoretical possibility, i think that will be the point of some political contention. going to have to leave it there, let‘s go back to westminster. i want to go via downing street because we have a camera there. according to several reports now, what will happen is cabinet ministers individually will be called into number ten for talks with the prime minister, head of what now seems to be a crucial moment in the brexit process. vicky young is in westminster. that is now confirmed? that is right. the text of the withdrawal agreement has been agreed at a technical level and that means officials have gone as far as they think they can go with compromise. now it is a matter of going back to the cabinet. we know cabinet ministers were allowed in to
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read 95% of the withdrawal agreement that was already in place. mime show what they will be asking for is to see the last 5%. the wording, the details around the issue, the sticking point there has been four months of avoiding those border checks between northern ireland. just a fallback position and one neither side wants to go to but it has to be there as an insurance policy. the big question for many in the cabinet is, how can the uk get out of back? that is what they are looking for in the small print. but now it is the moment of truth, not just for the prime minister, who has decided this is as far as she can go with this text and has decided to put it to her cabinet. they are the ones who have said they are not happy with what they are hearing, they fear the uk will be too closely aligned. they will see it and have to decide, do they stay in the cabinet and go along with it or do they decide to walk away? it is a
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huge moment, notjust they decide to walk away? it is a huge moment, not just for theresa may, but the cabinet and ultimately for this place as well. if it goes through, mps have to decide if they will back what she has put forward. that pressure, external pressure to get a deal done, not that any costs, but get it done to avoid and no—deal brexit, that will weigh heavily on that meeting tomorrow? it will and partly for downing street on the prime minister, the point is they feel if the cabinet is looking at the option of no deal, they will go along with what she has put in front of them. but it has been disputed in the house of commons where the alternative really is theresa may‘s deal or no deal at all. many feel there are other options and there could be another referendum for some, it is staying in the economic area. they feel parliament could lead the way, decide what happens if there is, if the deal is voted down.
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that is very much disputed and theresa may has always said it is my deal or no deal at all. i think many feel the uk simply isn‘t ready, although some preparations have been done belatedly. they said they haven‘t done enough for it to be a smooth ride injust overfour months if we were to leave without any deal. it is the stated aim of both sides, the eu and the uk to get a dealfor a smooth brexit sides, the eu and the uk to get a deal for a smooth brexit that isn‘t disruptive. that is what they have been pushing forfor disruptive. that is what they have been pushing for for these long months. this is what they feel they have got on paper, it is now up to the cabinet to decide if they can go along with it. vicky young in westminster, thank you very much. developments in the last hour which have led to confirmation theresa may will hold a cabinet meeting tomorrow to discuss a draft brexit agreement. cabinet source is telling the bbc
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that the text has been agreed at technical level by both sides after intensive talks this week. we are hearing suggestion that every cabinet minister, if we go to downing street now, we are seeing some movements, that is the scene at downing street, cabinet ministers expected to arrive in the next hour or so for meetings with the prime minister. plenty more to come in the news at five, but let‘s quickly get an update on the weather. good afternoon. enjoyed the fine weather of what remains of today. light breeze with highs up to 15 celsius. the evening isn‘t looking too bad but when we
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get into the small hours of wednesday the rain does push across wales with heavy downpours for northern ireland, northern england and to close the night, pushing into southern and eastern scotland. to the south, a drier story with clear skies and we will get the best of wednesday morning‘s sunshine. things we re wednesday morning‘s sunshine. things were clear from the south and wales moving into the sunshine by midday and with northern england and northern ireland, drier for the afternoon. and in northern scotland, the rain lingering to the far north. favourable temperatures up into the mid—teens. today at 5, the details of a brexit deal have been agreed, the bbc is told that the cabinet will hold a full meeting tomorrow, and asked to approve the deal. ministers met earlier today to be
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given the latest progress, but since then officials have apparently agreed the final outline of a deal. the moment of truth for the prime minister, can she get the cabinet to back it? but even if the cabinet approved the deal, there‘s still no guarantee that mps will back it in parliament. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. fires continue to rage across parts of california, 44 people are now known to have died, and hundreds
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