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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 14, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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i'm annita mcveigh in westminster, where theresa may will today try to secure cabinet backing for a brexit withdrawal agreement. the prime minister will try to head off any threat of resignations, telling ministers the deal she's secured from brussels is the best the uk can get. a deal is going to look pretty much like this one seems to look like. it isn't going to be dramatically different from that. therefore, they've got to keep that big picture in mind and they have to stick together, above all. this morning, ministers are still going into number 10 for one to one briefings on the details but there's opposition across the commons. we haven't been briefed on the text, we are really working on what the headlines that have been leaked or indicating, and if it is the case then i think there is serious trouble with this deal. if it's giving away £39 billion of british taxpayers' money for nothing guaranteed in return, that's unacceptable.
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iam i am reporting live from downing street where we are three hours away from the most critical cabinet meeting of theresa may's premiership, an obstacle she has to ove i’co m e premiership, an obstacle she has to ove rco m e if premiership, an obstacle she has to overcome if she is to make this d raft overcome if she is to make this draft brexit agreement stick. theresa may faces a crunch cabinet meeting in a few hours‘ time as she tries to win colleagues‘ support for the draft brexit agreement she has brokered between the uk and eu. the prime ministerfaces opposition from all sides. senior ministers are being briefed individually this morning and will gather in downing street at two o'clock this afternoon, amid calls to reject the draft from both senior brexiteers and some remain supporters. the dup says it won't vote for what it says is a humiliating deal. the actual document has not yet been released but let's have a look
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at the main points we believe are in it, although they have not been confirmed. the plan involves keeping the uk as a whole aligned with the eu customs union for a limited time. this would avoid a hard border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, which has been one of the most contentious issues in the negotiations and is known as the backstop plan. but it's believed that northern ireland would remain in a deeper relationship with the eu and abide by some additional rules and regulations. under the plan, an independent committee of uk, eu and external members would be set up to review ending this arrangement, this backstop, but the uk would have no unilateral right to leave it. lord hague, the former foreign secretary and conservative leader, is calling for ministers to back theresa may. you have to look at the big picture, and if what you want is to deliver
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on leaving the european union and have frictionless trade in goods at the border for the next few years, until a future free trade agreement comes into force, and have control over our own immigration policy, and keep the united kingdom together, all at the same time, well, then a deal is going to look pretty much like this one seems to look like. it isn't going to be dramatically different from that. therefore, they've got to keep that big picture in mind and they have to stick together, above all. but there's opposition both inside and outside the conservative party. mark francois, from the influential erg group of pro—brexit conservative backbenchers, has urged cabinet minister to make a stand if they don't agree with the deal. if you're member of the cabinet, today will be the most important thing you ever decide
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on in your whole life, and if deep down you feel, know and believe that it's wrong, today is the day to stand up and be counted. there is no point in saying, years from now, "0h, i would have resigned on principle but ijust kind of never quite got round to it." today is the day, today's judgment day, and we will have to wait and see what happens in cabinet and whether anyone has the moral courage to oppose this and, if the prime minister bludgeons it through, to resign. time will tell. the dup‘s brexit spokesperson has expressed concern about early reports on the shape of the deal. like yourself, we are still feeling a little bit in the dark on this because we don't have the text in front of us, we haven't been briefed on the text, we are really working on what the headlines that have been leaked are indicating, and if it is the case then i think there is serious trouble with this deal because first of all its ties the uk as a whole to the customs
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union, something the prime minister promised would not happened, and secondly it treats in northern ireland differently than the rest of the uk by having us tied now and forever to the eu rule book. in other words, rules about the production of goods, agriculture etc in northern ireland would be determined in brussels without any say from the uk or from northern ireland. let's have a look at how the next few days and weeks could pan out. perhaps a heavy emphasis on the word could. so today we have the cabinet meeting at 2pm in downing street where ministers will discuss the draft agreement, and at the same time, the ambassadors of the remaining eu 27 member states will be briefed in brussels. then tomorrow, if she gets the backing of her cabinet, the prime minister theresa may could make a statement
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to the house of commons, updating mps on progress. and then she could travel to brussels, perhaps in the next few days. then, provided discussions go well and the prime minister still has the backing of her cabinet, the eu would need to hold an emergency summit in late november to approve the deal. the 24th and 25th of november are the dates being talked about as the earliest this could happen. after that summit, if the deal is approved by the eu, the uk parliament will hold a meaningful vote on whether to agree to the deal. that needs to happen sometime in december. then on 29th march 2019 at iipm uk time the uk is expected to leave the eu and the transition period begins. and 21 months later — on 31 december 2020 — that is when the transition is due to end although it is extentable if all parties agree. when the transition period ends,
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that is when the backstop proposals kick in unless a future relationship is agreed. let's cross to downing street and speak to ben brown. i guess theresa may'sjob i guess theresa may's job this afternoon is to convince the members of her cabinet that the deal she has on the table is what people who voted to leave voted for. yes, and convince them not only this afternoon in the cabinet meeting starting in just under three afternoon in the cabinet meeting starting injust under three hours, the most crucial cabinet meeting of her premiership, but she has already been trying to convince them in 121 briefing sessions last night and this morning. downing street are sounding pretty lish. there will be worries that could be resignations after this meeting. penny mordaunt, international development secretary, is one person who is thought to have
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reservations about the draft agreement. esther mcvey as well. andrea leadsom, leader of the house of commons, we have heard from her and she seemed reasonably to mystic. —— optimistic. will you back the deal? i have had a good conversation with the prime minister and i am looking at the details of the deal today and i am optimistic that we'll have a good deal of time looking at the details today so i can't answer that question right now. what about the details that you have seen? i can't answer that question right now. you're asking to speculate on something i haven't seen. sorry about that. thanks. that was andrea leadsom. let's talk to our assistant political editor whojoins me in downing street. this cabinet meeting could not be more important but already the lobbying of those cabinet ministers has begun with the prime minister talking to them, still talking to them this morning. we had a steady trickle of ministers going in this morning. not just ministers, iain duncan smith,
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prominent brexiteer. are you confident of avoiding resignations, prime minister? so theresa may just so theresa mayjust heading off to prime minister's questions. she has been meeting with some key figures this morning ahead of that cabinet meeting. 0thers this morning ahead of that cabinet meeting. others have been going in to the cabinet office around the corner to read the 500 page document, but all the signs are, and it is guesswork, that although there are ministers with severe doubts, she is probably not going to face a mass walk—out. you don't get the sense that building up at that, in pa rt sense that building up at that, in part because ministers are bulking and the idea of a huge —— do not like the idea of a huge political
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crisis, in which you might catapult the country towards a no deal. these are things for ministers to reflect on if they refuse to back the deal. i think that will prey on their mind. and there is a view that this is as good as it is going to get. they had pushed the eu to the limits. it is either this or nothing. the last argument i think number ten will make is if you thought this town then brexit itself might go down. —— if you vote this down. the pressure on them is colossal and for that reason we may get one or two resignations perhaps at the lower end of the cabinet but i don't think we will see any big names. thank you very much indeed. we expect this cabinet meeting to
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last for about three hours so, between 2pm and 5pm, and we expect obligation of the draft agreement around 6pm. back to you. iamjoined by i am joined by lord heseltine, the tory grandees, i hope you're happy with me calling you that. you had seen the conservative party argue for many years about europe. is this a crucial time for the conservative party? there have been other crucial times many years ago but this is to me the biggest tension in my political life. we are watching britain vote to abandon its position
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asa britain vote to abandon its position as a major european power. is it going too far to say the future of the tory party is at stake at this point? i don't believe that because the whole history of the tory party is to seek power in order to achieve its purpose and it will come together. there may be a difficult period, it is already there, but the tory party has survival instinct and then instinct for achieving power. nonetheless you have clearly a deep concern that we as a nation are going to vote to reduce our power. that is the implication of leaving the european market. the truth is that we haven't yet done so and i think this whole extraordinary atmosphere where no one knows what is happening, what the 500 pages of
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legal documentation are with a couple of hours to look at it, my own guess is it will not get through the house of commons and we will almost certainly end up with a second referendum. interesting to discuss this in more detail. you are watching bbc news. on this point of what happens next, using nothing is a done deal. what are the options? will the prime minister first of all get this draft deal through cabinet? that is the first hurdle. get this draft deal through cabinet? that is the first hurdlelj get this draft deal through cabinet? that is the first hurdle. i was not party to these one—on—one discussions. i wonder what was discussed by whom and for what purpose but nevertheless i don't know if she can get through cabinet oi’ know if she can get through cabinet or not but what matters is whether
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she can get through the house of commons and on all the evidence that i have and you have it as well, i don't see where the vault—— the votes are going to come from to get it through. you think there will be oui’ it through. you think there will be our second referendum ? it through. you think there will be our second referendum?” it through. you think there will be our second referendum? i think it is increasingly likely. i cannot see the deal going through and i do not think the house of commons will want to see a chaotic leave situation and the economic damage from that, so i think there will be an emerging view that we have to put it active people to get a chance to vote on the reality as opposed to the section presented to them two years ago —— the fiction presented. so, could we
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end up with our general election? the labour party in power? even if there is a marshalls all the power she has, do you think she will not get enough support in parliament? the whips will use every ruthless technique to try to bully members are bound into doing what they want. that is theirjob. i don't think they will get away with it. i don't believe there is a threat of an election. under the present law there would have to be a majority in parliament for it and i don't think there is. i don't think the conservative party will vote for it. it is an empty threat. if there was a second referendum, do you think the result would be different? yes. first, people would know the facts,
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which have emerged since the referendum, they have seen the duplicity upon which it was conducted. equally important, it is the younger generation coming into the younger generation coming into the electorate and the older generation who the good lord is calling to his service, and that is making out difference —— making a difference to the profile and you can see it in the polls. let's say there was a second referendum but there was a second referendum but there was a second referendum but there was another vote for leave, you think there are red be a remain result, but say there was another vote to leave, what would the terms of the departure be? would it be another process of negotiation?m would almost certainly mean that we would almost certainly mean that we would leave. there is a limit to how long the debate can go on. the fact
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of the matter is that the last referendum was based on wishful thinking, a lot of assertions, false promises, rides. the next would be built on facts and that is the difference. what would you say to conservative mps, backbenchers and frontbenchers, given what you have said about your concerns that the uk's power will be greatly diminished? to ask themselves why they are there and to whom they owe they are there and to whom they owe the ultimate loyalty. not the party, but to their interpretation of british self interest. because in a majority you know that british self—interest is at the european top table, you must vote to stay. and brexiteers focused on british
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sovereignty, what about them?l brexiteers focused on british sovereignty, what about them? a man in the desert is free, he is sovereign, he can do nothing because he has no power. sovereignty without power is living in a world of fiction. you often have to share power with colleagues, friends, other interests. the world is shrinking before our eyes. thank you for your thoughts today. we are going to go to northern ireland. like all of us you are looking at some leeks and headlines creeping out about the content, the text of this draft deal. what do you make of it? i think if you step away from the heat of the political situation,
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a lot of businesses in northern ireland and certainly in the north—west, where i am right now, literally sitting a couple of miles away from the border, i think a lot of businesses will be reassured, albeit that we haven't seen the final text and we are a long way from a final decision in the uk, but i think from a final decision in the uk, but ithinka from a final decision in the uk, but i think a lot of businesses will be reassured that the deeper relationship with the eu will continue, certainly our membership in the chamber of commerce here in derry londonderry would vote overwhelmingly to remain in the customs union and single market. the wording leaked so far would certainly speak to a longer and deeper relationship with the eu which will go some way to reassure businesses that they will continue to have access to their staff, freedom of movement of goods, and to their markets and supply chains. i
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think with the little detail we have, we can certainly be assured that there is an understanding that northern ireland is in a different position to the rest of the uk and must be looked at with a different set of circumstances. and you are coming from the perspective that no deal scenario would be hugely costly to northern ireland. it cannot even be conceived, the fallout from that would be catastrophic for northern ireland. and for the whole of the uk. but we have particular circumstances here being so close to the border not just circumstances here being so close to the border notjust with the republic of ireland but potentially with the eu and that would be catastrophic here notjust for businesses but for the population, for civic society here, it could not even be conceived of. jennifer mckeever, good to get your views. from the londonderry chamber of
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commerce, just on the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. iamjoined northern ireland and the republic of ireland. i am joined by the conservative pro—brexit mp crispin blunt. do you think that the deal, what you have been able to glean from the draft deal, is what people voted for in the referendum in 2016? i don't think so. there is no confidence we can escape from the backstop plan of the uk remaining in the customs union for some period, andi the customs union for some period, and i will have to see what the text says, but that is not acceptable. the prime minister made it clear that we will not be in their customs union and if we are we will not be able to make deals with the rest of the world. it is difficult to see how the arrangement presented to us is better than no deal. is it fair to say you are keeping an open mind until you see more detail? that is
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the only responsible thing to do. given what we know so far, the shape of how the negotiations have been conducted by the eu in particular and the way i'm afraid the government have simply followed the text set out for them by the eu negotiators, it does not give on any confidence that the strength of the british position will be reflected in the agreements we ought to be able to strike with the eu. if this ends in no agreement because there is no majority in the house of commons to support it then we will actually look at the strength of the british hand on the 30th of march and work out it is a great deal stronger than people think. you might have heard lord heseltine saying to me now, he has seen arguments over europe for decades, saying that britain's position will
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be diminished if the uk leads the eu. -- if the uk be diminished if the uk leads the eu. —— if the uk is to leave the eu. it isa eu. —— if the uk is to leave the eu. it is a reasonable points to make that their country chose in june 2016 to become an independent nation of 65 million, cutting its own trade deals and making relationships across the world, reflecting in my judgment the underlying strength of the uk, global not regional, and ta ke the uk, global not regional, and take ourselves away from being a big power in europe, and the uk had that choice and it made the choice. there was not a right answer. you have no fear about an was not a right answer. you have no fearaboutan —— was not a right answer. you have no fear about an —— eight no—deal brexit? no. the committee that i chaired 20 months ago produced a
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report on the implications of no deal and said it would be a dereliction of duty if the government didn't properly prepare for it and asked the government is to make sure every department had a plan, andi to make sure every department had a plan, and i trust that work has gone on and it can now be properly surfaced. william hague was asking the government to prepare a few days ago, and now we have to prepare for the likelihood of no agreement. the londonderry chamber of commerce spokesperson said it would be catastrophic. that it could be ten times as costly for northern ireland businesses compared to if there was a deal. your words will not be reassuring for people like her. a deal. your words will not be reassuring for people like herlj a deal. your words will not be reassuring for people like her. i am not sure where her numbers are coming from because the bulk of northern ireland's traders with great britain. it will be a problem for the republic of ireland which is why their strategy in this
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negotiation has been a puzzle. they have made it very difficult to enable their to be an agreement and it is their manipulation of the eu commission around the border issue which has led to the prime minister producing this... sorry to interrupt you. we are going to say goodbye to oui’ you. we are going to say goodbye to our reviewers you. we are going to say goodbye to oui’ reviewers on you. we are going to say goodbye to our reviewers on bbc world. excuse me for the interruption. let's continue. you were offering your explanation of why people who are concerned about a no deal scenario why they should not feel so worried. it isa why they should not feel so worried. it is a long—term decision for the uk. if there is no agreement of course it will be a bit bumpy in the months after the 30th of march when we leave the eu, if there is no transition period to whatever the
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future arrangement is, but there will be a deal at some point, a sensible negotiation after march 30 about the things that must be fixed in the interests of the eu 27 and the uk. it is not as if everything suddenly stops and everything falls over and it is all over. we will have to sit down and put humpty dumpty back together again in terms of the relationship between the eu and uk but it will be on the eu negotiators who have put the uk in this position, and what you have to remember is... in the uk, people who wa nted remember is... in the uk, people who wanted this referendum, it is easy to blame the other side. it is a two—way street. to blame the other side. it is a two-way street. the uk had a respectable choice to make to leave the eu because we substantially
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support the eu budget and there is a massive balance of trade, surplus for eu partners selling goods into the uk, not merely set off by the rather small surplus we have in services and selling into the eu. 0n those facts alone there is a sensible reason as to why the uk, particularly as a country which does not have the euro as a currency, and lord heseltine wanted that, he probably wants us to move towards a united states of europe, but that is not shared by the majority of the uk people. because we are not committed to the institution the same way as people on the continent, we had a choice to make and we made it and 110w choice to make and we made it and now we have to get on with the consequences that come from giving ourselves the sovereign freedom to chart our own path in the world. would you support a second
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referendum? no. the country has made the decision and it was crystal clear in the referendum campaign with the project fear meted out to voters... you don't think people would vote differently? voters... you don't think people would vote diffe re ntly?|j voters... you don't think people would vote differently? i have no idea. i expected people to vote remain in 2016. but people had a clearer idea of where their interests were. looking at the real economy now, there are people in the service industries who have seen wages rise and rent falling as a consequences of what has happened. there are benefits already in our economy. they are largely unseen because we are going to leave the eu. we must leave it there. thank you for your thoughts. dominic raab
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iam you for your thoughts. dominic raab i am told has just gone into you for your thoughts. dominic raab i am told hasjust gone into downing street to talk to the prime minister. more in a few minutes but let's get the weather. best of the mild temperatures today and tomorrow then it turns cooler in the weekend with some sunshine. some rain this morning moving east as we move through the day today so north and east through the day. dry and bright weather across much of england and wales. the rain will ease in the north. a bit more clout in scotland. temperatures above average, highs of 16. in scotland. temperatures above average, highs of16. tonight in scotland. temperatures above average, highs of 16. tonight there will be some rain pushing back in the western parts of northern ireland, north—west scotland, some heavy bursts, more clout and the mildest temperatures in the north. some mist and low cloud and fog in england and wales, central and
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eastern areas, but hard to pinpoint exactly. some sunny spells and outbreaks of rain in the north and west. in scotland, dry and bright weather and temperatures of average. —— above—average. hello, this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines. theresa may is trying to secure cabinet backing for a brexit withdrawal agreement — telling ministers the deal she's secured from brussels is the best the uk can get. a deal is going to look pretty much like this one seems to look like. it isn't going to be dramatically different from that. therefore, they've got to keep that big picture in mind and they have to stick together, above all. this morning ministers are still going into number 10 for one to one briefings on the details — but there's opposition across the commons. we haven't been briefed on the text, we are really working on what the headlines that have been leaked are indicating,
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and if it is the case then i think there is serious trouble with this deal. if it's giving away £39 billion of british taxpayers' money for nothing guaranteed in return, that's unacceptable. in other news — 50 people are confirmed dead and rescuers in california are still searching for hundreds of people reported missing, amid the worst wildfires in the history of the state. prince charles is celebrating his 70th birthday today. the heir to the throne will mark the occasion by attending a private party hosted by the queen, at buckingham palace. in party hosted by the queen, at buckingham palace. we'll bring you the latest from downing street and westminster — ahead of what is expected to be a busy prime minister's questions sport now.
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we've had the first sacking of the premier league season...and it's fulham who've removed slavisa jokanovic. 0ur football reporter simon stone is here... unsurprising given the amount of money they spent in the summer, and where they sit in the table now? this bet £100 million, a decade for a newly promoted team in the summer, nine games without a win in the premier league, they have lost their last six games, near the bottom of the table. they have a game against southampton who are only three points better off than them and i think the owner thought she had to do something. almost an air of inevitability. and they've moved fast to bring in his replacement? i think fulham will be patting themselves on the back at the speed they did this and the fact that was not leaked. the claudio ranieri
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delivered that title to leicester but it has to be remembered within nine months of that he had been sacked and he had a less than impressive time in the french league last year. it have to hit the ground running and delivered from to safety. a signing for the fans. england have posted a decent score on the first day of the second test against sri lanka. they were in a bit of trouble earlier this morning, giving away some easy wickets. but a thoroughly enjoyable half—century from sam curran pushed them towards the 300 mark — he hit six sixes before being caught. england all out for 285. sri lanka 22—1 in reply. england's jadon sancho says more young players should follow his lead and play football abroad. here he is looking all moody at borussia dortmund in germany — the team he left manchestrr city for last year. he's done so well there that he's
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expected to make his first start for england at wembley tomorrow, and says that moving away from the premier league has given him new opportunities. personally if you feel you are ready then i think you should take a shot at it, try something different. if english clubs are not giving you a chance then abroad is always an option and they are always open to see your ability and hopefully if you are good enough you a chance. a referee in the women's super league has got himself into bother over a game of rock, paper, scissors. david mcnamara made the captains of man city and reading play the game to decide who kicked off...because he left his coin for the toss in the dressing room. he's been suspended for three weeks. lewis hamilton has questioned the benefits of taking formula one to new parts of the world. the five time world champion was back at the mercedes hq yesterday to thank staff for their support during the season. f1 recently announced a new grand prix in vietnam, but hamilton says he would
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like to see more races in countries with "real racing history". and roger federer rose to the occasion at the atp world finals in london. after losing his first match at the 02 on sunday, he had to beat dominic thiem to remain in the competition — and came through in straight sets to keep him in contention for the semi finals. if he wins the whole thing, it'll be federer‘s 100th career title. and before we go, we need to pay tribute to the end of an era... of one of the great footballing haircuts is no more... manchester united's marouane fellaini has got rid of his trademark curls...for a much closer, and some might say tidyer cut. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's return to westminster
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and annita mcveigh can bring us up to date with what's happening on this crucial day in the brexit process . we have been getting a reaction from northern ireland so far today because of course the issue of what happens to the border between northern ireland and the republic post brexit and whether there is a deal at all is absolutely crucial in all of this. let's go to belfast. (let's speak now to aidan connolly from the northern ireland retail consortium what have you been able to find it so far about this draft deal? isn't something you work with sand wedge? the worst scenario to be clear as a no—deal brexit as an unmitigated disaster for northern ireland. no—deal brexit as an unmitigated disasterfor northern ireland. we have half the discretionary income of households in great britain, we already pay more for fuel and car insurance and quite simply either northern ireland business nor consumers can afford the entries and
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cost that book, with no deal. 0n the other hand what we have been hearing and we have started to move towards and we have started to move towards a backstop, it is a lot better than having no deal but it is not perfect either. when we do have the details of that we will have to push hard on the eu and westminster government to start mitigating on things like administration and cost that will come from a backstop because quite simply that administration equals delays which equals costs and that will go on to the northern ireland consumer and we cannot afford to absorb those costs. as it stands at this draft deal in your opinion would be better than the option of no deal. absolutely. we have to be unequivocal about that, we have a very short time between now and the end of march and simply with no deal that there's no way the northern ireland consumer business is going to be better off. as it stands our
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biggest concern is that a deal of some sort has got across the line so we have that transition period so we have that backstop and a certain amount of certainty that we can then as business and consumers work towards the alternative of tariffs and customs and checks and big cost rises is simply not an alternative at all for us. briefly, i spoke to the dup brexit spokesman sammy wilson earlier, he said on twitter as well the dup would not be voting for what he called this humiliation. i knew concerned to hear that from the dup? we have always been asking for comments on that, we have been trying to remove the politics and ideology, and ask the question of how the northern ireland consumer will be better off. come the 29th of march. we hope the common sense will prevail and people will see along
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with us that having no deal is not an option that we do need for northern ireland consumers and business that certainty that a deal will bring. thank you. let's speak to our scotland correspondent lorna gordon. nicola sturgeon has been commenting on all of the events of the last 2a hours and keen to point out that the deal theresa may is talking about isn't in her opinion the only way forward. absolutely, there are potential difficulties brewing in terms of the scotland position in relation to northern ireland and in relation to northern ireland and in relation to northern ireland and in relation to fishing. the snp government's position could be summarised and saying they have been left in the dark and they are worried that scotland is going to be left out and left behind anti—sense that they are very angry they have not seen this brexit deal that will
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be discussed by uk ministers this afternoon. and left behind in the sense that they are very worried that if a special deal is cut for northern ireland then there could potentially be a situation where scotla nd potentially be a situation where scotland is competing forjobs with northern ireland which is effectively potentially staying in the single market. nicola sturgeon would say that is the worst of both possible worlds. her warning is that we should not, what is should not fall for the prime minister's spin. this is not a good deal for scotland, it would take scotland out of the single market which would be bad enough in itself but would do so for a living as competing for investment and jobs with northern ireland that would effectively be staying in the single market. that would be the worst of all possible worlds for scotland. what i think is important now as we do not allow ourselves to fall for the prime
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minister's spin that a bad deal has to be accepted because the only alternative is no deal, it does not mean no deal is inevitable if this deal is rejected by the house of commons, instead what that opens the possibility for is getting better options like phil single market customs union membership back on the table. we must strive for what is right for the country and myjob is to strive for what is right for scotland, not excepting bad deals. it is ironic that for the last two years the prime minister has told us that no deal is better than a bad deal and now she's arguing we have to accept a bad deal for fear of no deal, it is a false choice. fishing rights and other potential flash point. scottish conservatives increased the number of mps at the last election largely on the back of the fishing committees in the north—east and they will be watching closely to see how the common fisheries policy is dealt with in this brexit deal. and the potential future of what is known as an
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independent uk coastal states. the scottish conservatives will be coming under pressure in that area and also under pressure because of this rumoured northern ireland deal. in october sources close to the scottish secretary and ruth davidson the leader of the scottish conservatives who is now on maternity leave, they said they would resign if northern ireland faces new controls separated from the rest of the uk because that could fuel the case for scottish independence. david mandel appears to have worked back from that position subsequently, he clarified that those remarks saying it was not a threat to quit but everyone will be watching closely to see if he is considering his position. i'm joined by georgina wright, from the europe programme at chatham house you have been giving evidence to the
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committee for leaving the eu so you are very much thinking about brexit, the post brexit environment today. i know you have said if you think negotiating the withdrawal agreement was difficult to come could be even more tricky. absolutely. we need to remember where we are at this stage, regardless of what happens to the withdrawal agreement whether the uk parliament rejects accept that, at some point the uk and eu will have to continue negotiating. we have three options, the uk parliament rejects the dealer and the government decides to go back to brussels and negotiate but we do not know there will be enough time. 0ption know there will be enough time. option to the uk parliament accepts the deal and be entered into future discussions about trade and security
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and foreign policy and the third option is the uk parliament rejects ed and we enter no deal but even then you'll have to go back to brussels and this is a complex negotiation to think the most difficult part has been passed as wrong. we have no idea how long was future negotiations on trade will take. now, if the withdrawal agreement is accepted by the uk parliament then presumably we will have a transition period of about 20 months but a lot of accident a nalysts months but a lot of accident analysts i can would be long enough. no guarantees the job can be done and that time. as mps consider this and that time. as mps consider this and look ahead to a meaningful vote at wood gets us through the cabinet, they looking towards an certain scenarios when the consider whether
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or not to go for parliamentary approval but that'll be extra difficult. we have not seen the withdrawal agreement, it is over 500 pages long so i look forward to looking at it and reading at but there is no guarantee it is going to make it through parliament parliament will have two vote on that agreement regardless. the meaningful vote is about the future relationship and we are talking about the exit but about the future trade and security partnership and we shall see. in terms of the uk's position regarding europe and the rest of the world, statesmanship, how do you think other countries are reviewing the uk right now?” how do you think other countries are reviewing the uk right now? i think with a bit of surprise and apprehension. it is unclear whether the uk goes from here, what is the
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future of the uk and also the future of the eu? the future relationship and where that leaves the uk relations with countries across the world. lots of questions but hopefully some we should be thinking about now and at the withdrawal agreement gets through parliament that hopefully that will pave the way and give us time to think about those questions. thank you. let's separate from westminster for the moment. the prime minister will try to head off any threat of resignations — telling ministers the deal she's secured from brussels is the best the uk can get this morning ministers are still going into number ten for one to one briefings on the details — but there's opposition across the commons. and in other news — 50 people are confirmed dead and rescuers in california
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are still searching for hundreds of people reported missing, amid the worst wildfires in the history of the state. i'm vishala sri—pathma in the business news uk inflation remained unchanged at 2.4% last month with the cost of living increase held back by falls in the prices of clothes. we'll have more on this injust a moment. the uk airline flybe has put itself up for sale just weeks after it issued a profit warning. it released its financial results earlier which show that pre—tax profits for the six months to september fell by 54% to £7.4m. energy firm sse has admitted there is "some uncertainty" that its merger with rival npower will go ahead. these comments follow 0fgem's decision to cap the default electricity and gas bill atjust over £1100 a year, forcing the energy firms to redraw their merger plan. hello — good morning, welcome to the business news.. a bit of inflation to
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start you off today — now inflation is a term given to rising prices, and the reading for october shows uk inflation stood still at 2.4% which was better than expected...now,if you noticed a fall in the price of clothing — well that helped counter a rise in the cost of living. these are all factors that are considered when compiling that inflation figure — and so the result in october was no change. but what about the months ahead, where is it heading? janet mui, global economist at cazenove capital. what does it look like any outlook for inflation? we have seen the pound moving off the back of brexit, what is happening? from the data today we continue to see the tug between higher energy prices and
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service price inflation versus slower goods prices such as clothing and food. and the near term we think energy component will start to become a drag because while prices has fallen 25% since the peak last month. that'll have an impact in a couple of months and regarding brexit, that is a big driver. as you can see from the data this year goods prices has slowed and that is because of the impact from the stunning depreciation after the referendum. —— stemming the pc issue. —— stemming the pc issue. if the basic deal goes through then sterling could rally and inflation would lower but if brexit does not go through then there will be a slow and sterling which will push up the
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prices of goods. this draft agreement, what impact is it having on markets? basically sterling is a barometer of brexit progress so yesterday when the news broke that the eu and uk negotiators had reached a draft agreement, sterling rallied about 1.5% versus the dollar but quickly retraced back to about 196. but quickly retraced back to about 1%. today it was down by 0.5% and thatis 1%. today it was down by 0.5% and that is because markets have come to realise that there's actually a lot of hurdles remaining in the process, for instance mid on will still need to get heart cabinet support for the deal. —— theresa may will need cabinet support. conservative mps have expressed concerns about staying in a custom union and giving
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concessions to the eu and the dup have pushed back on issues on irish backstop so there was still a mountain to climb and i think sterling will continue to be volatile. in terms of interest rate decisions, this inflation figure is better than expected. what kind of information, influence rather will that have on the bank of england decisions? basically the inflation figure today of 2.4% as lower than the forecast of 2.5% but i think from the recent meetings and inflation report bank of england has biased review inflation reflected by the yesterday the governor was a decade high of 3.2% and today's figure continues to show service and inflation picking up which is the domestic factor. they may not look
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too much in to two days report but there are still the direction of interest—rate there are still the direction of interest— rate rates there are still the direction of interest—rate rates have depicted on the brexit outcome. thank you. the pound slipped back under $1.30 this morning, despite having hit its month high yesterday after downing street announced that draft agreement. that's all the business news. prime minister's questions is due to take place shortly in the house of commons. annita mcveigh is in westminster for us now... etc they will be interesting. not the average day by a any means, a couple of hours away from the crucial cabinet meeting at which theresa may will attempt to persuade her cabinet members to back this d raft her cabinet members to back this draft deal on brexit. but as eve ryo ne draft deal on brexit. but as everyone i have spoken to today has
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been saying, really it is looking ahead a couple of weeks to the meaningful vote, getting the deal through parliament which perhaps is the even bigger thing. apparently it does not feeling that to mid on facing that cabinet meeting. (pres). let's cross to the house of commons and speak to our assistant political editor norman smith (0s) assistant political editor norman smith. it'll be a prime ministers question of another cares about anything but exit sub you may have good and pertinent questions on issues like universal credit or hostility of the state of the economy but really all people are focused on here is the brexit steel, the looming cabinet meeting and whether there are going to be resignations and if so how many. and whether that in turn may scupper mrs may's deal and her premiership. there is a slight sense
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anything else is irrelevant at the moment. as for mrs may, difficult for her questions had a morning where this huge critical cabinet meeting is looming, she has to prepare herself for that at the same time, she has the steady trickle of ministers coming in and she has got to get on board she has to stay focused on that. she has not had much time to do the sort of normal preparation that she would do for my ministers questions so far have it isa ministers questions so far have it is a slightly fly by the seat of your pants pmq. she has two basket because her mindset is going to be on that crucial cabinet meeting and on that crucial cabinet meeting and on that crucial cabinet meeting and on that context what we are now going to be watching is the mood, the tone and language amongst her backbenchers and whether they are openly critical of her off whether they seem to be rallying around. thank you. theresa may preparing for
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the emergency meeting of the cabinet this afternoon. more questions than a nswe i’s this afternoon. more questions than answers as it stand over the 500 page plan, we want to attempt to a nswer page plan, we want to attempt to answer your questions at 3:30pm to send us your questions by text or e—mail... temperatures above average for the time of year but drier and brighter for the stove and wet and windy farther north. cause of the front pushing north the next cold front not far away and you can see the ice of hours tightly packed so fairly breezy. here is the rain gradually working north and particularly heavy through this morning in the north and west but through the list of today the rain easing, fair amount
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of cloud for scotland and northern ireland. sunny spells developing in the north—east. anger the rails dry and bright, at 4pm you can see plenty of sunshine to be had with the high—level cloud tanning sunshine hazy. black arrows of the wind, so breezy farther north, workload as well with bright intervals and the north—east of scotla nd intervals and the north—east of scotland and an sunshine than just good enough to 16 or 17. damages for today, mid—teens, 16 possible in the south—east. through this evening and overnight, one or two showers for a time in the north but the rain tending to ease, call front pushing into the north—west and bringing outbreaks of rain which could be quite heavy and to the early hours. more clout in the north and temperatures holding up into the double figures, could further south
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and we could see some low cloud, mr fox developing. firmly in the warm air mass into tomorrow, the yellow colour firmly across the uk so tomorrow another mild day, temperatures in the mid to high teens. low cloud, mr mark for central and eastern parts tomorrow but quite apt to savour it will be. cloud and mist to be fearless taverns, outbreaks of northern ireland gradually edging east but averages above average for the time of year, 16 or 17 in the south—east. high pressure in charge into the weekend, that'll keep away any weather front so it should be largely dry, workload on friday but running into the weekend, we will see more anyway of sunshine and temperatures starting to drop off so turning cooler by day and by night. i'm annita mcveigh in westminster,
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where theresa may is trying to secure cabinet backing for a brexit withdrawal agreement the prime minister will try to head off any threat of resignations, telling ministers the deal she's secured from brussels is the best the uk can get. we should be positive about what we can do. there has clearly been good progress secured over the last number of weeks and obviously we will now consider the next steps and taking that forward. ministers have been going into number ten all morning for one to one briefings on the detail but there's opposition across the commons. prime minister's questions is
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getting under way. yesterday saw the best wage growth figures in a decade, and the best employment figures in my lifetime. does the prime minister agree with me that this can only be delivered by the free market economics that unite this side of the house? and not by the bankrupt socialism opposite? my my honourable friend is absolutely right. as he references yesterday's figures, they showed more people in work than ever before, they showed the female unemployment rate at a record low and, as he says, the
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fastest regular wage growth in nearly a decade. but, can i say to my honourable friend that is all so on top of figures last week that showed our economy growing three times faster than the eurozone average, the share ofjobs on low hourly pay at a record low. and the number of children in workless households at a record low. but you only get that by good, conservative management of the economy. thank you, mr speaker. after two yea rs of thank you, mr speaker. after two years of bungled negotiations, from what we know of the government's deal it is a failure in its own terms. it doesn't deliver a brexit for the whole country, it breaches... if necessary i will say
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it again and again to members on both sides of the house. voices must be heard. i happen to know that thereof visitors from overseas in thereof visitors from overseas in the gallery. let's to impress them. not merely with our liveliness, but with our courtesy. mr jeremy not merely with our liveliness, but with our courtesy. mrjeremy corbyn. it breaches the prime minister's own red lines. it doesn't deliver a strong economic deal that supports jobs and industry. and we know that they haven't prepared seriously for no deal. so does the prime minister still intend to put a false choice to parliament between her botched deal or no deal? can i say to the right honourable gentleman that he is wrong in the description he set out, but can i also say that, time and time again, he has stood up in this house and complained and said that the government isn't making progress or anywhere close to a
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deal. now when we are making progress and close to a deal, he's complaining about that. can ijust say that i think it clearly shows that he and the labour party have only one intention, that is to frustrate brexit and betrayed a vote of the british people. mr speaker, after the utter shambles of the last two years of negotiations, the prime minister should look to herself in this. and she hasn't managed to convince quite a lot of people behind her. the rail minister resigned last week saying to present the nation with a choice between two deeply unattractive outcomes, pasalic and chaos, is a failure of british statecraft on eight scale unseen since the suez crisis —— vassalage. that is from a tory mp. last night the eu's lead brexit
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negotiator reportedly told the 27 european ambassadors that the uk must align their rules but the eu will read trade —— retain all the controls. is that a fair summary of the prime minister's deal? can i say to the right honourable gentleman, as i've said all along through these negotiations, what we are doing is negotiating a good dealfor the united kingdom. we are negotiating a deal that delivers on the vote of the british people, that takes back control of our money, law and borders and ensures we leave the common fisheries policy, we leave the common agricultural policy, we leave the customs union, but we protect jobs, we protect leave the customs union, but we protectjobs, we protect security and we protect the integrity of the united kingdom. under the prime minister's deal we will spend years with less say over our laws or how our money is spent. and the international trade secretary said last week that the decision to
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withdraw from any backstop agreement could not be contracted to somebody else. can the prime minister confirm whether under her deal it will be the sovereign right of the uk parliament to unilaterally withdraw from any backstop? there needs to be a backstop as an insurance policy. but neither side actually wants us to be in that backstop because we wa nt to to be in that backstop because we want to bring the future relationship into place at the end of december 2020. i'm aware of the concerns that there are that we don't want to be in a position where the european union would find it co mforta ble the european union would find it comfortable to keep the united kingdom in the backstop permanently, which is why any backstop has to be temporary. mr speaker, ithink which is why any backstop has to be temporary. mr speaker, i think that a non—answer has confirmed that parliament will not have that sovereign right. the international
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trade secretary breezily declared that he would have a0 trade deals ready to be signed the second after midnight when we leave the eu. well, with four months to go, can the prime minister tell us exactly how many of these a0 deals have been negotiated? we are doing two things. first of all, we are negotiating to ensure we maintain the trade deals that currently exist with the european union. it is not acceptable for members to shout at the prime minister when she is answering a question. we've been talking re ce ntly question. we've been talking recently in this chamber about respect and good behaviour on both sides. the person who has the floor must be heard, and that is the end of the matter. we have been negotiating on two fronts, on the continuity agreements which ensure
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that those trade deals that have been party to as a member of the eu are able to continue when we leave the european union, and we have also started discussions with other countries about the trade deals that we can forge across the world once we can forge across the world once we leave the european union. may i say to the right honourable gentleman, if he's interested in trade deals he really needs to sort out the labour party position on this issue. because originally they said that they wanted to do trade deals around the rest of the world. now he says he wants to be in the customs union. that would stop him from doing trade deals around the rest of the world. we know what's good for this country, an independent trade policy and good trade deals with europe and the rest of the world. the international trade secretary is not the only one who doesn't understand international trade rules. and he's not the only one in the cabinet that doesn't understand a few things. the brexit secretary said last week, and i
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quote, i hadn't previously understood the extent of this, but we are particularly reliant on the dover to calais crossing. when did the prime minister become aware of this absolutely shocking revelation about britain's trade routes?” really have to say to the right honourable gentleman that he stands here and reads out something that says we don't know about trade policy. we do know about trade policy. we do know about trade policy. that is exactly why we are negotiating the continuity agreements. it is why we will be taking our place as an independent state in the world trade 0rganisation. but he wants to talk about different positions being taken. what we are doing is delivering a good deal that will delivering a good deal that will deliver on the vote of the british people. we are delivering brexit. what have we seen recently from the labour party? well, the labour leader said we cannot stop brexit.
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the shadow brexit secretary said we can't stop it. —— we can stop it. so when he stands up he should make it clear, is it labour party policy to stop brexit? mr speaker, labour respects the result of the referendum. but what we don't respect is the shambolic mess that this government has made of the negotiations. the mess they have created that they can't get themselves out of. we won't let them destroy this country's economy or thejobs and destroy this country's economy or the jobs and life chances of so many others. and, mr speaker, if the brexit secretary is still in office by the time the cabinet meets this afternoon, could she take him to one side and have a quiet word with him and tell him that 10,000 lorries arrived at dover every day, handling 17% of this country's entire trade
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in goods, estimated to be £122 billion last year. this woeful ignorance by a person in high office is disturbing to so many people. this government spent two years negotiating a bad deal that will leave the country in an indefinite halfway house without a real say. yet they think they can impose a false choice on parliament between a half baked deal or no deal. when a sensible alternative plan could bring together... no matter how long it takes, the right honourable gentleman will not be shouted down in the house of commons. it is as simple and unarguable as that. jeremy corbyn. when a sensible alternative plan could bring together parliament and the country. even conservative mps say the prime minister is offering a choice between the worst of all worlds. and
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the catastrophic series of consequences. when will the prime minister recognise that neither of these options is acceptable? the right honourable gentleman talks about woeful ignorance. i will tell him where the woeful ignorance lies. it lies on a labour party front bench that thinks you can build a better economy by spending 1000 billion pounds more, putting up people's taxes and destroying jobs. the real threat to jobs and growth in this country sits on the labour party front bench, and i'll tell him what we are delivering in relation to brexit. he says what about brexit? i will tell him what about we are delivering on brexit. we will not rerun the referendum. we will not rerun the referendum. we will not renege on the decision of the british people. we will leave the customs union, we will leave the common fisheries policy, we will leave the common agricultural policy
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and we will take back control of our money, laws and borders. we will deliver brexit, and the united kingdom is leaving the european union on the 29th of march 2019. thank you, mr speaker. is the prime minister aware that if the media reports about the eu agreement are in any way accurate, you are not delivering the brexit people voted for. and today, you will lose the support of many conservative mps and millions of voters across the country. cani can i say to my honourable friend.
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order. members must calm themselves. i have often advise taking suitable medicine that will make them feel better. i want to hear what the prime minister has to say and i hope the house will give her back courtesy. can i say to my honourable friend that what we have been negotiating is a deal that delivers on the vote of the british people. in the list item delivered earlier i left out one of the things the british people are keen to see in this deal, an end to free movement and we will make sure we are delivering on that as well as the other elements i set out. what we are doing is a deal that delivers on that vote but also protects jobs, the integrity of the uk and the security of people in this country. thank you, mr speaker. the scottish national party with other opposition leaders have written to the prime minister, urging her to leaders have written to the prime minister, urging herto drop leaders have written to the prime minister, urging her to drop plans to prevent a truly meaningful vote on the brexit deal. shamefully, it
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seems that the government is seeking to prevent opposition amendments to the deal. effectively gagging the sovereignty of parliament by playing dirty tricks on procedures. can i asked the prime minister, what is she afraid of? is her government so wea k she afraid of? is her government so weak that the brexit deal will not succeed when other solutions are still on the table? may i say to the right honourable gentleman we have been very clear that there will be a meaningful vote in this house and we have also been clear that the motion on the deal will be amendable. but i also say to the right honourable gentleman that if you went out and ask any member of the public, when the government brings a deal back from europe, what do you expect parliament to vote on? i think they would expect parliament to vote on the deal. we expect parliament to ta ke the deal. we expect parliament to take its responsibilities. and to amend the deal. this prime minister
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is hamstrung, divided, desperate and looking defeated. in a total panic. the prime minister has been reduced to playing political games rather than playing fair. mr speaker, this is not a game. the snp will never ever gamble with scotland's future. there is only one lifeline left, to protect jobs there is only one lifeline left, to protectjobs in there is only one lifeline left, to protect jobs in scotland there is only one lifeline left, to protectjobs in scotland we must stay in the single market and the customs union. the prime minister will not drag scotland out against its will. if there is a deal to protect the economy in northern ireland, why not scotland? the honourable gentleman stands up and says the snp will not gamble with scotland's future. i say to him, the snp gambles with scotland's future every time it stands up and talks about independence! figures released yesterday show that for the first time ever, more than half of
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disabled people are now in work, including many military veterans. will the prime ministerjoin me in thanking those employers who have signed up to the scheme which has allowed such great strides to be made? can i say to my honourable friend that first of all it's very good news to see more disabled people getting into the workplace. i'm grateful to him for raising the scheme. i would like to praise the work of the secretary of state for work and pensions, who created and championed this scheme since it started in 2013. as my honourable friend knows, it works directly with employers, it aims to challenge perceptions of what it means to employ a disabled person, and we will continue to ensure we are giving every possible effort to make sure more disabled people who want to be in the workplace are able to. the prime minister's likely brexit agreement will leave our country economically week, mean that we take
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eu rules without any say, and give yea rs of eu rules without any say, and give years of uncertainty for business. not my words, the words of her latest ministerial resignation, or at least the latest as far as we know! does she agree, and isn't it about time she admitted there is no support for her reckless plan in her cabinet, and even less in parliament? as i had said earlier, what we are negotiating is a deal that will deliver the vote, that will ensure... and the proposals we put forward in the summer will make sure we see friction red frictionless trade across borders, and gives parliament a lock on those rules. in 2017, ministers committed to provide visualisationss of the rolling stock depot and viaducts proposed in my constituency. after a year of delaying, hs two are refusing to deliver on this
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commitment and ignoring ministers. will the prime minister ensure that within the next week might constituents get the visualisations they were promised, so they are able to comment on the draft environmental statement?” to comment on the draft environmental statement? i recognise the concern her constituents have raised about this issue, and indeed would like to thank her for the hard work she has undertaken to campaign on this issue. i understand the transport secretary is aware of this issue and is urgently looking into it, and! issue and is urgently looking into it, and i would urge my honourable friend to continue to engage with him on this matter to ensure that her constituents get what they were promised. post offices are closing in their hundreds, as postmasters struggled to make a living on the contract introduced by this government. through its north star initiative, the publicly owned post office is aiming for £100 million
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profit by 2021, while postmasters‘ pei has declined by £107 million since 2012. —— postmasters pay. will she intervene to ensure postmasters get a she intervene to ensure postmasters getafair she intervene to ensure postmasters get a fair rate? obviously we have seen a get a fair rate? obviously we have seen a change to our post office network and that has happened as people's pattern of behaviour in relation to them has changed. i'm sure the post office is making decisions they believe are right for local communities to ensure services are there when needed. reductions in business rates will help thousands of small and medium—sized shops, restaurants and pubs in town centres. will the prime minister commit to continuing to work for fundamental reform of local business
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taxation, so local shops and businesses can compete fairly with the online giants? i would like to thank him for raising the fact and referring in this house to the fact we are changing business rates and bringing in those changes to help local businesses. we are determined to help local business and that's why we are also working to implement reforms to make the system fairer and more effective. that would include three—year valuations, removing the so—called staircase tax and with the new challenge and appeals system, and we are aiming to increase the local share. in relation to future taxation, we will of course continue to keep it under reviews. the brutal murder of a mother in my constituency, shot in the back with a crossbow in front of herfamilyjust four the back with a crossbow in front of her family just four weeks before
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she was due to give birth to her baby, has shocked to the core people up baby, has shocked to the core people up and down our country. i know i speak to every member in expressing our deepest condolences to the family and our best wishes to the baby for a speedy recovery. given that these weapons like the crossbow used to kill her readily available for sale online, can i urge the prime minister to look urgently and seriously at expanding the ambit of the offensive weapons bill so that we can toughen the scope of the law governing the sale, possession and use of these deadly weapons? can i say to the honourable gentleman, he has raised a terrible and tragic case. as he has said, the thoughts of the whole house will be with the victor in's family and friends, and our deepest condolences go to them —— victim's family and friends.
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crossbow is subject to strict controls but we will consider the risk such weapons pose to public safety a nd risk such weapons pose to public safety and whether further measures are needed. we will of course look at that in the context of the legislation we bring before the house. the government has invested millions in the railways in this country, but when my constituents are still suffering from chronic overcrowding and carriages, it is incumbent on network rail to deliver projects on time to alleviate the overcrowding. can i say, he has highlighted the fact we are delivering the biggest rail investment programme since the victorian era. we are actually spending nearly £a8 billion on modernising and renewing our railways. it will deliver better journeys and fewer disruptions. he is right to say that it's vital that rail delivers their projects on time. iam
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rail delivers their projects on time. i am told that northern's new rolling stock is currently planned to serve lines from junejuly rolling stock is currently planned to serve lines from june july next year. i know my honourable friend has been campaigning excellently on this issue and i would encouraging him to do so. i'm privileged to have two award—winning sixth form coueges two award—winning sixth form colleges in my constituency. however, with no increase in funding since 2010, winstanley college has cut german a—level from the syllabus and saintjohn cut german a—level from the syllabus and saint john rigby cut german a—level from the syllabus and saintjohn rigby has reduced pastoral support. does the prime minister believed that these are just little extras, or will she agree it's time to raise the rate? of course, if you look across what we've been doing in funding for education overall, we have been putting extra money into funding... everybody says not in fe but in fe we've invested £7 billion to make sure there's a training place for
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every 16—19 —year—old who wants one. we also transforming technical education through the t levels. by 2020, the funding available to support adult participation in further education is planned to be higher than at any time in england's history. will the prime minister join me in paying tribute to my constituent dennis brock who will be celebrating his 100th birthday next week? uniquely, he has been ringing the bells in st mary's church sunbury for 87 years, and we believe confidently he's the oldest bell—ringer in the world. will she join me? order! iwant bell—ringer in the world. will she join me? order! i want to hear about the bell—ringing situation! join me? order! i want to hear about the bell-ringing situation! thank
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you, mr speaker. can i say, i'm very happy first of all to wish dennis brock a very happy 100th birthday, and secondly to pay tribute to him for his 87 years of bell—ringing. this is a considerable and significant record, and i think the support he has given and the work he's done, his commitment to st mary's in sunbury on thames is truly inspiring. over one third of children in my great city are currently living in poverty. 0ur local food banks have currently living in poverty. 0ur localfood banks have seen currently living in poverty. 0ur local food banks have seen a a2% increase in demand since universal credit was imposed on us injune. most referrals come from the tory lead city council who are refusing to give them a penny. if this compassionate conservatism ? to give them a penny. if this compassionate conservatism? as she is well aware, we are introducing universal credit, the previous benefit system which we inherited
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from the labour party did not work. it left over 1 from the labour party did not work. it left over1 million people living on benefits, trapped in benefits for more than... up to a decade. we are ensuring that people have more encouragement to get into the workplace, and when they are in the workplace, and when they are in the workplace, work always pays. as i said, we are seeing good figures and a significant reduction in the number of children in workless households. at the moment we are in the middle of a swirl of rumours about the proposed deal with the eu. and a torrent of criticism from the government's most voracious critics. but one of the rumours is that if the cabinet agrees, the government proposes to publish a white paper setting out the details. will the prime minister give an assurance that if and when this deal is published, a statement will be made to this house of commons when it is
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produced? because to this house of commons when it is produced ? because it to this house of commons when it is produced? because it is this parliament which is going to have to decide now what to do next, and we don't want parliament only to be consulted after another 2a hours of rumours and criticism. i wish the prime minister well in obtaining a majority on the course of action in the future which is in the national interest. can i say to my right honourable and learn it friend, that there are in fact two stages, potentially two stages in this process. the cabinet will be looking at the draft agreements the negotiating teams have produced and will consider and consider what the next steps should be is the right honourable and learn it friend requests us to do. i'm sure we will be looking at this in the national
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interest. i will return to the house in order to explain the outcome of that. can i also say that there is of course then the issue of when a final deal is agreed with the eu, and ensuring as we will that proper analysis is available to members of this house before the meaningful vote ta kes this house before the meaningful vote takes place, and that briefings are available to members of this house on the details of the proposals, so that as he says, members of this house are able to ta ke members of this house are able to take this decision in the light of an understanding of the details of the deal that has been agreed. home office documents, the met commissioner, the police federation and now the home secretary say the government's cuts to policing have had an impact on the surge in bile
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and crime. we cannot continue to see the levels of violence which resulted in five fatal stabbings in six days in londonjust two resulted in five fatal stabbings in six days in london just two weeks ago. how many times does the prime minister need to be told about the dire consequences before she gives our front—line policing the resources they so clearly need? may i say to the honourable lady that we are all concerned across this hours about the attacks taking place in recent days in london, but indeed we are concerned about the issue of knife crime and the serious violence we have seen and we heard earlierfrom her violence we have seen and we heard earlier from her honourable friend the reference to the use of a crossbow in attacking and killing an individual. she talks about police funding, and we have protected police funding overall since 2015 and we are putting more money into the police are making more money available. but it is also about ensuring that the police and
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criminal justice system ensuring that the police and criminaljustice system have the powers they need to deal with knife crime. and if she is concerned about knife crime, i suggest she asks the leader of the opposition why he voted against increasing the powers to deal with knife crime? mr speaker, i will not be asking about brexit. for now. but could i say to her that i was enormously proud of my government for agreeing to lower the stake on fixed odds betting terminals down to £2 because they have caused endless farm, terrible damage to families and it was the right decision. since then there has been a hiatus about the date on which this would start. can i ask my right honourable friend, is it a reality that now we have put down an amendment that the government will accede and we will get this process
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started on the 1st of april next year? i know my right honourable friend has campaigned on this issue with a passion, because as he says, the question of the maximum stake for fixed odds betting the question of the maximum stake forfixed odds betting terminals is one that has an impact on vulnerable people as well as their families and loved ones. i recognise the strength of feeling on this issue. i know gambling addiction can devastate lives. our priority is making sure this brings the results we want to see and we are listening to the concerns raised by colleagues and if my right honourable friend will have a little patience i can tell him that the culture secretary will set out further details later today. the institute for fiscal studies has indicated that by the year 2022 child poverty will have risen from 30% up to 37%. when a government
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treats people like that it is not worth their salt, but i suppose this government never had any salt anyway. shouldn't the government be ashamed of itself allowing the situation to develop with children? cani situation to develop with children? can i say to the honourable gentleman is what we have seen under this government is absolute poverty reducing to a record low and as i referenced earlier, we have seen significant reduction in the number of children in workless households. when you look at the figures, three quarters of georgen are taken out of poverty when their household moves from being workless to a household with work —— three quarters of children. which is why it the changes we are making to the welfare system is one that encourages people into work and make sure is work pays. former new zealand high commissioner and experienced trade negotiators sir lockwood smith told the international trade committee that if you remain bound to the eu regulatory system you will not be
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able to have a significant trade strategy. . iam i am pleased to say as i said earlier that there are a number of countries that are notjust expressing an interest in that. we we re expressing an interest in that. we were keen that we should talk to them aboutjoining were keen that we should talk to them about joining the were keen that we should talk to them aboutjoining the cct p. we we re them aboutjoining the cct p. we were looking at the proposals to strike those details around the world. and without that will be able to strike the trade deal. when will receive devastating
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effects they have on leaving the nations? as i indicated we will ensure that information is available to members of this house on withdrawal agreement and on the future relationship that is agreed with the european union. we will ensure that briefings are available, the documents are available and analysis previously committed to is available so that when members of this house come to the meaningful vote they will be able to have that information and make their vote against the background of that information. as soon as practicable following cabinet meeting this afternoon will be endeavoured to
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make available to all members the detail of the draft agreement so that those who wish to do so can comment upon the basis of fact rather than well—informed speculation? rather than ill informed speculation. —— so that those of us who wish to do so. the cabinet is meeting to determine what the next steps a re meeting to determine what the next steps are in relation to this issue. if this is a deal that is taken forward for further debate and negotiation with the european union, it is the intention to ensure that the details of that steel are made public so that people are aware of the facts. thank you, mr speaker. if what is being reported is correct, the prime minister is set on ploughing through with a brexit deal that will be bad for our economy, bad forjobs and bad for hard—working people up and down this country. if the prime minister honestly believes that she commands the will of the people, whether she put her brexit deal to
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the people, either through a general election, orfailing that, a new referendum? prime minister. can i say to the honourable lady, first of all we are negotiating a deal that is good for the economy of the uk. it will ensure we continue to have a good trading relationship with the european union, but also that we are able to strike independent trade deals around the rest of the world. 0n the issue of a second referendum, there was a referendum here in 2016 when we asked the british people whether they want to remain in the eu or leave, they voted to leave, and that is what this government will deliver. thank you, mr speaker. this morning, and incredibly well attended agm of the thalidomide ag pd took place, cani the thalidomide ag pd took place, can i invite my honourable friend ‘s two lend her support to that, to
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talk to the german government to persuade them of the case and merit for social justice and persuade them of the case and merit for socialjustice and deliver a solution to those who have suffered for too long? cani for too long? can i say to my honourable friend, first of all, i thank him for the way he has been championing this cause. i think it's significant that so cause. i think it's significant that so many years after this thalidomide caused the problems and difficulties for people that it did, we still see, as he said, people like himself and others having to campaign on this cause. i will look into an a nswer this cause. i will look into an answer from the foreign & commonwealth office to look into what he says about the possibility speaking to the german government on this issue. a woman spent eight years on death row in pakistan for a crime she didn't commit, since the high court quashed her conviction, she's been in hiding. weekend reports suggested she applied for asylum in britain,
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does the primaries do agree that britain should be a beacon for human rights and those fleeing persecution —— does the prime minister agreed? are primary concern is for the safety a nd are primary concern is for the safety and security of asia bibi. we would like to see a resolution of the situation. there are governments aren't caught in pakistan and the prime minister has publicly supported the supreme court and promised to uphold the rule of law while providing protection for asia bibi. a number of countries are in discussion about providing a safe place for her when the proceedings are complete. given the sensitivity it isn't correct to comment at this stage, but we remain in close contact with our international partners to ensure that asia bibi's long—term safety and interests... thank you, mr speaker. the prime minister confirmed earlier that we will be leaving the common fisheries
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policy, which is very welcome. she will be aware that there is concern within the industry, and she give absolute assurance that it will be for the uk absolute assurance that it will be forthe uk and absolute assurance that it will be for the uk and uk alone to determine who fishes in our national waters, after a deal is signed? prime minister. i reassure my honourable friend that we will be an independent coastal state, the uk will negotiate on the uk's behalf in terms of access to uk waters. the prime minister will know that in 1965 there was a neighbourhood agreement between northern ireland and the republic that each could fish in each other‘s six mile water. two years ago the irish republic remained on that. we didn't relate, so remained on that. we didn't relate, so all the irish fishermen can come into northern ireland but northern irish fishermen can't go to the republic. would she try and speak up sometimes for northern irish fishermen and not always support the irish government?
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consistently, throughout these negotiations, one of the issues i have had at the forefront of my thinking has been the people of northern ireland. she raises a specific issue and i'm happy to look at the specific issue of the six mile water she refers to. we will become an independent coastal state, asi become an independent coastal state, as i have just become an independent coastal state, as i havejust said, and we will ensure that it is the uk negotiating on behalf the uk, for access to uk fishing waters. the people of northern ireland are at the forefront of our concerns in relation to the deal we are negotiating. the prime minister is to be commended for initiating her race disparity ordered, which showed, amongst other facts, that traveller children have the worst education and wealth and employment outcomes of almost any group. given the acute distress also caused too many settled residents by this policy, and given the support for the ten minute rule bill yesterday calling
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for a review across the house, would be prime minister please appoint a senior cabinet minister to undertake a complete review of this area, so we can have better outcomes for all of our constituents? my of our constituents? my honourable friend raises an issue which is a concern for many across the uk in terms of what they see in their own constituencies. as he said, there is concern about the impact on the educational attainment of traveller children. as he will know we published a consultation on tackling unauthorised encampments in april, and we will respond to that in due course. we are committed to strengthening the local councils and police powers to address these problems and ensure fair play. we ta ke problems and ensure fair play. we take this issue very seriously and are considering the response we can give to the consultation. thank you, mr speaker. can the prime minister confirm that her deal will make the uk a rule taken out a rule
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maker, a vassal state, isn't the best way to get herself out of this mess to allow the people a vote, the people's vote? prime minister. may i say to right honourable gentleman, i think i've given him the same answer to this question on a number of occasions, this parliament gave the british people the vote on whether or not to stay in the european union in 2016. the british people voted, they voted to leave, and it is this government that will deliver on this road and on brexit. order! very briefly, a point of order. following the question by the right honourable member for rushcliffe, can you advise members whether you have had any indication about when a statement will be made on the apparent withdrawal agreement that has been agreed with the eu? we hear rumours that a statement may be made
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tomorrow, many honourable members may have commitments for tomorrow. i understand that this house needs to mark the 70th birthday of the prince of wales today, but in the remaining six hours, surely we could discuss the most important issue facing this country for generations? i'm grateful for her point of order, a candid answer is that i have been given to understand that they would bea given to understand that they would be a statement on this matter in all likelihood tomorrow. factually, to respond to the honourable lady, what i would say to her is that the chair would be perfectly amenable to a statement before then. that is not, however, a judgment for me. it is a judgment for the government. i understand what she says about commitments tomorrow, but it seems to mea commitments tomorrow, but it seems to me a reasonable order... order! it seems a reasonable point to make in response, that if members consider this to be a supremely
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important matter, they can, potentially, rearrange their diaries in orderto be potentially, rearrange their diaries in order to be present. i'm always in favour, as she knows, of statements sooner rather than later. but i don't think we should have a great row about whether a statement is today or tomorrow. what i would like to say to members, is when there is a statement to this house, in conformity with the practice i have applied for nine and a half years from this trailer, they will bea years from this trailer, they will be a full opportunity members in all parts of the house, expressing or representing all sorts of different points of view, to be heard. that's the way it's always been, and as far as i'm concerned, that is the way it will continue to be. point of order mr kenneth clarke. point of order mr kenneth clarkem is the same subject, mr speaker but although you say you have no role in this, do you not agree that it has
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a lwa ys this, do you not agree that it has always been, until very recently, the constitutional convention in this house that when a government announces a point of order in the house of commons as prime minister questions draws to a close. a fairly hefty proportion of its devoted to brexit although other subjects are covered as well. let's get the assessment of our assistant political editor norman smith. before pmq use speculative whether any backbenchers would try to pick is what the prime minister has been saying. quite an ominous warning direct to the prime minister saying that you have not delivered on the brexit the people voted for. many conservative mps will not support you nor will
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millions of conservative voters. that was a clear to paraphrase warning from the hard brexit wing of the party. it was interesting and iain duncan smith joked the party. it was interesting and iain duncan smithjoked he would not ask about the exit, i think when we are is the calm before the storm, eve ryo ne are is the calm before the storm, everyone is waiting before what transpires at cabinet and whether there is a cavalcade of resignations or whether mrs may manages to bind her ministers in. we are slightly in a holding pattern. the other thing we got was a preview of the sort of arguments mrs may is going to make two cabinet ministers this afternoon saying it is in the national interest. we will hear that again and again from mrs may that her deal will ensure brexit. you voted down, you may not get brexit. also
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stressing and her review and protects the economy, protect security and crucially protects the integrity of the united kingdom. in terms of detail, we did not get much. she was challenged byjeremy corbyn about whether the uk would unilaterally be able to leave this proposed customs arrangements and all she said was she was aware of the concerns but she did not really a nswer to the concerns but she did not really answer to mean as now we will not. all indications are there will be some sort of arbitration mechanism involving the eu and the uk before we can leave. i feel at the moment as if everyone is poised waiting to see whether any of the cabinet actually decide now, up with this, we cannot put. what did you make of something elsejeremy corbyn had to savour the centre be respect the result of the referendum at a sensible other plan could bring together parliament and the country. as he given himself some wriggle
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room for another vote? there is a fairamount of room for another vote? there is a fair amount of wriggle room and the labour position in all sorts of ways. they like everyone else and waiting and watching to see what emerges from the sort of turmoil thatis emerges from the sort of turmoil that is possibly now going to unfold andi that is possibly now going to unfold and i think they are keeping all the options open, ruling nothing in all out. their preferred course of option is a general election, that seems to be distinct and unlikely. there are many who hope the inevitable logic of the labour position will be to rally behind the idea of a second referendum. mr corbyn has been much more hesitant and resistant to that idea because he fears it would alienate vast swathes of labour voters who support the exit but he also will be facing his own decision time and although
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it is not a cliche to describe today asjudgment it is not a cliche to describe today as judgment day, it it is not a cliche to describe today asjudgment day, it really is in so many different ways judgment asjudgment day, it really is in so many different wastudgment day for mrs may pot brexit deal, on her premiership after a mass resignations and cabinet ministers and they have to decide whether to quit. and it is a looming judgment forjeremy corbyn about highways act click the response at this deal goes down. —— exactly how he responds. prime minister's questions have been taking place in westminster, questions have been going on in the irish parliament with interesting questions from leo varadkhar. he has been saying the d raft varadkhar. he has been saying the draft agreement does not negatively impact on the good friday agreement in northern ireland. expanding on that he says i know that for the
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unionist unity of northern ireland this is quite difficult, i want to say the good friday agreement will be protected and that includes the fa ct we be protected and that includes the fact we respect the territorial integrity of the uk. and importantly she said on the backstop it cannot have an expiry date and it cannot be possible for one side to withdraw from it unilaterally but it is important to appreciate that it is our intention that the backstop should never have two be invoked. in other words a future relationship, the terms of that relationship between the uk and the eu would be agreed. 0ne between the uk and the eu would be agreed. one other point, leo varadkhar, it is reported confirming an eu summit has been pencilled in for the 25th of november, part of a choreography leading up to a planned
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brexit but before that there are other hurdles for the prime minister to get through, not least this cabinet eating and just over an hour. —— cabinet meeting. let's give you a flavour of what other politicians have been seeing on an extraordinary day at westminster. communities secretary james brokenshire has been speaking ahead of that crucial cabinet meeting, calling for a positive discussion. i think we should be positive on getting a good deal for our country. obviously there will be we should get behind the prime minister on delivering that brexit to take back control of our borders, our monies and our laws. i think we should be positive about that. that's what cabinet will discuss at two o'clock this afternoon and discuss the next step. what is your message to your cabinet colleagues who are not sure? i think clearly cabinet will be looking at this in detail this afternoon. everyone has had the chance to read the documents, to look at this in detail, and i look forward to a positive and constructive discussion this
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afternoon on how we take our country forward and actually secure that positive brexit that we all want to get on with. is it taking back control? i think, well, we will have that discussion later on today in terms of the next steps around the documents that we've been reading today but i think we should be positive about what we can do. there has been clearly good progress that has been secured over the last number of weeks and obviously we'll now consider the next steps and taking that forward. thank you. what if parliament votes it down, mr brokenshire? the former home secretary amber rudd spoke to five live's emma barnett earlier today. she told emma that she thinks the deal will deliver on what she had expected from a brexit deal and that she would be voting for it. since we had eu membership, we have had the referendum, so we have to deliver on that, and i think that this version sounds to me like it does deliver on the things that are important to many of us who are in parliament, and to me that is making sure we protect the jobs, businesses, manufacturing
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in our communities, but we also take the opportunities that leaving the eu has. so i represent a fishing town in hastings and it is a great opportunity for them, for us to be outside of the common fisheries policy. so that is better. everyone will tell you, even people who are really committed to the eu, the common fisheries policy has not been a success for uk fishermen. so i'm looking forward to the opportunity of making sure we can have a real improvement when we leave the eu, for the fishermen. so i think it is quite exciting, this proposal, and i certainly hope the cabinet back it. you sound like you are going to back it. yes. unequivocally? i haven't actually read it so unless there is something i am really upset about, i am likely to back it. i think it is the right combination. it is a compromise. everybody knew it was going to have to be a compromise and the people who are throwing mud at it from either side are looking for something perfect, and perfect was never going to be on offer. the brexit negotiations
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have been closely followed in gibraltar, which voted overwhelmingly in favour of remain. chief minister fabian picardo has been giving his reaction to the draft agreement. what do you think of the agreement? think it potentially works for the uk and therefore for gibraltar. it is important and agreement is reached because the alternative no deal is not as good. can you give us an indication as to what you have discussed with members of the cabinet bowler we have had discussions today with the foreign office and exchequer secretary, theseissues office and exchequer secretary, these issues were relating to matters which affect gibraltar directly. the continued access to the uk market after december 2020 and we are making great progress and
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respects to that. the important thing for me has been to state how fantastic the working ownership between the government of gibraltar and the uk has been, heavily involved we have been in this process so involved we have been in this process so far. thank you. we know there's a lot going on behind the scenes, can you give us an indication of what you have experienced? it wouldn't be going on behind—the—scenes if i told you in front of the scenes. if this deal was voted down there would be no deal is everyone who genuinely cares for gibraltar would want to see a deal as important as this. thank you. the one, news as soon but let's look at the weather. edging towards the end of autumn, temperatures refusing to follow suit. through large parts of the uk isa suit. through large parts of the uk is a beautiful spells of sunshine
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and it is noticeably mild but normally an exception to the rules and that is the case through parts of northern ireland, western and northern parts of scotland will be seeing heavy rain and blustery winds. winds coming from the south—west, importing much milder airsort of south—west, importing much milder air sort ofjust doing well across the board. wins happen to boost to adjust to north—eastern parts of scotla nd adjust to north—eastern parts of scotland rugby could see highs of around 16 or17, scotland rugby could see highs of around 16 or 17, and the fahrenheit. the rain will ease through the day, still quite blustery and into overnight, initially dry with clear spells but mist and low cloud edges in and more rain for northern ireland and western scotland as well. temperatures will not fall too far, another mild night. through thursday, still reigned for northern ireland and western fringes of scotla nd ireland and western fringes of scotland once again which will become quite persistent for some areas. elsewhere murky to start,
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taking a while to lift under the low cloud but the best of the breaks through thursday will receive the highest temperatures in the south—east of around 16 or 17. many places will remain dry weight from that area of rain. even under the rain temperature still in the low teens so not too bad. into friday, high pressure builds and acts as a barrier to this low—pressure system moving in but will not make inroads, try the dry across the board. wins becoming more southerly and will generally be more cloud through the day on friday but some places, particularly north—east scotland seen particularly north—east scotland seen good spells of sunshine again added. feel mild, perhaps not quite as warm as thursday but still temperatures in the mid—teens for most places. i change on the cast towards the weekend, it will turn
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cooler but brighter for all of us. the brexit divorce agreement. cabinet ministers are heading to downing street as the prime minister seeks to get their backing for the proposals and says she will deliver on brexit. we will take back control of our money, laws and borders. we will deliver brexit and the united kingdom is leaving the european union on the 29th of march 2019. does the prime minister still intend to put a false choice to parliament between her botched deal or no deal? i will be reporting live from downing street. with less than an hour to go until the most crucial cabinet meeting theresa may's premiership. all the latest from westminster and brussels this
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