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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 15, 2018 9:00pm-10:00pm GMT

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welcome to this bbc news special, with me christian fraser in westminster and ros atkins in brussels. our top story... taking the right decisions, not the easy ones. the prime minister vows to continue with her plan for brexit despite strong opposition from all sides in westminster, promising it will deliver on the promises made in the referendum. i believe that this is a deal which does deliver that, which is in the national interest and am i going to see this through? yes. earlier today, a series of ministerial resignations, including that of the brexit secretary dominic raab who said the prime minister's brexit plan had fatal flaws. the leading brexiteerjacob rees—mogg submits a letter of no confidence in the prime minister and says he expects there'll be a vote on her future. here in brussels... michel barnier says the deal is fair and balanced and lays the ground for an ambitious new partnership. but the german chancellor warns against any changes
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to the plan at this late stage. translation: we now have a document on the table that britain and the eu 27 have agreed to. so for me, there is no question at the moment whether we negotiate further. good evening. welcome to westminster. theresa may has insisted that she will see brexit through and that she has set out the right course for the country. it's been a day of intense political pressure since the draft agreement was published yesterday with four ministers resigning. let's have a look back at how we got to this point... yesterday the uk and the eu presented its draft agrement
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for britain's withdrawal — which included provisions for a transition period and ‘backstop‘ while a trade deal is negotiated. in response, brexit secretary dominic raab quit this morning, followed by esther mcvey and two other ministers. theresa may defended her deal in the house of commons and was on her feet for three hours taking questions, some critical, from all parties. leading eurosceptic mp, jacob rees—mogg, submitted a letter of no—confidence in theresa may's leadership saying her draft brexit deal ‘had turned out to be worse than expected'. theresa may then held a press conference, where she said she would see brexit through. she said "leadership is about making the right decisions, not taking the easy decisions", adding her brexit deal would deliver on what people voted for. our political editor laura kuenssberg now reports on today's turmoil at westminster. on
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0 n exa ctly on exactly the spot where theresa may took on the job of prime minister... the march of the brexiteer is trying to walk her to the exit. and this is it, trying to force theresa may from office which could be the beginning of the end. what we need as a leader who will say to the european union that it is impossible to divide up the united kingdom. it is impossible to agree toa kingdom. it is impossible to agree to a situation where we have a perpetual customs union. it is impossible to pay £39 billion of taxpayers money for a few promises. what do you say to some of our viewers and listeners who think this is self—indulgent, you'rejust complaining about what is a practical compromise and this is about the ambition of brexiteers rather than what is good for the country? it is nothing about ambition the brexiteers, it is about ambition for the country. leaving the european union is the most fantastic opportunity for the united kingdom. the ugly fight over how we leave the european union... we voted yes!
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stop brexit! now an open battle in the tory party for who runs the country. what are we all to make of this warfare playing out in front of our eyes? those who still back her are exasperated. stop rocking the boat otherwise this will prove an historic, disastrous period notjust for the conservative party and for the government but for the country. the prime minister will not be bullied and the cabinet made a definite decision to back her. her toys, get up and go to work. are you confident you have got the rest of the cabinet's support? to use her phrase, get on with the job. it is less than 2a hours since her cabinet reluctantly agreed to back her compromise with the eu. but after two of them quit, she had to try to explain it to the commons. i do not pretend that this has been a comfortable process, or that either we or the eu are entirely happy with all of the arrangements that have been included within it. mr speaker, when i first became prime minister in 2016, there was no ready—made blueprint for brexit.
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many people said it could simply not be done. i've never accepted that. i've been committed day and night to delivering on the result of the referendum and ensuring the uk leaves the eu absolutely and on—time. this is not the deal the country was promised and parliament cannot and i believe will not accept a false choice between this bad deal and no deal. the government must now withdraw this half— baked deal, which is clear does not have the backing of the cabinet. nor of this parliament or the country as a whole. there is no escaping the big problems. the brexit secretary and some colleagues quitting, convince the prime minister signed up to a suffocating relationship with the eu. there comes a point where it is so bad that i felt i could not with good conscience seared
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over the line. would you forgive some of our viewers, including lots of people who voted for brexit, who will be really angry at people like you, who campaigned for brexit, now it gets really difficult, now it gets really hard, and you walk away? there are risks we take at any course in this historicjuncture. but i think the worst possible outcome when you balance the risks is to give in to the eu's blackmail and accept a deal which is bad for the economy and devastating for trust in our democracy. so can she really carry on? a challenge to her leadership, a plan with little support in parliament? she will try. serving in high office is an honour and a privilege. it is also a heavy responsibility. that is true at any time, but especially when the stakes are so high. negotiating the uk's withdrawal from the eu after a0 years and building from the ground up a new and enduring relationship for the good of our children
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and grandchildren is a matter of the highest consequence. my approach throughout has been to put the national interest first. i do notjudge harshly those of my colleagues who seek to do the same but who reach a different conclusion. i'm sorry that they've chosen to leave the government and i thank them for their service. but i believe with every fibre of my body that the course i have set out is the right one for our country and all our people. it's very clear you want to stick to your plan. isn't it the case to us that others are seeking to take that decision out of your hands? i'm going to do myjob of getting the best deal for britain. i'm going to do myjob of getting a deal that is in the national interest. when the vote comes before the house of commons, mps will be doing theirjob. am i going to see this through? yes.
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even if you try, try and try again, you don't always succeed. this prime minister, this government, is still in place. but certainly not in control. our political editor laura kuenssberg reporting there. on what has been a very turbulent day here at westminster and we saw a short time ago in international development secretary arriving home in her own car, who has not resigned yet but they are watching what you will do in the coming days. let's talk about what is going on in the parliament. i'm joined now by an mp who is backing theresa may, simon hoare. thank you for coming and do tell us where you think the party is tonight in the context of the leadership contest or the vote of no—confidence? contest or the vote of no-confidence? i do not think a leadership can't do my contest will materialise nor should it. you will have to have a general election immediately afterwards and also to change the parliamentary arithmetic
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and frankly, the board has a clamour for a general election in the clamourfor a clear one for a general election in the clamour for a clear one but for a general election in the clamourfor a clear one but guessing on delivering this brexit deal and making sure it is the best possible one which we can achieve and i think the document that the prime minister has produced over the last 2a hours isa has produced over the last 2a hours is a very good document, a very good deal and one which we should rally around. the mood of the party and politics, people will be coming from their own starting gates as it were andi their own starting gates as it were and i think as we start to read it and i think as we start to read it and digested, as would take soundings and talk to the constituencies and others, i am hopeful that we will come back next week and there will be a calm reflection. i admire your optimism. i watched the debate today and we we re i watched the debate today and we were in our end and i heard no one on either side of the house who was batting for the prime minister. it was an hour into the debate before we heard someone. we had someone,
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grassroot conservatives who field the trade and their conservative grassroots members. —— who feel betrayed. it is never going to find that sticker of perfection put on it by one side or the other. i do not like this language of the trail, it delivers on the referendum decision and brings back control of our laws within our borders and immigration, and takes us out of the jurisdiction of the core but more importantly it delivers on those things without slitting our economic threads because by ensuring that we are able to, that the vision is therefore trade to continue in frictionless trade to continue in frictionless trade to continue while at the same time maintaining the union with northern ireland, then i think that is the right sort of alice that we have been striking. we talk about this document like the daily newspaper landing on the mat in the
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morning. —— the right sort of balance. the critics said the prime minister never would be able to deliver this document and there cannot be a deal, there was too much and tryjohn jenkins and cannot be a deal, there was too much and tryjothenkins and their sheep was able to pull it off which speaks to her, like the three hours budgeted at the dispatch box, hostile, supportive, and she took them all with good grace. some stamina. a huge amount of stamina but what everyone should find impressive is the range of detail and some could say she is the prime ministers of that is the expectation that the way she did on a complex document gave all of us good effort and good heart that she knows what she is doing. one quick final one, michael gove has been billed as perhaps the next brexit secretary, that she asked him did do the job, do you know about that?|j that she asked him did do the job, do you know about that? i know nothing about that but i know that
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michael is an incredibly talented colleague and does the fantastic work supporting our environment and agriculture sector and i fully am behind him and i know whateverjob he is asked to do he will do to the best of his biddies. —— the best of his ability. he is going to stay and see this through because he liked the prime minister is devoted to duty and patriotic. dinky very much. michael gove is one of the senior brexiteer is and is coming under criticism that he has not walked today but he is sticking with it. all eyes will be on whether he takes thatjob, too all eyes will be on whether he takes that job, too previous all eyes will be on whether he takes thatjob, too previous secretaries this year. they have resigned because they do not have enough power to negotiate so will michael gove power to negotiate so will michael g ove wa nt power to negotiate so will michael gove want to spot into that though, we will see. stay with us, still to come, we'll have more
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on the story as it develops here in westminister. and reaction from here in brussels, where they're waiting to see whether the brexit agreement will stick. theresa may's deal has it's critics outside of parliament as well. earlier, bbc news spoke to the brexit campaigner nigel farage, and he is deeply unimpressed by the proposed agreement. here is a little of what he had to say. what we argued for in the referendum was that the united kingdom should become an independent country, and independent countries have their own laws, control their on borders and change their old friends in the world and nothing about that has changed. brexit itself must not be seen to be tarnished by a prime minister who simply never believed in it. there is no future deal because what she signed up to keeps us trapped in perpetuity a sickly inside a customs
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union and unable to make our own laws, stuck with the old them borders and no doubt 40— £60 billion we are currently talking about are considerably high. one thing did do with this were still in history and thatis with this were still in history and that is to put it in the bin. —— stuck with open borders. this is bbc news, the latest headlines the british prime minister has appealed for support for her brexit plan, saying the alternatives brought deep and grave uncertainty. earlier today, a series of ministerial resignations, including that of the brexit secretary dominic raab, who said the prime minister's brexit plan had ‘fatal flaws'. let me bring you up—to—date with developments here in brussels. earlier in the day we had confirmation from donald tusk that there are plans in place for a special brexit assignment on the
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25th of november and they hope that will be the day that the uk and eu sign off on this withdrawal agreement. tomorrow morning at 8am, ambassadors for 27 eu member states will meet to start planning for the summit ina will meet to start planning for the summit in a few days' time. europe ministers will meet and then the leaders will come to town for the summit itself. from the french prime minister we have had advice for eve ryo ne minister we have had advice for everyone within the european union to keep planning for no deal. he has been looking at what is happening in westminster and is concerned. angela merkel said this is the deal and do not expected to change, if you do not expected to change, if you do not take this deal, it we are probably looking at no deal and that is not desirable. translation: we now have a document on the table that britain and the eu 27 have agreed to. so, for me, there's no question at the moment we negotiate further. for more on this we're joined by dick roche, ireland's former europe minister.
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thank you very much for your time, are you worried this evening? this has become an extraordinary drama but today was an amazing day, i found myself unable to keep away from the television. i think if anyone was going to give advice to london about keeping calm, the reality is we are in a difficult position and any confidence that would have existed in brussels that we have reached a critical point months to begin to fray at this stage and i really can understand how the british authorities and how the people in the parliament are in charge of the negotiations allowed this to happen. it really is quite an extraordinary position to be in
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an extraordinary position to be in an very hard to see what the outcome would be in the solution would be in london, would actually be in brussels and i think that is why eve ryo ne brussels and i think that is why everyone will look at what is happening in the conservative party and what will happen in the comments. it isjust about impossible to predict but one of the possible outcomes here is no deal come the end of march 2019. are you concerned about the ramifications of that scenario for ireland?” concerned about the ramifications of that scenario for ireland? i think anybody who had any sense at all would be very worried about a new deal and britain crashing out and it would not just be deal and britain crashing out and it would notjust be in this island, it would notjust be in this island, it would be on the isle of ireland. the calculations are that the irish economy would have some really bad damage. certainly damage done to community relations. and the thing that irritates me and upsets me most about this, if you look at the
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reality of the island of ireland it should not be hard to craft an arrangement that would have dealt with the trade that takes place between northern ireland and the republic and it would not have been ha rd if republic and it would not have been hard if the uniqueness were brought in to the discussions at the beginning stage to craft a protocol which would have protected their positions. in 1921, carson said that he felt he had been used by the conservative party as if he were a puppet and i think there must be some people who are thinking back to that now. it is worth me jumping some people who are thinking back to that now. it is worth mejumping in and saying theresa may was asked about this earlier and replayed that she breathed the unionist party as she breathed the unionist party as she went through the negotiation so she went through the negotiation so she said they should have expected the outcome that materialised in this deal. let me also ask you though the point that dominic raab has been making and says a different approach is necessary. of the uk government did
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turn around to the european union and said we still want to make a deal but we have to change the terms of this deal do you think the european union should have allowed that to happen? i think if that were to happen, there would be a lot of anger but i certainly would believe the european union would do its very best to reach a proper settlement with the united kingdom, a settle m e nt with the united kingdom, a settlement that will see large it and not a hard order on this island because there is no interest for britain to crash out in my belief is, disbelief for a long time, if politicians in the uk cannot solve this issue, maybe it is time to go back to the borders and ask them to resolve it. we shall see if that happens. theresa may was asked about the hostility of his second referendum and said no, we are pushing ahead. thank you forjoining us. pushing ahead. thank you forjoining us. at the moment we have this strange situation where there are quite calm and predictable preparations going on for the eu
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summit, they are very well oiled, ambassadors and euro ministers meet and then in the and the leaders come to town and. while the motions are in place, we are all watching westminster and wondering once we get to sunday week, what will theresa may be able to say to her 27 cou nterpa rts theresa may be able to say to her 27 counterparts here in the eu.” theresa may be able to say to her 27 counterparts here in the eu. i know how the summits work and there will be work going on in the background as we both know. we will be watching this year because we will be wondering about summit goes ahead if there is a leadership contest. ben wright is with me. let's talk on the vote of no confidence if it would be. and of course what would need to happen is there will have to be 48 letters put forward to the 1922 committee, the committee of act ventures, are we anywhere near that 48? that is 1596 of the parliament of the tory party
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thatis of the parliament of the tory party that is the threshold that needs to be passed to trigger a vote of no—confidence and one in the told me this evening it is potentially the most corrupt electoral exist in the mac system you could design, and the only person who really knows what is going on is the chairman of the 1922 committee. he and his room has a safe and in that safe there are some letters. only he knows how many are in there. he is the one who will decide whether the threshold has been reached. once he gets the critical number... does he have to go if there is 48 emma does he have to call a vote? there is mystery around it. what he does have to do is speak to anyone who has previously submitted a letter to make sure that they are happy to have the letter included in the total and telling them that they are reaching the trigger to make absolutely sure they are happy with the consequences of what will happen. this process of verification
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and checking and counting again and could potentially go on as long as the chairman decides it should. no one is really sure. people have been running around all day, have you put a there are about 17 people who declared they had. it is a mystery what is going on. thank you very much. the financial markets have shown some steep falls today after those resignations from the cabinet, and no sign of how the government is going to resolve its difficulties over brexit. shares in banks and house—builders fell sharply — this was royal bank of scotland which closed down 9% — these are bloomberg charts and this was sterling against the dollar — falling too. do you see the clip at the moment dominic raab resigned today. vicky pryce is with me. markets unlikely to be calmed by theresa may's press conference basically saying, no change to the current plan? would you think markets make of the situation at the moment? it will
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affect sterling and the share prices as well, and when you look at what is happened today is that firms that tend to depend very much on foreign earnings, the low pound generally helps and the ones that are depending almost entirely on domestic demand and some things have found their shares fall significantly today. house builders as well. there is a difference between the ftse 100 as well. there is a difference between the ftse100 companies who have money offshore in the war domestic based. when you translate earnings back into pounds they are actually rise is a result in any fall in the pound and that has been like that since the referendum vote itself, that means brexit is a good thing but actually the pound was wea k thing but actually the pound was weak and it is dominated by big firms. those markets are going to worry about a long period of uncertainty in this morning we are already hearing businesses saying
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things may be improving in the future and we now have some sort of certainty and that has all collapsed today. the question is whether anything comes with comfort that will come back to the markets tomorrow but at the moment it does not look promising. let's say the agreement goes through and that is a big if, from march 29 britain will bea big if, from march 29 britain will be a different country and michel barnier said yesterday we will beat becoming a third country, for the city of london what does that mean? that is not good news because the best could be if the country has the equivalent, if we're lucky the eu will look at some of our regulations and say we will accept them, but keep them under review and we will do the same for theirs, and that does not mean that banks that operate here can sell their services across but they have to give the agreement for them to be able to do so which could be revoked at any point of the real issue with the
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customs union is that the disagreement goes through for a longer—term, if the deal goes there as it is now. we will have to find actually that services which would have been hugely on regulatory agreement with europe are going to find that they cannot actually trade as easily as they did before so it is not the customs union that is the issue for most of our economy and thatis issue for most of our economy and that is what businesses will be looking for. and countries that will be looking into london because it is close to europe but they might think otherwise. thank you for being with us. everybody looking at this agreement at the moment and everyone in the city looking at it and eve ryo ne in the city looking at it and everyone here in westminster wondering what is going to happen. there is an awful lot of uncertainty at the moment but today theresa may said she will bat on and will make sure that it goes through. you are watching a bbc news special. all day we have been monitoring the
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progress on a storm in the bay of bengal which is impacting us either in india which is making landfall with destructive winds and severe coastal storms as well in this part of the world which is low lying in the damaging winds and 200 mm of rain is expected to all, and you can see the progress during the course of thursday night and friday and coming in and crossing is in and there are top—level warnings and at there are top—level warnings and at the moment. read warnings in this pa rt the moment. read warnings in this part of the world because the common nation will give some very dangerous whether he indeed and even behind it we have the monsoon rain starting to pick up here and into sri lanka as well and there is a nasty weather here. we have the critical fire well and there is a nasty weather here. we have the criticalfire risk across california and air quality remains poor and there is signs that
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it is starting to ease and switching to win off the pacific but very little sign of any rain. ring systems a re little sign of any rain. ring systems are further north and further east and of course causing description on thursday and it is really the first winter storm of the season and it is a while before it slowly at bates, the snow turning into rain and it remains very wintry with potentially lake effect snow behind it during the course of friday. flooding in parts of windows areas in argentina because of the ban of slow moving showers in the course of friday and again across parts of the middle east. —— in parts of the middle east. —— in parts of the middle east. —— in parts of what is there is, and argentina. iraq and iran, the persian gulf, snow to relatively low levels because it is chilly for this time of yearand levels because it is chilly for this time of year and it is an ongoing issue here. let's turn our attention
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back to europe because we have a couple of issues here with red warnings out through thursday across parts of eastern spain and this developing storm system in the mediterranean, heavy snowfall as mentioned already around the black sea resorts a cross mentioned already around the black sea resorts across turkey but this looks nasty for greece in the balkans and snow as well with cold air starting to pool and elsewhere we have high pressure and that system as a say in the mediterranean looks nasty for the coming few days with the really cold air on top of all the warmth which provides more showers and high pressure builds across the uk for the weekend so we have the foggy conditions as we go through friday. high—pressure with a dryer went clears the fog away for the weekend but doctors by daystar to do boys. i prefer that and i like the sunshine with the crib crisp starts. there is more on the website. —— sunshine with the crisp starts. welcome to this bbc news special.
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with me christian fraser in westminster and ros atkins in brussels. our top story... taking the right decisions, not the easy ones. the prime minister vows to continue with her plan for brexit despite strong opposition from all sides in westminster, promising it will deliver on the promises made in the referendum. i believe this is a deal which it does deliver that, which is in the national interest and i am i going to see it through? yes. earlier today, a series of ministerial resignations, including that of the brexit secretary dominic raab, who said the prime minister's brexit plan had "fatal flaws". the leading brexiteer jacob rees—mogg submits a letter of no confidence in the prime minister and says he expects there'll be a vote on her future. here in brussels... michel barnier says the deal is fair the plan is a special summit on the
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november 20. michel barnier says the deal is fair and balanced and lays the ground for an ambitious new partnership. we've also had a strong message from the german chancellor saying the deal is all but done and will not be reit negotiated. translation: we have a document on the table that they both have agreed to, so for me there is no question at the moment whether we negotiate further. if you're just if you'rejust coming if you're just coming in, it's been a busy day here in westminster, let's recap today's dramatic developments in the brexit process. yesterday the uk and the eu presented its draft agrement for britain's withdrawal — which included provisions for a transition period and ‘backstop' while a trade deal is negotiated.
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in response, brexit secretary dominic raab quitjust before 9 o'clock this morning, followed by esther mcvey and two other ministers. at half past ten this morning, theresa may defended her deal in the house of commons and was on her feet for three hours taking questions, some critical, from all parties. leading eurosceptic mp, jacob rees—mogg, submitted a letter of no—confidence in theresa may's leadership saying her draft brexit deal ‘had turned out to be worse than expected'. theresa may then held a press conference, where she said she would see brexit through. she said "leadership is about making the right decisions, not taking the easy decisions", adding her brexit deal would deliver on what people voted for. let's here what the prime minister had to say at that press conference, around three hours ago. serving in high office is an honour
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and privilege, that's true at any time, but especially when the stakes are so high. negotiating the withdrawal after 40 years and building from the ground up a new and enduring relationship, for the good of our children and grandchildren, is a matter of the highest consequence. it touches almost every area of our national life, a whole economy and virtually everyjob. the livelihoods of our fellow citizens, our integrity as a united kingdom four nations, our safety and security, all of these are at stake. my approach throughout has been to put the national interest first. not a partisan interest, and certainly not my own political interest. i do notjudge harshly those of my colleagues who seek to do the same but to reach a different conclusion. they must do what they believe to be right, just as i do.
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i am sorry that they have chosen to leave the government, and i thank them for their service. but i believe with every fibre of my being that because i have set out is the right one for our country and all our people. from the very beginning, i have known what i wanted to deliverfor the british people, to honour their vote in the referendum. full control of our borders by bringing an end to the free movement of people, once and for all. full control of our money, so we decide ourselves how to spend it on priorities like our nhs. full control of our laws, by ending the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice in the united kingdom. getting us out of the common agricultural policy and common fisheries policy for good. that is exactly what this agreement will deliver — free movement ended, vast annual payments stopped, the jurisdiction of the ecj over,
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out of the cap, out of the cfp. this is a brexit that delivers on the priorities of the british people. in achieving these objectives, i'm also determined to protect the things that are important to us, protect the hundreds of thousands of manufacturing jobs that put food on the tables of working families right across the uk. those jobs rely on cross—border trade in goods, with parts flowing easily in and of the uk, allowing for integrated supply chains. this agreement protects that, protects the close security co—operation that keeps us safe, this agreement does that. protect the integrity of the united kingdom and the peace settlement in northern ireland by leaving the eu as one united kingdom and having no hard border. this agreement does that as well.
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yes, difficult and sometimes uncomfortable decisions have had to be made, i understand fully that there are some who are unhappy with those compromises. but this deal delivers what people voted for and it is in the national interest, and we can only secure it if we unite behind the agreement reached in cabinet yesterday. if we do not move forward with that agreement, nobody can know for sure the consequences that will follow. it would be to take a path of deep and grave uncertainty when the british people just want us to get on with it. they are looking to the conservative party to deliver, to deliver a brexit that works for the whole uk, a strong economy that keeps jobs safe and wages rising, and first—class public services we can rely on, an nhs there for all of us, great schools for every child, and the homes that families need. that is what the people we serve
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expect, and that is what we owe it to them to deliver. joining me now is ayesha hazarika — former media advisor to ed miliband & now a political commentator. and also with us is harriet line — political reporter for the press association i thought at the comedian in there. i wanted to go back in history and time and remember a moment with dominic raab resigned, and everything that has floated since that point. it's been an extraordinary day. it has, i walked the streets and been around for 20 yea rs of the streets and been around for 20 years of westminster and i have never seen ending like it, it does feel like the uk is gripped in a bona fide political crisis right now, and i feel that bona fide political crisis right now, and ifeel that the prime minister's days are numbered. do you why do you think that? she came out swinging today she gave a very
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defiant apartments and had her questions in parliament and took a press co nfe re nce questions in parliament and took a press conference but i think the mood has really soured in the conservative parliamentary party right now, i think both groups, remainders and brexiteers, they don't feel like they have a huge amount of confidence in her, and i think the sort ofjungle drums are beating and i think even though she says to the public and press, i'm here to stay, that may be out of her control in those 48 letters come in. i'm saying momentum is really important in politics, she had some last night when she came to the steps of downing street, and told us she had the backing of the cabinet but from that moment, it seems to have dissipated. perhaps not as badly as it could've gone for her, she has lost the brexit secretary and the working pensions secretary. it sounds a monty python night, that's quite a lot. it is but there
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are thought she could lose more than that so it's not as like half of omar gone that so it's not as like half of omargone and you're that so it's not as like half of omar gone and you're right she came out quite defined this evening and she was almost laughing and taking jokes and more questions than normal from the press as though she was quite relaxed and confident.” from the press as though she was quite relaxed and confident. i think she should've come on it to a song to be quite appropriate. yes and eve ryo ne to be quite appropriate. yes and everyone call george, but we will forgive herfor everyone call george, but we will forgive her for that and everyone call george, but we will forgive herfor that and it everyone call george, but we will forgive her for that and it was a long day. when some people would they not admire the stamina, three hours on her feet at the house of commons and the press, tomorrow she's going on at eight o'clock to a nswer she's going on at eight o'clock to answer questions from listeners. she received praise from some labour mps even today, for sharing a sort of determination to get it done and that she is trying to do what she thinks is in the best interest of the british people. and i think there is admiration for that, but
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there is admiration for that, but the problem is a lot of people don't agree with the path she's taking. and that's posing a lot up local problems for her. caduceus scenario over the next three or four weeks where they get big business to go behind her and won the consequences of the other side and they whip some of the other side and they whip some of the other side and they whip some of the mps on their own side and their people to go for it, could you see how those could get numbers? well, i think the matter still remaining very difficult for her to get the deal through parliament, the labour party have already indicated pretty strongly that they will not support this and actually, what are the big things their particular word about is a huge group that are very important on this, they're not going to go for, the dup, the green, i just think the mass are really hard andi just think the mass are really hard and i think the more you play the old traditional tactics, business and lots of scary numbers, that is not working with people. the whole
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eu referendum has been sort of a bowl of a big feelings rather than fa cts , bowl of a big feelings rather than facts, it's about emotion and those are facts, it's about emotion and those a re really facts, it's about emotion and those are really running high. and ijust feel that at the end of the day she's not going to be able to get this through parliament because it's a deal that really does not work for anyone but to be honest, i don't think there is a deal that would work for everybody at the brexit is quite an impossible thing that you cannot please everyone or anybody is the turns out. quick last question, there is a theory that this'll be a 2—door strategy voted down a terrible consequences on the markets, currency plummets, something comes back from europe and asa something comes back from europe and as a possibility? they're playing ha rd as a possibility? they're playing hard —— hard in and sent only deal thatis hard —— hard in and sent only deal that is going to come from the eu andl that is going to come from the eu and i don't know likely and i know whether mps will change their tune i think likely like she said, there
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are a group “— think likely like she said, there are a group —— emotions running high on both sides and there are plenty of labour mps who want to get a deal through the comments and it's a very difficult choice for them.” through the comments and it's a very difficult choice for them. i think that there are more mps who want a second referendum could cost mr to get it right at the deal through. thank you very much. would you make of that theory ross? this idea that you have one vote it on the bottom drawer, the europeans could have another one to come back for second vote is that a possibility? well, like anything is a possibility given the last two years, but i think that'll be reasonably difficult for the eu, only because several of its most senior representative, whether we're talking about michel barnier or in terms of a member state legal —— leader, they said actually vote on the deal in the current form is fairand on the deal in the current form is fair and balanced to use and they're very happy with it, but for them to
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us very happy with it, but for them to us to returned and offer the uk significant shift, i'm not saying it's not possible, but it would need them to go back a little to do what they been saying in the last 48 hours. but never say never there's been quite a few twists and turns and a christian you been writing is through the developments and westminster. let's run over what's been happening from the eu side of things, donald tusk confirmed there will be a special brexit summit on the 25th of november, we have heard from the french prime minister saying keep dining for no deal because he's worried about what's happening in the westminster, the president of the european parliament has said the deal was the best one possible in difficult circumstances, that's important because that european parliament can actually beat of the deal, but there's no sign from any of them but that oh yeah likelihood. we got a number developments and to our morning we know that they will all meet to start planning for the exit summit on the 25th. let's consider what's
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happening with the help of a thank you forjoining us. the ultimate arbiterfor you forjoining us. the ultimate arbiter for that, you forjoining us. the ultimate arbiterfor that, we her you forjoining us. the ultimate arbiter for that, we her treason you forjoining us. the ultimate arbiterfor that, we her treason may today said she's taken the uk away from thejurisdiction today said she's taken the uk away from the jurisdiction but some are just say that's not happening anti—what's your view of that? just say that's not happening anti-what's your view of that? it's anti-what's your view of that? it's a bit ofa anti-what's your view of that? it's a bit of a halfway house i'll have to admit, like the majority of the agreement today. under the title of government what seems to have been agreed is a joint committee, and i think the emphasis is on the word joint obviously so it's going to be accommodated two teens, team european union and teen uk, said representatives from both sides i think is 25 persons in total, and they're supposed to be willing and able to service members on an arbitration panel and of course those are there when things go
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wrong, that's the reason for it it's a sort of a stalemate breaker. ten proposed by the uk and ten from the eu -- proposed by the uk and ten from the eu —— european union and five from both sides to serve on the panel, to deal with disputes. and that is the nature of it and what sorts of disputes with they look at willoughby trade dispute or alignment related dispute and regressive financial services, people sitting on the the board will be hopefully independent beyond doubt, possessing relevant qualifications, so it's sort of a court within a court if you would like, a cloud within a cloud, and obviously in terms of any dispute involving aspects of eu law that needs interpreting, that'll be the ecj'sjob, needs interpreting, that'll be the ecj's job, there's no needs interpreting, that'll be the ecj'sjob, there's no getting out of that so there is a win for the eu in a sense because the umpire, he himself will be the ecj, it's a bit ofa win himself will be the ecj, it's a bit of a win for theresa made to some it's the same we have to have
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something separate there's a new legal tear if you'd like in times of the arbiter of mechanism that added. we're tight for time on the special some afraid we have to leave it there but thank you very much for joining us and if you're watching a lot more background on the issues we discussed including the ecj, that's available through the news website. you're watching a bbc news espresso, stay with the still to come... florida hit the recounting ballot, will bring you the latest on this review. all along, one of the major sticking points has been over the border between northern ireland and ireland, the uk's land border with the eu, and how that will work after brexit. it's a question which has caused controversy and division in westminster, and in ireland itself as our ireland correspondent emma vardy reports. who is scoring here?
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as northern ireland take on ireland in dublin tonight, theresa may has been trying to present the brexit deal as a win for both sides. the best case the northern ireland would be the homecoming of the uk, doing business without feeling like you have difficulties in the uk. some northern ireland businesses believe they could benefit. it's the best of a vast situation currently in something i think needs to go for it and it's in something i think needs to go for it and its positive for businesses and job security and it can provide options for. this afternoon one minister who has not resigned, northern ireland secretary, karen bradley came to rally support for the prime minister plan. this is a deal about the union, about ukraine it -- uk deal about the union, about ukraine it —— uk and a good deal for the union and as i say, it's a very,
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very complicated. it's a friendly in the football, but a political crisis that westminster. it's as good as it, i'm zoo, i can't hear word happens or not but it's brilliant tv. today, player after player and theresa made team have them quitting their positions, many saying it's those arrangements for the irish border that they can no longer support. if the relationship between these two sides that's continuing to design brexit. number there's plenty more on our website on brexit and the jargon they go with it, bbc .uk. this is bbc news, the latest headlines... the headlines. the british prime minister has appealed for support for her brexit plan, saying the alternatives brought deep and grave uncertainty. earlier today —— a series of ministerial
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resignations —— including that of the brexit secretary dominic raab who said the prime minister's brexit plan had ‘fatal flaws'. joining me here in brussels is ulrich ladurner, brussels correspondent for de zeit. what are you thinking as her watching advance and westminster? well, i personally am very worried because we don't know what will the result be for this upheaval and i think the european union has an interest to a normal and regular brexit if i might say so but we do not know the result of the political eventin not know the result of the political event in london and we are very worried. are your readers concerned about what no deal would mean for germany? of course we are because everybody knows that even for germany, it'll be great damage if there is no deal with the brexit, so i think everyone in germany including government hopes there will be a deal. but the message from
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the chancellor today was don't expect the deal to change, would he not be more helpful you said actually, we perhaps can move a little if theresa may gets the necessary support. yes but i don't think there's much room to manoeuvre i think the opinion has moved as much as it could because basically, the union needs to protect its internal market and that means we need to have a border and that's as far as need to have a border and that's as farasi need to have a border and that's as faras i can need to have a border and that's as far as i can get, there is no more room for compromise is. in terms of no beer —— no deal planning, germany doing it on his own or doing it through the eu, how does that work? ican through the eu, how does that work? i can tell you that government is doing it in a different way, local government is doing a because every region of germany is affected by this no deal so different status in parts of germany are preparing for it. you think the summit will happen? i really hope so. thank you first eking with us, so, christian at the end of the evening approaches here in brussels, we are looking
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ahead to tomorrow, when the diplomatic preparations for that summit began in earnest. >> ross: is in brussels, thank you very much for that patient waiting and watching. not much they can do there, it has to play out here. let's turn away from this vote and go to another complex vote, the us now. to us news now, where the deadline has come and gone for the re—count of midterm election votes in florida. both the senate and governor positions remain undecided — more than a week since voting day. rajini vaidyanathan joins me from broward county in florida. that county in florida that's been under so much pressure where are those ballots going to get them counted in times of the deadline is coming on what has happen? good question, yes the deadline passed at three o'clock local so more than an hour ago, but one of the counties not here but not too far away, palm beach county says it was not able to
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meet the deadline, so thank we're what will now happen when it comes to all the boats there their days they still have not managed to count you have the democratic incumbent senator, bill nelson who has filed a lawsuit ordering or asking a judge i should say that they hand count all the ballots in this county because not only were they unable to get it done in time but what are the reasons is because the machines in palm beach failed. and so, they have problems with the recount so now you have democrats saying look the only way to do it fairly is to do it by a hand count, but on the other hand you a republican opponent rick scott saying according to what we have seen so far, my boat got up —— went up seen so far, my boat got up —— went up by seen so far, my boat got up —— went up by 1000 year being a sore loser, i'm a had, you need to concede and let me except that i am the candidate, but i should say christian if the margin between the two candidates is less than a quarter of a percent, that we
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automatically go into a hand recount across the state of florida, and it's looking like that's going to happen in the senate race. it's crucial for just crucial for happen in the senate race. it's crucial forjust crucial for donald trump because he was in a foul mood which the paper they're written about over the weekend that he came from paris, and parted i probably was the fact that things don't look as rosy now as they did on election night. absolutely, i mean particularly with florida, he calls his states his second home, but it's a state that is always very close when it comes to elections. and you know, and the last few days donald trump has said that the recount should stop and he is accused democrats of conjuring up extra votes a nd democrats of conjuring up extra votes and says it that the process of the recount is a bit a sham. now, of the recount is a bit a sham. now, of course the state matters to both parties incredibly, notjust the senate race but the governor race, because when the party controlled the governorship of the state, they get to dictate the policies of people living in the state and as we know, florida is a key sink —— key
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swing state in presidential election so that all looking towards 2020 would do want to admit it or not. so that all looking towards 2020 would do want to admit it or notm would do want to admit it or notm would it be an election without florida and the uncertainty there, thank you very much in florida. what's bring back ross who's with us in brussels this evening and testing the polls over there, so it's been quite a day ross. i was saying earlier, not much that the eu can do about it. look, they came out and they said this deal is fairand came out and they said this deal is fair and it's balanced and are happy with it they think is the best steel and the circumstances but in the end, they can say these things it theresa may cannot line up the support for the deal, then what the eu feels about it alone isn't enough. no, that's true, ross in brussels, thank you very much a biggie forjoining us on this new special plenty more to come i would think tomorrow as well, we don't know there's more resignations we don't know the fate of an event, but all of that to come thank you very
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much for watching. hello, as we head into the last few days of autumn at how about the weather has been on thursday we had lots of fibre many parts of the country, this was the scene and linkage are taken by our weather watcher. contrast that to the sunshine we saw earlier in cumbria, and price of scotland we saw temperatures as high as 17 points 6 degrees. the next few days are shaping up, things are still quite mild and dry to start off to the next two days, turning colder into next week and there could be a few wintry showers around as well, but back to the here and now friday morning sta rts the here and now friday morning starts on a mild note lots of cloud around around parts of the country, particularly in the southeast, low cloud mist and fog here. temperatures by the afternoon will be around 12—40d with the best of the sunshine and northern and western parts of the uk. heading
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through friday night, we keep the cloud for many of us but you'll start to notice clear skies weaving from the southeast, bit of a change in hermas as we head through into the weekend, at lower temperature single figures for saturday in the east relatively mild further west. through the weekend cold air sweeps and from the east and it'll bring plenty of sunshine by day, but a return to chilly nights we haven't seen widespread frost for quite a while. saturday, cloud gets pushed northwest and then a return to sunshine across the board by afternoon, and as mild as it has been, but temperatures still above average around 10—30d on saturday. we are weather fronts out of the atla ntic we are weather fronts out of the atlantic but they're not making an road into the country because a big area of hype pressure on scandinavia and during the day on sunday it'll be drying wind in from the east direction. not bad day after quite a cold frosty start sunday morning plenty of sunshine things dry across
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the country and temperatures will be again between 9—13d. but then it's going to turn cold into next week, we have a cold front here into monday, it works his way west across the country it'll introduce more cloud, underneath that, if you spot that drizzle on the eastern coast, further west is better chance of sunshine breaking through. as temperatures have been in the mid—teens, we look at about 8—10d, top temperature is monday afternoon. by top temperature is monday afternoon. by the time is tuesday, the eastern breeze is still there but more will come in the way of shirey rain, some could be falling as snow over the mountains of scotland, and a cold day on tuesday, six or 7 degrees for most of us, best of the sunshine will be in the west and through the middle of the week this is how things look, blue collars with us, a cold air mass with went generally coming in from the east direction. so we could have seems like this,
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snowfall across the hills and mountains and northern parts of the uk possible. by the end it looks like a bit of a change later next week and next week and, low pressure developing across parts of spain, france and that could well move into southern parts of the uk. we could well see the weather turning more u nsettled, well see the weather turning more unsettled, but also slightly milder to and next week, so could well see pictures like this, rain arriving in the south and after what has been a cold spell of whether it looks like things will turn a little bit milder by next weekend. bye—bye. tonight at 10pm. we are in dining street —— downing street. i believe with every fibre of my being that the course i have set out is the right one for our country and all our people. earlier, dominic raab became the second brexit secretary
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to resign from the cabinet, saying he could not support the prime minister's approach. i think she needs a brexit secretary that will pursue the deal she wants to put to the country with conviction. i don't feel i can do that in good conscience but i respect her, i hold her in high esteem. i think she should continue but i do think we need to change course on brexit.
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