Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  November 16, 2018 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

5:00 pm
today at 5: a new brexit secretary is announced. steve barclay will take over at the department after dominic raab quit yesterday in protest at theresa may's proposed deal. are you happy to be back in cabinet, secretary of state? amber rudd returns to cabinet as work and pensions secretary to replace esther mcvey. the appointments follow news that leave supporter michael gove will stay in government to support the proposed agreement do you have confidence in the prime minister? i absolutely do, it is vital that we concentrate on getting the right deal in the future and making sure that in the areas that matter so much to the british people we can get a good outcome. we'll bring you all the latest from here in westminster. i'm ben brown — the other main stories on bbc news at 5. the number of people missing after the california wildfires more than doubles to 630.
5:01 pm
guilty of genocide — the historic court verdict against two former leaders of the khmer rouge sold! a david hockney painting becomes the most expensive work by a living artist ever sold at auction. a safe house in paris. why would i need a safe house in paris? eddie redmayne returns alongside jude law in fantastic beasts: the crimes of grindelwald. but did it cast a spell on mark kermode? find out later on the film review. it's five o'clock. welcome to westminster.
5:02 pm
our top story: in the last half hour, a new brexit secretary has been appointed. stephen barclay, a former health minister and brexiteer, takes overfrom dominic raab who resigned yesterday over the prime ministers brexit deal. and amber rudd is back in the cabinet, as work and pensions secretary, replacing esther mcvey. we'll bring you up to speed with the days other developments shortly but let's take a look at amber rudd's recall in more detail. mrs rudd was appointed home secretary when theresa may formed herfirst government, shortly after the referendum in 2016. but in april she was forced to resign from her post at the home office amid the windrush scandal, saying she "inadvertently misled" mps over targets for removing illegal immigrants. since then, an inquiry into the events leading up to her resignation concluded that she was let down by her own officials, who provided her with wrong information and failed to clear up the problem. let's talk to our political correspondent iain watson. we will talk about amber rudd in a
5:03 pm
moment, but first, stephen who? stephen barker, well—known health minister, of course(!), new "brexit" secretary, there are some logical reasons for that, crucially, secretary, there are some logical reasons forthat, crucially, he secretary, there are some logical reasons for that, crucially, he is a brexiteer, had a remainder being put into that post, then maybe she would have fanned the flames of a potential rebellion. 48 names voting against her. —— stephen barclay. moving policy very much in the direction of the european union, she needed a brexiteer. this also tells us needed a brexiteer. this also tells us there is not cabinet level ministers queueing up for thejob, they have brought someone in from outside. but looking at his background before becoming health minister, stephen barclay is a solicitor by trade, economic secretary to the treasury, dealing with the financial services industry who are likely to be impacted by brexit, he had thejob of who are likely to be impacted by brexit, he had the job of talking to them, reassuring them, talking to them. he has that background, trusted by them. sensible appointment in that regard but in addition to that, what is crucial, this is how thejob is defined, the
5:04 pm
downing street briefing past 30 minutes, we asked what they would be doing, they said he will be continuing preparations for a deal oi’ continuing preparations for a deal orfour no deal, so continuing preparations for a deal or four no deal, so that sounds like domestic preparations around brexit, whether there is a deal or not, not the international associations. as we know, michael gove turned down thejob we know, michael gove turned down the job because he we know, michael gove turned down thejob because he was not given flexibility by thejob thejob because he was not given flexibility by the job to try to renegotiate. —— bride the prime minister. we'll be at the administrative end rather than the political end. amber rudd, very different figure, really. she is, one of the leading lights in the remain campaign, there during the referendum, very critical of boris johnson, two crucial reason she is back, one, loyal to johnson, two crucial reason she is back, one, loyalto the johnson, two crucial reason she is back, one, loyal to the prime minister, to loyal. and secondly, she backs the deal that has been reached on the withdrawal agreement,
5:05 pm
and that is crucial for the prime minister. —— too loyal. not without controversy, she resigned over the windrush scandal, where people affected by that feel it is an insult bringing her back, they say, she's inexperienced secretary of state and an internal enquiry said that she was not supported properly. she was exonerated and apologised, she will be strong ballast, an ally for the prime minister. another interesting development, we don't normally do this, two cabinet appointments but also junior appointments, stephen hammond is going to be replacing stephen barclay, at the department of health. stephen hammond is a potential rebel, someone you might have thought could have been persuaded to vote down theresa may's deal and go for a new referendum potentially, he has now been appointed as a minister, that suggests he is also getting behind the deal, as is amber rudd, the prime minister trying to detach some of the potential rebels, keeping them together, and keeping them as a
5:06 pm
ballast for the deal. as many allies as she can get is what she needs. meanwhile both liam fox and michael gove insist they have confidence in theresa may as she pursues her brexit deal. mr gove was rumoured to be considering resigning from the cabinet but has decided to stay on to help the cabinet to get "the best future for britain". this morning the prime minister once again defended her brexit withdrawal agreement — answering calls from members of the public in a phone in on lbc radio. it comes amid speculation that a leadership challenge to mrs may is about to be launched by tory backbenchers. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo looks back at the days developments. will you be resigning today, mr gove? in the event, the answer was no. the environment secretary, a key brexiteer in the cabinet, has decided to stay in post after two of his colleagues walked out yesterday. though he declined the job of brexit secretary, michael gove has clearly calculated it's better to fight for the brexit he wants from the inside. i'm looking forward to continuing to work with all my government colleagues and all my colleagues in parliament to make sure that we get the best
5:07 pm
future for britain. i think it's absolutely vital that we focus on getting the right deal in the future and making sure that, in the areas that matter so much to the british people, we can get a good outcome. some good news then for the prime minister, on her way this morning to a radio phone—in to try to sell her brexit deal to the country and to mps. when this vote comes back, every individual member of parliament will decide how they vote — whether they are a member of the dup, conservative, labour, all the parties within the house of commons. myjob is to persuade, first and foremost, my conservative benches, those who are working with us — the dup are working with us, obviously confidence and supply, but i want to be able to say to all parliamentarians, every mp, i truly believe this is the best dealfor britain. the speaker: the prime minister! but the numbers are against her in parliament. 0pposition parties and plenty from her own side are determined to see her ditch the brexit deal. and there are now prominent tory backbenchers openly calling for a change of leader, waiting to see if they have a critical mass to move against her.
5:08 pm
the policy is totally intolerable, and we have to test whether the parliamentary party not only wishes to back the prime minister now she's sticking with this policy — and there can be no doubt about it whatsoever, there is no scope for improvement, this is the policy. to trigger a vote of no—confidence in the prime minister, 15% of tory mps need to write to the chair of the committee of backbenchers — that is sir graham brady. he is the only person who will know when the magic number of 48 has been reached. theresa may says she will fight the vote, and if a majority of mps support her she can't be challenged again for another year. i hope that those mps who are contemplating this do draw back, but i think if those letters were to go in i think she would win any such vote decisively, and she would deserve to do so. so the prime minister stays where she is for now. but her critics are still circling, and her hold on her party could still soon be swept away. leila nathoo, bbc news, westminster. so, how is the political
5:09 pm
uncertainty in westminster going down on the other side of the brexit negotiations in brussels? let's talk to our brussels reporter gavin lee. they are just watching, they have no choice. a senior eu official has said to me, right now, google will be important, at least any other search engine, because there will be lots of questions, "wer ist stephen barclay? " lots of questions, "wer ist stephen barclay?" , "que est stephen barclay?" , "que est stephen barclay?". michel barnier has met with 27 ambassadors to update them
5:10 pm
on the talks, to the rest of the ambassadors, also what she has had to go through and how she has survived the last 48 hours, also told the collective feeling among the consensus is this message, keep calm and don't provoke, a bit like somebody who would be near an angry bear, with the unpredictability of the uk, if somebody influential speaks out publicly, it might sway the argument. couple of years ago, david cameron had negotiated with the eu the changes, the renegotiation of the deal before the referendum, when big figures like jean—claude juncker spoke out, there was a feeling that the likes of nigel farage capitalised upon that, so, staged for now, keep calm, carry on, waits to find out who is the new counterpart, stephen barclay. on, waits to find out who is the new counterpart, stephen ba rclay.m mileage for theresa may to change
5:11 pm
the draft deal, that there is still a chance of tweaks here and there are, what they say about that in brussels. -- stay schtum. every effort has been made to publicly kill that, after 16 months of sweat and toil, even this week, we have heard of eu diplomats missing meals, having late nights, throwing all sorts of unscheduled meetings up until3am. sorts of unscheduled meetings up until 3am. this has been a lot of ha rd until 3am. this has been a lot of hard work and not something they wa nted hard work and not something they wanted back on, michel barnier was pretty hot on that. they were briefing journalists saying they have stretched the limits of the ability to compromise and the eu believe they have had to go to some degree and give britain and a la ca rte degree and give britain and a la carte brexit, in some scenarios, and this is not something they thought they would go as far as, angela merkel saying as much. publicly, thatis merkel saying as much. publicly, that is survey stretch it. thank you
5:12 pm
for that. here, the international trade secretary liam fox says he still supports theresa may despite the slew of resignations. back the prime minister, she has led the country with mendis dignity, and quite a lot of resilience, in a difficult time. she is doing a brexit settlement with no parliamentary majority and in a parliamentary majority and in a parliament where even if we had a majority we would probably have a majority we would probably have a majority of remainers in that parliament, it is a difficult balance for her to get. ultimately i think the worst outcome would be no brexit at all. with the public having voted for brexit, with the two main parties saying they would respect the results of the referendum, parliament passing article 50, and the withdrawal act, for parliament to vote down brexit i think would so damage faith in the democratic process that it would be dangerous. we have do make a choice about what they want going forward,
5:13 pm
there will be one certainty for business, —— whether they want certainty for business, or whether they want to risk losing brexit altogether, it is up to every member of parliament, i don't prejudge or criticise the judgments they come to, we all make our ownjudgments depending upon what we believe to be the national interest, different perceptions of that, ultimately, thatis perceptions of that, ultimately, that is what parliament will have to do, alland that is what parliament will have to do, all and will have to carry the consequences either way. businesses, this is our members, from under 35 members to entrepreneurs. they are coming together to say that this deal is a step forward, it does three things that matter do business if we get it across the line: first it moves us into transition, 80% of
5:14 pm
businesses are reducing investment because of uncertainty, getting into transition helps with that, that is critical for transition helps with that, that is criticalforjobs. second, gets asked to talk in more detail about a future deal, a deal which should be frictionless, supporting services, giving us control and say over the rules, we need to flash that out. thirdly, probably most important, it moves us away from a thirdly, probably most important, it moves us away from a disastrous no deal that would hit those who need the help the most. i'm with josh hardie, the deputy director general of the confederation of british industry. the cbi's most senior policy making committee just issued a unanimous statement on the draft brexit agreement, warning that no—deal "is not an acceptable option". this is about looking at the long—term relationship, the relationship which will determine the opportunities for generations to come. what do you say to those who are watching and say, this is not the brexit that the people voted. you'll we had a close referendum, and if we do get this deal, we are
5:15 pm
leaving europe, but doing so in a way that does not cost people their jobs are necessarily. this is a serious issue, if we go for something like canada, putting friction at the borders, which might work for a couple of economies that are farapart but work for a couple of economies that are far apart but not two that has spent generations building interconnected supply chains, if we rip that rug from underneath the feet, there will be real consequences. ideal meaning we leave europe but protect the economy is entirely sensible interpretation. having heard what you have just said, i suspect there is frustration about all the politics going on. certainly the noise does not help that if you are a business leader right now, what do you do, you are assessing the risk, working out how likely no deal is and you have spreadsheets giving a percentage. if the noise makes you move up the likelihood, that has an impact on investments. calm heads, leadership, vitally important, the most important thing is getting the
5:16 pm
future economic relationship. theresa may, is either prime minister to do that? we will not debate that, that is not... you want to see the transition period, this is the only deal in town, is this the only way to do it? what remains co nsta nt is the only way to do it? what remains constant is that the deal must deliver that transition, frictionless trade, deliver for services and the people that business need to access, that has been there since the referendum and will remain whatever happens in politics, that is what we need to deliver. we expect to see amber rudd, she has been to her new department, this is her leaving downing street earlier, having heard that she would be returning to cabinet, replacing esther mcvey. she is the work and pensions secretary, amber rudd, former home secretary, who left that job in the fallout of the windrush scandal. let's talk to phillip blond,
5:17 pm
who was an advisor to the former prime minister david cameron. how much do you think she has weathered the storm? her tenacity has impressed everybody, but more evidently, she is recruiting new people to the government, at the most important person not to leave was michael gove, the ship has not been left. so it is still on path. i think she is likely to be able to steer the government toward bringing the deal into parliament, i think she will survive any leadership challenge if it happens, and paradoxically, if she does, which i believe she will, she will stay on if she stays on by only one vote. all the stuff she will leave, 1/3, and two thirds don't support her, i
5:18 pm
think that is clearly nonsense. the deal will not pass, and then the question is, where are we? let's pre—empt a bit of that, the 1922 committee, do you believe the numbers will be there by monday, tuesday, whenever people say? we hear different things, i suspect the original yardstick which everybody thought, at least 30 letters already in with graham brady, chairman of the 1922, that is clearly wrong, because we know publicly over 20 letters have gone in and it does not appear that has been enough to trigger. what is really interesting is if the brexiteers are not able to trigger an election, she is if the brexiteers are not able to triggeran election, she has is if the brexiteers are not able to trigger an election, she has in effect shot "brexit" fox, and if we come monday, tuesday, and there is i'io come monday, tuesday, and there is no challenge, again she is empowered. if there is a challenge, i think she will win it and she would be in power. i can see why she is sticking to her game plan. pretty
5:19 pm
tough questions on the radio this morning, did she come out of that with a stronger position? as the day is going on, she is coming out in a stronger and stronger position, i think it looks like the parliamentary party is not moved to move her, or indeed, it may be that if we hit tuesday and nothing has happened, it is clear there is not even 48 mps prepared to put their name to challenge her, it may come to that, we will have to wait and see. how close did she come to losing everything, if michael gove had gone, would that have been it? no, ithink had gone, would that have been it? no, i think she will fight this tooth and nail whatever happens because the fundamental problem that brexiteers have is they do not have an alternative, they do not have a plan, very difficult to argue against something if you have nothing to put in its place. paradoxically, the eu has helped her, they have said, this is a done deal, not negotiating it, if you
5:20 pm
wa nt deal, not negotiating it, if you want this deal —— if you don't want this deal, the 0'neill turnipseed is i'io this deal, the 0'neill turnipseed is no deal. if there is an alternative, in the british government, then it is no deal, but there is not an alternative for any other conceivable deal, so what did she do, a newly strengthened prime minister who loses her deal? that is where we will be around christmas time. word does that put the possibility of this people's vote? that is emerging as almost the only alternative because i think the only way that the 27 will say, actually, we will extend article 50, is if there is the possibility of a new vote. 0n the eu side they will think, goodness me, we might get britain to remain, which is what they all desperately want, and theresa may could then with grace and integrity say, there is nothing in parliament, around which people will unify, i have done my best,
5:21 pm
there is nothing i can do around which people will unify so i think i have to go back to the people. that isa have to go back to the people. that is a position of integrity and it is looking more likely. a lot of mps going back to constituencies, and may well hear from those very people, "just get on with this". some well, someone, evilwho people, "just get on with this". some well, someone, evil who remain in their positions, smart moves to remain, but all the history of voting shows people can get very volatile in these situations. we cannot predict the outcome of any second referendum, no guarantees, what we do know is, the choice, really, if we have a second referendum, cannot be three choices between theresa may, remaining or no deal, that will split the leave vote, it has got to be remain all leave, and i think it is looking more and more like that is the only solution that we are going to get to. have you ever known a couple of
5:22 pm
days like those which we have just seen? not in my lifetime! britain has experienced many convulsions in the past. what is interesting, we are not collapsing, we are attempting to seek consensus, i think consensus in the current form will not be found but a lot of people talk about division but we should be proud of the fact that our democracy is desperately trying to deliver the outcome, and if it returns to that democracy, that is not a bad thing, either. i would returns to that democracy, that is not a bad thing, either. iwould not overstate the case. there is a majority against no deal, people don't want to crash out, so i would not yet lose heart. thank you for joining us, great to talk to you. plenty more to come from here. other news now:
5:23 pm
the number of people missing after wildfires destroyed the californian town of paradise has now doubled to more than 630. so far 63 bodies have been discovered there, but the death toll is expected to rise considerably. after the worst wildfires in california's history, president trump will travel to the state tomorrow to see the damage for himself and meet some of those affected. dan johnson has the latest from paradise. the air here is still really thick with smoke. everyone has a mask. and there are still places where the ground is smouldering, more than a week after the fire tore through here, burning pretty much everything to the ground, and this sort of destruction is typical. you can see this right up the main street. shops and businesses like this completely burnt to the ground. and it's not a case of coming in here and making repairs or rebuilding. they're going to have to start again, build from the ground up. but there's a big question, a serious question, about whether that can be done, whether people will even want to come back and live here again, amongst these trees on the hillside, in the forest, where this fire spread so quickly. there are questions about how it started and suspicion that an electrical fault in the power network could have been to blame. there are lots of engineers here,
5:24 pm
trying to rebuild that power network and make it safe, but those questions will have to wait because the priority is working out exactly how many people lost their lives in this fire, and accounting for those who are missing. the number of people who we're still looking for, who are unaccounted for, has increased to 631, and this number increased by 501 people. there are teams going through neighbourhood after neighbourhood, house by house, delicately searching, trying to provide those answers, but every day, the death toll keeps increasing. danjohnson, bbc news, in paradise. well, as you heard there, more than 600 people are missing following california's deadliest wildfire on record. combing through the smouldering shell of the family home in the town of paradise, 19—year—old jonathan clark has been searching for his brother, his sister—in—law and his
5:25 pm
six—year—old nephew. all my gosh... words can't describe it. oh my gosh. words can't describe it. oh my gosh. words can't describe it. -- it. oh my gosh. words can't describe it. —— oh my gosh. my dad is starting to lose hope a little bit, this is not like her, to disappear off the face of the earth and not let anybody know, but we will do what we can, we will try to get her
5:26 pm
alive, that is what clarks do, we look out for each other. jonathan clark searching for relatives in paradise. fires are still burning in the southern part of the state as well. joseph metcalfe, who's originally from dorset but has lived in california for the past decade, was forced to flee his home in thousand oaks , along with his wife and young children they start sending out e—mail alerts and phone alerts, that was voluntary until we started packing bags together but in 17 minutes, that was the time difference, the mandatory order came in. you look at the front door, plumes of black smoke. reflections of orange, the flames coming in behind, just blocks from the neighbourhood. we knew it was a short space of time to get out. you have one priority, and that is life. but also, making sure you do not
5:27 pm
worry your children, we try to make it an adventure for them, and as we are driving out, pretending this is an adventure, driving by the freeway, you can see back into the house is, 30 foot flames rising above the houses, hillside on fire, it is something, it is difficult to mask. we have seen fires, this is the third evacuation from our home, because we have grassland behind the house. this time, this was something completely different. it was the mix of humidity, very high wind, speed and ferocity of this fire, this was different, this was different. two former leaders of the murderous khmer rouge regime in cambodia have been found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity at a un—backed tribunal. in the 1970s, the fanatical rule of the khmer rouge is believed to have killed some two million people, a quarter of the entire population. the former leaders, one
5:28 pm
of whom was pol pot‘s deputy, have both been sentenced to life in prison. 0ur south east asia correspondent jonathan head reports. it contains pictures some viewers may find distressing. few cambodians today remember the terrible years of the khmer rouge. yet many queued up to watch this historic verdict. inside the courtroom, two elderly men accused of responsibility for some of the most appalling crimes ever committed. one of them known as brother number two, nuon chea, second only to the notorious pol pot, and the other, khieu samphan, a head of state for the fanatical regime. we find the accused to be guilty... both men had already convicted of crimes against humanity for years ago but this is charges and this is the trial had been in two stages. without people, there was no need for transport and communications.
5:29 pm
when the khmer rouge seized power in 1975, —— when the khmer rouge seized power in 1975, it emptied the cities and tried to build a revolutionary agrarian society based on communes and limitless brutality. they called it year zero. enemies of the revolution were slaughtered in huge numbers. the presiding judge found the defendants guilty on multiple charges of crimes against humanity and genocide against two ethnic minorities. the verdict pleased those who had come to watch the trial. translation: we are happy, they forced us to live without food and medicine. translation: i am the only child who survived that regime, they killed everyone else. they will end their lives in captivity but this complex
5:30 pm
judicial process has been slow and expensive and has only convicted three people. most of those responsible for cambodia's killing fields will never be called to account. jonathan head, bbc news. let's have a look at the weather. temperatures are beginning to fall away and we are seeing some dense fog out and about channels some tricky travelling conditions over the next few hours. there is also a bit of drizzle falling from the cloud in places so it will be quite a damp night just cloud in places so it will be quite a damp nightjust temperatures 7-212dc but a bit a damp nightjust temperatures 7—212dc but a bit coal done that in scotla nd 7—212dc but a bit coal done that in scotland no day we will keep some clearer skies. into saturday off with the low cloud and we will see
5:31 pm
some sunshine quickly spreading across england and wales and the sunny skies will reach scotland. a stern scotland stays quite cloudy. temperatures coming down, closer to average for the time of year. the sunshine reached northern ireland on sunday so a decent second half of the weekend nationwide. but then it gets much colder with temperatures diving off a cliff into next week. it will feel like winter has arrived. this is bbc news. the headlines... steve barclay is the new brexit secretary after dominic raab quit yesterday in protest at theresa may's proposed deal. amber rudd returns to cabinet as work and pensions secretary to replace esther mcvey. michael gove says he won't resign, following speculation that he would be the third cabinet minister to quit in protest at the brexit deal. the number of people missing after the california wildfires more
5:32 pm
than doubles to 630. welcome back to westminster. i am nowjoined by sam coates of the times and dawn foster of the guardian. it has been a remarkable week, where are we tonight going into the weekend, has theresa may seen the worst of this or not? right, what has happened, so this morning, michael gove decides not to resign. essentially theresa may brings back amber rudd, to bolster her position. she is a loyalist, and who is stephen barclay, a loyalist who is stephen barclay, a loyalist who has never voted against the government. that is what she has
5:33 pm
done. she has also appeared on the media so she is trying to reinforce her position! but the same old problems remain. we can count about 23 who have said publicly... that is a long way off 48th! but of course you submit the letters in private. she has got this deal which she presented to parliament yesterday, spending three hours in the commons, and it took 57 minutes before the first tentative voices of support came, from peter bottomley, for her deal. but still looks incredibly difficult, so the fundamentals remain incredibly difficult, she has got through another day but next week is going to be pretty brutal. and yet, dawn foster, in the commons
5:34 pm
on statement and the questions that followed, and indeed in her radio interview this morning, much praise for the resilience of theresa may. yes but again if you are saying, well done, you've managed to get through this, people are feeling sorry for her... or are they saying there is some leadership there? almost certainly she will not get this deal through the commons and it feels more like pity than people thinking she is pulling this through. it looks as though she has almost certainly lost the dup. and this huge deal says that there will bea this huge deal says that there will be a backstop trinh and arlene foster, nigel dodds, all of the dup, who give her the confidence and the
5:35 pm
numbers she needs to pull, have said that almost certainly they do not like this deal and they will not vote for it. almost certainly she is not going to have a free vote but she will not be able to get it through parliament. are we looking ata through parliament. are we looking at a much greater likelihood of some sort of people's vote? erm, i'm not sure weather we are, yet. the problem is that... i am going to interrupt you because we are going to hear from amber interrupt you because we are going to hearfrom amber rudd. she has been visiting her new department. we can hearfrom been visiting her new department. we can hear from her been visiting her new department. we can hearfrom her now... been visiting her new department. we can hear from her now... at the time of your resignation some people described you as acting as a human shield for theresa may, are you now her secret weapon shoring up her government? i never saw it like that! what i can say is i am delighted to have the honour and responsibility of becoming secretary of state at the dwp, a huge and really important office and job, punping really important office and job, pupping 20 million people across the country. and as a one—nation tory i
5:36 pm
wa nt to country. and as a one—nation tory i want to make sure that we really do help everybody across the country. what would you say to some of your collea g u es what would you say to some of your colleagues who are thinking of sending in letters or have sent in letters expressing no confidence in the prime minister? i would ask them think again, this is not a child time for changing our leader, this isa time time for changing our leader, this is a time for pulling together and making sure that we remember who we are here to serve and help, that's the whole of the country. and i worry sometimes that my colleagues are too concerned about the westminster bobble rather than keeping their eye on what ourjob is, to serve people. are you confident the prime minister can survive? i am, i think confident the prime minister can survive? i am, ithink she confident the prime minister can survive? i am, i think she has demonstrated this week complete commitment to making sure that she serves the people she was elected to do and she has come forward with a really practical response to leaving the european union. i think it's the right combination. weekly, universal credit, some would say that's a bit of poisoned chalice? credit, some would say that's a bit of poisoned chalice ?|j credit, some would say that's a bit of poisoned chalice? i have seen universal credit do some fantastic things in my constituency in
5:37 pm
hastings, it has transformed lives. but i also recognise that there have been some issues and problems with it and been some issues and problems with itandi been some issues and problems with it and i see you very much as my, who is my role to make sure that i can iron out those difficulties so that it becomes a force for good completely. amber rudd, the the new work and pensions secretary, underlining what she has been brought in to do? yes, very much loyalist first and perhaps work and pensions secretary second. you saw amber rudd's skills on display, she isa amber rudd's skills on display, she is a very good frontwoman, that's why some people think she might even go for the leadership in the event that there is a vacancy, perhaps even she thinks she might go for the leadership. that is one interesting thing about this reshuffle, she has brought back two people who might actually end up going quite far. what you had earlier today was steve baker talking about in the event of a leadership contest, hoping to succeed, the brexiteers choosing one brexit candidate... well today theresa may has matched that by
5:38 pm
bringing ina theresa may has matched that by bringing in a loyalist her to come into the candidate cabinet, giving her a better chance to go for the topjob. one thing he would not be pushed on is who he would prefer. but there are only a few names in the frame, aren't there? there are people in the cabinet who are brexiteers and they would see some of them as being tainted by dipping their hands in the blood of the deal they don't like. they are people watching dominic raab, some of those people who worked for vote leave in 2016 are particularly attracted to dominic raab for the way he handled himself and his attention to detail and he has convinced those on the right but here's one of them. so he has the backing of a slice of the conservative party. but there is no doubt that what happens next is the undertone of what's going on today and theresa may, in the way that she has done it, she has done some clever politics to widen things. we we re clever politics to widen things. we were talking about the possible at
5:39 pm
the other people's vote, dawn foster, do you think with each week it looks more and more like the only option facing theresa may? i'm not sure, i don't think at this point that theresa may would turn around and open it back up to the public. i think it would be more likely that a general election would happen but again, the conservatives are scared of that at the moment because they are in complete disarray, they're consta ntly are in complete disarray, they're constantly having these internal battles and they do not look united and after what happened at the last election, any general election looks like it could hand the keys to no 10 tojeremy corbyn. like it could hand the keys to no 10 to jeremy corbyn. i just like it could hand the keys to no 10 to jeremy corbyn. ijust think there is not really the mandate at the moment to go for a people's vote and if there was a second referendum there is a huge risk that the public could back on in even bigger numbers and it would not shift anything. and it could be more divisive even than the first one? quite possibly. the problem is it is entirely unclear what is going to happen next. i'm not sure theresa may has got the numbers for her deal, i'm not sure the people's vote would have a majority in the commons and they would need a prime minister in
5:40 pm
favour. i cannot see how that happens. i cannot see a general election happening because the conservatives would need to vote for it. i can't see no deal happening because a whole load of ministers would resign. so theresa may gets what she wants? i don't see how she has a majority for the plan that she is putting forward. this is the problem with where we are. we can criticise each option but because there is no good option and there is no way through, it is very hard to predict at the moment. but if i am sitting watching you in downing street and i havejust listened sitting watching you in downing street and i have just listened to you, hang on, he hasjust said no deal is not an option, then actually, that makes whatever deal theresa may puts forward as the only alternative and it has to go through, you say it hasn't got the numbers but... i amjust through, you say it hasn't got the numbers but... i am just saying every single path has its problems, there is also a plan being put forward by nick boles involving norway and efta and staying in quite a lot of the structures, staying quite close to what the labour party might want... ijust don't know,
5:41 pm
that's the point. as for downing street watching me on tv, sad! come on! we are better than that! dawn foster, theresa may gets through this weekend, and her next issue is going to be the 1922 committee, how do you see that playing out?|j going to be the 1922 committee, how do you see that playing out? i think almost certainly they do have the correct number of letters at the moment, there was a lot of noise that a lot of people do not want to come out publicly yet but have submitted the letters. i think if there is a vote of no confidence in theresa may, i think that she might narrowly survive it. and that would be good for her technically but it would still mean that the entire country has seen that a lot of people don't have confidence in her. and i think more people than 48 would vote against her, so gee will survive it but she will be walking wounded, even more so. and every time one of these catastrophes happen is for her, she looks weaker,
5:42 pm
it looks as if the government has even less of a hold on the situation. i cannot see it coming out well for her even if she is a virus it. have you ever known a time like this? no, it's great! so, if theresa may limps through the next week or so, there's still the high likelihood that parliament will get a vote on this? yes. so, the political backstop as it were is the meaningful vote, possibly on the 18th of december, happy christmas, everybody! and in that scenario you have... everybody! and in that scenario you have. . . why everybody! and in that scenario you have... why the 18th? because that was the date on a leaked document that somebody saw. and so you have the meaningful vote very close to christmas and you have 50 conservative mps who have said they are not going to back it because they are brexiteers. you have got eight who have said they are not going to back it because they are remainers and they want a people's vote. you also have the dup who have said they are not going to back it, either. and then you have the
5:43 pm
opposition parties. by hoarding it on the 18th it is not quite claim clear that you have the time to hold the vote for a second time, using the vote for a second time, using the markets to scare you like they did in 2008, to have another go, there would not be time. again, hard to say what is going to happen but those seemed to be some of the things that we are lurching into. do you agree? i do agree entirely, i think everybody at this point realises that we are in a mess, we're not sure what is going to happen, she almost certainly can't get her deal through and, does she have time to renegotiate it, even if she did, anything she brings back, there will be massive division. nobody in parliament has a real majority for what they want at the moment. so it is almost impossible to know what is going to happen before the 29th march. dawn foster, sam coates, thank you very much, have a good weekend. we be back here on mondayjust
5:44 pm
have a good weekend. we be back here on monday just we've just have a good weekend. we be back here on mondayjust we've just had a remarkable three days here in westminster and there's really only one word right now, having got to this stage, may be a peaceful weekend beckons, it is phew! let's see how we are on mondayjust time now to look at the new releases to hit our screens. hello and welcome to the film review here on bbc news. taking us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. what delights do you have for us this week? very interesting week, we have the latest in thejk rowling is wizard world, fantastic beasts: the crimes of grindelwald. we have a remake of a horror classic
5:45 pm
and we have a documentary about the intersection of art and commerce.

32 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on