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tv   BBC News at 9  BBC News  November 22, 2018 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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the prime minister says she'll return to brussels on saturday for last—minute negotiations to clear the remaining hurdles on the final details of her brexit deal. the board of the carmaker nissan meets to decide whether to sack its chairman, carlos ghosn, who is accused of financial misconduct. a british charity says the number of cases of type two diabetes among youngsters in england and wales has soared. a majorfire at a depot in orpington in south—east london destroys seven buses and seriously damages four others. and in sport, the chelsea fc legend didier drogba confirms he will be retiring from playing football after 20 years. we'll have more on that and the latest sport news later. the wife of a british student who has been
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jailed for life for spying in the united arab emirates has strongly criticised the government's handling of the case. daniela tejada arrived back in uk in the last few hours. she said the foreign office failed to act quickly and firmly enough when her husband, matthew hedges, was detained in may. mr hedges, who's 31, says he is innocent, and was in the uae to research his phd. speaking this morning on the bbc‘s today programme, ms tejada says officials had disregarded her views, and appeared to place britain's interests in the gulf above those of her husband. theyjust disregarded my requests. they said that it wasn't part of theirjob, that it wasn't part of their duty. on one occasion one of the caseworkers actually said that the foreign
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office did not have a duty of care so they weren't obliged to make such representations. i was under the impression that they were putting their interests with the uae above a british citizen's rightful freedom and his welfare and his right not just to a fair trial, just to freedom. they were stepping on eggshells instead of taking a firm stance. no allies should be treating a fellow country's citizens like that. and there's absolutely no reason why they should think that a close ally would be sending an undercover agent to spy on them. it's absurd. daniela tejada, matthew hedges‘s y.
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—— wife. also speaking on the programme, the health secretary matt hancock said the case had the potential to damage diplomatic relations betweent the uk and the uae. we have seen no evidence to back up these charges and there are clearly going to have to be serious diplomatic repercussions. the question of why a friend of the uk should act like this is a perfectly reasonable one. i understand that daniela is going to meet the foreign secretary later today. the foreign secretary later today. the foreign secretary has already raised this case personally with the grand prix is on the 12th of november, so before the hearing. —— with the crown prince. the foreign office has been acting on his behalf at the highest possible levels. matt hancock. let's get more now from our middle east reporter paul blake who's in dubai. hello to you. daniela tejada is now at home in the uk but as for anyone
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acting for her husband, matthew hedges, still in the uae, what are they saying? that's right. it is interesting right now, the uae press. the stories this morning are talking about how the verdict is not final, and they are citing the attorney—general for the uae. final, and they are citing the attorney—generalfor the uae. there seems to be a softening here at least, programming against some of the shocks that came out of the uk yesterday. certainly that caught the british government and the family of matthew hedges by surprise. it seemed like there was going to be released yesterday and the hearing was held at ten o'clock local time, 6am in the uk. there was a feeling that there could be some kind of resolution, that he might be released. that was not the case and a couple of hours later we got this from the family that he had been sentenced to life in prison. the family said the trial lasted less than five minutes and there was no
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lawyer present. do you think there could be a change of heart from the authorities in the uae if there is enough diplomatic pressure thereby the uk? we have heard in the last few minutes that matthew hedges's wife feels that the uk government didn't act quickly enough and firmly enoughin didn't act quickly enough and firmly enough in the first instance. didn't act quickly enough and firmly enough in the first instancem didn't act quickly enough and firmly enough in the first instance. it is ha rd to enough in the first instance. it is hard to predict and it will take time to gel. certainly the local media is saying that matthew hedges has 30 days to appeal. i can only imagine they will go ahead with that appeal. in terms of what will happen, i think there are high level conversations happening between the uk government and the uae about the situation and the case. the brits are maintaining matthew hedges's innocence and the family are. the uae are saying that he confessed during interrogation to the crimes of espionage. but the family is countering that saying the confession came in the form of a document written in arabic, a language that matthew hedges doesn't speak or understand, so he didn't know what he was signing. he was
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also fed a cocktail of drugs while he was being held in solitary confinement. the family are suggesting that he wasn't completely aware of what he was signing and the confession that he later —— they later found out he supposedly made. thank you. let's speak to radha stirling. she's a human rights lawyer and chief executive of detained in dubai which acts for people arrested in the united arab emirates. they also campaign for changes in the legal system in the uae. thank you forjoining us. you have dealt with many cases like this where you believe there has been a miscarriage of justice. ultimately believe there has been a miscarriage ofjustice. ultimately in how many ofjustice. ultimately in how many of those cases have people actually been freed? in the cases where there is diplomatic pressure and it has hit the international press and it is essentially having an impact on tourism and investment, at that point they are usually released, but
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if people remain silent about their cases, they can stay in prison for life. and as you said earlier, any confessions in the uae cannot be taken seriously. we have seen as a regular practice forced confessions, unfair trials, prosecutions without evidence, so much so that uk courts will not even extradite to the uae based on the real risk of an unfair trial or torture and human rights violations. is this case is different to ones that you have dealt with before? for example the life sentence? the life sentence is highly disturbing. abu dhabi tends to bea highly disturbing. abu dhabi tends to be a little bit stricter in these matters than do by —— dubai. but we have seen other british nationals arrested for espionage such as the plane spotters four years ago, and they released after diplomatic pressure. we can see in matthew hedges's case that relations between
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the uk and the uae are really strained because otherwise he would have been released already. in terms of the thought processes in the uae, do you think there is for domestic consumption process of going through sentencing, in this case a life sentence for matthew hedges, and then further down the track, that person, that individual is released? do you think that could be how things unfold here? it is very interesting because over the last ten yea rs interesting because over the last ten years we have seen the uae apologising and releasing british nationals who have been unfairly detained and wrongfully accused. but what we have seen over the last six to 12 months is a growing pattern, where somebody has been wrongfully accused and held in custody without charge, without reason, with rather than releasing them immediately, they would rather pretend to have evidence against that person and then later released them. in a sense it helps them to preserve their
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reputation by almost portraying that they have a fairjustice system, which they certainly don't. then when that person is released, they are defamed, but the uae will look better in front of british expats and investors who are there, because they are going to make it look like that person is guilty. i think matthew has 30 days to appeal and he has tremendous support, both from the international community, the uk, the international community, the uk, the us, the government, international press and the academic community, and what they have done here is really, really damage relations to a severe level that we have never seen before. his lawyer said they have no confidence in the process of appeal. do you think they might win it? i think that in the uae, if he is going to appeal, the result of the appeal will not come down to thejudicial result of the appeal will not come down to the judicial system, which we know to be unfair, and corrupt. it will come down to whether the ruler of abu dhabi decides it is
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worth letting matthew go and whether it is worth the diplomatic risk that he is currently promoting with the uk and the allies. detained in dubai, thank you for your time this morning. thank you. theresa may has spoken with the spanish prime minister, pedro sanchez, as efforts continue to finalise a brexit deal ahead of a key summit of european leaders on sunday. mr sanchez has said he will oppose the agreement unless changes are made to the section on gibraltar. downing street said there had been good engagement with the spanish government, and that discussions were continuing. mrs may, who held two hours of talks with eu officials in brussels yesterday, will return for further talks on saturday. damian grammaticas reports. just days before the final summit to seal the brexit deal is due, this is a serious obstacle.
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the spanish prime minister, pedro sanchez, said the texts of both the withdrawal treaty and the accompanying declaration on future ties between the eu and the uk are not acceptable for spain. translation: we are disappointed that we have found in the withdrawal deal a number of elements, an article, article 184, that questions the ability of spain to negotiate with the uk about the future of gibraltar. if this is not solved between now and sunday, spain, unfortunately, a pro—european government, is to vote no and exercise its veto. mr sanchez wants it made clear that if any future trade deals between the eu and the uk are to apply to gibraltar as well, the uk will need to secure a separate spanish agreement. he calls it an essential point for spain
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that they can negotiate with the uk about any issues to do with gibraltar. i have been clear that we will not exclude gibraltar from our negotiations on the future relationship. we want a deal that works for the entire uk family including gibraltar. at the summit on sunday, eu leaders are not expected to hold a formal vote. they will instead seek to agree by consensus. that means spain does not have that direct veto to wield but it will be problematic for the eu to press ahead over any objections spain may have at that stage. damian grammaticas reporting there. as we have been doing all week, we are bringing you the view from brussels and london on brexit and we will go to adam fleming in brussels shortly but first to norman smith in westminster. downing street is playing down any wobbles about this summit on sunday. what could this all mean for theresa may and how
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difficult is this making life for her back home? it is not making life difficult yet provided the summit goes ahead. the real problem is if the timetable slips beyond sunday, because number 10 really have no marginfor because number 10 really have no margin for error. they have a very tight timetable sketched out for the commons vote. the thinking is get the deal signed off on sunday, then have a couple of weeks debating in the house of commons, then in the third week, probably, you will have the big boat. then the week after that, parliament goes into recess. there really is no room for error by number 10 because if it slips and we don't get the meaningful vote until january, that could change a lot and make it hard to get the necessary withdrawal legislation through parliament. it could change the mood in parliament in terms of getting mps to back the deal, so they really need this summit to go ahead on sunday. 0k, norman. over to
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need this summit to go ahead on sunday. ok, norman. over to brussels and to adam fleming. the eu 27 are expecting to see the latest draft of the political declaration this morning ahead of an informal meeting of ambassadors. but how realistic do you think the chances are of getting theseissues you think the chances are of getting these issues ironed out ahead of sunday? we were discussing this yesterday, whether the summit could actually go ahead? the honest answer, who knows? you chat to people and there is a range of opinions. on the outstanding issues with fish, the eu has always had a policy on this which is that british fishermen selling their fit into the eu has got to be accompanied by eu trawlers having the right to go into british waters. that has been eu's position on the future relationship when it comes to fisheries since the start of this year and it is a question of clarifying that and putting it into the political declaration to please the member states without frightening the
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british government because of the reaction it will get back home. the other sticking point is the whole thing about frictionless trade in goods. they're the debate is can you put ina goods. they're the debate is can you put in a statement to please the eu 27 and in particular france to say that the four freedoms of the single market are indivisible and the only place you can get frictionless traders in a customs union and the single market? but can that be balanced by optimistic and ambitious language to make it look like theresa may will get a free trade area in goods with something that looks a bit like the common rule book? the real sticking point is gibraltar. as we havejust book? the real sticking point is gibraltar. as we have just been hearing, the spanish government is kicking up a realfuss hearing, the spanish government is kicking up a real fuss and hearing, the spanish government is kicking up a realfuss and not backing down. somebody said to me last night, an eu officialfrom another country, that this is a relatively easy to solve problem because it is a political problem. you don't need to write some new bits into their withdrawal agreement oi’ bits into their withdrawal agreement or get lawyers to work on it, you canjust or get lawyers to work on it, you can just say we don't want this to bea can just say we don't want this to be a problem but the spanish government is the one who has got to buy into that. and with local
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elections in andalusia, which suddenly everyone in brussels has become obsessed about, that is a difficult thing for pedro sanchez, the spanish prime minister, to do domestically, so that is a big political problem that has got to be solved. my theory is that by tomorrow afternoon after we have had a meeting of the sherpas, the prime ministerial advisers from across europe, we will be in a position to know whether theresa may's meetings on saturday in brussels are social calls to finalise the last few details or crisis talks to get the sunday summit back on track. i think we will know tomorrow afternoon and we will know tomorrow afternoon and we will know tomorrow afternoon and we will get some clues today because i think that political declaration will start truly out. that is a very big distinction and we will watch for that. —— will start to leak out. thank you, adam fleming. seven buses have been destroyed and four others badly damaged in a major fire at a depot in south—east london. at one point, 60 firefighters
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were tackling the blaze, which broke out in orpington in the early hours. the cause isn't yet clear. a man has been arrested after two explosive devices were discovered in a flat in north—west london. the suspected devices were found by builders who were renovating an empty property in the harlesden area. counter—terrorism officers are leading the investigation although detectives say there is no risk to the public. ten times more children and young people have type 2 diabetes in england and wales than previously estimated, according to new research. the charity diabetes uk has found that at least 7000 people under the age of 25 have the condition. health campaigners say more needs to be done to cut the rates of childhood obesity which is one of the main causes of the disease. type 2 diabetes is a really serious condition in children and young people, so what we need to see is a lot of effort put into preventing children from becoming overweight and therefore developing type 2 diabetes. plans have been announced to allow more nhs patients in england to receive care at home
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rather than be kept in hospital. an additional £3.5 billion will be spent each year on projects including new rapid response teams made up of doctors, nurses and physiotherapists who can provide urgent care in the community. more support will also be offered to care home residents. it is 9:18am. the headlines on bbc news: the wife of british academic matthew hedges jailed for spying in the united arab emirates accuses the government of putting british interests above her husband's fate, as she says the evidence in the case is fabricated. the prime minister says she'll return to brussels on saturday for last—minute negotiations on the final details of her brexit deal. the board of the carmaker nissan meets to decide whether to sack its chairman, carlos ghosn, who is accused of financial misconduct. in sport: didier drogba is retiring from football after spending nine
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yea rs from football after spending nine years at chelsea, helping them to their first years at chelsea, helping them to theirfirst premier years at chelsea, helping them to their first premier league and champions league titles. he is the only player to score in four separate fa cup finals. jack nowell is out of england's final autumn international against australia this weekend because of injury. with fellow winger chris ashton also out injured, it means bath'sjoe cokanasiga will start having made his debut against japan last time out. and it's a big day for england's cricketers at the women's world t20 in antigua. they play india in the semi—finals later tonight. and coming up in the sport we will have a full report from antigua for you. thank you, sally. see you soon. donald trump has hit back at the us chiefjustice, who took the extraordinary step of rebuking the president for calling a federaljudge "an obama judge" for ruling against the president's asylum policy. john roberts defended the independence of the judiciary, saying there were no obama judges
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or trumpjudges. the president said somejudges had different views to those charged with the safety of the country. our north america correspondent peter bowes is following developments. extremely unusual. the chiefjustice would step into what is a political argument that the president is making here. so when you get the chief justice of the making here. so when you get the chiefjustice of the supreme court making a statement that clearly contradicts what the president is saying, a lot of people are very surprised. and he didn't mince his words, saying president trump had said this was an obama judge, and it was true that he was appointed by president obama, but the chief justice is saying we don't have obama judges, we don't have clinton judges, we don't have bushjudges and we don't have trumped judges. what we have is an extraordinary group of people, dedicated judges, who do their level best to do equal right to those appearing before
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them. he goes onto say that an independent judiciary them. he goes onto say that an independentjudiciary is something we should all be thankful for, of speaking on the eve of the american thanksgiving holiday. peter bowes reporting. the head of the russian military intelligence agency, the gru, has died at the age of 62. general igor korobov was reportedly rebuked by the kremlin following the gru's botched attempt to kill the former double agent sergei skripal and his daughter in salisbury in march. a defence ministry source said the general had been ill for a long time. the board of the carmaker nissan are holding an emergency meeting to decide the fate of the firm's chairman, carlos ghosn. it comes days after the tycoon, who also works for mitsubishi and renault, was arrested for financial misconduct. he is accused of misusing company funds and understating his income. joining me in the studio is business reporter katie prescott. that meeting is under way. is there
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any news from it yet? no, it started recently. i think there will be a foregone conclusion. ghosn is accused of using company money for luxury homes around the world, and also the way in which nissan have been talking about it indicate that. his number two described him as a tyrant, the chief executive. they said his tenure at the company was a dark period, which is really quite astonishing given that he has been in charge for nearly 20 years and is seen as in charge for nearly 20 years and is seen as having turned the company around. yet renault is taking a very different approach. mr ghosn chairs the alliance between nissan, mitsubishi and renault, and there are some suggestions that this is an elaborate attempts to elbow him out of the way. what is so interesting about this story is it gives coming back to the alliance between the two japanese companies, nissan and mitsubishi, and france's renault. the figure thatjoined all those
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companies together was carlos ghosn and it was really a marriage of unequals. if you look at the relationships between the three companies, nissan owns 15% of renault, but renault owns 43% of nissan and has rights over who the chairman of nissan is. analysts are speculating now that nissan executives are getting resentful about that relationship. hang on, we are bigger than renault and doing better than them so why is this so unequal? and the idea being that they potentially wanted to push mr ghosn out to change the dynamic of the relationship. some analysts are saying that in september carlos ghosn said at a board meeting that he wanted to bring renault and nissan will close together, and some a nalysts a re nissan will close together, and some analysts are saying that actually nissan said they didn't want that. it is like a soap opera. so what are ghosn's representatives saying? we have not yet heard from mr ghosn because he is under arrest. the fact that it
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because he is under arrest. the fact thatitis because he is under arrest. the fact that it is coming out that this is a political move shows that supporters are saying that we don't know about the financial misdemeanours but we think something else is going on here. thank you very much. over 800 staff will work through the thanksgiving holiday in california to help identify the remains of those killed in the wildfires that struck the region earlier this month. more than 560 people remain unaccounted for, with 86 fatalities confirmed across the state. heavy rains have helped firefighters trying to contain the fires, but they've also raised fears of flooding and landslides. the bbc‘s danjohnson has more from los angeles. two more bodies have been found today in what remains of paradise and the villages around it. every day the search teams have made more grim discoveries but conditions, the weather, all getting worse making thejob harderfor them. there has been some rain this afternoon and there is more forecast over the next
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few days and into the weekend. the fear is that if the rain is really heavy and causes flooding there, thenit heavy and causes flooding there, then it may get almost impossible to dig through what is left, and actually find any human remains. the sheriff has emphasised how difficult thatjob sheriff has emphasised how difficult that job was anyway sheriff has emphasised how difficult thatjob was anyway because of the intensity of the fire, because of how little is left, but certainly the worsening weather conditions are not going to make life any easier. on the other hand, the rain has helped the firefighters tackling the wildfires and they are now all but contained. that is one positive but as the death toll increases and the number missing is still above 500, there is definitely work for the emergency services and search teams to do that will take a long time yet. the number of people unaccounted for has been reducing over the last few days. but still there are many hundreds unaccounted for, so work to do to work out exactly where those people are. and a real fear that things could get worse over the weekend if there is flooding and even mudslides in that
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area. and then there are the longer term questions about people returning to see what is left of their home and contemplating whether they can rebuild. all sorts of questions about the contaminants that are left after a fire of this intensity, and the swords of infrastructure that needs to be rebuilt to support the community there again in future, the power, there again in future, the power, the communication, the community facilities like churches, schools and shops. all of that has got to be considered. at the minute they are trying to find people temporary housing and to bring in education services for the children who have been displaced. it gives you an idea of the number of levels on which people have been affected by this disaster. they are also talking about counselling for the people caught up in the fire is nearly two weeks ago now. a long way to go for the people of paradise and for that town. dan johnson reporting. health warnings have been issued in parts of australia as a giant dust storm passes across the east of the country. the 500km—wide storm has been
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travelling up from the south, picking up dust in drought—affected new south wales. the sky over many cities and towns turned orange, with warnings issued for people with respiratory problems to stay indoors. dust storms are typical at this time of year for inland australia, but it's rare for them to reach the east coast. in a moment the weather but first let's join victoria derbyshire to find out what she's got coming up in her programme at 10am. i think more from you on matthew hedges? absolutely. we will be talking to matthew hedges's mp about what he thinks britain should do now its friends and ally the united arab emirates has jailed matthew hedges for life after a five—minute hearing without a lawyer present. and we will be talking to one of the british academic‘s colleagues. and in our brexit dates series, it is boris johnson's in our brexit dates series, it is borisjohnson's dad in our brexit dates series, it is boris johnson's dad and in our brexit dates series, it is borisjohnson's dad and author and journalist emma whelan, who absolutely believes in brexit.
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journalist emma whelan, who absolutely believes in brexitlj would never ever support the final say referendum or another referendum. why? you might increase the majority. but the point is the process of having a second say undermines the first say. i'm not sure about that. people argue for more democracy to have more votes but it is not more democracy if you have a rerun of a vote. the people who started the whole process want the british people to endorse the view of parliament. i don't think thatis view of parliament. i don't think that is a travesty of democracy. join us on bbc two, bbc news and online at ten o'clock for that full conversation. victoria, see you soon. now it is time for a look at the weather forecast with simon king. hello. we have had a cold and frosty start. temperatures as low as 6 degrees in central and southern parts of england. you can see from the satellite imagery where we have had clear skies. further east this morning there has been quite a bit
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of cloud and beneath it, rain and drizzle. throughout today, we will have sunshine across the west, gradually the cloud moves west into north west england and the midlands and the south—east. you will hold onto that such the further west you are, in northern ireland, wales and the south—west. temperatures this afternoon getting up to seven or nine. tonight we continue with quite a bit of cloud and the risk of a shower here or there across south—west england with showers moving in. not as much cloud and largely frost free with temperatures staying above freezing at three or four. some cloud and showers in south—west england and scotland with high temperatures of eight to ten. goodbye. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, is due to meet the wife of british academic matthew hedges, who was jailed for life in the united arab emirates after being convicted of spying. the prime minister says she'll
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return to brussels on saturday for last—minute negotiations on the final details of her brexit deal. the board of the carmaker nissan meets to decide whether to sack its chairman, carlos ghosn, who is accused of financial misconduct. a british charity says the number of cases of type 2 diabetes among youngsters in england and wales has soared. a majorfire at a depot in orpington in south—east london destroys seven buses and seriously damages four others. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. as we've been hearing this morning, there was shock and surprise when matthew hedges, a british academic, was jailed for life in the united arab emirates after being accused of spying.
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the 31—year—old says he was in the country researching security strategy and has always maintained he is innocent. matthew hedges' wife daniela tejada spoke to the bbc‘s today programme this morning just after returning to the country. i have only been able to speak to matt's court—appointed lawyer ones since the hearing. he said there is a possibility for appeal and they will be working on it. however i feel that it should not have had to get to this instance. his innocence is evident and every evidence against him is completely fabricated and he was put through so much for six months that absolutely nothing that he said or did could be used against them. it is obviously dreadfully upsetting for you to have
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to talk about it. right at the beginning you mentioned for six months, you are at the end, are you, but the process should have been the moment the british government got involved? yes. most definitely. if all lead us to ensure that matt had access to legal counsel and to counsel from day one. the fact he was able to see an officer for five minutes after six weeks of intense interrogation and then all they got access to a lawyer in his second or third hearing means that there has been no due process and anything that has been used against matt is com pletely that has been used against matt is completely unfounded and shouldn't be used against him. do you believe the foreign office should have made those points more forcibly publicly at the beginning? i believe that they should have taken a firmer
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sta nce they should have taken a firmer stance from the beginning, if not publicly through their private representations. this is something i feel they failed to do. throughout, really. the only started taking a firmer approach and started taking everything that i had been insisting on for months seriously once marked was released on bail or was able to speak to them directly. you had been talking to them and trying to persuade them to do more? yes. on repeated occasions, probably on a weekly basis, i asked for the foreign secretary's representation, forfirmer foreign secretary's representation, for firmer stances from the foreign minister and most definitely from the foreign office in general here in london to be more proactive instead of just in london to be more proactive instead ofjust insisting in details
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that were really not at the core of the issue. the core issue was that he was being detained and held an unacceptable conditions for something that he didn't do. when you said that to the foreign office what did they say? they disregarded my requests. they said it was not pa rt my requests. they said it was not part of theirjob, that it was not pa rt part of theirjob, that it was not part of theirjob, that it was not part of theirjob, that it was not part of their duty. on one occasion one of the caseworkers said that the foreign office did not have the duty of care. so they were not obliged to make such representations. given that we have been very close allies with the uae did you get the impression that they regarded it as a nuisance? i was under the impression that they were putting
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their interests with the uae above a british citizen's right for freedom and his welfare and his right, not just do a fair trial but to freedom. they were stepping on eggshells instead of taking a firm stance. no allies should be treating a fellow country's citizens like that and there is no reason why they should think that a close ally would be sending an undercover agent to spy on them, it is absurd. matthew hedges's wife. just after she arrived back in the uk. giorgio cafiero, matthew's friend and colleague, has been campaigning for his release. he spoke to naga munchetty and charlie stayt on bbc breakfast about how matthew has been treated in the united arab emirates. he has been in solitary confinement.
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he has been denied access to a lawyer. he has had very few occasions to communicate with his family. this has certainly been a grave injustice committed against an innocent man. you have collaborated with matthew on a number of academic activities and research. can you explain to me why or how this has got to the point where the authorities, the gulf authorities, think that he could be a spy? there are many people who have different theories. it is not useful for me to speculate but what i can say is that matt was a very respected academic who focused on security issues in the gulf region, certainly focusing on the united arab emirates. since 2011 there has been a tremendous amount of volatility around the uae but the uae is a very
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prosperous quite stable country and there is a lot of concern in the uae about the problems throughout the middle east undermining security. they are very sensitive about what some foreigners may or may not be doing in their country. we have to be fair and acknowledge that the emiratis do face great security threats but if they believe genuinely that matthew hedges is any sort of a threat to their country they are 100% wrong about matt. also this morning, we've been hearing from matthew hedges' colleagues at durham university. his phd supervisor is clivejones, professor of regional security in the school of government and international affairs. he told mishal hussein on bbc radio 4's today programme about the nature of matthew's work in the uae. matt was working on several military
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relations in the united arab emirates post—arab spring. his research was based on accept his literature that examines and looks that relations in the middle east and the arab world so there was nothing called out in any of the material he had been using up—to—date in the thesis. he went to the uae to conduct a series of interviews to help flush out some of the theories and some of the evidence that he has collected but i stress all the material that he had was secondary stress all the material that he had was secondary source, stress all the material that he had was secondary source, there was nothing clandestine, nothing secret, nothing clandestine, nothing secret, nothing covert and what he was doing. you did not think he was at risk in any way? absolutely not. within the wider context, academics
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at university have regularly sent people, myself conduct fieldwork in the gulf states, if we had any inkling that matt was going to be in danger then of course we would not have agreed to have let him go. matt was no stranger to the united arab emirates. he had lived there on and off since the age of nine. he knew many of the people he was going out to interview. it is bizarre and perverse and a miscarriage of justice that this has befallen him. professor clive jones of justice that this has befallen him. professor clivejones of durham university. well, there's been lots of coverage of this in the uk papers this morning. in the uae, gulf news, an english language newspaper based in dubai, also covers the case on its front page, which we can see here. but the paper makes no mention of the outrage in britain. it says prosecutors took action after receiving a report from an emirati citizen who claimed the academic had been asking
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for sensitive information. more now on the brexit deal, where one of the major sticking points seems to be the future of gibraltar, the british overseas territory which spain has long laid claim to. spain has said it will not agree to the deal unless changes are made to the wording over gibraltar. while spain cannot explicitly veto the deal on sunday, when european leaders meet for a summit, the eu hopes to proceed by consensus. and it could be politically problematic for other eu countries to press ahead without spain's support. well, juan fernando lopez aguilar is a member of the european parliament for the party, the socialists, who are in charge in spain at the moment. it's their prime minister pedro sanchez who's raised the issue of gibraltar. and he's been speaking tojustin webb on bbc radio 4's today programme about spain's objections. while the government of spain is the
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representative of the kingdom of spain in the counciljust taking place this sunday the government spain has made it clear that spain would like to be article 184 of the treaty clarified for the sake of the respect of the guidelines which stated that spain will have the final say on the future state of gibraltar when it comes to the ratification of the brexit which requires unanimity. article 184 says the eu and the uk will seek to negotiate rapidly the agreements governing their future relationship and you want an extra rider as it we re and you want an extra rider as it were seeing on gibraltar that negotiation is between spain and the uk only. i insist it states the case of spain in this process but it is only clear that the guidelines are
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to be respected. spain has shown goodwill, constructive, negotiated special protocol of understanding when it comes to gibraltar an important and sensitive matters, environment, fiscal matters which are of the highest importance for spain and the respect of all the workers who are cross bordering on a day—to—day basis but spain would like to clarify that spain will have the final say when it comes to the future of gibraltar because spain has always sustained this position that there are a number of issues which are of the highest importance for spain foreign policy when it comes to gibraltar. and would like to become clarified that article before signing. numberfour,
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number four, cycling awareness could lead to dupe an insurance for drivers. the government wants to make motorists modelling of cyclists and thinks they should be offered cheaper insurance if they take a course to make them more aware. a series of 50 measures to reduce the number of cyclists and pedestrians being killed. last year 100 cyclists died on uk roads and 470 pedestrians we re died on uk roads and 470 pedestrians were killed. you can see more about what the government is proposing in terms of potentially cheaper insurance for drivers if they take that awareness course. most watched, lots of you might be thinking about whether to get the fluid up. —— flu jab. how effective is the flu jab?
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that is number one in the most watched. a use for what as ever from the reality check team. i think we are having a few technical problems. hopefully i can show you this. hearing about how drones are being used in many different applications. sorry, we cannot show you that but i will tell you. it is being developed in latvia. it weighs 55 kilograms, it is tethered to the ground, i hope iam painting it is tethered to the ground, i hope i am painting a picture, it is tethered to the ground, i hope iam painting a picture, it it is tethered to the ground, i hope i am painting a picture, it can wash buildings and put out fires. that is the morning briefing. sport now, and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. we're going to start this morning with what is a remarkable return to formula one.
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this man, robert kubica, is going to be back racing as a full—time driver for williams next season. why is that remarkable? well, eight years ago he was nearly killed in a rally driving accident, he partially severed his arm and still only has partial movement. deputy team principal claire williams says kubica's return is a great credit to his strength of character and tenacity. we will be hearing much more of that for the rest of the day. he spent 20 years terrorising defences, and now didier drogba is retiring from football. he's 40 years old now, and has spent the last couple of years playing in america's mls. but in his prime there were few better than him. in his nine years at chelsea he helped them to their first premier league and champions league titles. the more scoring goals the more
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the support was coming and really, like, we've been chasing this champions league for, what, eight years together, and to win it the way we did, to suffer the way we suffered during the final, i think there is nothing more than this kind of relationship, you know, that i share with the chelsea fans. it looks like jack nowell is out of england's final autumn international against australia. he's injured his hamstring in training, and joins fellow winger chris ashton in the treatment room. it means that bath'sjoe cokanasiga is in line to start, having made his debut againstjapan last time out. it's a big day for england's cricketers at the world t20. they play india in the semi—finals later, as they aim to become double world champions. jo currie reports from antigua.
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they may paint a picture of calmness, but underneath there is a nervous excitement bubbling in the england side. they are on the cusp of a second world cup final in the space of a year. afterfinishing behind the west indies in their pool, now they face india in the semis. we didn't play anywhere near the best cricket. we will face different conditions here. we'll have to adapt to that very quickly. there have been tough times. in terms of rain and preparation. the girls couldn't have done better in terms of how they have gone about things. that is most pleasing. you are still competing. still finding ways to compete. after claiming the one—day world cup in 2017 by beating india at lord's, now england have the prospect of being in possession of both world titles, something they haven't achieved since 2009. someone who knows just how big a moment that would be is the team's former captain. it would be an exceptional effort. i don't think they will be focusing on that right now. they will want to get
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through the semi—final. they have two massive games of cricket and potentially they could be double world champions. this tournament has broken new ground. it is the first time it has been held as a stand—alone competition away from the men's t20, and the decision has been rewarded with sell—out crowds. another packed house here tonight. for the players it is an occasion to savour. let's have a look at some of this morning's back pages. great story in the express, barcelona will have to pay £100 million more than any other club if they want to buy one of liverpool's players in the future. that's a clause written into phillipe coutinho's contract when he moved to the nou camp. the times looks at where the returning jonny bairstow will fit into the england side for the final test against sri lanka. looks like he's there
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as a specialist batsman. and the guardian has a great picture of manu tuilagi, as we wait to see if he'll be risked for england against australia this weekend. on the 15th anniversary of england's win at the rugby world cup, we liked this from their instagram page. this is jamie george and elliot daly who've set up their own coffee parlour in the hotel they're staying at for the autumn internationals. apparently daly‘s quite the barista and george is more than happy to be front of house. before we leave you, just time to remind you about sportsday. all the day's sports news on the bbc news channel at 6:30pm tonight. that's all the sport for now. nhs digital has published a report
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into the mental health of young people. one in eight of children and young people aged between five and 19, surveyed in england in 2017, had a mental disorder according to a major new report which provides england's best source of data on trends in child mental health. the report published by nhs digital also surveyed 2 to 4 year olds for the first time. with me now is our news correspondent sophie long. you are just getting first sight of this yourself. the last time something like this was done was in 2005. things have changed a lot in terms of the things that young people are exposed to. exactly. that was done when facebook was just launching. i do not think the first tweet had been sent. social media had not taken off. those were the
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last figures back in 2004. this is a major survey which has taken 9117 children but we cannot draw a direct comparison because it is a different age group this time, from two up to 19. last time they only looked at school—age children, four upto 16. if we try to draw comparisons there has been a slight increase in overall prevalence of mental health disorders in 5—15 —year—olds. 10.1% of children were suffering from a mental health disorder and this time it is 11.2%. that is school aged children. talking about mental health problems, things like stress, anxiety, to a level they need treatment. at first glance of the results we have been looking at today, 17—19 —year—olds, one in six
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we re today, 17—19 —year—olds, one in six were found to have a mental disorder so were found to have a mental disorder so that is fixed .4% experiencing more than one mental disorder at the time of the interview. that is quite a high figure. young women in that age group, females aged 17, twice as likely as males to have a mental health disorder. higher rates for emotional disorder and self harm. those are the figures that seem to jump those are the figures that seem to jump out at the moment. thank you for taking us through the details. lots for public policy makers to look at. italy's leaning tower of pisa has straightened slightly according to experts. they say it's now stable and very slowly reducing its lean. the attraction was closed for 11 years in 1990 for safety reasons as its tilt had reached five feet from the vertical, and engineering
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work was undertaken to save it. caroline rigby has more. for decades, tourists have flocked to pisa in italy to see its leaning tower, and perhaps offer a little support. but according to experts, the world—famous landmark appears to be leaning, well, a little less than before. building work first again on the mediaeval tower in 1173, and the 57—metre—tall structure has suffered from a tilt ever since. blamed on the soft sand and clay beneath its foundations, its lean became increasingly worse over time, reaching a whopping 4.5 metres, or 15 foot, by 1990, when it was closed to the public over safety concerns. cue a major engineering project to stabilise it. that involved earth being removed from the opposite side to correct the tilt and steel braces being added. completed in 2001, the work here saw the tower‘s lean reduced
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to 38 centimetres. over the following years it appeared to correct itself even more, with experts reporting further movement of 2.5 centimetres by 2013. now, the group who have been monitoring the attraction for the last 17 years say it is stable, having straightened by a total of four centimetres since the tower reopened. translation: the committee had made a forecast of 15 years to stop this trend. the tower is still recovering, but we can say that now it's almost steady. but some might question whether this is entirely good news for a tourist industry built around a tower famous for its lean. now it's time for a look at the weather. definitely frosty this morning.
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it certainly was, a widespread frost across england and wales. the lowest temperature was in south newington in oxfordshire. in many parts of the west it was a frosty start. we had clear skies through the night across western areas which was why it was so western areas which was why it was so cold. further east temperature stayed above freezing but we have more cloud and outbreaks of rain affecting eastern areas of england and into the east of scotland. that will continue throughout the day. that will move further west and it will stay quite wet at times across eastern scotland but in the west of scotla nd eastern scotland but in the west of scotland you will hold onto some sunshine into the afternoon. some sunshine into the afternoon. some sunshine for northern ireland and south—west england and central and southern parts of england holding onto some sunshine. across the midlands and eastern parts of the cloud will continue and across eastern areas it will remain a
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little bit damp at times. maximum temperatures 5—8 or 9 degrees. keeping cloud overnight but because of the clouded is not going to be as cold as last night. temperatures staying above freezing. largely frost free friday. a few showers moving into the far south—west of the uk links to this low—pressure will stop this weather front skirting the far south—west of england, south—west wales. a few showers likely around on friday across eastern scotland as well. elsewhere it should be dry day with lots of code that there will be some brea ks lots of code that there will be some breaks developing and sunshine at times in northern ireland in particular. temperatures a degree or so particular. temperatures a degree or so higher than today, 7—11d. into the weekend this low—pressure is still with us, that weather front is there, it moves through the english channel so during saturday the will bea channel so during saturday the will be a few showers along southern
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coastal counties. foremost on saturday it is going to be dry day. a few breaks with sunshine breaking through the cloud across northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england. temperatures fairly similar to friday. keeping largely dry conditions as we go through sunday and into the new working week and temperatures 7—10dc. hello. it's thursday. it's ten o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. in shock. the wife of the british academic jailed for life for being a spy in the united arab emirates after a five minute hearing without a lawyer present. and daniela tejada says the uk government got its priorities wrong. i was under the impression that they were putting their interests with the uae above a british citizen's
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rightful freedom and his welfare and his right notjust to a fair trial, just to freedom. we will talk to a friend of matthew hedges and his mp about what should happen next. also the prime minister is flying to brussels again on saturday to try
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