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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 19, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello. you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2: the prime minister vows to take back control of britain's borders as she pitches her brexit withdrawal plan to the business community, saying tough negotiations lie ahead. it was never going to be easy or straightforward. and the final stage was always going to be the toughest. but we have in view a deal that will work for the uk. it comes amid continuing speculation over whether the number of tory mps submitting letters of no—confidence in mrs may will reach the 48 required. the eu's chief negotiator agrees with the prime minister that brexit talks are at a decisive moment. now, more than ever, we must all remain calm and i will remain calm and keep our focus on the need for the uk to leave the eu in an orderly fashion. in other news, thousands of passengers at the busiest rail stations in the country are left stranded this morning after overrunning engineering works. coming up on afternoon live:
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all the sport with holly hamilton. in the nice, warm sports studio. it isa in the nice, warm sports studio. it is a little bit warmer here. we will be talking about change in tennis after the world number one novak document was beaten by alexander's meredith. many saying that he could be the next big thing. we will be looking at why. thanks holly. also we will have a little bit of rain and perhaps some showers. the full forecast on the way. thanks. also coming up, he was once the fastest man on the planet,
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but suffered a stroke this summer. in an exclusive interview, michaeljohnson tells us about his road to recovery. i was once the fastest man in the world at that event. and it took 15 minutes. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. the prime minister has been trying to win backing from the business world, for her draft deal on leaving the european union, at the beginning of what she's described as a ‘critical week,‘ for the brexit process. in a speech to the business organisation the cbi, theresa may said the proposals will create an immigration system based on talent, and stop eu migrants ‘jumping the queue.‘ meanwhile there‘s still speculation over whether there‘s enough backing among conservative mps, for a no confidence vote in her leadership. our political correspondent chris mason reports.
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when reporters like me set up camp in shabby tents next parliament for days on end, you know things are a bit fruity at westminster, and while plotting rumbles on here, to ditch the prime minister‘s plan, or to ditch her, she rolled up down road to sell it. now, there‘s one paramount issue facing our country at the moment... her back against the wall, business leaders in front of her, this is what prime ministerial defiance looks like. it was never going to be easy or straightforward and the final stage was always going to be the toughest. but we have in view a deal that will work for the uk, and let no one be in any doubt, i am determined to deliver it. it has become traditional for brexiteers in the cabinet, those still there, to receive a doorstep greeting from reporters. i‘ll be working with
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the whole cabinet to get the best deal possible for the united kingdom. thank you. are they plotting from within to shift mrs may‘s position? the prime minister has my full support and i hope people will get behind her as she endeavours to get the best deal for great britain. will she make the late changes you want? she is doing a very good job. should negotiations be reopened? you know i don't do doorstep interviews. do you have confidence in the prime minister, mr fox 7 back outside parliament the prime minister‘s conservative critics wielded umbrellas, big hats and sharp language. it is such a bad deal that any mp, or any government member involved in putting that through parliament will not have a future in british politics because it will end up being seen... these are surrender terms. this is us becoming a colony of the european union, should they choose to enforce that. those who hope to force the prime
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minister to face of verdict of confidence have not yet managed to rustle up the numbers to make it happen, despite promising for months they were getting close and even if they pull it off, it‘s not certain they would topple theresa may. the fact it is still a live possibility in the midst of everything else that is swirling around this place tells you everything you need to know about how bumpy things are. enter next, then, from the club of former party leaders, this plea. i don‘t think members of parliament should be distracted during the next few weeks by a no—confidence motion or the leadership contest which might follow that. they should be concentrating on the document and its implications. so, what happens next? you are more likely to find a pot of gold at the bottom of that rainbow than find anyone who can answer that with any confidence. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. let‘s speak now to our chief political correspondent, vicki young.
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yes, and trying to gauge truly the mood amongst conservative mps and i think as ever there is a range of views, some who think that theresa may should be given the space to on com plete may should be given the space to on complete these negotiation and put her plan to the house of commons, and then it is up to mps to decide, but there are several others who think the plan needs to change and the only way to change the plan is to change the person and change the leader. i‘m joined by the conservative mp simon clark, one of those who is calling for a theresa may to move on, and there has been lots of regulation about how many official notifications, how many letters have been put in. it is a secret process. some have gone public. what is your understanding, given we have fought. given we have for public. what is your understanding, given we have for weeks that 48 need to be brought into digger at. my understanding is, plainly and simply, is that if people do as they say they will do, then we will be at
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48 letters sooner rather than later. that is not a matter that anyone can control but i do think the time has come for colleagues to actually take a stand on this. we know there is a lot of discontent about these proposals. we know that there is real concern that this might not only be the wrong brexit deal but potentially also lead to the colla pse potentially also lead to the collapse of the government if the dup walk away, and so it does seem to me that the time for words is over and that actually colleagues need to stand up and be counted. you are suggesting they are maybe not being entirely honest with what they are saying and doing. it is testa m e nt to are saying and doing. it is testament to the fact that it is a very difficult decision. i have wrestled with this and i know that eve ryo ne wrestled with this and i know that everyone in this process finds it very difficult. we have the utmost personal regard for the prime minister and it is properly possible to have that while also begin she‘s making a very serious mistake. no one finds this easy, and that does account for the time like that we are seeing. it is now time and i think actually the message i would send out is, for heaven‘s say, let‘s get on with this. let‘s test opinion and let‘s see whether in truth there is support for this plan because the plan and the person are, as you said
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earlier, an extendable. but the timing... the problem you have got is that some of those who are unhappy with the plan, they actually think there is going to be able to listen the house of commons, probably at the beginning of december. that is the policy at the moment, that you vote against it and stop the plan. why not with about? the truth is, i think every hour, every day that goes by where we are not preparing other for every day that goes by where we are not preparing otherfor a better deal or perhaps more plausibly now for the without a deal exits, it is time wasted. it is clear to me that the arithmetic in parliament doesn‘t add up this deal to pass and therefore if we are waiting deep into december to resolve this, all we‘re doing is waiting time and there has been too much time already. a quick prediction, by the end of the day you think those letters will be in? this is a very dangerous game. i can say is that collea g u es dangerous game. i can say is that colleagues actually stand up and do what they are promised, then there will be. if they don‘t, then this will be. if they don‘t, then this will go on. ok. thank you very much indeed. that is where we are on all of this. i think it is interesting that there are many who feel that
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voting down the policy is the right action to take, but of course all of that can change very quickly. interesting too that the prime minister is getting out there and trying to get her message across and really trying to sell the deal that she has got. thank you very much. joining me now are the sun‘s political editor, tom newton dunn and nicola bartlett, political correspondent at the daily mirror. it's it‘s all about the numbers at the moment, isn‘t it? do you think they hold will have the numbers by tonight? i think that has been the kind of question for the last few days, and it‘s a really difficult game that a lot of them are playing. you don‘t necessarily want to be the one that triggers at all. and i think there are definitely people who have said that they have put letters in who haven‘t, and there‘s a lot of goals for people to sort of step up, as we havejust a lot of goals for people to sort of step up, as we have just heard, a lot of goals for people to sort of step up, as we havejust heard, and kind of put their money where their mouth is. i would always kind of error on the side of caution because i feel like we have error on the side of caution because ifeel like we have been in this position so many times before over
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the last few years. and the message we we re the last few years. and the message we were deceiving, tom, is that you haven‘t got a letter in, do it now. by haven‘t got a letter in, do it now. by the end of tonight, the numbers are not there, do you think that it? i think that probably will be it for fiow. i think that probably will be it for now. there is a feeling that mps are coming back from their constituencies and talking to their associations and members and took soundings over the weekend. if they wa nt soundings over the weekend. if they want to push this one over the line, it's today. if they don't do it by tonight, then the revolution may have been lost. however, there will be many more points for this to come about letting the next point of concern. about letting the next point of concern. for me, theresa may will probably be saved this week but the next point is to be a concern for numberten will be next point is to be a concern for number ten will be next monday when ideally she comes back from brussels with video and people then maybe act badly to the deal again and then there is a meaningful vote next month at some stage, around the tenth or 12th of december. hasn't that now become the moment that eve ryo ne that now become the moment that everyone is aiming for, if by the end of today no 48 letters. can she
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work on the basis that she has got a couple of weeks? probably not, no. the key thing is that anything detained at any time at at any stage. remember, by ourcount detained at any time at at any stage. remember, by our count and we did account at the weekend and by out did account at the weekend and by our count there were 42 letters in. at youtube — — our count there were 42 letters in. at youtube —— 42 promises. at any stage, any one of those 42 can get bribed to buy a nice job in government or at the offer of a peerage, which is equally scandalous and disgraceful, and can withdraw the letter, but the tally is incredibly fluent and it is interesting to hear simon clark saying, please get your letters in now. that is not the first time someone would have been urging their colleagues. that lobbying operation has been happening ever since last thursday lunchtime and jacob rees—mogg said, right, chaps, it's beginning now. i detect a very interesting divide between a younger generation of young bucks, perhaps the likes of simon clark, jacob rees—mogg, and the older generation
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of quite long—standing sceptics, david gentleman, david davis, people who haven't put the letters in a dark and comfortable about doing so at the moment. we have a split within a split. it is interesting what andrew mitchell was saying and the other comparison of people have made between kind of this sense of the tory party going for mrs may, like they did catch. it is interesting to think about how this looks to the rest of the country. there‘s a lot of people who may not have started off this process as theresa may‘s biggest fan, but you kind of widely seen as trying to do her best in the very difficult circumstance and i think maybe some of that older generation are warning the younger bucks that if they do start to be seen to be attacking her, then the country is not really going to forgive a tory party which kind of turned in on itself at what is seen as a really crucial moment for the country. there is a feeling of deja vu about this, isn‘t it?
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yes, there is. andrew mitchell is an interesting character. he has spent the last two years mass debating for a david davis leadership, so again this is the tory mps that we're talking about. who have they said what to do influence their thinking. i don't think this will come as a massive surprise to your viewers that the tory party is in a state of civil war with a variety of different factions over europe. very quickly, what sort of time today are you going to start saying, look, it hasn‘t happened. you going to start saying, look, it hasn't happened. when our first edition comes, but then there is a second edition, and a third. it's all right. a long afternoon. i wish you well. thank you very much for joining. ministers from the remaining 27 eu states have backed the draft withdrawal deal, at a meeting in brussels. the eu‘s chief negotiator michel barnier says brexit talks are at a decisive moment. here‘s our europe correspondent damian grammaticas. while the arguments rage in the uk, in brussels, the eu‘s 27 other countries are moving ahead.
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ministers meeting today to green light the deal reached last week. translation: we all agree this is very good news. we all made really a big effort to get this far. the 27 countries have been as flexible as they can. now we‘re waiting to see if the uk will accept it and we can move forward. here there was no appetite for reopening negotiations with theresa may. this is the best she‘ll get. it is the best after so many months of negotiations and i'm sure that now we need to go further. are you worried that the deal will not survive this week or maybe mrs may won‘t survive? it will survive. we are waiting for the same situation in london, but here it will survive. the eu believes the text agreed with the uk is fair and balanced. the only item to be resolved — michel barnier‘s proposal the uk be offered the option of a one—off extension to the so—called transition period after brexit, up to four years in total. it would, if used, tie the uk
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to following eu rules, paying annual contributions, but give more time to agree a final trade deal. some in the uk want more negotiations on the exit treaty. here, they agreed they‘re over. the first difficult step is done. the negotiations between the european union and the british prime minister theresa may have led to a deal. we have succeeded in preserving the unity of the eu 27 throughout these negotiations. the question now is whether there is an approval of this deal in the uk and within the european parliament. ladies and gentlemen, break—ups are never easy, but it always is better when it happens on friendly terms. that is also the best way to build a good relationship for the future. we still want the uk as an essential partner in all fields for many years to come. so now michel barnier is focusing on the detail of the second text to finalise this week, the uk‘s future relationship with the eu.
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for the future relationship, both the eu and the uk will have full control of their own legislation and rule—making. this is essential on our side for the integrity of the single market. it is essential for the uk in terms of taking back control. now, more than ever, we must all remain calm and keep our focus on the need for the uk to leave the eu in an orderly fashion. whether that orderly exit happens now depends on events in london. eu leaders will sign off their side in a summit on sunday. then hold their breath. let‘s speak to our brussels reporter, adam fleming. the extension of the transition period to 2022 is something that
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michel barnier says is possible. yes, soggy one outstanding thing in the withdrawal agreement, the divorced treaty is because saying the transition period can be extended up to, and then it says the sist extended up to, and then it says the 31st of december 20xx, and that number has to be replaced by an actual data and that is what the negotiators are going to do this week and what michel barnier has proposed is that the ultimate end state for a potentially extended transition would be december 2022. now, that is quite controversial to people in the uk because legally there is supposed to be an election happening in the summer of 2022, and lots of people particularly on the tory side say, could we really have an election while we are still out of the eu but still following lots of the eu but still following lots of eu rules and regulations in the transition or in fermentation period. the caveat there is that we still don‘t know what the actual date that will be written in will be. this was michel barnier‘s opening offer, this idea that he presented to eu officials in private last night, and also there is no
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guarantee the transition extension would never be used, and there is no guarantee it would last for the whole time. it is just up to that date. so an interesting little niggle there in the brexit negotiations, but not a massive, massive explosion just yet. but an a cce pta nce massive explosion just yet. but an acceptance that things are volatile over here, so they don‘t want to baffle a ny over here, so they don‘t want to baffle any more feathers. no, not at fault. it was fascinating this morning. the latest chapter in michel barnier‘s transformation, if you like, from kind of finger wag in chief to chief salesman for the deal. gone were the days where he would say that the clocks ticking and they want this but they can‘t have it. he is now reading from a script that could have been written by downing street. listen to what he said this morning. this is a fair deal that is fairfor said this morning. this is a fair deal that is fair for both sides. the eu, we have compromised. in fa ct, the eu, we have compromised. in fact, we have moved towards the british position quite substantially when it comes to the insurance policy for no hard border, the irish backs up, by adopting this idea of a uk wide customs arrangements. 0h,
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and by the way, that backstop that no one likes, no one wants to use it because we are going to have an amazing view to relationship that is going to be deep and special and ambitious and strategic. he was far from rocking the boat. he was trying to send the boat out in the right direction. that is how the metaphor would go. amazing. michel barnier is now really, really on the same side as theresa may because they are both trying to sell this deal that they have reached together. i thought my hearing had gone there for a moment, but it does show how things have changed, doesn‘t it? i will talk to you later. tens of thousands of rail passengers have been delayed or left stranded, after more problems on some of the busiest routes in the uk. network rail has apologised for the disruption after engineering works overran. our correspondent chi chi izundu is at london‘s waterloo station. the infant motion boards behind me
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said it was cancelled. angry passengers didn‘t understand what was going on. passengers were being told to change their travel plans and other people trying to get to work being told to travel from home that lack —— to work from home. this has had a knock—on effect on other stations also. the uk‘s busiest station on a monday morning, passengers at waterloo were greeted by cancellations and delays, and commuters trying to get into london face similar problems. south western railway said late—running engineering works in the hampton court area had left four lines blocked with no trains running between waterloo and surbiton. the company advised passengers not to travel this morning and warned disruption would continue throughout the day. at clapham junction large queues formed between platforms. it‘s terrible, there is no warning, you get here and this is what you see, and there is nothing you can do about it. at teddington it was a different
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story, with an almost empty station. i‘m trying to get to the city via waterloo and i arrived at the station at 7:30am to get my 7:30am train, which was cancelled, i gave up and then i‘ve been at home for the last couple of hours. i'm due to go to the russian embassy to be fingerprinted. it is quite important that we are there this morning. are you going to be late as a result? yes. very late. what will you do? we have to wait for the train. other stations including woking, surbiton, raynes park and earlsfield were closed. services started again before 10am but disruption is expected to continue. we have seen overrunning engineering works in the surbiton area causing all the lines into waterloo to be shut, causing really significant disruption. we‘re working hard to return the train service to normal but passengers should expect disruption through the rest of the day and we are asking people
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to check before you travel. some services may be cancelled and services will be busier than normal. south western passengers, along with those using other rail companies, also face cancellations and delays earlier in the year due to ongoing disputes with train guards. the rmt union said this morning‘s disruption was more evidence of the impact of privatisation on britain‘s railways. both south western railway and network rail apologised for this morning‘s delays. so an apology from network rail, an apology from south western railways, but also an apology from northern rail, who say that damp weather and leaves on the railway lines have caused disruptions in the north of the country with their railway systems. everyone is being advised to check before they travel. one of the leading figures in the global car industry has been arrested, over allegations of financial misconduct. carlos ghosn is expected to be fired
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as chairman of nissan. the firm said it had been conducting an internal investigation for several months, which showed mr ghosn had misused company resources. the former england footballer, paul gascoigne, has been charged with sexually assaulting a woman on board a train from york to durham. our correspondent fiona trott has more details. we understand that the alleged incident took place on august the 20th. as you say, it was on board a train from york to durham. we understand that a woman in her 30s was sexually assaulted early that evening and what the british transport police have confirmed to us is that paul gascoigne has been arrested. he has been arrested and charged with one count of sexual assault by touching. the former newcastle and tottenham player, who is now 51 and lives in leicester, has had a well—documented struggle with alcoholism in the past, and we know that he is going to appear at a magistrates‘ court next month. urgent checks are being carried out
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on up to 3,000 doctors, after it emerged that a woman was allowed to practise as a psychiatrist for 22 years with no medical qualifications. zholia alemi claimed she had a primary medical qualification, when she first registered in the uk in 1995, but her claim to have a degree from the university of auckland in new zealand was fraudulent. the general medical council said the woman was allowed into the medical register under a scheme for commonwealth citizens, which has since been abolished. he was a superstar athlete... not him! he was the fastest man in the world over 200 and 400 metres. but after suffering a mini—stroke in september, michaeljohnson feared he might never walk again. now, the four—time 0lympic champion says he‘s pretty much back to normal, and says it was his ‘0lympic mindset‘ that helped his recovery.
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in an exclusive television interview, he‘s been speaking to sally nugent. michaeljohnson, storming away to another gold medal! this is the michaeljohnson many remember from his athletics career. the fastest and possibly the fittest man in the world for a time. he was simply unbeatable on the track. this latest challenge is surely his biggest yet, recovering from a mini stroke. i sat on the mri table for about 20 minutes and after i got off the table from the mri, which was probably about two and a half, three hours after i had initially felt the first sensation, i was no longer able to walk, i was no longer able to stand, my left side was very much, you know, numb, without much feeling. i didn‘t have much control of my fingers, on my left arm. michaeljohnson is now familiar to british audiences as a commentatorfor the bbc. he says he is determined to use his recovery to warn people about the symptoms of stroke. unfortunately, a lot of people just
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don‘t recognise the signs and so you have to be vigilant, recognise the signs of loved one, if there is slurred speech or if you are feeling something that doesn‘t feel quite right and you start to feel some tingling on that sort of thing, don‘t take the chance. i could have very well thought, i don‘t feel any pain, and i could havejust said i am going to sleep it off. that would have been the absolute wrong thing to do. seconds count, minutes count in these situations. get to the emergency room, get to the doctor and get under their care. for this 0lympian, mental strength and physical power made him the best in the world. he is drawing on those attributes now. the best chance for recovery is to immediately get into physical therapy, so i was, two days later, i was allowed to start physical therapy and this was probably the most sort of poignant moment in the transition, for me, from the fear and the anger to positivity and hope
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and drive and determination, and that is when a physical therapist came up to my hospital room with a walker and helped me out of bed and i got behind the walker and he said, today, the first day, we are just going to walk around the hospital floor. ironically, that first walk was about 200 metres and it took about 15 minutes for me to cover that 200 metres. and, you know, ordinarily, i‘m sure that, you know, anyone in that situation would be disappointed and... but i wasn‘t, i was actually encouraged and it is what encouraged me because, with every step, and following the instruction of my therapist and trying to really focus on the movement and trying to mimic the movement of my left foot with my right foot and trying to relearn these movement patterns, in
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i could experience and feel some very tiny, very small, incremental improvements. nothing major and nothing that the ordinary person would probably even recognise, but having been through that situation as an olympic athlete, and as a sprinter, where, you know, wins and losses can be measured in hundreds and thousands of seconds and you are dealing with tiny, tiny incremental improvements every day, i could recognise that. sally nugent, bbc news. its taken a turn for the colder here in westminster for the last few days. i know, i‘ve been here for most of them. looks nice there in this dude you are. yes, it is nice and warm. i don‘t know how much longer you‘re going to be out there but i hope you have a nice line in scarves , but i hope you have a nice line in scarves, because it‘s not going to get any warmer. no one has mentioned this one yet, but we are running
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out. as far as the weather across the uk goes, it is looking decidedly colder over the next few days. a shock to the system. if you haven‘t located your scarf for a while, i think now is the time. our weather is coming from the east. the concealers cloud on the satellite picture coming in from the east. this is not a warm place for our weather to be coming from and we have this easterly wind and some cold airedging have this easterly wind and some cold air edging across the country. as we go through the rest of this afternoon, the odd shower around. could be showers were simon is in westminster but also in scotland. further west, a better chance of seeing some sunshine. 9—10dc at best. this evening and overnight, the showers of the highest hills may start to include something a bit wintry, some sleek, maybe some snow mixed in. most places what these —— most mixed in. most places what these —— m ost pla ces mixed in. most places what these —— most places will be too cold and attempt is down to 2—5dc. maybe the odd spot all the way down to freezing. into tomorrow, and we will
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again seea freezing. into tomorrow, and we will again see a bit of sunshine in the west. a lot of cloud generally and some further showers. again, some of the showers of the highest ground could be wintry. maybe over the downs to the south of london could see some sleet mixed in over the hills and mountains of wales, certainly over the pennines there could be some sleet and wet snow. temperatures around nine celsius, a brisk wind. you will season sunshine across parts of northern ireland, west of scotland, a scattering of showers into eastern scotland. the temperatures are really only half the story. these are the values that your thermometer will read but when we add on the strength of the wind, it is going to feel colder than that. if you are spending a day in norwich, it might not feel like it has got above freezing. elsewhere, maybe one or 2 degrees. further ahead to come into tuesday night, and by this stage, quite a big chance that over the high ground of the pennines and the hills and mountains of scotland, we may well see some sleet and some snow mixed in with the wet weather. into wednesday, this cloud and rain with
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some hail snow will edge further north and west, so the further south you look, a better chance of seeing dry weather and perhaps some sunshine. those temperatures, 5—9dc. still on the chilly side. a subtle change as we move out of wednesday and into thursday towards the end of the week low—pressure spinning to the week low—pressure spinning to the south—west and instead of that easterly wind i showed you, we will get into more of a southerly wind. that will bring something just a little bit less cold. slowly surely temperatures making something of a recovery, but the next couple of days, very chilly. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the prime minister vows to take back control of britain‘s borders as she pitches her brexit withdrawal bill to the business community — saying tough negotiations lie ahead. it was never going to be easy or straightforward. and the final stage was always going to be the toughest. but we have in view a deal that will work for the uk. it comes amid continuing speculation
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over whether the number of tory mps submitting letters of no—confidence in mrs may will reach the 48 required. the eu‘s chief negotiator michel barnier said the draft deal was "fair and balanced" and that talks will now centre around the transition period arrangements and the future relationship. now, more than ever, we must all remain calm, and i will remain calm, and keep our focus on the need for the uk to leave the eu in an orderly fashion. in other news — thousands of passengers at the busiest rail stations in the country were left stranded this morning after overrunning engineering works. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. the atp tour finals came to a close in london yesterday and there is a new face of world tennis? good afternoon.
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it also long we have been talking about are just a few names at the top. but slowly, a few more unfamiliar faces have really been making their presence known. yesterday, alexander or sasha zverev proved himself to be the best of this new breed. 0k — it‘s not his first title and he‘s beaten both djokovic and federer before, but by beating the world number one in the final of the atp finals at the 02 yesterday, many are now seeing him as the next big thing, including six—time grand slam winner boris becker. he says this is a big step for the 21—year—old, who will now finish the year as world number four, and says the next step is doing it over five sets at the australian open injanuary. rugby union, and england have dropped danny care for their fourth and final test of the autumn series.
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the scrum—half started the game againstjapan at the weekend, scoring the first try, but was replaced on the hour mark and is now out of the squad completely for australia. alex lozowski and zach mercer also miss out, while number eight nathan hughes returns from suspension. disgraced cricketers steve smith, david warner and cameron bancroft could all be back playing sooner than they thought. they were all banned earlier this year for ball—tampering during the series with south africa. cricket australia is considering a formal request from the players‘ union to end their bans early — and a decision is expected this week. dina asher—smith‘s been named on the shortlist for the iaaf female athlete of the year award. the 22—year—old‘s had a great year, becoming the first british woman to win triple gold at the european championships, along with a couple of medals at the commonwealth games too. the winner will be announced in monaco on december the 4th.
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17—year—old racing driver sophia florsch is undergoing surgery today after a horrendous crash in formula three. she lost control at the macau grand prix in china and was taken to hospital with broken back, and later tweeted that she was "fine", thanking everyone for their support. her team principal says she had an "angel on her shoulder" to survive the crash. british racer billy monger lost both his legs in a crash 18 months ago — he says it‘s impossible to make motorsport totally safe. obviously, yes, there is dangers in motorsport and everyone knows that when they sign up for it. nobody expects that to happen, especially to yourself, nobody considers it. i know sophia florsch well so i am just wishing her the best in her recovery and i am glad she is ok. safety is improving in the sport, which is great, but it is never going to be risk—free.
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but as long as we keep improving and making strides, that is obviously a massive part for everyone who wants to compete in the sport. and the five—time world darts champion raymond van barneveld is to retire from the sport. the dutchman, who‘s known as barney, will call it quits after the pdc world championship in 2020. he‘s one of only three players to have won five titles, but says he can no longer "keep up" with other players. that‘s all the sport for now. sirming, sir ming, freezing cold salmon, back to you! —— simon. some breaking news, we are hearing from the parole board who have decided the serial sex offender john worboys, the black cab rapist, must stay in prison after reconsidering his case. in much the
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high court overturned a decision to release him, saying the parole board had filtered for a wider pattern of his alleged offending which cast doubt on his credibility. a different parole board member has now examined the case afresh by reviewing a dossier of evidence about him. john worboys has 28 days to challenge the decision by requesting an oral hearing. separately the bbc understands the cbs is considering whether to charge him with further offences. a file was passed by police to the cbs after the 61—year—old was interviewed under caution in july. among the allegations, that span a ten year period between 1997 and 2007 come our sexual assaults and administering a substance with intent to commit a sexual offence. so the breaking news thatjohn worboys stays in prison for the moment at least. we will bring you more on that later. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, has arrived in iran. he‘s the first western foreign
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minister to visit the country since donald trump abandoned the nuclear deal and imposed sanctions on the country. on his arrival mr hunt explained what he hoped to discuss with his iranian counterpart. this is a part of the world which is frankly a tinderbox and so many things can go wrong here and iran is one of the big players and we are very, very keen to move towards peace in yemen. that‘s our number one priority at the moment. but also we have the case of nazanin zaghari ratcliffe and other dual nationals here, who are in prison and shouldn‘t be. we want to get them home. so there‘s lots to talk about. and i‘m just about to head off to the foreign ministry and all these things will be discussed. our diplomatic correspondent james landale is in tehran and gave us more details about the foreign secretary‘s visit. this is jeremy hunt‘s first visit to iran, and so naturally, this morning, he took in the sights. he went to the grand bazaar here in tehran to sample some of the dates and pomegranate juice that are on offer
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at the market there. but now he‘s come here to the ministry of foreign affairs to talk to his counterpart, the iranian foreign minister, and the foreign secretary‘s messages are clear. he is telling the iranians that they should release immediately nazanin zaghari ratcliffe and other british iranian dual nationals who are detained here in tehran. the foreign secretary will say that they should be released on humanitarian grounds, and they shouldn‘t be used as tools for diplomatic leverage. but he‘s also here to assess for himself the impact of american sanctions here in tehran. the sanctions were reimposed two weeks ago. his message will be that for now britain is sticking with iran, supporting the deal that is limiting iran‘s nuclear programme, but as long as iran sticks to the terms of that deal. the interesting question is how the americans will respond because the foreign secretary has come here to the heart of the capital of a country that the us says is the world‘s biggest sponsor of terrorism. you are watching afternoon live,
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live in westminster. one way to stay warm here is to wear some form of costu me. warm here is to wear some form of costume. this is what one person has come up with! yes, he is keeping warm. i don‘t know if that is a he ora warm. i don‘t know if that is a he or a she. i warm. i don‘t know if that is a he ora she. i have warm. i don‘t know if that is a he or a she. i have no idea why a dinosaur is part of this particular demonstration, but they are. the prominent brexit campaigner arron banks has been accused of misleading members of parliament, over the way he ran the leave. eu campaign. he‘d previously told mps that staff at his insurance business were not used in his political operations. but tonight the bbc‘s inside out west programme will show unseen footage that appears to contradict this. mr banks says the claims are part of an effort to smear his business interests, and discredit the brexit campaign. robin markwell has the story. liz, do you mind just closing the door and saying, you know,
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just "welcome to the call centre," or something like that? as we see the sign on the front. so, welcome to the know, it's all being redone at the moment... arron banks‘s hq as you‘ve never seen it before. we are a campaign to leave the eu. there‘s been huge speculation about exactly what happened in this bristol insurance office in the months before the referendum. west country fudge. mr banks had set up the leave.eu campaign inside, but our previously unseen footage raises serious questions over the truth of what arron banks has said about that campaign. here he is appearing before mps back injune. so did you use you staff who'd previously worked in the insurance business in leave. eu? no. so where did these people come from? well, we created a team of people, as you would do in a business. so arron banks is clear that his insurance staff didn‘t work on the campaign. but watch his chief executive here. as you can see here, they are busy looking at skippy stuff. go skippy is one of banks‘ insurance brands. can we get on this desk here?
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yes, sorry, sam, can wejust swap to a know post, can you put something on the know up? here, it‘s clear that the same person has access to insurance and campaign material at the same time on the same computer. this graphic reveals the names of people who are also working or had worked for banks‘ insurance business. and call centre staff wore lanyards labelled eldon insurance, the parent company for banks‘ insurance brands. leave. eu insisted they were for building access and didn‘t represent their employer. we showed our footage to the mp who led the questioning of arron banks. well, it‘s totally at odds to what arron banks told the select committee. he said that the eldon insurance business was kept totally separate from the leave.eu campaign. now, admittedly, this is at a much earlier stage but this whole thing seemed to be mixed up together and, what‘s interesting is when arron banks was asked about that, he said that the person that
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alleged that had lied. well, actually, they don‘t look like the liar now. leave.eu said they wanted to set the record straight. they said staff had legitimately been transferred across and that mr banks had been misunderstood by the mp5. that was their interpretation of the answer. perhaps they should have clarified that position if they weren‘t quite sure, because arron was quite transparent when he said actually staff were seconded so i don‘t think anyone‘s ever tried to give false answers, it‘s just that the whole answer hasn‘t been presented properly. leave.eu has since moved out of this building, but its campaign goes on, as parliament grapples with the brexit vote arron banks help secure. robin markwell, bbc news. and you can see more on that story on tonight‘s inside out west, that‘s on bbc one at 7.30, and of course later across the uk on the bbc iplayer. four men have been taken to hospital with stab wounds, after a fight in edmonton in north london. the condition of the men, who are all in their 20s, is not known. police say two vehicles that had been involved in a collision
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were found at the scene. our reporter, simon clemison, is at the scene. it has been a very busy morning here. this is a busy area. people have been going to school and work but this morning they have been crossing a police cordon to do so, many saying you don‘t expect this level of police investigation here. it is yet another sign of some of the problems london has been experiencing in recent months. we have been here throughout the night but the police have been here all the way through, and with daylight you can start to see for the investigation is centred. we are here on the outer cordon but if you look over to my right you can start to see the inner cordon where the police forensics have been spending the evening. they have just left the scene but still buy them at a police presence here. four men suffered sta b presence here. four men suffered stab wounds, there were taken to hospital. the latest is that one of them has been discharged, the other
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three are still being treated. two vehicles which had been in a crash we re vehicles which had been in a crash were found here. it is early stages but it is believed to be linked to a shooting also in this part of london over the weekend, two man had a teenage boy were injured when a shot gun was fired into a mini cab. overnight speaking to people here, they have talked aboutjust how crime is not unheard of here, but this is really a different kind of level of investigation. when you think about some of the things the mayor of london has been saying about violent crime and what a challenge it is, that really does make a lot of sense to people when you speak to them here. a specialist unit is in place to deal with some of the problems london has been experiencing in recent months. but the latest here is now that one person has been arrested in connection with the investigation in edmonton. the headlines this
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afternoon. the prime minister vows to take back control of britain‘s borders as she pitches her brexit withdrawal bill to the business community — saying tough negotiations lie ahead. it comes amid continuing speculation over whether the number of tory mps submitting letters of no—confidence in mrs may will reach the 48 required. the eu‘s chief negotiator agrees with the prime minister and says that brexit talks will now centre around the transition period arrangements and the future relationship. as we have been hearing, theresa may has told business leaders a draft eu withdrawal plan will protect british jobs and she is determined to deliver. in a speech to the cbi she said her agreement represented hard—won progress towards a long—term trade strategy. jamie roberts and is at the conference in
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greenwich. theresa may has been talking head to business. business generally well receiving what she has said, with some caveats. i‘m joined by the director—general of the cbi some caveats. i‘m joined by the director—general of the cb! and also bya director—general of the cb! and also by a businessperson, gordon wilson, who is from a software company that provides software for the health service and local authorities. what was your immediate reaction to what mrs may was saying? was your immediate reaction to what mrs may was saying ?|j was your immediate reaction to what mrs may was saying? i think three parts, really. two good and one less good. good to hear the prime minister talk about a partnership with business, which echoes many of our themes. we need that for the future. also good to hear her echoing the points about the progress that has been made on brexit. the fact we have finally after 20 months a proposal on the
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table that makes no deal almost impossible. it takes it off the table if we get that through parliament. but the part that is less welcome for business and where we have a real difference of opinion is on immigration policy. it is a real opportunity for this country but it's also a great responsibility. the idea that we should block off the flow of low skilled labour to our country at a time when we have nearly full employment is, we think, a misstep and we would like to reopen the conversation. villa gordon, immigration, where you get your tale nt immigration, where you get your talent from, you want the brightest and the best. have you found that difficult to find liz green ioo%, thatis difficult to find liz green ioo%, that is exactly what we want. we have a very unique recruitment engine. it is slightly different because we bring in high—performance engineers. but i think the whole
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immigration issue is desperately important because we do have a shortage. i think we should have an open but managed immigration. probably along the lines that if there is a job, probably along the lines that if there is ajob, we probably along the lines that if there is a job, we should offer the job rather than set this arbitrary numberof £30,000, there job rather than set this arbitrary number of £30,000, there might be people who fulfil vital roles under that threshold. do you think the idea of a no—deal brexit is being pushed out of the door? in many ways what mrs may was saying today was talking to industry and saying, if you are onside and you believe it, we are going to go ahead with this withdrawal agreement. it is certainly not off the table yet. if you talk to businesses they are hugely concerned that this proposal will not go through, it will tip into an accidental no—deal brexit. it's not of the table, it would be, though, if there were no agreement. it is not perfect, not perfect for
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business, it is a compromise but it brings greater certainty and it is time to back that progress. would a no deal be disastrous for you?m would be pretty disastrous. what we would be pretty disastrous. what we would like to see is an extension so we don't even get into the backstop. so the certainty going forward. she talked a lot about the industrial strategy as well. if we get some sort of currency there would be an industrial strategy, how helpful is that? it is incredibly helpful. businesses who are at the forefront of new software solutions, we want businesses like that to be able to succeed in the uk. but what does that do? we should ask gordon. sorry to bypass your! i also sit on the board of a company where i am responsible for trying to form our industrial strategy, and the
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strength is obvious the the technology, the clean economy, the ageing society and mobility. from my point of view, the productivity issues we have will partly be filled bya numberof issues we have will partly be filled by a number of initiatives but maybe biotechnology. before adopting new technologies that will make us more productive. we just launched our survey and in that, 68% have actually said they would be happy to work... would be happy to work alongside automation going forward. from your point of view, the points mrs may was saying about new technology and government strategy, does that inspire you? absolutely. the uk is incredibly well placed to be at the forefront of these new technologies. but we need a good brexit and the industrial strategy is what will help lay the
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foundations. so these are the right messages. and the ability to trade outside the eu? do you see much chance of us doing trade deals beyond whenever? trade outside the european union is hugely important but trade deals are really hard. so we need to have our eyes wide open. which is why all our members are saying that the eu relationship first. that is something 43% of our trade, we know we need it, then we can move on to think about other trade deals. the eu. thank you both very much. the voice of business. gordon wilson runs this company advance. both of them have been generally was adept but with caveats. jamie, thank you very much. this is afternoon live. two other news now. across northern california.
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77 people are now known to have died in huge wildfires that have swept across northern california. nearly 1000 people are still missing. heavy rain is now forecast, bringing new fears of floods and mudslides. our reporter dave lee has the latest from the city of chico. the process of mourning is just about getting under way. there are still many unaccounted for in these fires. prayers have been said this evening for firefighters, police officers, anybody that has been offering support since the fire took hold. those fires are still raging. there are forecasts for rain over the next few days, that could combo kit firefighting efforts further. that means across the state there are still issues around air—quality as far away as san francisco. the eba would anyone with respiratory issues should probably stay indoors as much as possible. here in chico,
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the support of this community is helping with the rebuilding efforts, both with the town itself and in the hearts and minds of those who live there. there‘ve been protests in the mexican city of tijuana over the arrival of thousands of central americans on their way to the united states. tijuana is on border between the two countries, and is struggling to cope with the influx. many of the migrants are part of a caravan from honduras, and are hoping to claim asylum in the us. lebo diseko has more. tempers boiling over on the streets of tijuana as locals make their frustration clear. they‘re angry about the arrival of thousands of central americans on their way to the us, and the protesters accuse border officials of letting illegal migrants through. "no to the invasion", says this sign, echoing language used by us president donald trump. "mexico first", demand others. as they march, they shout "out, hondurans, we don‘t want you here",
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and "united tijuana will never be defeated". a lone voice is raised from talking about the treatment of mexicans arriving in the us, but it‘s quickly drowned out. tijuana itself is a city of migrants, but it seems there is little sympathy for the newest arrivals. around 6000 central americans are thought to have arrived in tijuana, and another border town, since last week, monday. they filled up shelters and many are now sleeping in the streets. for their part, the migrants say this is a temporary stop. translation: the mexicans have the right to protest because they don‘t like that we are here. but in spite of everything, they are good people. they are the same as us. we are only passing through, we won‘t stay here. local authorities have asked for federal help to try and deal with the sheer numbers.
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meanwhile, the us is increasing its security at its southern border and says large groups will not be allowed in. with more caravans of people from central america on their way, the fear is that it could mean migrants are stuck in tijuana for months to come. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. this week brings a distinct change in the feel of the weather. it has been pretty mild lately, but the weather now has begun to come from the east. you can see the clouds moving from the east to the west. this is never a warm place for the weather to be coming from. high pressure a cross weather to be coming from. high pressure across scandinavia, feeding the easterly winds in her direction, bringing ever colder air. temperatures as we enter the afternoon, nine or 10 celsius at
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best. areas exposed to the easterly wind will continue to see some showers. through this evening at night, some of the showers may start to turn wintry. it is going to stay quite windy overnight, gusty winds particularly in the south. as a consequence of that strong wind, despite the cold air, it is not going to get particularly cold, temperatures around five sources. tomorrow, still that chilly east and when, a lot of cloud and some showers, most especially across eastern areas. some places will see more showers than others. there will be some brighter glimpses. this is how we expect it to look the early pa rt how we expect it to look the early part tomorrow afternoon. over the tops of the pennines and the welsh hills and the scottish mansions, the showers are likely to start to turn to sleet or even snow over the highest ground. temperatures on the thermometer will range between around six and eight celsius. but we will have that strong easterly wind. this is what it is actually going to
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feel like. in norwich, it might not get above freezing in terms of the feel of the day. elsewhere, one, two or three celsius. a chilly day and a chilly night. these showers increasingly turning wintry over high ground, more likely rain to lower levels. through wednesday, we will see this area of cloud and patchy rain with some hills and are continuing to drift to the north west. for southern and eastern parts, a better chance of seeing some dry weather and sunshine. but still quite chilly. that changes a little as we head towards the end of the week, low pressure spinning down to the south west. high pressure in the north east. but we‘re good to have more of a south—easterly wind, which will bring us something a little bit less cold as we head to the end of the week. hello. you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 2: the prime minister vows to take back control of britain‘s
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borders as she pitches her brexit withdrawal bill to the business community — saying tough negotiations lie ahead. it was never going to be easy or straightforward. and the final stage was always going to be the toughest. but we have in view a deal. but we have in view a deal that will work for the uk. it comes amid continuing speculation over whether the number of tory mps submitting letters of no—confidence in mrs may will reach the 48 required. a parole board panel has concluded that black cap rapist john worboys must remain in prison, saying he is not suitable for release. and the chairman of nissan, carlos ghosn, has been arrested over claims of financial misconduct. we‘ve got all the sport. that is, as you can see, we‘ve got all the sport. that is, as ou can see it‘s we‘ve got all the sport. that is, as you can see, it‘s with holly. hello, there. we will be talking about a star being born. we will be talking
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about tennis following review weekends atp finals. it wasn‘t the winner many were expecting but now people are saying that 21—year—old alexander‘s zverev may be the next big thing and i will be looking at why. we will talk to you later on. and with the weather forecast, here is then rich. the something of a shock to the system this week. temperatures stuck in single digits, a biting wind and some showers and also possibly some snow above higher ground. thank you very much. also coming up — he was once the fastest man on the planet but suffered a stroke this summer. in an exclusive interview michaeljohnson, tells us about his road to recovery. ironically, that first what was about 200 metres which was the event that i help the world record of and was once the fastest man in the world, a history, and it took about 15 minutes.
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hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. our main story: the prime minister has been trying to win backing from the business world, for her draft deal on leaving the european union, at the beginning of what she‘s described as a ‘critical week,‘ for the brexit process. in a speech to the business organisation the cbi, theresa may said the proposals will create an immigration system based on talent, and stop eu migrants ‘jumping the queue‘. meanwhile there‘s still speculation over whether there‘s enough backing among conservative mps for a no—confidence vote in her leadership. our political correspondent chris mason reports. when reporters like me set up camp in shabby tents next to parliament for days on end, you know things are a bit fruity at westminster.
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and while plotting rumbles on here to ditch the prime minister‘s plan, or to ditch her, she rolled up down road to sell it. now, there‘s one paramount issue facing our country at the moment... her back against the wall, business leaders in front of her, this is what prime ministerial defiance looks like. it was never going to be easy or straightforward and the final stage was always going to be the toughest. but we have in view a deal that will work for the uk, and let no one be in any doubt, i am determined to deliver it. it has become traditional for brexiteers in the cabinet, those still there, to receive a doorstep greeting from reporters. i‘ll be working with the whole cabinet to get the best deal possible for the united kingdom. thank you. are they plotting from within to shift mrs may‘s position? the prime minister has my full support and i hope people will get behind
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her as she endeavours to get the best deal for great britain. will she make the late changes you want? she is doing a very good job. should negotiations be reopened? you know i don't do doorstep interviews. do you have confidence in the prime minister, mr fox ? back outside parliament, the prime minister‘s conservative critics wielded umbrellas, big hats and charb language. —— sharp language. it is such a bad deal that any mp, or any government member involved in putting that through parliament will not have a future in british politics because it will end up being seen... these are surrender terms. this is us becoming a colony of the european union, should they choose to enforce that. those who hope to force the prime minister to face of verdict of confidence have not yet managed to rustle up the numbers to make it happen, despite promising for months they were getting close and even if
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they could pull it off it is not certain they would topple theresa may. the fact it is still a live possibility in the midst of everything else that is swirling around this place tells you everything you need to know about how bumpy things are. enter next, then, from the club of former party leaders, this plea. i don‘t think members of parliament should be distracted during the next few weeks by a no—confidence motion or a leadership contest which might follow that. they should be concentrating on the document and its implications. so, what happens next? you are more likely to find a pot of gold at the bottom of that rainbow than find anyone who can answer that with any confidence. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. let‘s speak now to our chief political correspondent, vicki young. last week, those in the rg group seemed fairly confident that they would have those 48 letters in by the end of last week. now, here we
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are, monday afternoon, and at what point does look as though they are not going to do it? well, i think it looks like that now. because this is an ongoing process, there is no deadline. people can hand in the letters whenever they like, so it could go on for months or years, and they just accumulate and could go on for months or years, and theyjust accumulate and then finally have they ever hit 48, that triggers this vote of no—confidence. but i think it is getting to the point where you think, well, if they haven‘t done it now, why not? and the suspicion as to be because people are saying one thing in private, that they are doing these letters, but they haven‘t actually done them. now, i think there is definitely a split amongst those in the eurosceptic wing of the conservative party because there are some who think we can go for the policy. there is going to be a vote in the house of commons, probably in december. that is the moment you vote against it and you try and defeat the policy. and the idea of actually trying to change the prime minister, i think some do feel is a distraction. it‘s a bit of a waste
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of time. it is not completely clear whether they would when a confidence vote a nyway. whether they would when a confidence vote anyway. they are struggling to get a 38 people, can they really get to 158 to defeat the prime minister? and if she winds in any doubt like that, she is safe for another year. i think at the moment theresa may is likely held back by the fact that two opponents of her own party are split —— slightly helped. and also it has to be said that some of jeremy corbyn mps are saying that you can just keep saying that we are going to renegotiate this whole thing in three months. some of his mps don‘t think that is credible and they are trying to get him to swing behind this idea of another referendum. we will be hearing from jeremy corbyn a little later. he is addressing the cbi as well. theresa may did that this morning. one voice that seems to be very much on her message and it is advice that hasn‘t beenin message and it is advice that hasn‘t been in the past and i am talking about michel barnier. yes, it has
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been interesting how now both sides are been interesting how now both sides a re really been interesting how now both sides are really just getting been interesting how now both sides are reallyjust getting out there to sell this deal. that is exactly what is happening with theresa may. it is pretty clear that downing street are wanting to shift attention away from the office of sir graham grey day, who is or is not taking in those letters. they want to make this a much broader argument by speaking to the business community and making the business community and making the case that this is about people‘s jobs. it is not about the westminster bubble. this is about a smooth brexit. this, she says, is why she has ended up with this compromise agreement that she has, because she feels she is delivering ona because she feels she is delivering on a referendum results by starving freedom of movement at the same time she would argue that she is trying to make sure that our trading relationship with the eu is smooth, so that people are not adversely affected in their jobs so that people are not adversely affected in theirjobs or that the uk economy isn‘t adversely affected, so she is out there making the case and michel barnier is out there making the case now. i think i suppose given they have both worked on this for more than two years with thousands of hours of negotiations, maybe it is not a huge surprise,
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both of them accepting this from ice coppermine perturbing that the roadside will accept it. thank you very much. let‘s speak now to the former conservative minister, and remain campaigner, philip lee. thank you for coming out here in this bitterly cold weather. my pleasure. i am just wondering this bitterly cold weather. my pleasure. i amjust wondering how you see theresa may‘s next 24 hours. do you think there will be these 40 letters ? do you think there will be these 40 letters? what is the sense within the party? well, i always presumed that they had the 48, otherwise why the rallying call last week? it would be pretty weak, i think, if there isn‘t a 48 who are prepared to put their head above the parapet here, but who knows? but i don‘t quite understand is the arithmetic in parliament doesn‘t change, irrespective of who is by minister, soi irrespective of who is by minister, so i don‘t quite understand the logic of pushing for a vote now. so you agree with the prime minister that it you agree with the prime minister thatitis you agree with the prime minister that it is actually not help. yellow don‘t think it changes the dynamic year. the moment this deal isn‘t passing. 50 mps are making it clear
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they would not support this deal. so iam more they would not support this deal. so i am more interested in talking about what comes next. well what does come next? clearly, the gamble that theresa may is taking is that people will go for this deal rather than the spectre of an ordeal. well, i don‘t see no deal passing parliament. i think at the moment, the options facing colleagues if the government‘s dealfalls the options facing colleagues if the government‘s deal falls is as follows. i think the norway ideas being floated, particularly on the conservative side. i don‘t see a majority for this and i don‘t think that normally delivers on the referendum result in 2016. the second option is that if we do leave, it would never be as an ordeal, i presume it would be wto rules with arrangements around medicines at the like, and a third option is what i am campaigning for, which is a people‘s vote, and i think that makes the most sense, both for brexit voters and remain voters in 2016. are you not assuming that that would then resolve this
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and we would have a clear idea one way or another, when quite clearly the country is split. well, at least if we had another referendum, there would be an informed consent referendum feel about it, in that over the last two and a half years, it is not as if brexit hasn‘t been discussed ad nauseam in the media. the public now realise the indications of leaving. all i am calling for. you preface me as a remain campaigner. yes, i have not recalled from my position on remain, but i would be more happy if there was a brexit phot in the circumstances and a people‘s vote because at least then we could all say the public were fully aware of the indications of doing so. were you back in your constituency and have you spoken to your constituents lately, and what a? i speak to my constituents on a regular basis. i think the message i got loud and clear this weekend was that the government‘s deal didn‘t please anybody. i know it doesn‘t please business, and i know it certainly doesn‘t please the most active
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members of my association. i think the government‘s deal is not going to pass and i think irresponsible government should be about working out how do we get past this? and i can see no other way of breaking this impasse so there are four we have to go back to the public and legally deliver options on remain and brexit. thank you very much for joining us. ministers from the remaining 27 eu states have backed the draft withdrawal deal at a meeting in brussels. the eu‘s chief negotiator michel barnier says brexit talks are at a decisive moment. here‘s our europe correspondent damian grammaticas. while the arguments rage in the uk, in brussels, the eu‘s 27 other countries are moving ahead. ministers meeting today to green light the deal reached last week. translation: we all agree this is very good news. we all made really a big effort to get this far. the 27 countries have been as flexible as they can. now we‘re waiting to see if the uk will accept it and we can move forward.
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here there was no appetite for reopening negotiations with theresa may. this is the best she‘ll get. it is the best after so many months of negotiations and i'm sure that now we need to go further. are you worried that the brexit deal will not survive this week or maybe mrs may won‘t survive? it will survive. we are waiting for the same situation in london, but here it will survive. the eu believes the text agreed with the uk is fair and balanced. the only item to be resolved — michel barnier‘s proposal the uk be offered the option of a one off extension to the so—called transition period after brexit, up to four years in total. it would, if used, tie the uk to following eu rules, paying annual contributions, but give more time to agree a final trade deal. some in the uk want more negotiations on the exit treaty. here they agreed they are over. the first difficult step is done. the negotiations between the european union and the british prime minister theresa may have led to a deal. we have succeeded in preserving
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the unity of the eu 27 throughout these negotiations. the question now is whether there is an approval of this deal in the uk and within the european parliament. ladies and gentlemen, break—ups are never easy, but it always is better when it happens on friendly terms. that is also the best way to build a good relationship for the future. we still want the uk as an essential partner in all fields for many years to come. so now michel barnier is focusing on the detail of the second text to finalise this week, the uk‘s future relationship with the eu. for the future relationship, both the eu and the uk will have full control of their own legislation and rule—making. this is essential on our side for the integrity of the single market. it is essential for the uk in terms of taking back control.
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now, more than ever, we must all remain calm and keep our focus on the need for the uk to leave the eu in an orderly fashion. whether that orderly exit happens now depends on events in london. eu leaders will sign off their side in a summit on sunday. then hold their breath. let‘s return now to brexit — with me is the conservative vice chair for woman, helen whatley. what is the mood in the party? we have just heard from philip what is the mood in the party? we havejust heard from philip lee, saying the letter writers might still emerge. you getting a sense that actually theresa may is going to toss this one out? my feeling in parliament is that things are much, much calmer today. computer last week when there was this kind of fee
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brow atmosphere. today things are, and people have had a chance to read through the deal and get their heads around it and think about the alternatives. most conspicuously, those who are objecting loudly last week having come up with a plan. they don‘t have an alternative which is convincing colleagues to follow them, and so you‘re seeing people rallying round behind the prime minister. be confident that by the end of the day they will not be 40 letters ? end of the day they will not be 40 letters? i don't see any signs from what i have heard today that we are going to get to that point. as i said, isee going to get to that point. as i said, i see people focusing much more on really understanding the deal and working out what their position is and how they are going to explain it to their constituents as well. a lot of the mps have had their weekends with their constituents, and you have too. i wondered, what are people saying to you? what i heard back in my constituency is that some people who have always wanted to leave and have a lwa ys have always wanted to leave and have always wanted the hardest possible brexit and are quite happy with a no deal, they are still in that place and are still happy with the idea of and are still happy with the idea of ano and are still happy with the idea of a no deal, and people in my constituency on the other side of
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the argument, who passionately wa nted the argument, who passionately wanted to stay still passionately wa nt to wanted to stay still passionately want to stay, but the people in the middle want us to find the deal. at a pragmatic deal. there is no way to have a deal that everyone is going to be happy with because you‘re trying to bring together those two sides, but actually they want to see something which brings the country back together again and enablers is to move on, to get on with doing what people want to do, doing the things you care about, and also have stability. so here we are on the monday after that turbulence of last week. do you think theresa may is in a better place moving the deal to parliament, or is that still a huge question? it is clearly still going to bea question? it is clearly still going to be a challenge because we have heard that there are plenty of people who are not keen on the deal. ido people who are not keen on the deal. i do feel that people are coming round. as i said, getting the chance to really absorb it, to beat it, to see the pros and cons to it, to appreciate for instance that we are definitely going to end free movement of people and the big payments that were coming out of the single market and the customs union but we‘re doing that with the cliff
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edge and there has been movement on the trade, so for me as a kent mp, it looks like for instance we have got a good chance of having free growing through our borders at dover and calais and having a balance between regulation and free—trade. so people are getting their heads around what is on the table. thank you very much forjoining us here. on this cold day. thank you very much. in the last hour, the parole board has decided that the serial sex offender, john worboys, must stay in prison, after reconsidering his case. he‘s been injail since 2009, for attacks on twelve women. let‘s get more now with our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. known as the black cab rapist. the handling of this case when one pa role handling of this case when one parole board boss lost his job, handling of this case when one parole board boss lost hisjob, so what has happened today? well, the pa role what has happened today? well, the parole board has been reconsidering this case after the high court overturned its previous decision to allowjohn worboys to be released.
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that, as you said, led to the resignation of nick hardwick, the former chairman of the parole board in controversial circumstances in march this year. last month, april panel of three members looked at the case freshly and considered a dossier of over 1200 pages detailing john worboys‘s criminal record and the allegations against him, his record in custody and so on, and they have come to the clear conclusion that it is not safe for him to be released or indeed moved to an open prison where there are fewer restrictions, and the reasons for that set out in a summary of the pa role for that set out in a summary of the parole board decision. and it says that the panel listed risk factors associated with john that the panel listed risk factors associated withjohn worboys, including sexual preoccupation, a sense of sexual entitlement, his attitudes towards women, including any java sexual contact with women and to control women, a belief that rape was acceptable, alcohol misuse, and problems with relationships. the
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pa role and problems with relationships. the parole board went on to say that it was aware thatjohn worboys was subject to investigation by the metropolitan police following new historical allegations made against him and indeed the crown prosecution service has been part of the full file of evidence relating to those allegations, and it says the process is likely to be lengthy and the parole board will require evidence of those further allegations which would not be possible while the investigation is ongoing. on that john worboys‘s half, he said that he worked very hard to accept and understand his offending, however the parole panel said that it considered there could be a need to further understand risk factors and triggers to his offending. so overall the parole panel said it was not safe forjohn worboys to be released. he has 28 days in which to challenge that decision and request an oral hearing, so a full hearing in which he is allowed to make representations. 28 days to do that,
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and if he doesn‘t or indeed if his submissions are rejected, then he will stay in custody for up to another couple of years.|j will stay in custody for up to another couple of years. i don't know if it is probably early days, but has there been any reaction from police or indeed from some of his victims? there hasn't been any reaction, but i would imagine that his victims will be very relieved that this decision. indeed, seven of them submitted personal statements detailing the continued impact of his offending. they, i‘m sure, will be relieved that this, but it is not the end of the matter. he has the opportunity to try an appeal against this decision and that could lead to an oral hearing at some point next year, and in any event, within two yea rs, year, and in any event, within two years, he‘s entitled to ask the pa role years, he‘s entitled to ask the parole board to consider his case again. but we should remember, as we have heard there, the police have been investigating further allegations spanning a ten year period between 1997 and 2007, and they have passed a file of evidence to the cps to decide whether or not
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john worboys should be charged. thank you very much. danny shaw there with the latest on thejohn worboys case. one of the leading figures in the global car industry has been arrested, over allegations of financial misconduct. carlos ghone is expected to be fired as chairman of nissan. the firm said it had been conducting an internal investigation for several months, which showed mr ghone had misused company resources. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield hayes told us more about the allegations. the accusations against carlos ghosn come from an internal investigation carried out by nissan motor corporation over the last few months, and apparently it started with a whistle—blower who came forward with information about irregularities in the reporting of mr ghosn‘s salary to financial authorities here in japan, mr ghosn‘s salary to financial authorities here injapan, and another senior executive called greg kelly, who is an american. both of them are under investigation. the accusation against mr ghosn is that he was paid between 2011 and 2016 a
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total of 88 million us dollars by nissan. but that he only reported an income of 44 million us dollars to the financial authorities here for tax purposes. so that is an underreporting of around 50%, and thatis underreporting of around 50%, and that is why he is being questioned by the prosecutor ‘s office now. and we have also heard from the current ceo of nissan at a press conference and he has said that he will call aboard modern meeting sometime in the next two days, we think on wednesday, and that during that board meeting he will recommend the immediate termination of mr ghosn‘s employment. mr ghosn is still currently the chairman of nissan motor corporation, so this is a huge story here in japan, motor corporation, so this is a huge story here injapan, and it will send shock waves around the world because of course mr ghosn is one of the biggest and most famous, most powerful executives in the car industry. he is also the ceo of renal in france and he is the
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chairman of the nissan renault mitsubishi alliance. so it really is an astonishing fall from grace from an astonishing fall from grace from a figure who has been very prominent in the auto industry for at least the last 20 years. tens of thousands of rail passengers have been delayed or left stranded, after more problems on some of the busiest routes in the uk. network rail has apologised for the disruption after engineering works overran. our correspondent chi chi izundu is at london‘s waterloo station. the information boards behind me said nothing but cancelled this morning. and this concourse was actually filled with a number of really angry and confused passengers who didn‘t quite understand what was going on. we spoke to university stu d e nts going on. we spoke to university students who are being told by staff here to change their travel plans, and other people trying to get to work being told to work from home. network rail is blaming the
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overrunning engineering work, but this destruction isn‘tjust affecting waterloo station here. it has had a knock—on effect on other stations also. the uk‘s busiest station on a monday morning, passengers at waterloo were greeted by cancellations and delays, and commuters trying to get into london face similar problems. south western railway said late—running engineering works in the hampton court area had left four lines blocked with no trains running between waterloo and surbiton. the company advised passengers not to travel this morning and warned disruption would continue throughout the day. at clapham junction large queues formed between platforms. it‘s terrible, there is no warning, you get here and this is what you see, and there is nothing you can do about it. at teddington, it was a different story, with an almost empty station. i‘m trying to get to the city via waterloo and i arrived at the station at 7:30am to get my 7:30am train, which was cancelled, i gave up and then i‘ve been at home for the last couple of hours.
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i'm due to go to the russian embassy to be fingerprinted. it is quite important that we are there this morning. are you going to be late as a result? yes. very late. what will you do? we have to wait for the train. other stations including woking, surbiton, raynes park and earlsfield were closed. services started again before 10am but disruption is expected to continue. we have seen overrunning engineering works in the surbiton area causing all the lines into waterloo to be shut, causing really significant disruption. we‘re working hard to return the train service to normal but passengers should expect disruption through the rest of the day and we are asking people to check before you travel. some services may be cancelled and services will be busier than normal. south western passengers, along with those using other rail companies, also face cancellations and delays earlier in the year due to ongoing disputes with train guards.
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the rmt union said this morning‘s disruption was more evidence of the impact of privatisation on britain‘s railways. both south western railway and network rail apologised for this morning‘s delays. an apology from network rail, an apology from south—west of railways, but also an apology from northern rail, who say that damp weather and leaves on the railway lines have caused disruptions in the north of the country with their railway systems. everyone is being advised to check before they travel. urgent checks are being carried out on up to 3,000 doctors, after it emerged that a woman was allowed to practice as a psychiatrist for 22 years, with no medical qualifications. zholia alemi claimed she had a primary medical qualification, when she first registered in the uk in 1995, but her claim to have a degree from the university of auckland in new zealand was fraudulent. the general medical council said the woman was allowed onto the medical register, under a scheme for commonwealth citizens, which has
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since been abolished. it has started raining very heavily here, which is good. let‘s have a look at the weather forecast. ben rich. good afternoon. a different feel to weather this week. something much colder than we have had of late. easterly winds blowing across the country, temperatures at best around 9—10dc, showers coming into eastern areas as well. this evening and overnight, for the showers reading from east to west. don‘t be surprised if you are on the highest ground for the showers to 20 something like sleep, maybe even wet snow over the tops of the mountains. 2-5dc. snow over the tops of the mountains. 2—5dc. into tomorrow, we will again see quite a lot of cloud and the best of the brightness in the west. most of the showers in the east and again over high ground some of the showers could contain some sleek and possibly even some snow. temperatures on the monitor, 6—8dc.
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on the strength of the wind, it will feel like freezing if you are in norwich, 1—4dc. as we head into wednesday and thursday, it stays pretty chilly. a bit of rain at times. slightly less cold by the end of the week. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the prime minister vows to take back control of britain‘s borders as she pitches her brexit withdrawal bill to the business community — saying tough negotiations lie ahead. it comes amid continuing speculation over whether the number of tory mps submitting letters of no—confidence in mrs may will reach the 48 required. the eu chief negotiator says talks will now centre around the transition period arrangements and the future relationship. a parole board panel has concluded that "black cab rapist" john worboys must remain in prison — saying he is not suitable for release. and the chairman of nissan, carlos ghosn, has been arrested over claims of financial misconduct — he‘s been accused of under—reporting his pay package. sport now on afternoon live
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with holly hamilton. news on the tennis? good afternoon. for so long, men‘s tennis has been dominated by the very few. nadal, djokovic, federer — murray, until a year ago. but slowly but surely, a few more unfamiliar faces have been making their presence known. and yesterday, alexander or sasha zverev proved himself to be the best of a new breed. ok, it‘s not his first title and he‘s beaten both djokovic and federer before, but by beating the world number one in the final of the atp finals at the 02 yesterday, many are now seeing him as the next big thing. including six—time grand slam winner boris becker. he says this is a big step for the 21—year—old,
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who will now finish the year as world number four, and says the next step is doing it over five sets at the australian open injanuary. rugby union, and england have dropped danny care for their fourth and final test of the autumn series. the scrum half started the game againstjapan at the weekend — scoring the first try — but was replaced on the hour mark and is now out of the squad completely for australia. alex lozowski and zach mercer also miss out, while number eight nathan hughes returns from suspension. joe schmidt has released eight players from his ireland squad for their final game this weekend including dan leavy, who‘s being treated for a neck strain. leavy was selected to start against the all blacks on saturday, but was replaced by leinster team—matejosh van der flier after suffering what was described as "general tightness". schmidt is expected to make wholesale changes for the visit
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of the usa and will name his starting team on thursday. west ham have reached an out—of—court settlement in a bitter dispute with their landlords on the day that a high court case is due to get under way. the two sides have confirmed an agreement has been reached towards the london stadium capacity increasing to 66,000. it‘s also believed that the premier league club will pay some additional costs. when the club agreed to move into the old olympic stadium, they thought capacity would eventually reach 66,000, but in recent times, it‘s been restricted to 57,000. dina asher—smith‘s been named on the shortlist for the iaaf female athlete of the year award. the 22—year—old‘s had a great year, becoming the first british woman to win triple gold at the european championships, along with a couple of medals at the commonwealth games too. the winner will be announced in monaco on december the 4th. 17—year—old racing driver
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sophia florsch is undergoing surgery today after a horrendous crash in formula three. she lost control at the macau grand prix in china and was taken to hospital with a broken back, and later tweeted that she was "fine", thanking everyone for their support. her team principal says she had an "angel on her shoulder" to survive the crash. british racer billy monger lost both his legs in a crash 18 months ago — he says it‘s impossible to make motorsport totally safe. obviously, yes, there's dangers in motorsport and everyone knows that when they sign up for it. nobody expects that to happen, especially to yourself, nobody considers it. i know sophia quite well, so i am just wishing her the best in her recovery and i am glad she is ok. safety is improving in the sport, which is great, but it is never going to be risk—free.
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but as long as we keep improving and making strides, that is obviously a massive part for everyone who wants to compete in the sport. that‘s all the sport for now. we will go back now to simon in westminster, who has been keeping himself warm! thanks for your concern. back now to brexit. let‘s speak to kate proctor, political correspondent for the london evening standard, and steven swinford, deputy political editor at the daily telegraph. apart from the weather, things are warming upfor apart from the weather, things are warming up for theresa may because these 48 letters, how confident can she be that they are not coming? todayis she be that they are not coming? today is a good day for number ten. we were told today would be the moment of truth, when the letters would come through, we would have 48 and we would be in the territory of and we would be in the territory of a vote of confidence. it hasn‘t happened so far. there are only one
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or two letters going in today so it doesn‘t feel like we are at that magic number 48. who do you think might be sitting at home, wondering ifi might be sitting at home, wondering if i write the letter or i back darren? it's about 12, they are all waiting for them to hand in their letters, they said they would, but they have not appeared. some of those are 2017 intake mps for whom it is probably too much of a risk. they are at the start of their careers and they don't want to be seen like that going forward. they have been saying its career suicide. and not much truck with their own constituents. many have been at home over the weekend and might have been told, just do it? i'm hearing that one mp that they went back and had a constituency supper on friday night, and the message to them was please, just get on with it, get it through. i think they are tired. yes! what
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about theresa may and her close circle? what about the five cabinet members? the gang of five, as they we re members? the gang of five, as they were called. they were going to work together, michael gove, andrea leadsom, penny mordaunt, liam fox, they were all going to work together to change things from within. they have been speaking weekend, they we re have been speaking weekend, they were due to meet today, they are now not meeting and it appears they are more fractured than we thought they were. rather than changing things from within, they can‘t unite around a common view and four of them, i‘m told, have accepted they cannot change the withdrawal agreement, the divorce terms which theresa may put before them. who is in the gang of one? andrea leadsom is still pushing ha rd to one? andrea leadsom is still pushing hard to change the terms of the withdrawal agreement. the prime minister was categoric at the cbi that the deal on the table is the final deal that she‘s going back to brussels with and it will not change. i said earlier, brussels with and it will not change. isaid earlier, it brussels with and it will not change. i said earlier, it felt like a good day for theresa may, she was
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very strong, this is it, we are going for it. i‘m taking you with me. that even many of her detractors admire that she has stood firm and said, this is the plan. so the next focus will be the vote in this place. do you think she is beginning to feel slightly confident about it? i think the cbi speech was quite telling of how she feels. i think she thinks things are starting to go in her direction. but things are changing every hour. i think she probably feels as though things are possibly swinging round for her. it also depends on labour as well. i walked white derek —— y toral and there are mps going in and out of there are mps going in and out of the cabinet office. one of those was john woodcock, a labour mp who is now an independent. he has been in the cabinet office today. clearly the cabinet office today. clearly the government are trying to shore him up. we have yet to hear from jeremy corbyn. his approach seems to
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have been so farjust jeremy corbyn. his approach seems to have been so far just to jeremy corbyn. his approach seems to have been so farjust to sit back and watch them tear themselves apart. he will have to say something today. it must be rather refreshing today. it must be rather refreshing to see the conservative party tearing themselves apart in this way. i think jeremy tearing themselves apart in this way. i thinkjeremy corbyn can afford to take this line. some of his mps are dying for him to come out and say something about a second referendum or push forward with the people's vote but he is not going to do that. finally, at what time tonight, this afternoon, can theresa may say the challenge is not coming? i think she can probably already say that this afternoon. the danger isn‘t passed, there is a lot of time to come and we could see big names coming and going. there were whispers that david davis could submita whispers that david davis could submit a letter of no confidence, if he was to do that it would have a galvanising effect and the letters could flood in. so the danger is not passed. but they still would have to vote in the house after that. yes,
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there would still need 158 in the house. it is still very dangerous for the prime minister so it might bea for the prime minister so it might be a good day but in the longer term, it is going to get very dicey indeed. thank you very much, both of you. the labour peer and former european commissioner for trade, lord mandelson has been speaking about the uk‘s brexit deal. during a visit to hull, lord mandelson said the prime minister‘s negotiations had been boxed in by some elements of the conservative party. the problem for theresa may is that she was like a different brexit. she would like to negotiate a different deal. but she is trapped, she is a prisoner of her own party. she has all these people, noises off, coming m, all these people, noises off, coming in, pushing around, laying down the law, saying you can‘t have that, you can‘t have this, this is a red line, that‘s a rule, you can‘t cross this.
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she is trapped, a prisoner. as a result, look at the sort of deal we have ended up with in britain. we are going to have worse trade and we will be given —— giving back control. some dealfor will be given —— giving back control. some deal for britain!|j will be given —— giving back control. some dealfor britain! i am going to hand you back now to clive, who has got a warm studio to work from! the former england footballer, paul gascoigne, has been charged with sexually assaulting a woman on board a train from york to durham. our correspondent fiona trott has more details. we understand the alleged incident took place on august 20 on board a train from york to durham. we understand a woman in her 30s was sexually assaulted earlier that evening. the british transport police have confirmed is that paul gascoigne has been arrested. he‘s been arrested and charged with one
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count of sexual assault by touching. the former newcastle and tottenham player, who lives in leicester, haase the well—documented struggle with alcoholism in the past. we know that he‘s going to appear at a magistrates‘ court next month. saudi arabia‘s king salman bin abdulaziz has addressed the kingdom‘s shura council today, its main advisory body. in a televised address to the council, the king lauded his country‘s judiciary and public prosecution for "carrying out their duty in the service ofjustice", but he made no mention of the case of jamal khashoggi, the suadi journalist murdered in the saudi consulate in turkey. our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, has more from riyadh. the king‘s speech was widely anticipated, he doesn‘t speak in public very often and it was thought this occasion, the opening of the shura council, his annual address,
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would be a moment, however obliquely, to refer to the issue thatis obliquely, to refer to the issue that is still making waves around the world, that is the murder of the saudi journalistjamal the world, that is the murder of the saudi journalist jamal khashoggi. but there was no direct reference, and there was only the most subtle of hints. he wanted to read between the lines in the king‘s address. he praised the prosecution and the judiciary, saying no crime would go unpunished, that they should not deviate from god‘s law, as he put it, without discrimination, he also proved —— talked about improving governments in the kingdom, which is an absolute monarchy, and doctor about avoiding any excesses or mistakes. afterwards i spoke to some members of the council and they said perhaps today was not the place to raise those kind of issues, but you speak to so many saudis and they know that this dark cloud is going to hang over the kingdom for a long time to come. one female member of the council said to me, we felt we
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we re the council said to me, we felt we were making progress on showing the world we were pursuing reforms, that the kingdom was changing, but whatever saudi arabia does here, and it says it is going to do, it has arrested 21 individuals, 11 have been indicted and will go to trial, five, the prosecution will seek the death penalty, but the question will continue to be asked around the world, who ordered the murder of jamal khashoggi and how high up in the kingdom did it go? the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister vows to take back control of britain‘s borders as she pitches her brexit withdrawal bill to the business community — saying tough negotiations lie ahead. ff a parole board panel has concluded that black cab rapist john worboys must remain in prison — saying he is not suitable for release. and the chairman of nissan — carlos ghosn, has been arrested over claims of financial misconduct. as we‘ve been hearing,
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theresa may has told business leaders her draft eu withdrawal plan will protect british jobs, and she‘s determined to deliver it. in a speech to the cbi, she said her agreement represented " ha rd—won progress" towards a long—term trade strategy. our business presenter jamie robertson is at the conference in greenwich, south east london with reaction for us now. thanks very much. we heard from theresa may earlier this morning, about brexit and about business‘s involvement in brexit. over the last two years one of the biggest things we have been hearing about workers‘s rights and how that will be affected as we pull out from the eu and possibly lose the kind of protection that workers have had from the european union via the union, one
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might say, over the last 40 years. i‘m joined now by a leadership and enterprise development professor, and the cbi‘s chief economist. let‘s find out from you, what does the withdrawal agreement say about the rights of workers? will there be much change within the next couple of years and after that?|j much change within the next couple of years and after that? i think what is important about the withdrawal agreement is that it gets us withdrawal agreement is that it gets us into that transition period, which will last from april 2019 to december 2020 and which will last from april 2019 to december2020 and in which will last from april 2019 to december 2020 and in that time we will be operating under the same rules and regulations that we do at the moment. a business, it means we avoid that cliff edge of a no deal, which we know would be catastrophic for the economy. it would have a big impact onjobs for the economy. it would have a big impact on jobs and for the economy. it would have a big impact onjobs and life heard. but after that, that's about negotiating our new relationship with the eu, and that's where we've got some outline of that deal. but that needs
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to be negotiated over the next 20 months. when you come to those kind of negotiations, are we going to be talking about workers‘s rights? will the eu be demanding a kind of level playing field? when you talk to the business community, they are not the ones who are pushing for a step change in workers' rights for any changes in that area. while they are saying is that we want to stay in line with our biggest training partner. —— trading partner. line with our biggest training partner. -- trading partner. is that what you‘re finding as well? partner. -- trading partner. is that what you're finding as well? our research is following a similar pattern. businesses do not want any further disruption. in all fairness, the government is not saying that it is likely to start meddling in those particular kinds of policies. they wa nt particular kinds of policies. they want that consistency. it is important that we recognise there is not go to be any big dramatic change
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in stock we made such great inroads in terms of workers' rights. let me put to you a situation that might occur in several years, we do a trade deal with the country, which will remain nameless, which has workers who have virtually no rights at told that are turning out cheap goods at enormously low rates, very fast indeed, with which we cannot compete. surely at that stage we say, p, we will cut our regulations as well. what do we do?” say, p, we will cut our regulations as well. what do we do? i don't think we wait until that stage. i think we wait until that stage. i think it's very unlikely. in the same way, we have a period of transition and during that transition, that's the point when we will be looking at what works and what doesn't. so we have to be mindful of the fact that we know that very often, employers' rights and employee rights and workers' rights are often influenced by the low skilled migrant labour, as are
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some firms, and we have to be attuned to that in terms of what that might mean for those businesses. i think when i talk to businesses, one of the things they are concerned about in future trading agreements as a focus on services. we know that 40% of what the uk exports at the moment is around services. that is all about people, the services of people doing business. businesses now are most concerned about how they can attract tale nt concerned about how they can attract talent to the business, how they can show they are a model employer, that they are creative —— creating an inclusive environment. that they are giving good conditions to their workers. that drive for a deregulated, free labour market is not coming from the business community. they are more concerned about how to attract talent and how the immigration system might change in the future. thank you both very much. that‘s the view here from the cbi in greenwich. it seems at the
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moment, that if they go ahead with the withdrawal agreement, no particular change for the moment. although what happens if the post—transition although what happens if the post—tra nsition —— although what happens if the post—transition —— in the post—transition —— in the post—transition is a different matter. he was a superstar athlete, the fastest man in the world over 200 and 400 metres. but after suffering a mini—stroke in september, michaeljohnson feared he might never walk again. now, the four—time olympic champion says he‘s pretty much back to normal, and says it was his "olympic mindset" that helped his recovery. in an exclusive television interview, he‘s been speaking to sally nugent. michaeljohnson, storming away to another gold medal! this is the michaeljohnson many remember from his athletics career. the fastest and possibly the fittest man in the world for a time. he was simply unbeatable on the track. this latest challenge is surely his biggest yet, recovering from a mini stroke. i sat on the mri table for about 20 minutes and after i got off the table from the mri, which was probably about two
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and a half, three hours after i had initially felt the first sensation, i was no longer able to walk, i was no longer able to stand, my left side was very much, you know, numb, without much feeling. i didn‘t have much control of my fingers, on my left arm. michaeljohnson is now familiar to british audiences as a commentatorfor the bbc. he says he is determined to use his recovery to warn people about the symptoms of stroke. unfortunately, a lot of people just don‘t recognise the signs and so you have to be vigilant, recognise the signs of loved one, if there is slurred speech or if you are feeling something that doesn‘t feel quite right and you start to feel some tingling and that sort of thing, don‘t take the chance. i could have very well thought, i don‘t feel any pain, and i could havejust said i am going to sleep it off. that would have been the absolute wrong thing to do.
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seconds count, minutes count in these situations. get to the emergency room, get to the doctor and get under their care. for this olympian, mental strength and physical power made him the best in the world. he is drawing on those attributes now. the best chance for recovery is to immediately get into physical therapy, so i was, two days later, i was allowed to start physical therapy and this was probably the most sort of poignant moment in the transition, for me, from the fear and the anger to positivity and hope and drive and determination, and that is when a physical therapist came up to my hospital room with a walker and helped me out of bed and i got behind the walker and he said, today, the first day, we are just going to walk around the hospital floor. ironically, that first walk was about 200 metres and it took about 15 minutes for me to cover that 200 metres.
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and, you know, ordinarily, i‘m sure that, you know, anyone in that situation would be disappointed and... but i wasn‘t, i was actually encouraged and it is what encouraged me because, with every step, and following the instruction of my therapist and trying to really focus on the movement and trying to mimic the movement of my left foot with my right foot and trying to relearn these movement patterns, i could experience and feel some very tiny, very small, incremental improvements. nothing major and nothing that the ordinary person would probably even recognise, but having been through that situation as an olympic athlete, and as a sprinter, where, you know, wins and losses can be measured in hundreds and thousands of seconds and you are dealing with tiny, tiny incremental improvements every day, i could recognise that. sally nugent, bbc news.
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simon will be back with more on the latest goings—on concerning theresa may and brexit. time for a look at the weather with ben. this week brings a distinct change in the feel of the weather. it has been pretty mild lately, but the weather now has begun to come from the east. you consider clouds on the satellite picture moving from the east towards the west. this is never a warm place for our weather to be coming from at this time of year. high pressure across scandinavia feeding the easterly winds in our direction, bringing ever colder air. temperatures this afternoon nine or 10 celsius at best. areas exposed to the easterly wind will continue to see some showers. through this evening, some of the showers over
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high ground may turn a little wintry but it is going to stay quite windy overnight, particularly in the south. as a consequence of that strong wind, despite the cold air, it is not going to get particularly cold, around two to five sources. tomorrow, still that chilly easterly wind, a lot of cloud and some showers, especially across eastern areas. but some places will see more showers than others. there will be some brighter glimpses, this is how we expect it to look in the early pa rt we expect it to look in the early part of tomorrow afternoon. showers blowing in on the easterly wind. over the tops of the pennines, the welsh hills and the scottish mountains, the showers will likely start to turn to sleet or even snow over the highest ground. temperatures will range between around six and eight celsius. but remember we will have that strong easterly wind. this is what it will actually feel like. in norwich, it might not get above freezing in terms of the feel. elsewhere, one,
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two, three celsius. a chilly day, and a chilly night. the showers increasingly turning wintry of higher ground, more likely rain to low levels. going through wednesday, we will see this area of cloud and patchy rain with some hilly —— hill snow continuing to drift to the north west. for southern and eastern parts, better chance of seeing some dry weather and sunshine. still chilly, but that changes as we head towards the end of the week. low— pressure towards the end of the week. low—pressure spinning down to the south west, still high pressure in the north east, but instead of an easterly wind, we will have more of a south—easterly, which will bring us a south—easterly, which will bring us something a bit less cold as we head to the end of the week. hello. you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy, live in westminster. today at 4: the prime minister vows to take back control of britain‘s borders as she pitches her brexit withdrawal bill to the business community, saying tough negotiations lie ahead. it was never going to be easy or straightforward. and the final stage was always going to be the toughest.
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but we have in view a deal that will work for the uk. it comes amid continuing speculation over whether the number of tory mps submitting letters of no—confidence in mrs may will reach the 48 required. a parole board panel has concluded that black cap rapist john worboys must remain in prison, saying he is not suitable for release. and the chairman of nissan, carlos ghosn, has been arrested over claims of financial misconduct — he‘s been accused of under—reporting his pay package. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport with holly hamilton — looking ahead to the rugby autumn internationals finishing finishing this weekend. the window is slowly closing and we are expecting some big changes from the site involved in that historic win at the weekend. england will reveal their squad for their final game against australia with some notable omissions. more on that later. ben rich as the weather for us, such as it is. you have had one
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or two showers in westminster, i saw that. some shoppers across many central and eastern parts of the country, particularly those coming from the east. in fact, all our weather is coming from the east and thatis weather is coming from the east and that is not a warm place for our weather to come from at this time of year. the details on the way. thank you very much. also coming up — he was once the fastest man on the planet but suffered a stroke this summer. in an exclusive interview michaeljohnson tells us about his road to recovery. ironically, that first work was about 200 metres which was the event that i held the world record that and was once the fastest man in the world and in history at that event, and it took 15 minutes. hello, everyone.
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this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. the prime minister has been trying to win backing from the business world, for her draft deal on leaving the european union, at the beginning of what she‘s described as a ‘critical week,‘ for the brexit process. in a speech to the business organisation the cbi, theresa may said the proposals will create an immigration system based on talent, and stop eu migrants ‘jumping the queue‘. meanwhile there‘s still speculation over whether there‘s enough backing among conservative mps for a no—confidence vote in her leadership. our political correspondent chris mason reports. when reporters like me set up camp in shabby tents next to parliament for days on end, you know things are a bit fruity at westminster. and while plotting rumbles on here to ditch the prime minister‘s plan, or to ditch her, she rolled up down road to sell it. now, there‘s one paramount issue facing our country at the moment... her back against the wall, business leaders in front of her, this is what prime
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ministerial defiance looks like. it was never going to be easy or straightforward and the final stage was always going to be the toughest. but we have in view a deal that will work for the uk, and let no one be in any doubt, i am determined to deliver it. it has become traditional for brexiteers in the cabinet, those still there, to receive a doorstep greeting from reporters. i‘ll be working with the whole cabinet to get the best deal possible for the united kingdom. thank you. are they plotting from within to shift mrs may‘s position? the prime minister has my full support and i hope people will get behind her as she endeavours to get the best deal for great britain. will she make the late changes you want? she is doing a very good job. should negotiations be reopened? you know i don't do doorstep interviews. do you have confidence in the prime minister, mr fox ?
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back outside parliament, the prime minister‘s conservative critics wielded umbrellas, big hats and sharp language. it is such a bad deal that any mp, or any government member involved in putting that through parliament will not have a future in british politics because it will end up being seen... these are surrender terms. this is us becoming a colony of the european union, should they choose to enforce that. those who hope to force the prime minister to face a vote of confidence have not yet managed to rustle up the numbers to make it happen, despite promising for months they were getting close, and even if they could pull it off it is not certain they would topple theresa may. the fact it is still a live possibility in the midst of everything else that is swirling around this place tells you everything you need to know about how bumpy things are. enter next, then,
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from the club of former party leaders, this plea. i don‘t think members of parliament should be distracted during the next few weeks by a no—confidence motion or a leadership contest which might follow that. they should be concentrating on the document and its implications. so, what happens next? you are more likely to find a pot of gold at the bottom of that rainbow than find anyone who can answer that with any confidence. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. the labour peer and former european commissioner for trade, lord mandelson has been speaking about the uk‘s brexit deal. during a visit to hull, lord mandelson said the prime minister‘s negotiations had been boxed in by some elements of the conservative party. the problem for theresa may is that she would like, i think, a different brexit. i think she would like to have negotiated a different deal. but she is trapped. she is a prisoner of her own party. she‘s got
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all these people noises off, coming m, all these people noises off, coming in, pushing her around, all these people noises off, coming in, pushing heraround, laying down the law, saying, you can‘t have that commie can‘t do this, you can‘t do that, this is a red line, it can do this, you can go there. she‘s trapped. she‘s a prisoner. and as a result, look at the sort of deal we have ended up within britain. we are going to have worse trade and we are going to have worse trade and we are going to have worse trade and we are going to be giving back control. some dealfor britain. ministers from the remaining 27 eu states, have backed the draft withdrawal deal, at a meeting in brussels. the eu‘s chief negotiator michel barnier, says brexit talks are at a decisive moment. here‘s our europe correspondent damian grammaticas. while the arguments rage in the uk, in brussels, the eu‘s 27 other countries are moving ahead. ministers meeting today to green light the deal reached last week. translation: we all agree this is very good news. we all made really a big effort to get this far. the 27 countries have been as flexible as they can. now we‘re waiting to see if the uk will accept it and we can move forward.
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here there was no appetite for reopening negotiations with theresa may. this is the best she‘ll get. it is the best after so many months of negotiations and i'm sure that now we need to go further. are you worried that the brexit deal will not survive this week or maybe mrs may won‘t survive? it will survive. we are waiting for the same situation in london, but here it will survive. the eu believes the text agreed with the uk is fair and balanced. the only item to be resolved — michel barnier‘s proposal the uk be offered the option of a one off extension to the so—called transition period after brexit, up to four years in total. it would, if used, tie the uk to following eu rules, paying annual contributions, but give more time to agree a final trade deal. some in the uk want more negotiations on the exit treaty. here they agreed they are over. the first difficult step is done. the negotiations between the european union and the british prime minister theresa may have led to a deal. we have succeeded in preserving the unity of the eu 27
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throughout these negotiations. the question now is whether there is an approval of this deal in the uk and within the european parliament. ladies and gentlemen, break—ups are never easy, but it always is better when it happens on friendly terms. that is also the best way to build a good relationship for the future. we still want the uk as an essential partner in all fields for many years to come. so now michel barnier is focusing on the detail of the second text to finalise this week, the uk‘s future relationship with the eu. for the future relationship, both the eu and the uk will have full control of their own legislation and rule—making. this is essential on our side for the integrity of the single market. it is essential for the uk
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in terms of taking back control. now, more than ever, we must all remain calm and keep our focus on the need for the uk to leave the eu in an orderly fashion. whether that orderly exit happens now depends on events in london. eu leaders will sign off their side in a summit on sunday. then hold their breath. our brussels reporter adam fleming ssays there has been a definite change of tone from michel barnier. the one outstanding thing in the withdrawal agreement, the divorce treaty, is the peace where there is a clause saying that the transition period can be extended up to and thenit period can be extended up to and then it says 31st of december 20xx. now, that number has to be replaced by actual date, and that is what
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negotiators from the uk and the eu are going to do this week, and what michel barnier has proposed is that the ultimate end date for a potentially extended transition would be december 2022. that‘s quite controversial to lots of people in the uk because legally are supposed to be an election happening in the summer of 2022 and lots of people particularly on the tory side say, could we really have an election while we are out of the eu but still following lots of eu rules and regulations in the transition variant. the caveat there is that we still don‘t know what the actual date will be. this was just michel barnier‘s opening offer, this idea that he presented to eu officials and private last night, and also there is no guarantee the transition extension would ever be used, and there is no guarantee it would last for the whole length. it is just up to that date, saw an interesting legal there in the brexit negotiations, but not a massive, massive explosion just yet. but an a cce pta nce massive explosion just yet. but an acceptance that things are volatile over a year, so they don‘t want to
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ruffle a ny over a year, so they don‘t want to ruffle any more feathers. no, not at all. it was fascinating this morning, the latest chapter in michael barnier‘s transformation if you like from finger wag in chief to a chief salesman to the deal. gone we re a chief salesman to the deal. gone were the days when he would say, the clocks are kicking, the brits have not told us what they want, they wa nt not told us what they want, they want this but they can‘t have it. he is now reading from a script that could have been written by downing street. listen to what he said this morning. this is a fair deal that is therefore both sides. the eu, we have compromised. in fact, we have moved towards the british position quite substantially when it comes to the assurance policy for no hard border, the irish backstop, by adopting this idea of a uk wide customs arrangements. and by the way, that backs up that no one likes, no one wants to use it because we are going to have an amazing future trading relationship thatis amazing future trading relationship that is going to be deep and special and ambitious and strategic. he was farfrom and ambitious and strategic. he was far from rocking the and ambitious and strategic. he was farfrom rocking the boat. he was trying to send the boat out, if that is how far the metaphor will go.
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michel barnier is now on the same side as theresa may, because they are both trying to sell the steel that they have reached together. adam fleming there. a lot of selling going on and lobbying as well and in the last half—hour three prominent brexiteers have been spotted going into number ten. presumably to try to persuade staff there of the potential changes to the withdrawal agreement. iain duncan smith, owen paterson there. and peter lilley amongst that group. david trimble also in that group, as they headed into downing street. as i say, all brexiteers. iain duncan smith, of course, one of those who said that the withdrawal deal needs to be changed and no doubt hoping to do a bit of arm twisting. don‘t know who they have been seen in downing street. theresa may was at the cbi conference this morning, but we don‘t know whether they actually got
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to meet the prime minister or not. well, we‘ll bring you plenty more from here. we are hoping to get to downing street in just a from here. we are hoping to get to downing street injust a moment from here. we are hoping to get to downing street in just a moment or two. but also to make the point we are still waiting to hear if there are still waiting to hear if there are 48 letters now with the chairman of the 1922 committee. still no sign that that has been achieved. our chief political correspondent, vicki young, is at downing street. it is probably a little early for theresa may to be going a few, but with the hour that passes, it increases the chance that she is out of the woods. yes, i think the problem with this is, as you say, there is no moment she can totally relax because this is an ongoing process. it has been going on for several months with one or two letters going in and we are never entirely sure, but it does seem slightly perplexing having been told for weeks that they are close to
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getting to this number, this trigger point of 48, that after last week, that fanfare from jacob rees—mogg, that fanfare from jacob rees—mogg, that there haven‘t been these letters going in order get them over the line. all i can tell you at the moment is that iain duncan smith, a leading brexiteer, former party leader, and owen paterson, former northern ireland secretary, and david tribble have gone into number ten to see the prime minister, they hope, in order to speak to her about what they think the solution would be as an alternative to this thorny problem of the irish backstop, trying to stop the need for border checks between northern ireland and ireland in the event of note trade deal, no suitable trade deal being ready, so they have gone in their armed with some documents, bringing along with them some technical experts who they say can explain what an alternative might be. now, the question is if she doesn‘t accept that... and it may well be something they have talked about before, but if she doesn‘t, what do
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they decide to do? teamed doug smith, asa they decide to do? teamed doug smith, as a former leader himself, will be part of him slightly synthetic to the prime minister‘s position, more likely to want to change the policy rather than the person. we‘ll see what the others say and whether this is a moment where they say that more letters are going to going, but obviously they don‘t feel that the game is up. they feel that they can still try to persuade the prime minister, even though she has said that the withdrawal agreement, that is the document, the legal documents running to more than 550 pages, she says that that has been fully agreed with the commission and that there is really no reopening of that this week. she is focusing on that future relationship about what her relationship about what her relationship with the eu will be like after we have left. perhaps we should stress the point that even as the 48 letters are achieved and the chairman of the 1922 committee has them in his hand, there is still a much more important about to happen
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in the house of commons and the conservatives there and the bar for thatis conservatives there and the bar for that is even higher, 158. yes. i mean, ithink that is even higher, 158. yes. i mean, i think it is almost misleading to say that it triggers a leadership contest. technically, it doesn‘t, really. what it does is it triggers a vote of no—confidence in theresa may‘s leadership, thought they were to get the 48 letters, they were to get the 48 letters, they then have a secret vote of all conservative mps, and she just needs to wina conservative mps, and she just needs to win a simple majority of those mps, around 158 or so, in order to survive. of course, the dreadful reality of the situation is that if there were dozens and dozens and dozens there were dozens and dozens and d oze ns of there were dozens and dozens and dozens of mps coming out against, thenit dozens of mps coming out against, then it would be maybe tricky for her to carry on, but i think the other side of that is if she were to win it, she is unsafe for a year, and that is what i think is dissuading some who are unhappy with the policy to act now. what they fear is that they trigger this process , fear is that they trigger this process, she winds that vote of confidence, and then she can‘t be ousted for another year, and many of
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them do not like the idea of that at all, and there was one leading brexiteer is booked last night who said we are going to have this boat in the house of commons on the policy itself. that is the moment to defeat her. you defeat on the policy and vote against in the house of commons. so many of them feel that thatis commons. so many of them feel that that is the opportunity that they have to make a difference here. for now, thank you very much. do you think we will hear when they have beenin think we will hear when they have been in there? yes, we will come back to it when that happens. 0k, talk to them. thank you very much. the parole board has decided that the serial sex offender, john worboys, must stay in prison, after reconsidering his case. he‘s been injail since 2009, for attacks on twelve women. there was outrage earlier this year when the board decided he should be freed —— which resulted in its chairman, nick hardwick resigning. well, a little earlier, i spoke to our home affairs correspondent danny shaw about the case.
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the parole board has been reconsidering this case after the high court overturns its decision to allowjohn worboys to be released. that led to the resignation of nick hardwick, the chairman of the parole board in controversial circumstances. last month, april panel of three members looked at the case afresh. they considered a dossier of over 1200 pages, detailing john worboys‘s criminal record, the allegations against him, his record in custody and so on, and they have come to the clear conclusion that it is not safe for him to be released or indeed moved to an open prison, a prison where there are fewer restrictions. and there are fewer restrictions. and the reasons for that set in a summery of the parole board decision, and it says that the panel listed risk factors associated with john worboys, including sexual preoccupation, a sense of sexual
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entitlement, his attitudes towards women, including any doubt sexual contact with women and to control women, a belief that rape is acceptable, alcohol misuse, and problems with relationships. the pa role problems with relationships. the parole board went on to say that it was aware thatjohn worboys was subject to investigation by the metropolitan police following new historical allegations made against him and indeed the crown prosecution service has been passed a full file of evidence relating to those allegations, and it said the process is likely to be lengthy and the pa role is likely to be lengthy and the parole board would require evidence of those further allegations which would not be possible while the investigation is ongoing. onjohn worboys‘s have, he said that he worked very hard to accept and understand his offending. however, the parole panel said that it considered there to be a need to further understand risk factors and triggers to his offending. so overall the parole panel said it was not safe forjohn worboys to be released. he has 28 days in which to
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challenge that decision and request an oral hearing, so a full hearing, in which he is allowed to make representations. 28 days to do that, and if he doesn‘t, or indeed of his submissions are rejected, then he will stay in custody for up to another couple of years. one of the leading figures in the global car industry has been arrested, over allegations of financial misconduct. carlos ghone is expected to be fired as chairman of nissan. the firm said it had been conducting an internal investigation for several months, which showed mr ghone had misused company resources. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield hayes told us more about the allegations. the accusations against carlos ghosn come from an internal investigation carried out by nissan motor corporation over the last few months, and apparently it started with a whistle—blower who came forward with information about irregularities in the reporting of mr ghosn‘s salary to financial authorities here in japan, and another senior executive called greg kelly, who is an american.
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both of them are under investigation. the accusation against mr ghosn is that he was paid between 2011 and 2016 a total of 88 million us dollars by nissan, but that he only reported an income of 44 million us dollars to the financial authorities here for tax purposes. so that is an underreporting of around 50%, and that is why he is being questioned by the prosecutor‘s office now. and we have also heard from the current ceo of nissan at a press conference and he has said that he will call a board meeting some time in the next two days, we think on wednesday, and that during that board meeting he will recommend the immediate termination of mr ghosn‘s employment. mr ghosn is still currently the chairman of nissan motor corporation, so this is a huge story here injapan, and it will of course, mr ghosn is one of the biggest and most famous,
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most powerful executives in the car industry. he is also the ceo of renault in france and he is the chairman of the nissan renault mitsubishi alliance. which is this year the biggest car manufacturer in the world. so it really is an astonishing fall from grace from a figure who has been very prominent in the auto industry for at least the last 20 years. the former england footballer, paul gascoigne, has been charged with sexually assaulting a woman on board a train from york to durham. our correspondent fiona trott has more details. we understand that the alleged incident took place on august the 20th. as you say, it was on board a train from york to durham. we understand that a woman in her 30s was sexually assaulted early that evening and what the british transport police have confirmed to us is that paul gascoigne has been arrested. he has been arrested and charged with one count of sexual assault by touching. the former newcastle and tottenham player, who is now 51 and lives in leicester, has had a well—documented struggle with alcoholism in the past, and we know that he is going
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to appear at a magistrates‘ court next month. urgent checks are being carried out on up to 3,000 doctors, after it emerged that a woman was allowed to practice as a psychiatrist for 22 years, with no medical qualifications. zholia alemi claimed she had a primary medical qualification, when she first registered in the uk in 1995, but her claim to have a degree from the university of auckland in new zealand was fraudulent. the general medical council said the woman was allowed onto the medical register, under a scheme for commonwealth citizens, which has since been abolished. he was a superstar athlete, the fastest man in the world over 200 and 400 metres.
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but after suffering a mini—stroke in september, michaeljohnson feared he might never walk again. now, the four—time olympic champion says he‘s pretty much back to normal, and says it was his "olympic mindset" that helped his recovery. in an exclusive television interview, he‘s been speaking to sally nugent. michaeljohnson, storming away to another gold medal! this is the michaeljohnson many remember from his athletics career. the fastest and possibly the fittest man in the world for a time. he was simply unbeatable on the track. this latest challenge is surely his biggest yet, recovering from a mini stroke. i sat on the mri table for about 20 minutes and after i got off the table from the mri, which was probably about two and a half, three hours after i had initially felt the first sensation, i was no longer able to walk, i was no longer able to stand, my left side was very much, you know, numb, without much feeling. i didn‘t have much control of my fingers, on my left arm. michaeljohnson is now familiar to british audiences as a commentatorfor the bbc. he says he is determined to use his recovery to warn people about the symptoms of stroke. unfortunately, a lot of people just
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don‘t recognise the signs and so you have to be vigilant, recognise the signs of loved one, if there is slurred speech or if you are feeling something that doesn‘t feel quite right and you start to feel some tingling and that sort of thing, don‘t take the chance. i could have very well thought, i don‘t feel any pain, and i could havejust said i am going to sleep it off. that would have been the absolute wrong thing to do. seconds count, minutes count in these situations. get to the emergency room, get to the doctor and get under their care. for this olympian, mental strength and physical power made him the best in the world. he is drawing on those attributes now. the best chance for recovery is to immediately get into physical therapy,
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so i was, two days later, i was allowed to start physical therapy and this was probably the most sort of poignant moment in the transition, for me, from the fear and the anger to positivity and hope and drive and determination, and that is when a physical therapist came up to my hospital room with a walker and helped me out of bed and i got behind the walker and he said, today, the first day, we are just going to walk around the hospital floor. ironically, that first walk was about 200 metres and it took about 15 minutes for me to cover that 200 metres. and, you know, ordinarily, i‘m sure that, you know, anyone in that situation would be disappointed and... but i wasn‘t, i was actually encouraged and it is what encouraged me because, with every step, and following the instruction of my therapist and trying to really focus
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on the movement and trying to mimic the movement of my left foot with my right foot and trying to relearn these movement patterns, i could experience and feel some very tiny, very small, incremental improvements. nothing major and nothing that the ordinary person would probably even recognise, but having been through that situation as an olympic athlete, and as a sprinter, where, you know, wins and losses can be measured in hundreds and thousands of seconds and you are dealing with tiny, tiny incremental improvements every day, i could recognise that. sally nugent, bbc news. just a quick line of news i‘m getting. there are two more letters. the target for those wanting to have a vote of confidence into theresa may, two more letters have gone in.
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theresa villiers, the former northern ireland secretary, and philip holeable —— philip hollobon. we saw iain duncan smith going on with owen paterson short time ago and there is a sense that they might come out after their meeting in downing street. we are keeping an eye on what is going on in downing street, but two more letters, theresa villiers and philip hollobone. we don‘t know what that total is in terms of the number of letters that have gone in for a vote of confidence in theresa may. we will have the latest from downing street and the latest from westminster and any developments, we will bring them to you. now it is time for a look at the weather with beverage. thank you very much indeed. the weather not looking too pretty at times at
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westminster this afternoon. we have had quite a lot of showers which has been the case for many eastern areas and as you can see from the radar picture, the showers have been drifting in from the east. when our weather comes from the east at this time of year, that is never a one direction from our weather to be coming from. guidicelli in some places. tonight, a scattering of showers. some started to turn wintry over the highest ground. 2—5dc with a fairly brisk wind. some frost across the far south—west of england and then into tomorrow again we will see some showers, particularly in eastern areas, some of these over high ground might start it on to sleet and snow over the very highest hills. some sunshine, the best of that in the west. temperatures just 5-8dc. that in the west. temperatures just 5—8dc. if we factor in the strength of the wind, aching easterly wind, it will feel like this, like freezing in norwich. it stays cold into wednesday and thursday. still a lot of cloud, some outbreaks of rain at times. winteriness over high
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ground. slowly things will turn less chilly as we head towards the end of the week. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the prime minister vows to take back control of britain‘s borders as she pitches her brexit withdrawal bill to the business community — saying tough negotiations lie ahead. it comes amid continuing speculation over whether the number of tory mps submitting letters of no—confidence in mrs may will reach the 48 required. the eu chief negotiator says talks will now centre around the transition period arrangements and the future relationship. a parole board panel has concluded that "black cab rapist" john worboys must remain in prison — saying he is not suitable for release.
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and the chairman of nissan, carlos ghosn, has been arrested over claims of financial misconduct — he‘s been accused of under—reporting his pay package. now it‘s time for the sport. holly hamilton is here. we were talking about rugby and we think back to last weekend, where it was really a tale of two test matches. we had ireland‘s historic victory over the all blacks butjust hours before that, there was a victory for england over japan, but eddiejones‘ side came in for some criticism with some disappointing individual performances — and looking at the team sheet for their final game against australia, it seems he‘s taken that on board. he‘s dropped scrum—half danny care. he started the game againstjapan at the weekend and actually scored the first try, but was replaced on the hour mark and is now out
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of the squad completely. alex lozowski and zach mercer also miss out while number eight nathan hughes returns from suspension. joe schmidt has released eight players from his ireland squad for their final game this weekend including dan leavy, who‘s being treated for a neck strain. leavy was selected to start against the all blacks on saturday, but was replaced by leinster team—matejosh van der flier after suffering what was described as "general tightness". schmidt is expected to make wholesale changes for the visit of the usa and will name his starting team on thursday. west ham have reached an out—of—court settlement in a bitter dispute with their landlords on the day that a high court case was due to get under way. the two sides have confirmed an agreement has been reached towards the london stadium capacity increasing to 66,000. it‘s also believed that the premier league club will pay some additional costs. when the club agreed to move into the old olympic stadium, they thought capacity
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would eventually reach 66,000, but in recent times, it‘s been restricted to 57,000. it‘s been a disappointing nations league campaign for the irish, and the republic of ireland face another tough task in their final match of the competition when they take on denmark this evening. just a warning there‘s some flash photography coming up. martin o‘neill‘s side go into tonight‘s game having already been relegated with a game to spare while the danes have already secured group top spot. having claimed just one victory in the last calendar year, questions are now being asked of o‘neill‘s future. however, celtic manager brendan rodgers has defended his fellow countryman, insisting he can turn things around. he isa he is a very experienced manager, he
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knows exactly what he will want. the players he has, he is looking to maximise what he can get out of them. they have had a really good results over the last couple of yea rs. results over the last couple of years. but martin has got so much experience in the game, i‘m sure he would use that to transform the results for the squad. 17—year—old racing driver sophia florsch is undergoing surgery today after a horrendous crash in formula three. she lost control at the macau grand prix in china. she was taken to hopistal with broken back. the team owner said the operation has went well and there is no fear of paralysis. british racer billy monger lost both his legs in a crash 18 months ago, he says you can‘t make motorsport totally safe. obviously, yes, there's dangers in motorsport and everyone knows that when they sign up for it. nobody expects that to happen, especially to yourself, nobody considers it. i know sophia quite well, so i am just wishing her the best in her recovery and i am glad
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she is ok. safety is improving in the sport, which is great, but it is never going to be risk—free. but as long as we keep improving and making strides, that is obviously a massive part for everyone who wants to compete in the sport. that‘s all the sport for now. john walton will be back with more in the next hour. thank you very much. let‘s pick up on what is going on here in westminster. let‘s speak now to kate ferguson, senior political correspondent for the mail online, and patrick maguire, political correspondent at the new statesman. it is all about numbers still. we know that iain duncan smith is in downing street at the moment. how many downing street at the moment. how ma ny letters downing street at the moment. how many letters do you think? what is the best guest? earlier today we had
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25 gone public with the letters. two more have been added in, that takes us more have been added in, that takes us to 27. those are public declarations. but the feeling of them might be another ten or so in privately. we are looking at maybe high 30s. that would still leave us another ten or so before the magic number 48 is reached. no surprises perhaps with what we know in terms of who has booked letters. but how do you think theresa may will be feeling tonight? this bodes very ill for the european research group, it confirms suspicions that they cannot be whipped. i think the prime minister will be feeling emboldened. she will feel if they cannot organise this rebelling, it increases their chances. and there isa increases their chances. and there is a moment where those who booked letters a nd is a moment where those who booked letters and might want to say they wa nt to letters and might want to say they want to bring it back because they have gone off to la. the best metaphor is that steve baker and
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jacob rees—mogg were invited to a party on facebook and while they thought they would get 60 people attending, people looked at the weather, it's pretty gloomy and thought better of it. they thought better this brexit than none at all. and isn‘t that theresa may‘s plan? if you present the alternative as no deal, people will say, let‘sjust have any deal at this stage. that's been interesting about her strategy. she‘s going over the heads of her mps. pitching straight to the nation but urging them to get behind her in the national interest. she did that this morning at the cbi, urging business leaders to back her, and broadly they did. and again, going over the heads of mps to talk to the tory party chairman. she is time to carve a middle way for national unit is. the gamble of, she's gone to
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ta ke is. the gamble of, she's gone to take it to parliament, she is not going to offer an alternative, are you getting a sense that perhaps with mps having to spend the weekend with mps having to spend the weekend with constituents, she might mean more emboldened as time goes by? she might be, but all this talk of numbers works on the other direction. given we know there are 27 at the very least who have signed these letters, the tories have a working majority of 13, take the 27 tory mps who have signalled they don't like the prime minister's course, regardless of whether they add the numbers in, steve bakerand jacob rees—mogg do not look like the massed organisers they were pegged as, the chances are slim. but the atmosphere is gloomy. what about the cabinet members who it is thought are trying to persuade her to change bits of the deal? we have heard a lot about this gang of five, pizza
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get—togethers. .. lot about this gang of five, pizza get-togethers. .. know ideye! -- lot about this gang of five, pizza get-togethers... know ideye! -- no pizza today. we have seen liam fox khmer being supportive of the pm. it doesn‘t look like we‘re going to see a fresh wave of resignations. it has been clear that the eu withdrawal bill... agreement, is done. she is looking at the future trade deal now and that will be where we see the discussion move on to next. is there a moment where she can say that threat of 48 letters has gone? there was the pandora's box is they would say, this is not the be all and end all, the withdrawal agreement is rejected or not by the house, they might say more letters will come. they will say it's a process. everyone expected this to be wrapped up everyone expected this to be wrapped upa lot everyone expected this to be wrapped up a lot quicker. last week! they
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are revising their predictions. but suppose they would take heart from the fact there is still a bit of road left to run. one voice we are waiting for isjeremy corbyn. what course will he take? he has remained silent on the basis that presumably he is watching the tories tear themselves apart. it is an awkward topic for him because his history of being a eurosceptic, a lot of his supporters are pro—remain. i think in his speech today to the cbi, he will be making a lot of the fact he wa nts will be making a lot of the fact he wants the customs union to be a permanent engagement. and trying to pitch himself to business leaders that way. obviously a lifelong socialist, maybe not the most natural audience, the cbi, but i think that will be how he tries to differentiate himself from the pm.
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and the change of tone from brussels today, we have from michel barnier saying that this is the deal, using language that could have been written by downing street. indeed, but there is only one group of people that the brexiteers distrust more. trusting downing street would be scant cover for people time whether to submit letters are not. it is less a question of what jeremy corbyn than the mps who might be induced to back his deal. the signs are that mps are not going to appear in the lobbies with their tories and big enough numbers to let the parameter passed the deal. patrick and kate, we could go on for a lot longer! thank you both forjoining us. let‘s find out what is happening in the business world. jamie has all
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that. theresa may was talking to the business world this morning and we have jeremy corbyn business world this morning and we havejeremy corbyn coming up in a few minutes. one of the things we have a look today, the way business has been reacted to what mrs may has been saying and to the withdrawal agreement. but particularly this timei agreement. but particularly this time i want to look at technology and the way in which tech companies which mrs may was talking about in her speech, but the help she will give them, we are looking at the way in which those technology companies have done over the last couple of yea rs have done over the last couple of years and how they hope to do in the future. i am joined years and how they hope to do in the future. iamjoined by years and how they hope to do in the future. i am joined by emma mcguigan. first, what was your reaction to what theresa may was saying today? she did mention technology, she was keen on the idea of research and develop matt, apprenticeships and trying to improve the environment. —— r and d.
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broadly positive. positive about the fa ct we broadly positive. positive about the fact we are looking at a degree of stability. keen we are seeing investing in our own skills and technology, which will be important. that is reaching into schools as well as putting emphasis on apprenticeships. but if the no-deal brexit... apprenticeships. but if the no-deal brexit. .. that would apprenticeships. but if the no-deal brexit... that would be seen here as a disaster, and as regards technology, which of course is very light—footed, just one laptop can be a company. that is very true. the technology transformation will keep coming. the opportunity for technology in business will remain regardless of whether brexit remains asa regardless of whether brexit remains as a certainty or no deal. a lot of forecasts of doom around the referendum about to leave without meaning companies would flee, and
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things like technology would have a really ha rd things like technology would have a really hard time. what has the last two years been like for the technology industry? for the technology industry? for the technology industry? for the technology industry there is much opportunity because of that disruption, thomas outweighs any political... just general disruption? just generally the technology innovation is driving different outcomes in industry. that creates disruption, which is not going to slow and it is not going to going to slow and it is not going to go away, regardless of the political scenes. is an incentive to stay in the uk? i think the incentive for the uk? i think the incentive for the tech companies in the uk is to tap into herwe the tech companies in the uk is to tap into her we have real excellence. you look at the academics, in places like cambridge where we have real innovation, start—ups happening, working with academia, that is where the opportunity sits and it would be a shame if we lost that because of brexit on saturday. theresa may
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talking about her industrial strategy, what does an industrial strategy, what does an industrial strategy like hers do in order to improve the situation —— a situation like the one you describe? and industrial strategy really has to get to the heart of how we can pull an ecosystem together, whether it is tale nt an ecosystem together, whether it is talent already in this country, creating new talent through better education, or allowing us to bring the right skilled individuals in to work in this country with our own people to build those new businesses and new capabilities. the other big thing is a high, and the threat or the promise or the opportunities of ai at the promise or the opportunities of a! at the moment. again, what role is the government playing in this? does it see it as being a real opportunity for this —— british business? i think there is an opportunity for the government to do a lot more in the place of ai, i believe it is all about opportunity but it is opportunity that has to be
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educated. today's jumps will not but it is opportunity that has to be educated. today'sjumps will not be those of tomorrow, that creates fear. jeremy corbyn isjust appearing onstage downstairs. we will listen to what he has to say. thank you for that introduction. you became the director—general of the cbi shortly both —— before i became leader of the labour party and since that time, liver—mac and the cbi have had actually a very constructive and fruitful working relationship. —— labour in the cbi. which will no doubt continue in the future for a more successful and prosperous society in our country. it isa prosperous society in our country. it is a pleasure to be here today, addressing you at such a crucial time in our country's politics and national life, and as this is the la st national life, and as this is the last gig of the day, i hope you enjoyed. it is a time of huge decisions that could shape the future of our country for a generation. decisions about our relationship with the european
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union, of course, but also about the kind of economy we want to have. when i spoke to your conference last year, i said that even though we we re year, i said that even though we were 17 months on from the referendum, the situation was more precarious than ever. confusion was at the heart of government. creating an unprecedented uncertainty for you as businesspeople and of course for those who work for you in enterprises all across the country. ifi enterprises all across the country. if i said the same today, but would count as something of an understatement. instead of national leadership, we have a government in complete disarray. as soon as the terms of the withdrawal agreement from the european union were set down on paper, the government began to collapse on itself. and now the conservative party is trying to decide whether this crucial moment in our country's history is the right time to have a party leadership election. the government has mishandled two years of
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negotiations, that is now not a controversial view. subjecting businesses and their workforces to month of uncertainty. so some perhaps hoped the length of the negotiations might at least be a sign that the government rather than negotiating with itself was negotiating with itself was negotiating with itself was negotiating with brussels. driving an effective and hard working to get the best deal for our economy. now we know the answer. after the events of the past week, many people and many businesses will be confused and very, very anxious. the prime minister has negotiated a botched worst of all worlds deal which is bad for britain, leaving the country in an indefinite halfway house without a real say. withdrawal agreement which bridges the prime minister's own red lines and doesn't deliver the strong economic settlement the country needs to supportjobs settlement the country needs to support jobs and industry. settlement the country needs to supportjobs and industry. the deal makes no mention of retaining
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frictionless trade with europe and only minimal protections for workers, consumers and our natural environment. while hard—wiring in further potential restrictions on state aid for industry. labour has always said that we respect the results of the referendum. but we cannot respect the shambolic way in which this government has bungled these vital mcguffie asians. this is after all a deal that was immediately denounced by the brexit secretary. —— immediately denounced by the brexit secretary. — — these immediately denounced by the brexit secretary. —— these vital negotiations. as well as the brexit secretary before that will stop labour will vote against the government's deal and if the government's deal and if the government cannot get its central policy through parliament, we will demand what i think is the only sensible course of action, that is a general election to decide who will govern this country in the future. but if we cannot secure a general
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election, we have to be clear that all options must remain on the table, including a public vote of some form. the chair and ceo of thyssen krupp in the uk and i believe a lifelong conservative voter recently said that the tories have failed business. they are not making decisions for business, he said, they are making decisions to prevent the implosion of their own party. the result of this skewed hierarchy is a brexit deal that is simply not good enough. rather than ending the uncertainty of the last two and a half years, the government has negotiated what locks in uncertainty for another two, three, four or goodness knows how many more years. if a comprehensive future relationship is not agreed by january 2021, which frankly few believe is likely after the experience so far, then those negotiations would have to be put on
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hold because the focus would inevitably shift from negotiating the future relationship to negotiating an extension of the transition period, meaning another period and further uncertainty. and if the transition period cannot be extended, britain will be locked into a backstop from which it cannot leave without the agreement of the european union. with no time limit orend european union. with no time limit or end point. and no safer this country. sowing the seeds of a backlash in years to come. and that is only we —— the withdrawal agreement. the outlying political declaration that was also published la st declaration that was also published last week, which is supposed to signal our future relationship with the european union have to brexit, runs to a mighty seven pages. after two whole years, the fruits of the government's efforts to outline our trading future can be set down on
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just seven sheets of paper. with no ambition to negotiate a new, comprehensive customs union, no clear plan for a strong deal with the single market, merely a vague commitment to go beyond the baseline of the world trade organisation. no determination to achieve frictionless trade, or even the prime minister's downgraded ambition to trade to be as frictionless as possible. meaning even more uncertainty for the businesses that you represent. and only these most —— the most scant mention of workers's arrives, consumers's rights or environmental protections. after all the speculation about which adjective to use before the word brexit. hard, soft, clean, red, white, blue, the prime minister has taken us into a new one. a blindfold brexit. a deal designed to get her through the next stage of the process without anyone being able to see where we are heading as a
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country, which is what we all need to know. it's a leap in the dark, and ill—defined deal with a never defined end date. a blindfold brexit followed by further years of botched negotiations on our future relationship with the eu. with most leverage already thrown away. it risks seriously damaging british industry and of course the wider economy. the government is trying to force through this bad deal by threatening us all with chaos and serious damage to our economy of a no deal outcome. but i believe the prime minister knows that no deal isn't the real option. neither the cabinet nor parliament would endorse such an extreme and frankly dangerous course. labour will not countenance a no—deal brexit. i fully understand why business, which knows how disastrous a no deal would be, is so concerned about the prospect. at why some might feel under pressure to support any deal,
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no matter how botched and half baked, to avoid something worse. but the threat sibley isn't realistic. if the government believed no deal was a if the government believed no deal wasa genuine if the government believed no deal was a genuine option, it would have made serious preparations, but it hasn't. indeed, shortly before he quit, the former brexit secretary revealed he had onlyjust found out that the uk is particularly reliant on the dover to calais crossing! because we are, as he put it, a peculiar geographic entity. by which i think he means we are an island. well, we are only talking about 10,000 lorries a day arriving at dover, handing 70% of the country's entire trading goods worth an estimated £122 billion last year. the choice between the prime minister's deal and no deal is a false one, designed to scare people into backing the government. so, labour has set out an alternative
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plan for a sensible, jobs first agreement that could win support in parliament and help bring our country together. first, we want a new cover offensive, paramount customs union with a british say in future trade deals that will ensure no hard border in northern ireland, and avoid the half baked backstop deal. businesses and workers need certainty. the tories' sticking plaster plan for a temporary customs arrangements with no clarity and how long it will last and no british say can only prolong the uncertainty and putjobs and can only prolong the uncertainty and put jobs and prosperity at risk. second, a sensible deal needs a guarantee of a strong single market relationship. talk of settling for a downgraded canada style arrangement is an option popular only on the extremes of the conservative party. it would be a risk to our economy,
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jobs and investment in our schools, hospitals and all of our vital public services. third, a deal that works for britain must also guarantee that our country does not fall behind the european union in workers' rights for protections for consumers, and the environment. which should be a world leader, our country should be a world leader in rights and standards. we will not let this happen. we will not let this conservative government use brexit as an excuse for a race to the bottom in protections, to rip up rights at work or to expose our children to chlorinated chicken by running down our product standards. a good brexit plan for this country is notjust a good brexit plan for this country is not just about what can be negotiated with brussels, it must also include a radical programme of investment and real change across all of the regions of britain and the nations that make up the uk. brexit should be the catalyst to
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invest in our regions and infrastructure, bringing good jobs and real control to local communities and people. if the prime minister is unable to negotiate an agreement that can win a majority in parliament and work for the whole country, labour's alternative plan can, and! country, labour's alternative plan can, and i believe must take its place. the deal i have outlined has always been possible, putting the economy and jobs first as both labour and the cbi have argued in different ways for some time. in january, carolyn called for the uk to remain in a customs union with the eu for the long—term and i agree with the cbi on the need for a deal that guarantees a strong single market relationship. there is a better deal to be had, and it's not too late to achieve it. if the government has the courage to change course or stand aside and let an election takes place. the
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responsibility for how we got to this point certainly lies with the government, both in downing street and in the predecessor incumbent to downing street as well. but there is a bigger story to tell. in 2016 the country voted to leave the european union, against an economic backdrop of post crash britain forced a 1 million families using foodbanks. 4 million families using foodbanks. 4 million children living in poverty. and real wages that are lower today than they were in 2010. in towns and cities, hollowed out by industrial decline and neglect, with boarded—up shops, closed youth centres, many people voted for brexit as an act of protest against a political system that simply was not delivering for them. at the root of this was britain's profoundly unbalanced economy. chronic underinvestment and
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field economic policy. that needs to change. the shape of our economy after brexit will not only determined that might be determined by the text negotiated and bustle, it will be driven by political decisions about the directions we wish to take in this country. we could try to carry on as before with economic thinking that is fuelled —— has fuelled instability and insecurity and brought about crisis. orwe can embrace insecurity and brought about crisis. or we can embrace change and build a more equal and more prosperous society that meets people's hopes and needs. so today i not only want to talk about getting a good deal with the eu but about getting a good deal for all of our country's people. you may be working for a big company, struggling with personal debt, striving to meet excessive rent or mortgage payments, you may be running a small business, scraping by, awaiting payments to
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cover ever rising overheads. you may be employed in the public sector, having barely seen a pay rise in ten years but working harder than ever, as many of your colleagues have lost their jobs as many of your colleagues have lost theirjobs and you are covering for them. oryou may theirjobs and you are covering for them. or you may be surviving in theirjobs and you are covering for them. oryou may be surviving in a precarious economy as one in every nine working people now are, maybe getting paid the minimum wage on a o—hours contract, getting paid the minimum wage on a 0— hours contract, instantly sackable, never knowing for sure whether you will have work from one day to the next.
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