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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 16, 2018 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first, the headlines. theresa may is backed by cabinet ministers, after a wave of resignations. leading brexiteers pledge support for the prime minister. do you have confidence in the prime minister, mrgove? i absolutely do. i think it's absolutely vital that we focus on getting the right deal in the future and making sure that in the areas that matter so much to the british people, we can get a good outcome. the prime minister is still facing a possible vote of no confidence, but the cabinets newest member warns colleagues against. this is not a time for changing our leader. this is a time for pulling together, for making sure that we remember who we are here to serve, who we are here to help. that is the whole of the country. and johnston press, which owns newspapers including the i, the scotsman and the yorkshire post, says it's preparing to enter into administration. the number of people missing after the california wildfires more than doubles to 630. hello and welcome to our look ahead
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to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the broadcaster, john stapleton, and kate proctor, who's a political correspondent at the london evening standard. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. let's start with the financial times, which says the prime minister personally urged 300 local conservative party chairs to give their support. the i suggests number ten is preparing for a vote of no confidence against mrs may as early as tuesday. the telegraph claims five eurosceptic ministers will urge theresa may to renegotiate the terms of the northern ireland backstop, in return for withdrawing their threats of resigning from the cabinet. ‘may‘s day‘ is the headline
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in the daily mail, it has an exclusive interview with the prime minister who thanks her husband philip for his support through her toughest week. the times focuses on the return to the cabinet of may loyalist amber rudd as the new work and pensions secretary. the mirror's front page has a picture of borisjohnson and his father stanley in a restaurant, pictured with former ukip leader nigel farage as the brexit chaos unfolded. and finally, the guardian, which steers away from brexit. its front page highlights a un report, which says millions of people in the uk are suffering in poverty. to the call a halt to. a picture of a smiling and barra and who not long ago was the home secretary. —— and the rudd. six months ago she was out
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and ash is back in, mrs may needs the support she has surrounded herself with a couple of people she can hopes she can rely on. then steve barclay, who has been made brexit secretary, he has never gone against the government as far as we know. he is the brexit secretary. he would not actually be cut it —— a conducting any of the negotiations. neither did the other two, it was a lwa ys neither did the other two, it was always m rs neither did the other two, it was always mrs may that did the talking. is almost like being the minister of the portfolio. he has been promoted from health minister into this a p pa re ntly from health minister into this apparently lofty from health minister into this a ppa re ntly lofty a nd from health minister into this apparently lofty and difficult job. i suspect that she hopes she —— i suspect that she hopes that the end of it so —— and it. you saw, her first breath was this is not the time to change prime ministers and give her support. nobody seemed to know who steve arkley was? some
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googling has called on this evening to find out a bit more about him. —— steve barclay. it is in name only, prime minister will be doing the bulk of the work. in many ways i can see why she has brought amber rudd back, their attitude and approach is very similarand back, their attitude and approach is very similar and they have this deep sense of public duty and quick service. you can't get away from the windrush scandal and just how devastating that was for everyone involved. it has emerged that she came unstuck and she was given the right information at the time but a lot of people would say you are the secretary of state home office, you should have been in control of your brief. i have seen this evening that amber rudd coming back into cabinet hasn't been widely seen as a good idea. seven months, is that not enough? i do think, typically, it would be enough. —— i don't think. i
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just think, in times we are in now where theresa may has to bring people around her as quickly as she can, this can happen. a sign of desperation. absolutely, iwould have thought you'd be out in the cabinet for much longer. the daily telegraph has a picture of amber rudd, delivering ultimatum. five ministers saying that they might go on the she gives them what they want. what do they want? so, yes, you have this gang of five which is developing and it appears that michael gove is that figure had. these are the brexiteer cabinet members, everybody on the ring of perhaps resigning, they have now come together with michael gove leading the way on this and they wa nt leading the way on this and they want theresa may to go back and say that the backstop arrangement she has come to with the eu over northern ireland is not satisfactory. so, theresa may has negotiated deal where, while their trading relations are worked out,
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backstop position would be put into place, but britain could only get out of it if the eu says so. they won't like that. they don't want that litters that gives the eu to much control. but how are they going to do this? they think they are going to be able to go in and say we wa nt going to be able to go in and say we want to do have more control over when we come out of the backstop. i think theresa may has been pretty categorical, she cannot take any other deal, it is down to the wire and this is what she can achieve realistically. if you go back to the eu 27, they might want more. also, they have also said that this is the deal, and of story, you accept it or you don't and if you don't, good night basically. i don't know what they expect michael gove and andrea leve nson they expect michael gove and andrea levenson and chris grayling and liam fox hoped to achieve. -- andre led some. we are seeing the rising power of michael gove began, searching for
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a prominent position within the cabinet, that i feel like he will be theresa may's number two. cabinet, that i feel like he will be theresa may's number twom cabinet, that i feel like he will be theresa may's number two. it has been cruelly suggested that he is not doing it in the interest of anybody, it is because he will doesn't want the other backbench. anybody, it is because he will doesn't want the other backbenchlj just passing that on. as a thought. looking at the financial times. —— i am just. looking at the financial times. —— i amjust. —— looking at the financial times. —— i am just. —— just a thought. theresa may takes battle to eurosceptic. discernible factions now. stephen baker discernible factions now. stephen ba ker calls discernible factions now. stephen baker calls up the press announcers, and get rest. the hardline brexit, —— brexiteers, are apparently furious with michael gove for not resigning, so they are battling amongst each other, while at the same time trying to garner these 48 letters, suggesting that mrs may should stand down on a vote of no
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confidence. now there is a prospect of that, as we have heard in the next couple of days. but comic unit, other people say maybe this has drawn away. this morning, baker was very confident about prospects of the 48 letters being asked by the end the day. graham brady. we have got baker, steven barkley, and brady. that prospect has diminished little bit. it will more likely be on monday, if at all. so you need is 48 letters to trigger a no—confidence vote in the prime ministerand no—confidence vote in the prime minister and some reports are saying actually this weekend is really crucial because they don't have 48 letters at the moment that have been submitted, but the mps will go back to their constituencies over the weekend, they are going to take advice from people they meet, perhaps in the surgery, sound it out and then at that point they will decide whether to put the letter in. you can see these 48 number being
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reached by early next week. instinct is that it won't happen. meanwhile, mrs may has talked to the constituency chairman, hopefully they will co—operate, she has pulled in the chief or, having a chat with them. she is obviously deeply concerned about it. having said all that, once again, i am with the thought, you know far better than me, if there was this vote of no confidence could do the house, would rest on go on and win it?|j confidence could do the house, would rest on go on and win it? i think we are seeing the —— inability to get those letters quickly today, that not actually. the mood has changed. i think so. the i mention this. downing street on red alert to rebel mutiny, whether it comes to fruition oi’ mutiny, whether it comes to fruition or not. the i is one of the papers from thejohnston
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or not. the i is one of the papers from the johnston price. or not. the i is one of the papers from thejohnston price. you work for one of their titles. i worked for one of their titles. i worked for the yorkshire post in westminster for a year and when you hear things like this isjust so sad for ever and who worked so hard at these newspapers. also, yorkshire post is one of most powerful voices in regional press and i sincerely hope it has a really strong future and that there are buyers out there would —— that would want to come in and keep these going. newspapers do amazing work and it isjust so sad that this company has had to make the decision. i think it is sad not just for the journalists and those who work at them, but regional evening papers had torn and i think it is not just evening papers had torn and i think it is notjust sad for the staff, it is sad for democracy. these local, regional newspapers are our watchdogs, they keep an eye on the courts and the councils and make sure people in authorities are behaving themselves and if not, they ta ke to behaving themselves and if not, they take to task. that is an essential pa rt take to task. that is an essential part of our democracy that has been finished because the internetjust
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does not do the same job. it was said that grenfell tower and all of the mistakes investigated in two, had there been a good local news service there, some of those things would have been picked up.|j service there, some of those things would have been picked up. i think some of those journalist felt that they were very much ticking up on it, it was difficult to get traction. that is perhaps the case. i know a lot to do with residents and grenfell i know a lot to do with residents and gre nfell tower were i know a lot to do with residents and grenfell tower were put on a blog, traditionally that would have been there through newspaper which perhaps might have had more...” said isn't it sad hour late —— i was told what shame it is. said isn't it sad hour late —— i was told what shame it islj said isn't it sad hour late —— i was told what shame it is. i have fond memories of the yorkshire post, i was in university and there was a seller there who said i have had a very ha rd seller there who said i have had a very hard day, help me get rid of them. his marvellous way of selling new paper. may's day, an exclusive interview with the pm who said how
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her husband philip has helped her through a tough week. in many ways, the best read of the days. this is a piece authored by sam walters, from the mail on sunday... the paper already feels different. it definitely feels different and they have been going full blast in support of mrs may this week. is a good old fashioned daily mail campaign. they want those hard to tears to calm down, rally behind the prime minister. yesterday about how rhys morgan and his friends were backing her. this is all about how her husband, of course, sing had been criticised on television, became so furious that he was watching at the television, he got so watching at the television, he got so furious and turn the television off and when she got home he had a large whiskey waiting for her. a p pa re ntly large whiskey waiting for her. apparently it was a welsh whiskey, but the interview she was very quick
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to point out that she drinks such as well. and he made her baked beans on toast. and anecdote around our about how she opened the ten of these. we don't get a lot from theresa may in terms of her private life. we know she likes walking. we know she likes cooking. we know she likes fashion. this is actually another insight into her private life in what must have been one of the most difficult weeks of her career. it is an extremely flatter at — — weeks of her career. it is an extremely flatter at —— flattering portrayal. it is very flattering. is not the most politically incisive piece you will read in your life, but it is a good read into their life and people like the idea that her husband was there waiting for her, feeling more angry than she did, apparently, at the attacks she received and he was there to support her. are good, warm story. reminiscent of the margaret thatcher, denis thatcher... it does hark back to that relationship and they make visible comparisons between philip and dennis, i am not
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sure that is exactly correct. physical comparisons? yes, they said he looks similar. itjust shows, i think, how much theresa may, give no, she doesn't have a big team around her. she has her husband and she is really fighting, really battling, she is smiling on the front of this paper here and i think thatis front of this paper here and i think that is a genuine smiles. i was at a press conference with her earlier this week and she got it, sometimes her voice cracks and sometimes she is shaky and you do feel like the wheels are coming off. but it hasn't been like that this week. wheels are coming off. but it hasn't been like that this weeklj wheels are coming off. but it hasn't been like that this week. i was watching her vox pops on television, on the bbc, of course... i am sure it was. i am not sure what it was, but people were expressing that sentiment. yes, it may be she is made a mess of it. we think it is a terrible mass. but she has done her best. i think the mood is changing asset for her in the last two before hours. we are being drawn to
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sympathy and we have to remember there are a lot of mistakes that we re there are a lot of mistakes that were made at the beginning of her time as prime minister. triggering of article 50 as soon as she could have done, other people were saying why didn't you get some ideas in place before you do that? that. to silly about. it is still an unspeakable mess and we should be in it and she is partly to blame for us being here in the first place. she was very, very closed for a very long time and now she is letting the papers into her world a little bit and you can see why she is doing that, because she absolutely has two because this is everything she up. smart pr move. corp let's move away from brexit to the guardians of the austerity has inflicted misery on people, according to a un rapporteur by the name of professor philip 0lsen, an australian who has come to britain and had a look around at some of our poorest communities. he went to nine
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communities. he went to nine communities and sat in community meetings and listen to people, listen to their stories and personal expenses of how they have coped and how they are feeling, over the last few years, what their living circumstances are like and how they are surviving in circumstances of poverty. it is really, really, it is a really damning report, quite tough reading and he is saying here that poverty is a political choice, he said that authority has infected great misery on the citizens. he also points out that, from his research that he has done that for un human rights agreements have been breached, including rights related to children. it really is such a stark report that i think the government is larger to take notice. he said the benefits system is misogynistic, and said that if you got a misogynistic, and said that if you gota group misogynistic, and said that if you got a group of misogynists in a room
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and said for them to come up with a system that benefits men over women, they would come up with this. a searing indictment. you cannot think the un is going to come to britain. which is the point that the sun ta kes. which is the point that the sun takes. what has it got to do with un? says takes. what has it got to do with un ? says the takes. what has it got to do with un? says the sun. well, says mps. philip davies is a tory mp who has said that if the un was serious about tackling poverty they might wa nt to about tackling poverty they might want to go to the third world, rather than coming here and grandstanding with some hard left agenda. we are the fifth richest economy in the world. fifth or sixth in the world and the suntec rate exception to this gentleman making his comments. —— the sun takes great exception. the fact of the matter is this guy is coming up, presumably as
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an independent observer, and reach these conclusions. the government is saying that household inequality is fallen, incomes have never been high up fallen, incomes have never been high up about one in four fewer people are living in poverty than eight yea rs are living in poverty than eight years ago. but a lot of people are in work and having to claim benefits, and the universal credit rollout has cause great hardship. just because you are in work does not mean you're not in poverty, and thatis not mean you're not in poverty, and that is the issue the government has to address. amber rudd has been brought back as work and pensions secretary into cabinet, she will have to use at —— have to look at universal credit, because alongside brexit is one of the most politically toxic debates going on at the moment. why shouldn't the un look at this country. we are not exempt from... look at the economic situation all over the world, why shouldn't britain be an exception —— why should britain be an exception?
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let's look at cats. page three of the times. why pet lovers always use a copycat. this is a story based on some academic research, all of which has been done at liverpool university, or a big chunk, has been done at liverpool university, ora big chunk, does your cat like to terrorise the neighbourhood, prowling the streets, intimidating new arrivals, looking for romantic conquests, that is likely what you are like two. in other words your cat is like you. if you are soft and cuddly your cat is soft and cuddly. so you make your cat like you. if you are a boring person who likes routine, you are likely to have a cat that is not display very spontaneous tendencies, a very dull cat. people say this about pets, if you get a dog, they and their owners about pets, if you get a dog, they and theirowners and about pets, if you get a dog, they and their owners and at morphing into the same kind of character. i
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do know, there is probably something in it. they reckon the same of dogs. my in it. they reckon the same of dogs. my cat scratches the wardrobe in the middle of the night for food, she attacks your feet and disappears the days. my son and his wife have this little toy poodle, absolutely delightful but does exactly the same thing. straight from your feet, straight to your shoelaces. it is a jov- that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers. if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. and here is an idea, by a paper tomorrow. a big thank you to my guests this evening, john stapleton, and kate proctor. coming up next — the latest from the bbc sport centre. good evening, here's
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your latest sports news. wales manager ryan giggs expressed his pride in his players, despite their 2—1 defeat by denmark in cardiff this evening. his side had been hoping to reach the top tier of the nations league but narrowly missed out in an eventful match, watched by patrick gearey. land of my father is sung by one of the lands favourite sons. harrisdale is‘ returned to wales brings back excellent and confident and initiate should have given them the lead against denmark. —— gareth bale. it can be a cruel, ruthless game, later in the half chestermere something else, —— chester missed something else, —— chester missed some meals. when denmark get ahead
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they tend to stay there, the well struggled to find flair of the useful kind. ryan giggs trying to get the spark from the stands but his defence developed a terrible d raft. his defence developed a terrible draft. denmark smashed clear. everyone including the director and the danish defence was still taking that he and when gareth bale nicks through to make it 2—1. it took the replay to reveal the role ashley williams‘ pass had played. denmark had done enough for promotion, gigs and wales still have some work to do. elsewhere, the netherlands deservedly beat france 2—0 to end the world champions‘ is—game unbeaten run and relegate germany. a dutch draw in germany on monday would see them win the group. elsewhere, gibraltar‘s euro 2020 dream is almost certainly over after a 6—2 hammering by armenia. a hat trick from anya shrubsole has helped put england to victory in their women‘s world t20 match against south africa. they bowled the south africans out forjust 85 and knocked off the runs with six overs to spare.
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england‘s bowlers had dominated the south african batting before shrubsole blew away the tail, taking three wickets in three balls to bowl south africa out for 85. despite a few stutters england‘s batters eased to their second victory of the tournament. joe root hit a century to put england in a strong posititon going into the fourth day of the second test against sri lanka. england lead by 278 runs in kandy with two days left to play. they lost four down before lunch but were rescued by root with his fifteenth test century. he was one of six wickets for akila danajaya. ben foakes was unbeaten on 51 before a lightning storm forced an early close. england reaching 324/9 in their second innings, thanks to that captain‘s knock. certainly enjoyed myself today.
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there were a few filthy hacks in there at times, but i think the way you have to think about batting and the sort of mental approach —— mental approach, and getting different strategies against different strategies against different bowlers takes it really good fun. that is what it should be about, you shouldn‘t feel like the pressure is too much, you should enjoy the occasion and make the most of the opportunity that is in front of the opportunity that is in front of you, and i thought whole group managed to really harness that today and make the most of it. danny cipriani shone on his return from a three—week suspension to help gloucester beat leicester tigers and move up to third in the premiership. in a lively game the best of the tries was saved until last when 0llie thorley ran the length of the pitch to score under the posts to help his side win 36—13. we now know the semifinal line up at the atp world tour finals in london. world number five alexander zverev will face roger federer next
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after his straight set victory over john isner this afternoon. novak djokovic had already booked his place in the last four and he didn‘t have any trouble beating marin cilic earlier tonight. the world number one took the first set on a tie—break and went on to win the second comfortably 6—2. he‘ll play kevin anderson on saturday evening. and that is all the sports are now, but you can get all our other stories on the bbc sport website and apple. good evening. —— app. time for a check on the weather, it is pretty murky out there, tower blocks disappearing into the low cloud and the mist. however the things will change over the weekend, the merc is going to start a clear. we will see more sunshine, but things will also start to turn chilly and that is a sign of things to come. high pressure is anchored across europe, wins throw around
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high pressure in this —— clockwise condition will pick up a south—easterly wind, watch the cloud, it will break up with some more dry airing our direction. as we go through the small hours of saturday it will be a lot of mr merc and low cloud, the fog patch, however by the end of the night the cloud will start to clear from east angular into the south—east, and repeal westwards from the map to reveal more clear skies. i saturday lunchtime we will have some lingering cloud across the channel islands, the far south—west of england into west wales as well but into east anglia, the midlands and the south—east they should be some sunshine to enjoy. the northwest england it should take a while to brighten up across northern ireland, eastern scotland seeing more cloud, but western scotland like today will have the lion ‘s share of the sunshine. temperatures generally around 9— i2 sunshine. temperatures generally around 9— 12 that you will notice the strength of that easterly breeze. through saturday night we will see largely clear skies
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overhead, so despite a brisk breeze temperatures will dip away, they will probably not drop too far at towns and cities down to around 3— four degrees and the countryside could be a little colder than that. sunday promises to be a cracking day for most of us with blue skies and sunshine overhead. there may be some extra cloud blowing into the eastern slopes of the pennines, past elites in scotland and specially around high ground, —— passed the east of scotland. to bridge between 9— i2 still, not to battle this time of year. the change as we get into monday, this cold air from the east will head our direction, particularly across southern parts of the uk, it will feel decidedly chilly and monday will also bring the return of the cloud, a bit of mist and merc, the odd spot of drizzle, but look at the temperature, single digits for most of us on the strength of the wind, in the south it will feel chilly. that is how it stays into tuesday
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and wednesday, a lot of cloud around, could be the odd spot of rain in drizzle, the odd shower, and if you are over high ground even the odd flake of something wintry. this is bbc news. i‘m lewis vaughan jones. our top stories: the british prime minister ends a difficult week by winning the support of some of her cabinet‘s leading brexit backers. written, but not submitted. president trump says he has finished writing his answers to questions posed by the mueller inquiry into russian meddling in the 2016 election. mr president... that's enough, that's enough. the white house reporter who clashed with president trump is to get his press pass returned, by order of a judge. rescue workers are intensifying their search, after california‘s deadliest wildfire. the number of people missing is now over 600. and, he was the king of rock and roll. now, 40 years after elvis presley
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died, he is awarded america‘s
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