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tv   BBC News  BBCNEWS  November 22, 2018 7:30pm-9:01pm GMT

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temperatures did not rise a great deal today. a very grey and gloomy day in many areas, low cloud continuing across northern england into scotland with showers. a few brea ks into scotland with showers. a few breaks behind that before more clouds coming from the south together with some sharp showers in the far south—west. just about frost free tonight, no significant breaks in the cloud. some brighter skies for a while and a little sunshine tomorrow for northern ireland, at the far north of england, southern scotland. quite cloudy elsewhere, still showers in scotland as heavy ones clipping the far west of england. temperatures showing a bit ofan england. temperatures showing a bit of an improvement can with today. not quite cold, possibly double figures in —— double figures in southern england. but a great deal
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of sunshine this weekend, cloudy skies, dry, southern parts of england should could see showers and stillbirth easterly breeze continues through the weekend. —— still that easier but mike easterly breeze. the prime minister has hailed a draft agreement on post—brexit relations with the eu as ‘right for the whole of the uk'. the police officer poisoned in the salisbury nerve agent attack has told how his family lost all their possessions after he was contaminated with novichok. after a review looking into the manchester arena terror attack — mi5 accepts it made a mistake in not tracking the bomber. the wife of matthew hedges — jailed for spying in the united arab emirates — thanks the foreign secretary, after he assured her that his team is doing everything in their power to free mr hedges. new figures reveal a big increase in the number of youngsters experiencing mental health problems. theresa may has told the commons
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she will spend the next three days in "crucial" brexit negotiations, after officials agreed a draft political declaration on the uk's future relationship with the eu. the prime minister said the agreement was "right for the whole of the uk" — but mps from all sides of the house criticised it — with the labour leaderjeremy corbyn dismissing it as 26 pages of waffle. let's have a look at some of the key points within that declaration. the document — which is not legally binding — says both the eu and the uk are open to finding alternative arrangements to avoid the so called irish backstop, to ensure there is no hard border. it leaves open the possiblity of using technological solutions to solve the problem. the new text says the future relationship will respect the result
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of the referendum and makes a specific reference to the end of free movement to the uk. it also says the uk will be able to develop an independent trade policy. after fishing rights became a potential stumbling block, the agreement acknowledges that the uk will be "an independent coastal state". but in a move that could anger brexiteers, the text gives a continuing role for the european court ofjustice, in the interpretation of eu rules. there's been fierce criticism from both sides of the political divide. let's discuss the implications of this brexit deal in more depth. in a moment, we'll talk to dr phillip lee — he was the first conservative mp to resign his ministerial post over brexit — but first let's hear from fellow conservative mp, sherryl murray. thank you both forjoining us. if i
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can thank you both forjoining us. if i ca n start thank you both forjoining us. if i can start with you, you have made it very clear that you are not happy with the prime minister's approach. did she say anything during another lengthy periods in the commons today to reassure you on this new document? not at all. one of the main thingsi document? not at all. one of the main things i am worried about is with the fisheries gushy nation. i have been involved in the industry for long enough to know how fishing rights were sold out before. —— fisheries discussions. i know how strongly the other member states feel about access to our fish stocks. one of the things in the document where there is a —— it doesn't matter how the prime minister addresses this up and i appreciate it is not a legal agreement but it is a state agreement but it is a state agreement linking the economic partnership. there is a whole
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section with regard to trade in goods, things like that. it links it to fishing opportunities. but surely you would expect that if the uk wa nts to you would expect that if the uk wants to have the right to sell its fishing and fish produce into the eu, it would have to allow some access to eu boats? both the eu and the uk have signed up to international law but quite rightly says any fish that uk boats can't catch can be made available for other nations. but what happens when this was shared out before with that uk fishermen got a very tiny amount of fish from what was declared in mind —— ini976 of fish from what was declared in mind —— in 1976 as british waters. there is no other commodity in the european, in our exclusive economic zone, that is treated in the same way as fish. when you have fishermen
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like i had in my constituency, my late husband was one of them, then getting 9% of the cod quota, that is the sustainable use that quota taken each year, and the french fishermen get nearly 80%, that is totally unfair. when we had the member states join unfair. when we had the member statesjoin us, all of unfair. when we had the member states join us, all of the other european union member states had to reduce theirfishing european union member states had to reduce their fishing fleet. i'm afraid this is what will happen again. if i can afraid this is what will happen again. ifi can stop afraid this is what will happen again. if i can stop you there, obviously some of this is still to be negotiated during the transition deal, assuming we get one. ijust wa nt to deal, assuming we get one. ijust want to bring in philip, because i know you had so many concerns about the government's approach that she resigned from the government. this was a political declaration we got today, what did you make of it? as you have already said, it is not a
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binding documents. it is like a letter to father christmas, a hope list, a wish list. although i recognise that plenty of work has gone into producing this document, and that there is an expectation that deals can be done down the line, the reality is that what we're finding in this process, this circus that isn't is that doing this deal is proving to be very difficult because we have a complex, deep relationship with the european union. that is why when i resigned on the 12th ofjune, i said i thought we would end up with a parliamentary impasse and i thought that the ultimate deal would not reflect what was promised in 2016. asa reflect what was promised in 2016. as a consequence we reflect what was promised in 2016. as a consequence we should then seek the informed consent of the british people in a final say referendum. the prime minister made it clear today in response to several questions that she has no intention of holding another referendum. she believes that would be to fly in the face of what the people voted for in
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2016. i think she is wrong in that judgment and i hope that she changes her mind. i think she should want to put this deal am i use the word deal loosely because this is not a deal, this is an understanding, a hope list as i have said, i think she should put that to the british public for confirmation that that is what they want. the idea that what was promised in 2016, it's not what was promised in 2016, it's not what was written on the tin. in 2016 it was written on the tin. in 2016 it was lots of money for the nhs, take back control, all of those things, we rememberthe back control, all of those things, we remember the rudder clever strap lines. if you read this document, if you read the withdrawal agreements, none of this is going to transpire in the way the public were promised. consequently it can only be the decent, professionalthing consequently it can only be the decent, professional thing to go back to the public and seek their informed consent before proceeding.
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given what we have heard from both of you to conservative mps to approach this from very different perspectives, do you think the prime minister is going to get the approval of parliament, assuming it gets the sign off at the special eu summit? i don't think a statement of intent is good enough to attract me to vote. i know very clearly that my fishermen and my constituents voted to leave the eu. philip might say that we ought to go back for another referendum. how many referendums does he want? i won't be voting for this deal because i don't think the prime minister has delivered. it is a statement of intent. what would you like to see? if the deal is voted down, what you expect to happen? i would like to see the prime minister go back to europe and stand up to europe and show as much determination as we have already
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seen from her in trying to bring this to the house of commons. and say i'm going to deliver the brexit the people voted for. it is wrong to say that people didn't know what they were voting for because david cameron spent two years going around europe, came back with a deal, as a document through everybody‘s door which was issued by the government and that allowed people to make up their minds. as things stand, do you intend to vote against this deal and steer you think the prime minister has any chance of getting it through parliament? she doesn't have any chance. last time i looked at the numbersl chance. last time i looked at the numbers i got above 70 —— conservative mps, plus the dup being against. of course i am voting against, i would vote against any deal likely to transpire from this process. because i think we need to get confirmation from the public before proceeding. this isn't about
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weather we remain or we brexit, this is about the full consent of the public that they recognise what actually is going to happen, not what was promised to happen in 2016, the actual details, the locations. if the public vote for that i will be steeping more peacefully going forward. at the moment i am concerned that the public will have voted for one thing and will be getting another. i don't think that is good for the country or for our democracy. if you put this down you may not get that referendum you want, you may end up with a general election, a labour government. which is why i would like the government to pivot towards putting their deal to pivot towards putting their deal to the public. i'm not going to vote for a deal because of the fear of something else when that deal is fundamentally not in the best interest of my country. thank you
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both. the security service — m15 — has admitted it made a mistake in failing to track the manchester bomber salman abedi, whose attack last year killed 22 people. a report by mps on the intelligence and security committee says m15 missed potential opportunites to stop the attack. the mps say m15 admits it moved "too slowly" in establishing how dangerous salman abedi really was. the committee reviewed five attacks that hit britain last year, as judith moritz reports. five attacks in six months made 2017 the worst year for terrorism in recent times. targets included the houses of parliament, the london underground, and a mosque in finsbury park. 36 lives were lost, thousands more injured and traumatised. now there's strong criticism from mps, who say lessons weren't learned from past attacks. it has been striking how many issues which arose in relation to the 2017
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terrorist attacks had been previously raised by this committee in our reports on the 7/7 attacks reports on the 7/7 attacks and on the killing of fusilier lee rigby. recommendations in all of these areas, yet the government failed to act on them. mis‘s handling of the manchester arena attack has been held up for particular criticism. the bomber, salman abedi, was allowed to travel freely from libya, visited an extremist in prison, and was dealt with too slowly. robbie potter was gravely injured in the attack, left in a coma with shrapnel removed from his heart. today he's on the mend, but angry at the revelations. this is something that could have been stopped, end of. this didn't have to happen. every alarm bell was ringing. you feel let down? i am a bit, yes. there was enough warning signs, it wasn'tjust like one hoax call. there were enough warning signs.
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they should be took to court, i've said it. they should be took to court now. they are just as guilty, that could have been stopped. mis? yeah. 15—year—old olivia campbell—hardy was one of the 22 people killed at manchester arena. she's everywhere in our house, as you can tell, always in our thoughts. olivia's grandfather, steve, feels her loss every day, but doesn't blame the security services. i don't hold them to task over it because nobody goes to work to do a bad job of anything. but if they've admitted failures, then they must be learning lessons and they must be improving security. they must be tightening things up, especially on people leaving the country and coming back, where they've been and what's happened to them. if they are looking at things like that, that's a lesson to go for. the home office and other agencies are said to have made a litany of errors in the parsons green tube attack, which will require a further review. the government says it's doing
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everything it can to tackle the evolving threat of terrorism. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister has hailed a draft agreement on post—brexit relations with the eu as ‘right for the whole of the uk' . the police officer poisoned in the salisbury nerve agent attack has told how his family lost all their possessions after he was contaminated with novichok. after a review looking into the manchester arena terror attack — m15 accepts it made a mistake in not tracking the bomber. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. the footsie down somewhat after initially rallying. all the latest figures for the dow and nasdaq. the detective leading the investigation into the novichok poisonings in salisbury says the amount of nerve agent found
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in a fake perfume bottle could have killed thousands of people. a police officer who fell ill after investigating the attack on former russian spy, sergei skripal, and his daughter yulia, has been speaking publicly for the first time. detective sergeant nick bailey says he was "petrified" when doctors said he had the nerve agent in this system. jane corbin has this exclusive report. salisbury, wiltshire. in march this year, the city became the epicentre of a deadly attack. two russian assassins were sent to kill former russian spy sergei skripal with lethal nerve agent novichok. he and his daughter yulia were discovered criticall ill in the city centre. but one of the police officers investigating the crime would become a victim too. we had to make sure there were no other casualties in the house or anything in the house that was vital for us to find out what had happened to them.
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detective sergeant nick bailey was the first person to go to the skripals' home that night. he was wearing a full forensic suit when he entered their house, and everything appeared normal. once i'd come back from the house, the skripals' house, my pupils were like pinpricks and i was quite sweaty and hot. at the time, i put that down to being tired and stressed. nick bailey too had come into contact with the novichok. it's like oil, sinking through porous surfaces, and it's spread by touch. just a few milligrams can kill. it only took a day for nick to realise something was badly wrong. everything was juddering. i was very unsteady on my feet. the sweating had gone from my forehead down my back. my whole body was just dripping with sweat. must have been pretty frightening for you. yes, it was. it was horrendous. he recalls the moment in hospital when he was told what had poisoned him.
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they said, "you have this novichok, this nerve agent, in your blood system". what was your reaction? scared, because it's the fear of the unknown. it's such a dangerous thing to have in your system. knowing how the other two were, or how badly they'd been affected by it, i was petrified. it took two weeks for the investigators to discover that the nerve agent was put on the front door handle of the skripals' home, but it took the death of dawn sturgess to work out how it got there. her partner charlie rowley, who also became ill, had found a perfume bottle used to smuggle the substance into britain. officers say it contained a significant amount of novichok, which could probably kill thousands of people. did it help you when you knew that it had been on the door handle and you didn't know that when you enter the house? it helped in some ways. i at that point knew, "well, it's not something that i've done wrong",
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because that was a big thing for me. it's such a... outrageous, dangerous way of doing something that it angered me as well. but nick, the skripals and charlie rowley all survived the attack carried out by russian military intelligence officers alexander mishkin and anatoliy chepiga. it's unlikely they will ever appear in a british court. i said all along, "i want to walk out of hospital with my wife", which we did in the end. and being able to do that, to walk out of hospital after two and a half weeks of going through what i went through was incredible. detective sergeant nick bailey ending that report by panorama's jane corbin, and you can see more in tonight's panorama, salisbury nerve agent attack: the inside story on bbc one at 8pm. more and more young people are experiencing mental health problems according to a new report by the nhs. a survey of more than 9000 young
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people in england found that as many as one in eight 5 to 19 year olds have a mental disorder. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports the content of the videos can be a bad influence, orjust make you upset. you keep the lid on, and all those feelings build up and eventually when the bottle explodes, it will lead to depression. it'sjust nice to know there's someone there for you when you need help. learning to cope with the ups and downs of life. these children are used to talking about how they feel. mental health is taken seriously at their school in salford. instead of lessons, they start the day by playing and chatting, and that gives the staff the chance to spot any problems. if a child comes into school and they've got things going on in their head or they're worried or anxious, they're not going to learn, because there's an automatic barrier there. so we have a responsibility to help alleviate that anxiety or those
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worries they may have. if the children here are struggling, they can turn to a trained counsellor provided by the charity place2be. in over two decades working in schools, they've seen demand steadily increase. certainly, when i talk to headteachers, i can see that they're so well tuned in to the fact that behaviour in children, often what we might call bad behaviour, can be recognised now as a burgeoning mental health problem or a sign of distress. social media was in its infancy when this survey was last conducted in 200a. it's now another pressure that children have to cope with, alongside the challenges of families, friendships and schools. the reason the mental health of these young people matters is that so many of the problems adults experience have already developed by the time people reach the age of 18, and that's why it's important
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that they can access help early. as a young teenager, emma struggled to talk about her anxieties and fears until they spiralled out of control. i became really isolated. when my parents found out i didn't see many friends, i felt like i didn't deserve anything, really. deserve help or for people to care about me. emma's recovery continues. meanwhile, the government has promised extra money for children's mental health, and the key seems to be acting early, giving children the skills to handle whatever life throws at them. the united arab emirates has said it hopes to reach what it's called an "amicable solution" with the uk, after criticism of the life sentence given to matthew hedges, the british academic who's been convicted of spying. this afternoon his wife, daniela tejada, met the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, who assured her that the government was doing everything in its power to secure his release.
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there's flash photography in this report from our diplomatic correspondent paul adams. back on home soil, exhausted and emotional. matthew hedges' wife, daniela, returned from the united arab emirates early this morning. in a bbc radio interview, she spoke despairingly about her husband's six—month ordeal. his innocence is evident, and every evidence against him is completely fabricated and he was put through so much pain for six months that absolutely nothing that he said or did could be used against him. the uae says mr hedges is a british spy, convicted after due process. britain says there's not a shred of evidence. a message relayed in no uncertain terms when the foreign secretary met the uae‘s ambassador this morning. the foreign ministry of the united arab emirates says that contrary to media reports,
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matthew hedges has been treated fairly, according to the constitution of the uae. we are proud, it says, to have a system ofjustice that gives everyone the right to a fair trial. mr hedges' wife had herfirst meeting with jeremy hunt this afternoon. she is still haunted by what she saw in court just yesterday. seeing him shaking in court after being handed a life sentence and then being made to leave was beyond heartbreaking. we didn't even get to say goodbye. i really appreciate the foreign secretary taking the time to meet me at this crucial point in mine and matt's life. the government is clearly anxious to be seen to be doing everything in its power to secure matthew hedges' release. how soon that happens, if at all, is still an open question, but the authorities in the united arab emirates insist that anyone convicted in a court has the right to appeal within 30 days and that families have the right to appeal for presidential clemency on behalf of convicted relatives. paul adams, bbc news,
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at the foreign office. nearly eight years ago, the formula 1 driver robert kubitsa almost died in a crash which left him with terrible injuries including a partially severed arm. now incredibly he's returning to formula one racing as a driver with the williams team. he says it is his greatest achievement. patrick gearey reports. few know the terrifying risks of racing at high speed better than robert kubica. this was the state of his rally car after it smashed into a roadside barrier in northern italy in 2011. kubica was lucky to escape alive. his right arm was nearly severed. he'd never regain full movement in that limb, and yet next season he's back for more, as a driver for williams in formula one. i know what it took me to get here, and i know what it takes to...to be one of the top drivers in formula one. now the question is to work, to give me a bit of time, and then
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to focus on what is the part which i enjoy more — is being a racing driver. before the accident which changed his life, kubica raced for sauber and renault. he was tipped as a future world champion. it was his relentless pursuit of speed which saw him climb into the rally car which he had his crash in. many would choose to leave that high—octane world behind. instead, kubica tried to find a car he could race in with what he calls his limitations. he tested for renault as well as williams, and now drives 70% left—handed, trying not to grip the wheel tight. difficult to imagine in a car that can reach 210 mph. it is incredible, you know, the comeback that he's made. it's so unlikely. no one thought it would happen really. when you're driving in formula one, we need all the senses you can get, and these guys are absolute elite drivers. the biggest achievement of my life... it's an heroic story, in contrast to williams' recent struggles. they are bottom of the constructors' championship.
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they say they're picking kubica for speed, not sentiment. he wouldn't have it any other way. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. last night was the coldest night for quite some time. the next few night should see much more cloud. coming in on the easterly breeze. that dominates most of the uk. the best of the weather across the western side of the uk. in the south—west of them winds, not as cold, wind and a different direction but rotating around this area of low pressure, threatening heavy and thundery showers. still a lot of cloud away from here. gloomy, cold and grey, mortalfog moving northwards. ifew brea ks mortalfog moving northwards. ifew breaks coming in behind that perhaps. not as many breaks in the
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cloud as last night. it won't be as cold as last night. most places should state frost free. no sunshine of —— across western scotland on friday morning. most of scotland's pretty cloudy. on bristol ‘s rain and low cloud. likely to be some hill fog. the cloud is lifting and breaking in northern ireland. perhaps northern england. a hint of sunshine here. i can give the cloud as we move down into wales, the midlands and southern england. producing one or two showers. most of them will be across devon and. these are where we get the heavy ones. not a great deal of change, sun xiang at a premium. most places cloudy and dry. still some rain in scotland. some sun in southern scotla nd scotland. some sun in southern scotland as well as northern ireland and the far north of england. temperatures and improvement of the day. we may get double figures across parts of england and wales.
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the risk of showers notjust in the far south—west by pivoting across eastern parts of southern england is. perhaps heading into south wales. still the easterly breeze elsewhere, temperatures struggling to around seven to 9 degrees. not as cold but still cold, cold in the second half of the weekend because high pressure is building from the north. bringing with it about weather france, cold air behind it. that will push into scotland and north—east england. easterly breeze fairly quiet weather, a lot of cloud around. still some rain through the in which channel. maybe beginning to retreat. temperatures should be underfull though retreat. temperatures should be under full though were on sunday. this is bbc news, i'm carole walker.
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the headlines at 8. the prime minister says a final brexit dealfor britain is within sight as she prepares for 3 more days of crucial negotiations before sunday's summit of eu leaders. the british people want this to be settled. they want a good deal that sets us on course for a greater future. that deal is within our grasp. i am determined to deliver it. the salisbury nerve agent attack — the police officer poisoned by novichok speaks publicly for the first time about his ordeal. i was still very, very sweaty, and the sweating had gone from my forehead down my back and my neck was... my whole body was just dripping with sweat. m15 admits it made a mistake when it failed to track the man who carried out the manchester bombing last year, killing 22 people. we'll hear from one of the survivors. talking to children
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about their mental health — to have anxiety, depression and all of that other stuff that comes in your way. talking to children about their mental health — as new figures reveal a big increase in the number of youngsters having problems. and a remarkable tale of resilience — eight years after losing part of his arm in a crash, robert kubica returns to formula one. with just days to go before eu leaders gather in brussels for sunday's crucial summit on brexit, british and eu negotiators have finally agreed a draft political declaration on the uk's future relationship with the eu. it covers trade, security
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and foreign affairs. but it is not legally binding and still needs signing off by the other 27 eu leaders. here are the main points. the 26 page—document outlines plans for an ambitious economic partnership between the uk and the eu. it says the uk will be allowed to pursue an independent trade policy with other countries. it says brexit will end the free movement of eu citizens wanting to come and live in the uk but that will also apply to british citizens wanting to move to the eu. and on the issue that's caused much concern — the efforts to stop a hard border between ireland and northern ireland — it says they'll work on new technology to ensure that doesn't happen. but the european court ofjustice will still play a role in uk affairs — which many brexiteers are unhappy about. and this afternoon the prime minister faced widespread criticism in the commons as she defended her draft brexit deal.
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here's our deputy political editorjohn pienaar. here she was again. mrs may hasn't had much to crow about lately, but months of wrangling in brussels had finally delivered at least the outline of a plan to take to parliament. she couldn't wait that long. this is the right dealfor the uk. it delivers on the vote of the referendum. it brings back control of our borders, our money and our laws, and it does so while protecting jobs, protecting our security and protecting the integrity of the united kingdom. the agreement we have reached is between the uk and the european commission. it is now up to the 27 leaders of the other eu member states to examine this agreement in the days leading up to the special eu council meeting on sunday. not many cheerleaders for this plan. she did the job herself. the british people want this to be settled. they want a good deal that sets us
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on course for a brighter future. that deal is within our grasp, and i am determined to deliver it. so, the wheels haven't come off, not yet anyway. up ahead, her critics were waiting. brexiteers, former remainers who also think britain is heading blindly into a weaker position with no time limit, and the opposition, all keen to stop mrs may in her tracks. the brexit divorce deal was facing opposition on all sides already. the new deal for the future after brexit talks about improving and building on a customs relationship, a relationship that is far too close to the eu for the brexiteers already. the deal talks about considering the use of new technology to avoid a hard irish border, but that is on top of the customs relationship, not instead of it. the european court would have the last word in legal disputes on european law where there is any dispute on any future agreement. that's another let down
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for the eurosceptics, and there is no guarantee britain could pull out of a customs relationship if it comes about on its own initiative when it wants & new trade deals. it all added up to a hard sell in the commons. order. statement, the prime minister. she needed support, wanted to move on. the negotiations are at a critical moment and rivers must be focused on working with our european partners to bring this process to a conclusion in the interests of all our people. the labour leader had other ideas. we have 26 pages of waffle. he has been accused of lacking clarity. that was his charge against mrs may. this empty document could have been written two years ago. it's peppered with phrases such as, the parties will look at. the parties will explore. what on earth has the government been doing for the last two years? brexiteers hated the idea of being stuck in a close
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customs relationship under the so—called backstop plan. if a trade deal takes too long. we have the horror of being in the customs union, the horror of northern ireland being split off under a different regime. and a potential leadership contender piled in. we should junk forthwith the backstop, upon which the future economic partnership, according to this political declaration, is to be based. some tories fear losing control of uk fishing grounds. the snp agrees. scotland's fishing rights, thrown overboard as if they were discarded fish. so much for taking back control. more like trading away scotland's influence. the pressures may be mounting for a fresh referendum. now that we are in a position to ask people for their informed consent, that really is the time for a people's vote on this final deal.
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but mrs may has support too, and they made themselves heard. outside this house, there was a much higher appreciation of the tenacity of the prime minister in pursuing this deal. than we sometimes hear inside here. the prime minister met her austrian counterpart the day, getting agreement in europe has been hard. but that looks like being the easy bit. john pienaar, bbc news, westminster. so the plan now is that theresa may and the other 27 eu leaders will meet in brussels on sunday to sign off on both today's draft political declaration — and the draft withdrawal agreement which was published last week. our europe editor katya adler has been looking at the declaration, and what it says about any future relationship, in more detail. theresa may says this deal is the right one for the uk. but does it live up to her brexit promises, and even if it's right for the uk, what about the rest of the eu? this text is being studied now
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in all 27 eu capitals. one of the key issues at the heart of the eu referendum was taking back control. now, you have frequent mention in this document of uk sovereignty, and also of an independent uk trading policy. it's also made very clear here that after brexit, the freedom of movement of eu citizens to come and live and work in the uk is over. theresa may said that after brexit, the uk would leave the single market but could still enjoy frictionless trade with the eu. well, that's not in here because the eu wants to drive home the point that if you leave the single market, you can't have the same benefits. but this is ambitious on trade. it calls for the ease of trade between the eu and uk, and to have as close a trading relationship as possible. for those who dislike the wording of the irish border guarantee in the other brexit document, the withdrawal agreement, they'll be relieved to see
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here that the eu and the uk say they're going to work hard to find alternatives, such as using technologies when they're up and running. and for others who worried that they were going to be staying in a customs union with the eu forever, there is no mention here of a union, but of "ambitious customs arrangements", which clearly is open to interpretation. there's no mention of gibraltar in this document, despite the recent political spat. the eu sees the issue as bilateral between the uk and spain, and expects it will be resolved by the brexit summit on sunday. france's demand to fish in uk waters isn't addressed in the text either, which vaguely says fishing rights will have to be sorted out byjuly 2020. this is where the prime minister comes on sunday to meet eu leaders in the expectation that they will sign off on these brexit texts. but don't forget, the political declaration is not a final trade deal. it's not legally binding,
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so it's sort of designed to be all things to all people, in the hope too that this will help theresa may sell her brexit deal to the house of commons. katya adler, bbc news, brussels. we can speak now to conservative mp huw merriman — who joins us from tunbridge wells. thank you very much indeed for talking to us this evening. there was a huge amount of criticism in the commons for the prime minister today. what do you make of this political declaration?” today. what do you make of this political declaration? i see this as they had the parents. i was in parliament for the entire setting. i thought the prime minister show the kind of stamina quite frankly that i was disappointed to see colleagues fail to replicate. i think the agreement delivers for us, of course it isa agreement delivers for us, of course it is a heads—up turns, but the fact is it is agreed with our european union counterparts, so that together with the withdrawal agreement should not see as set fare to get out on
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consensual terms ought on certainty andi consensual terms ought on certainty and i think that's the most important thing because everything else offered by mps across the house was just a wish list, and i else offered by mps across the house wasjust a wish list, and i don't believe it's possible to deliver. you are one of the very few conservative mps who spoke in favour of this approach, and we were hearing just a little earlier to collea g u es hearing just a little earlier to colleagues from different sides of the argument who both are poised to vote against the deal because whatever it says and the political declaration, they are very worried about many of the contents in that withdrawal agreement. do you accept that the prime minister seems to have united both sides of your party in opposition to her deal? what i do accept, and perhaps i come with this as 18 years as a commercial lawyer where i've had to negotiate if you never get absolutely everything you wa nt never get absolutely everything you want ina never get absolutely everything you want in a negotiation. you have to compromise. when two parties have got more to gain by coming to an agreement than they will, and that is what we've got with the eu and uk. you have those in parliament who either want a second referendum,
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which is not on the table, in which case they could stand up and kick the can down the road but they're not facing up to their responsibilities, that will not be on offer. or you have those who still seem to think they can negotiate some kind of deal, which the eu will not accept and they're not facing up to the reality of the situation. easy to criticise, but their 650 mps and only one person that has to come to the agreement, and that is the prime minister, and i hope that all of my colleagues and collea g u es i hope that all of my colleagues and colleagues on all side of the house will realise that their constituents and their businesses will be a lot worse if we don't have the certainty of some form of agreement in place andi of some form of agreement in place and i did not come into my dash of politics to make my constituents worse off. i hope they get this. i have knocked on doors, they are more understanding. i think the house of commons chamber is completely out of touch with the country right now. but, when you listen to the hostility, to the arrangements from all sides of the house, from the opposition and from many on your own site, do you accept that at the moment it looks as though the prime minister is heading for defeat in
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the house of commons? let'sjust wait and see how this pans out, because at the moment everybody has something to say, everyone has something to say, everyone has something to say, everyone has something to criticise. but as these people spend more time with their constituents who actually may want us constituents who actually may want us to move on, they would be quite happy this in the free movement, payments to the eu and we can start making our own laws and be persuaded by their constituents who may be worse off. i think certainly speaking to my constituents they are sick and tired of this, they want certainty, an end to this and they wa nt certainty, an end to this and they want us to focus on domestic policies. anything else quite frankly as either uncertainty or keep bass kick the can down and we'll be arguing about this for yea rs we'll be arguing about this for years to come. she doesn't seem to have convinced many of your collea g u es have convinced many of your colleagues it is delivering on that break the deal. many are very concerned about the backstop will tap the uk in a form of customs union for many years to come, many are very worried that there is still are very worried that there is still a role for the european court of justice. they clearly feel that it does not deliver on the promises that were made. i don't think my
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collea g u es that were made. i don't think my colleagues have spent enough time reading. i've been in the library all day, i spent time with the negotiators last week, the only mp to turn up to a cross party section of 650. this is the first aid immediate i have done. if you look at the backstop we have an arbitration off, and abducted these before. is typically fine, and ultimately of the european union don't work towards a future trade agreements and ultimately we have the right to walk away from the withdrawal agreement by the arbitration dispute resolution clause. i think if people spend more time reading, they might get a bit more comfortable with the terms. the other part of this is political and it's about trade. it is not within the yukonite interest to fail to come to an agreement with us. in certain parts with regards to northern ireland having access to the single market it in a much better placed than any other eu country, so therefore it is contrary to the eu wishes to see that type of thing continue and to perpetuate. i think as far as i'm concerned it is a good deal, we all have to compromise and be realistic, and we need to get certainty in this one is
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the only game in town. what do you think will happen if the comments does defeat the the prime minister? ifearfor does defeat the the prime minister? i fear for what will happen next, because some people may have voted down and say they will give it a chance for a second referendum. there is nothing in there that allows for a second referendum, so maybe there'll be another election and maybe they'll get their second referendum that way, but who knows what happens next. my dear of course would mean a labour government. some people think or no deal is a great pa na cea , people think or no deal is a great panacea, but if we have no deal we have no pair of free trade with our european counterparts and that will cost jobs european counterparts and that will costjobs and european counterparts and that will cost jobs and cost european counterparts and that will costjobs and cost people their security. i think people should look very closely at what they will end up very closely at what they will end up voting for if they don't vote for this deal, because they haven't got any certainty of what it will be, and they might be the ones looking their constituents in the eyes and having to justify why they have just cost them theirjobs and livelihoods. thank you very much for joining us from tunbridge wells. and we'll find out how this story —— and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:40 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight
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a re steven swi nford, who's deputy political editor at the daily telegraph, and the talk radio presenter, daisy mcandrew. the headlines on bbc news: the prime minister has hailed a draft agreement on post—brexit relations with the eu as "right for the whole of the uk." the police officer poisoned in the salisbury nerve agent attack has told how his family lost all their possessions after he was contaminated with novichok. keyes told the bbc the amount of nerve agent found in a fake perfume bottle could have killed thousands of people —— he has told. after a review looking into the manchester arena terror attack — m15 accepts it made a mistake in not tracking the bomber. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's holly hamilton. hello, dolly. hello, carol. we start
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with one of the more remarkable comeback stories in recent times. he is called it one of the greatest achievement of his lifetime, but eight years after nearly losing an arm ina eight years after nearly losing an arm in a rally accident, robert kubica will be back in formula 1 in 2019. he will drive for williams, once a british rookie george russell, patrick geary has the details. you know the terrifying risks of racing at high speed better than robert kubica. this was the state of israeli car after it smashed into a roadside barrier in northern italy in 2011. kubica was lucky to escape alive. his right arm was nearly severed, he would never regain full movement in that limbo, and yet next season he's back for more as a driver for williams in formula 1. i know what it took me to get here, and i know what it takes to be one of the top drivers in formula 1, so now the question is to work, to give me a bit of time and
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to focus on what is the part which i enjoy more. being a race driver. before the accident which changed his life kubica raised for two other places tipped as a future world champion. it was his relentless pursuit of speed which saw him climb into the rally car which he had his crash in. many would choose to leave the high—octane world behind, instead kubica try to find a card he could raise in with what he calls his limitations. he tested for renault as well as williams, now drives 70% left—handed, trying not to grip the wheel tight. difficult to grip the wheel tight. difficult to imaginea to grip the wheel tight. difficult to imagine a car —— in a car that can reach 210 miles an hour. it is incredible, the comeback he's made. it is so unlikely. no one thought it would happen, really. when you are driving in formula 1 you need all the senses you can get, and these quys the senses you can get, and these guys are absolute elite drivers. the biggest achievement of my life. guys are absolute elite drivers. the biggest achievement of my lifem isa biggest achievement of my lifem is a hit —— biggest achievement of my lifem isa hit ——a biggest achievement of my lifem is a hit —— a relic story in contrast to his recent struggles. to
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say we are picking kubica for speed, not sentiment. he would not have it any other way. incredible story. it isa any other way. incredible story. it is a big day for england cricketers of the women's world t2o in and see that playing india in the semifinals. latertonight, that playing india in the semifinals. later tonight, if that playing india in the semifinals. latertonight, if they win they will have the chance to become double world champion, having won the one—day title last year. everyone remembers the semifinal. once you have made it to the final you can kind of relax and know you have been a part of it. the semifinals can be difficult, but we got to make sure we are on and make sure we put a really strong performance. we start well and we need some of the girls to step up in t20 click delete to cricket. one or two players if they would have a strong performance can when you and we know from our line—up we have a lot of players that are capable of putting in a performance. the first semifinal is already under way in antigua, west and east are in action against australia with the appointment host winning the toss.
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because these are batting first and have moved to 20 for one in the first two overs, that many the first wicket to fall there and there live text commentary and in play highlight at the bbc sport website. backin highlight at the bbc sport website. back in an england shirt after more than two years out of test rugby. he's been named on the bench for the final bold and international against australia at twickenham saturday. you'll bejoining australia at twickenham saturday. you'll be joining amongst her place by cocaptain you'll be joining amongst her place by coca ptain dylan you'll be joining amongst her place by cocaptain dylan hartley and jamie george will start. liam williams will start at fullback for wales against south africa on saturday. he is the only survivor from that side that thrashed tonga, moving from the wings to replace leigh halfpenny who is injured. and greatest gymnast ashley watson has leapt into the guinness book of world records, quite literally, with the longest backflip between words on tool bars. take a look. watson, who trains alongside the wimpy niall wilson
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sailed nearly six metres into the air, or19 sailed nearly six metres into the air, or 19 feet if you prefer —— alongside the olympian milo wilson. he said afterwards he was surprised no one had tried it before. —— niall wilson. i have a fair idea, it that can aid goes to get it right. that is all the store for now. i will have more in sports day at half past ten, back to you. many thanks. the detective leading the investigation into the novichok poisonings in salisbury says the amount of nerve agent found in a fake perfume bottle could have killed thousands of people. a police officer who fell ill after investigating the attack on former russian spy, sergei skripal, and his daughter yulia, has been speaking publicly for the first time. jane corbin has this exclusive report. salisbury, wiltshire. in march this year, the city became the epicentre of a deadly attack. two russian assassins were sent to kill former russian spy sergei skripal with lethal nerve agent novichok. he and his daughter yulia were discovered critically
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ill in the city centre. but one of the police officers investigating the crime would become a victim too. we had to make sure there were no other casualties in the house or anything in the house that was vital for us to find out what had happened to them. detective sergeant nick bailey was the first person to go to the skripals' home that night. he was wearing a full forensic suit when he entered their house, and everything appeared normal. once i'd come back from the house, the skripals' house, my pupils were like pinpricks and i was quite sweaty and hot. at the time, i put that down to being tired and stressed. nick bailey too had come into contact with the novichok. it's like oil, sinking through porous surfaces, and it's spread by touch. just a few milligrams can kill. it only took a day for nick to realise something was badly wrong. everything was juddering.
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i was, very very unsteady on my feet. the sweating had gone from my forehead down my back. my whole body was just dripping with sweat. must have been pretty frightening for you. yes, it was. it was horrendous. he recalls the moment in hospital when he was told what had poisoned him. they said, "you have this novichok, this nerve agent, in your blood system". what was your reaction? scared, because it's the fear of the unknown. it's such a dangerous thing to have in your system. knowing how the other two were, or how badly they'd been affected by it, i was petrified. it took two weeks for the investigators to discover that the nerve agent was put on the front door handle of the skripals' home, but it took the death of dawn sturgess to work out how it got there. her partner charlie rowley, who also became ill, had found a perfume bottle used to smuggle the substance into britain. officers say it contained
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a significant amount of novichok, which could probably kill thousands of people. did it help you when you knew that it had been on the door handle and you didn't know that when you enter the house? it helped in some ways. i at that point knew, "well, it's not something that i've done wrong", because that was a big thing for me. it's such a... outrageous, dangerous way of doing something that it angered me as well. but nick, the skripals and charlie rowley all survived the attack carried out by russian military intelligence officers alexander mishkin and anatoliy chepiga. it's unlikely they will ever appear in a british court. i said all along, "i want to walk out of hospital with my wife", which we did in the end. and being able to do that, to walk out of hospital after two and a half weeks of going through what i went through was incredible. that was detective sergeant nick
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bailey. i've been speaking to jane corbin, the bbcjournalist in that report who worked on tonight's panorama — and i asked herfor more detail about detective seargant nick bailey's ordeal. he went into the house, he was unaware of this. he was wearing a full forensic field, but after he got back from the house he didn't see anything, it had all looked normal. he immediately had this he described feeling hot and sweaty and pinpricks in his eyes, and he got really bad the next day. so much so that today's money had to be rushed to hospital. clearly during the course of this programme you discovered more aboutjust how potent this novichok poisoning is. yes, the detective leading the investigation, the counterterrorism policing network looking at what happened there, he and his officers of course found tragically because of course found tragically because of dawn stu rg ess of course found tragically because of dawn sturgess —— because dawn stu rg ess ha d of dawn sturgess —— because dawn sturgess had died in a second attack, they found the perfume bottle field is filled with novichok that had been used to put the nerve
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agent under the door handle, and he told me in the interview that there was a significant amount left in the bottle when it was discovered. his estimation was that it could have killed probably into the thousands of people, and this was perlic —— stornaway an event, found it and we re stornaway an event, found it and were put to lead an appointment, subsequently one died and one survived but i think his point was it could've been so much worse. could have killed thousands, that is something we've never heard before. that is right. he said, and i think we would all agree, but it was so reckless, the act, to throw it away, up reckless, the act, to throw it away, up bottle still with this liquid and of course actually that would not have been that much in the bottle, but the point about novichok is it is one of the deadliest nerve agent known to man and even a few milligrams could have been infinitely potent. i interview the scientist, russian scientist who helped develop it and he told me once, a maximum of two mg can kill a person, so even a small amount and a bottle could have had devastating effects. and these investigators
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will delete that were in no doubt this place and had them put there by the russians? yes, and in the programme they detailed the painstaking investigation that they carried out. they went through 11,000 hours of cctv, and they isolated the two individuals by looking at them and what their movement had been in salisbury on the day of the poisoning, and at the end of the date they are certain that these russians were the ones who carried it out. jane corbyn talking to me a little earlier. you can watch tonight's panorama, on the bbci player. the security service — m15 — has admitted it made a mistake in failing to track the manchester bomber salman abedi, whose attack last year killed 22 people. a report by mps on the intelligence and security committee says m15 missed potential opportunites to stop the attack. the mps say m15 admits it moved "too slowly" in establishing how dangerous salman abedi really was. well, we can speak now to michael taylor,
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who was in the foyer, when the bomb went off in the manchester arena. he was knocked out and lost his hearing. his wife, gaynor, suffered shrapnel wounds to her stomach, back and legs, and then tried to find their daughter, grace. michaeljoins us now live from salford. thank you very much indeed for talking to us. you and your family clearly went through a terrible ordeal that night. what do you make of this admission by the security services, that they should have moved sooner? good evening. i think, although it is admission of the security services, admitting they made a mistake, none of these people... there's no sort of rules and looking for a terrorist. they've got 20,000 people of interest to
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look at. who do they keep their eye on most? do they keep their eye on people on the left, or people on the right? and if they're looking at the people on the let the people on the right are doing atrocities. if they look at the people on the right you might have people on the left doing atrocities, and at the moment they have boarded 1a major terrorist attacks in this country, just the year alone. so, i attacks in this country, just the yearalone. so, ithink attacks in this country, just the year alone. so, i think on the balance the work they do is absolutely great. yes, mistakes will be made, but i'm sure they will learn from them and they will get better and better as time goes on. clearly be scale of the task facing the intelligence agencies is a huge one. it does seem though that in this case salman abedi had been on their radar. he had actually visited a known militant in prison, but they failed to carry out the follow—ups that they should have done. yes, i'm sure they did. but also i think the government and the home office are
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just as much to blame for this. if they have a single person going over to libya, he's not going to libya for his holidays, he's not going for a fortnight in the sun. they know he's going overfor a fortnight in the sun. they know he's going over for something. a fortnight in the sun. they know he's going overfor something. as soon as he comes back they should have brought him in, question him, saying what are you up to, what are you doing? things like that. just let him know that he's on their radar, and maybe he might have taken a different route and this atrocity might not have happened. clearly the intelligence and security committee has carried out an investigation and report looking at notjust the manchester attack but others as well. are you confident that the right lessons have been learned i'm pretty confident. and they will learn from these mistakes, it is a big thing that they are actually running the security services. it is not little, it is massive. it is my perfect world. they're not perfect,
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the world is not perfect, and it was a perfect world we would money be counterterrorism officers, but we do. i they will learn, and things will work out and they are learning all the time. they're one step behind the terrorist all the time, so the chat —— they are chasing them. i think they be fine. you and yourfamily them. i think they be fine. you and your family have clearly been through a lot. do you feel that you have now recovered from what you went through? i don't know if you ever say you can recover fully, because the light changes on a major terrorist attack. you see sounds and sights that you would never ever imagine. you can never get them out of your head. but you just have to carry on as best as you can and don't let the terrorist bu. just get out, try and get things back to normal, which we do, and just carry on, really. michaeltaylor, thank you very much indeed forjoining us
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this evening from manchester. thank you. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. tonight, not as cold as last night. too much cloud around the temperatures did not rise a great deal today, very grey and gloomy in many areas and that low cloud continuing for a while across northern england into scotland still showers as well. a few breaks coming in behind that before we see more cloud coming up from the south. together with sharp showers in the far southwest. just about frost free tonight, no significant breaks in the cloud to speak of really. maybe brighter scribes —— skies for a while and a little sunshine for a while and a little sunshine for a while for northern ireland, perhaps the far north of england into seven is individually. still showers around in scotland is heavy ones clipping the far southwest of england. temperatures probably showing a bit of an improvement compared with today, it may not feel quite so cold, possibly getting double figures in southern england especially if we do see some sunshine. they not be a great deal
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of sunshine this weekend, generally cloudy skies, generally dry, southern by of england as see showers for a while and still easterly breeze continuing through the weekend. hello this is bbc news with carole walker. the headlines. the prime minister has hailed a draft agreement on post—brexit relations with the eu as ‘right for the whole of the uk'. the detective leading the investigation into the novichok poisonings in salisbury has told the bbc the amount of nerve agent found in a fake perfume bottle could have killed thousands of people. after a review looking into the manchester arena terror attack, m15 accepts it made a mistake in not tracking the bomber. the wife of matthew hedges, jailed for spying in the united arab emirates, thanks the foreign secretary, after he assured her that his team is doing everything in their power to free mr hedges. new figures reveal a big increase
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in the number of youngsters experiencing mental health problems. the united arab emirates has said it hopes to reach what it's called an "amicable solution" with the uk, after criticism of the life sentence given to matthew hedges, the british academic who's been convicted of spying. this afternoon his wife, daniela tahada, met the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, who assured her that the government was doing everything in its power to secure his release. there's flash photography in this report from our diplomatic correspondent paul adams. back on home soil, exhausted and emotional. matthew hedges' wife, daniela, returned from the united arab emirates early this morning. in a bbc radio interview, she spoke despairingly about her husband's six—month ordeal. his innocence is evident, and every evidence against him is completely fabricated
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and he was put through so much pain for six months that absolutely nothing that he said or did could be used against him. the uae says mr hedges is a british spy, convicted after due process. britain says there's not a shred of evidence. a message relayed in no uncertain terms when the foreign secretary met the uae‘s ambassador this morning. the foreign ministry of the united arab emirates says that contrary to media reports, matthew hedges has been treated fairly, according to the constitution of the uae. we are proud, it says, to have a system ofjustice that gives everyone the right to a fair trial. mr hedges' wife had herfirst meeting with jeremy hunt this afternoon. she is still haunted by what she saw in court just yesterday. seeing him shaking in court after being handed a life sentence and then being made to leave was beyond heartbreaking.
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we didn't even get to say goodbye. i really appreciate the foreign secretary taking the time to meet me at this crucial point in mine and matt's life. the government is clearly anxious to be seen to be doing everything in its power to secure matthew hedges' release. how soon that happens, if at all, is still an open question, but the authorities in the united arab emirates insist that anyone convicted in a court has the right to appeal within 30 days and that families have the right to appeal for presidential clemency on behalf of convicted relatives. paul adams, bbc news, at the foreign office. more and more young people are experiencing mental health problems according to a new report by the nhs. a survey of more than 9000 young people in england found that as many as one in eight 5 to 19 year olds have a mental disorder. boys between the ages of 5 and 10 are twice as likely as girls to have behavioural issues but by the age of 17 its young women who struggle
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the most with as many as 1 in 4 suffering from a mental illness. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports the content of the videos can be a bad influence, orjust make you upset. you keep the lid on, and all those feelings build up and eventually when the bottle explodes, it will lead to depression. it's just nice to know there's someone there for you when you need help. learning to cope with the ups and downs of life. these children are used to talking about how they feel. mental health is taken seriously at their school in salford. instead of lessons, they start the day by playing and chatting, and that gives the staff the chance to spot any problems. if a child comes into school and they've got things going on in their head or they're worried or anxious, they're not going to learn, because there's an automatic barrier there.
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so we have a responsibility to help alleviate that anxiety or those worries they may have. if the children here are struggling, they can turn to a trained counsellor provided by the charity place2be. in over two decades working in schools, they've seen demand steadily increase. certainly, when i talk to headteachers, i can see that they're so well tuned in to the fact that behaviour in children, often what we might call bad behaviour, can be recognised now as a burgeoning mental health problem or a sign of distress. social media was in its infancy when this survey was last conducted in 200a. it's now another pressure that children have to cope with, alongside the challenges of families, friendships and schools. the reason the mental health of these young people matters is that so many of the problems adults experience have already developed by the time people reach the age of 18, and that's why it's important
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that they can access help early. as a young teenager, emma struggled to talk about her anxieties and fears until they spiralled out of control. i became really isolated. when my parents found out i didn't see many friends, i felt like i didn't deserve anything, really. deserve help or for people to care about me. emma's recovery continues. meanwhile, the government has promised extra money for children's mental health, and the key seems to be acting early, giving children the skills to handle whatever life throws at them. on the eve of black friday, britain's financial watchdog says it wants to cap the prices people pay for household goods like televisions and washing machines when they buy from rent—to—own shops. the financial conduct authority believes that in some cases, people who are often on very low incomes, end up paying several times the average retail price. our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz reports. rent to own can look like a lifeline
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— just a few pounds a week and nothing big up front. but on credit, over three years, the cost adds up. the worst examples the fsa found were a washer/dryer, eventually costing five times the normal price, including insurance and extended warranty, and a gas cooker which would have set you back nearly six times what you might pay elsewhere. which means michelle got off comparatively lightly when she bought her cooker, but she is still angry that it turned out to be nearly three times the normal cost. if they're publicising that they're helping vulnerable people, or people on low incomes, then, at the end of the day, they shouldn't exploit them by higher interest rates. they should be capped. the new price cap will mean that rent to own customers like michelle will never have to pay more than double the standard retail price, once the cost of credit
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is taken into account. what we're trying to do here is make sure when they do need to use this kind of credit that actually they're protected from some of the worst excesses we have seen in this market. it is the offer of something new which draws people in. one of the companies, perfect homes, said today it recognised consumers' need to be protected. but here is a way of avoiding the problem, this re—use centre in essex, one of 200 across the country. reconditioned items at low prices, with a guarantee. the financial watchdog, the fsa wants more people to come to places like this where second hand and nearly new appliances are refurbished and sold on much more cheaply and they're sending out the message that where the rent to own retailers charge too much for credit, they will put a cap on it. the biggest rent to own chain, bright house, said it would consider the new regime carefully, but whether they like it or not, the plan is from next april they will face an upper limit
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on what they can charge. climate experts have warned that the window of opportunity to tackle rising global temperatures is almost closed. the world meteorological organisation says greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached record levels last year. it says that without immediate action to cut them, the impact on life on earth will be irreversible. our science correspondent pallab ghosh reports. the world is warming because the amount of sun gases in the earths atmosphere has been steadily increasing since the industrial revolution. these so—called greenhouse gases are now at record levels, higher than they've been for 3 million years. it's extremely critical to take actions now, and not wait until we have the wonderful solutions, because if we do not act now, then all these gases,
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especially carbon dioxide, they will stay in the atmosphere for thousands of years, and there's nothing we can do about that. since 1990, concentrations of greenhouse gases have increased by lio%. in that time, levels of co2 have in increased might increase sharply to about 400 ppm. last year and concentrations were so high, but when it was between two and three degrees warmer. computer models indicate that warming is likely to be repeated, resulting in damaging, and your reversible climate change. a group of britain's leading scientists has called for radical action. i think it's transparent that we need really substantial conservation across all parts of society and industrial sectors. so we need transformation to our energy production. we need to move transport toward electrification, more rapidly. we need to be thinking about removing the carbon dioxide, and putting it under the ground,
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so carbon can restore it. we need to see change across every sector. at a time when china and india are growing their economies, the planet's net emissions of co2 will need to be zero by 2050 to prevent damaging climate change. a 2 degree rise would mean that the world will have no coral, a message to the worlds political leaders when they meet in poland next month is that time is running out. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister has hailed a draft agreement on post—brexit relations with the eu as ‘right for the whole of the uk'. the detective leading the investigation into the novichok poisonings in salisbury has told the bbc the amount of nerve agent found in a fake perfume bottle could have killed thousands of people. after a review looking into the manchester arena terror attack,
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m15 accepts it made a mistake in not tracking the bomber. marine biologists are turning to usual solutions in an effort to boost oyster stocks off the essex coast. it's a place where richard the lion heart first granted oyster fishing rights, but forfishermen there, keeping the stocks high is as important to their livelihoods as harvesting them. scientists think magnets will help, as our correspondent richard westcott reports. off the windswept essex coast, a 1000—year—old industry is still grappling with an age—old problem. to boost oyster stocks, fishermen need to know exactly when the animals are reproducing. in a much warmer lab at essex university, scientists think they've found an answer. you can see the magnet is connected to the top half there, so then we can measure the amount
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of opening, the amount of gaping that the oysters do. when female oysters release their eggs, they do something strange. she shows the behaviour for45 minutes, one hour, something like that, where the valves go pump, pump, pump, in a very steady rhythm. and you can see the eggs coming out from this rare footage shot by scientists in alabama. using a magnet and a sensor, the essex team can monitor that opening and closing. now they're testing it at sea. so, tom, it's quite an office you've got here, on a raft in the middle of the estuary. it absolutely is. a bit colder today, but we do get to work out here. the purpose of the sensor is to tell us when 50% or more of the oysters, that are down here in the water attached to wires, have already spawned. we can actually see the spawning behaviour through the dynamics of the valves of the oysters opening and closing, sending that signal up the wire, into the data hub, up to a ag connectivity transmitter, that will send a signal back to the mobile—phone—connected
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computer in the office of the oyster men. once they get that signal, colchester oyster fishery has just a matter of days to lay tonnes of crushed shells onto the sea floor. the baby oysters love to settle on the shells and grow. but lay them too early and they get covered in mud, lay them too late and the larvae get washed away. the oyster data could bring other benefits too. this estuary is experiencing climate change. it has changing temperature regimes so we've seen warmer coastal seas here, warmer than we had before, and warmer environments more often than we have before. and it would be great to be able to use this tool to get more rich information on how species are responding to their environment here in the wild. richard the lionheart granted the first rights to fish these waters. now, the latest science is keeping one of our oldest industries alive. richard westcott, bbc news, mersea island in essex. the government says we're throwing
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away too many things that are potentially useful. ‘upcycling' is the idea of re—using old materials as a way cutting waste. our environment analyst roger harrabin has been to brighton where the council has already employed its first "resource goddess"... in brighton, here's one of the most unusual houses in britain. from a distance it looks like a fairly conventional modern home, clad in black tiles. in fact, the entire house is made out of waste. and here's surprise number one. the traditional black tiles are not tiles at all. they are carpet tiles, turned back to front. absolutely extraordinary. the building has hollow walls. they are stuffed with experimental forms of insulation, including old denim jeans, cassette tapes, videos, and abandoned duvets.
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ok, if you come in here, i'll show you what we're doing with duvets. the waste house is used for teaching. so, believe it or not, duvets in the uk are all either incinerated or sent to landfill, and what we've done here is install a panel of them to test what sort of good installation they're going to be. the house is full of ideas on reuse. and what about this, a sofa made out of cardboard boxes. reusable items are scavenged by a woman known as the brighton resource goddess. these offices are being closed. instead of dumping the unwanted contents in a skip, she's sorting them out and selling them on. she says it actually saves money, and she insists that all councils could do this. i think the government can set an agenda where there's a framework and an attitude within the waste management industry, and also for local authorities and business, where its ideal and normalfor us
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to reuse things, and not to always be focusing on recycling. the brighton wood store salvages timber that would otherwise be destined for landfill. they take out the nails and they saw the wood to regular lengths. some might consider this enterprise a bit hippy—ish. we are doing something that is very, very simple and straightforward and profitable. we're making the most out of a waste product that would ordinarily go into a landfill. we're making money, there's nothing sort of hippy—ish about that. there are 30 wood stores around the uk. anti—waste campaigners want hundreds of them, to combat the scourge of the skip. roger harrabin, bbc news, brighton. living on your own suits some people. but if you're elderly and vulnerable, loneliness can be a big problem.
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it can affect your physical and mental health. now a new pilot scheme in liverpool is aiming to tackle that. postal delivery workers are checking up on the welfare of older people in parts of the city. it's part of a trial by the home office and royal mail to help tackle isolation. as andy gill reports. the pool this morning. the spokesman is calling on a 93—year—old margaret haines. good morning. pretty good today? yes fine. this is notjust a chapel study asks about margaret's well—being. —— this is notjust a chat. he relays the answers back to a computer. it is nice to speak to someone because i a computer. it is nice to speak to someone because i do not go out very much. the information which the
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postman are collecting is sent to age of concern. they can spot an immediate problem or have someone has a problem which is developing or is gradually changing. the home office which is funding the trial as royal mail to take part to see if using delivery workers can help tackle loneliness in older people. we are already walking up every street. we already know the people, and people know our people and trust them. it seems an appropriate set of people. this scheme brings a practical check the posters like billy that people become around.|j know people are probably 30 when i started, and they are pension age, andl started, and they are pension age, and i need to keep an eye on them. not every person but enough of them. the proportion of all the people in the uk is growing. what projections
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as there'll be eight and a half million people over 65 and the next 50 yea rs. million people over 65 and the next 50 years. which concerns isolation brings a range of problems. they are lonely and isolated, so people can forget about them. services don't know about them. there are risks that people are not eating properly. see you later. this is a six—month trial to see if calls from postal workers can a difference. and to see how the scheme fits in with having to deliver the mail. andy gill, bbc northwest tonight, liverpool. italy's leaning tower of pisa has straightened slightly, according to experts. they say it's now stable and very slowly reducing its lean. the attraction was closed for 11 years in 1990 for safety reasons as its tilt had reached five feet from the vertical, and engineering work was undertaken to save it. caroline rigby has more. for decades, tourists have flocked to pisa in italy to see its leaning tower,
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and perhaps offer a little support. but according to experts, the world —famous landmark appears to be leaning, well, a little less than before. building work first again on the medieval tower in 1173, and the 57—metre—tall structure has suffered from a tilt ever since. blamed on the soft sand and clay beneath its foundations, its lean became increasingly worse over time, reaching a whopping 11.5 metres, or 15 foot, by 1990, when it was closed to the public over safety concerns. cue a major engineering project to stabilise it. that involved earth being removed from the opposite side to correct the tilt and steel braces being added. completed in 2001, the work here saw the tower‘s lean reduced to 38 centimetres. over the following years it appeared to correct itself even more, with experts reporting further
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movement of 2.5 centimetres by 2013. now, the group who have been monitoring the attraction for the last 17 years say it is stable, having straightened by a total of four centimetres since the tower reopened. translation: the committee had made a forecast of 15 years to stop this trend. the tower is still recovering, but we can say that now it's almost steady. but some might question whether this is entirely good news for a tourist industry built around a tower famous for its lean. a lost portrait of a young charles dickens has been found in south africa, after 174 years. the miniature portrait shows the author, aged 31, when he was just beginning to make a name for himself. it was painted by artist margaret gillies, during the same period that dickens was working on a christmas carol, and was last seen in public when it
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went on display in 1844. it turned up in a box of trinkets in south africa, and will go back on display in london this week. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. it is finally feeling like winter. it is finally feeling like winter. it was —7 last night across some parts of england. the next few nights will be much much milder. we will see rusty or air. with the cold airand will see rusty or air. with the cold air and easterly wind blow, but generally speaking you will get better weather west of the uk. not quite so chilly near the southwest, but we have an area of low pressure in. most of the wet weather over the past few hours have been in scotland, and it has been a wet commute home in sterling. because of broken further south across the parts of southern england for here's
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a glimpse of the frost moon. the first full moon of november. there will be many sightings of that tonight, because there are a lot of clouds around. there are mother clouds around. there are mother clouds coming up and misty weather is heading to northern england and scotland. a few breaks, but perhaps it will be a milder night and yesterday. temperatures are near freezing and a couple of places. heading into the morning it will be partly cloudy across most of scotland. there will be some showers around as well. the south of that, clouds will break across northern ireland and perhaps into the western parts of england. we are back at the more clouds of the whales, midlands, and southern england. not quite the local gloomy clouds that we had today, but good enough to give one or two used showers. —— more clouds
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in wales, and southern england. perhaps developing and southern parts of scotland as well. most places it will be quite a cloudy sort of day. temperatures should be a bit higher than they were today. temperatures make it a double figures in the south. in southern england we have the chance to see some showers, and the on rumble of thunder could happen. temperatures in the eastern areas, again near to 9 degrees. the second half of the weekend, it sees the rain near the channel is pulling away for the most part. higher pressure from the north drifting its way further south. dragging down a good deal of clouds and it will bring down the cold air as well. most places will be dried with a limited amount of sunshine. the temperatures know better around seven or eight degrees celsius. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the uk and the eu agree on a declaration that outlines their relationship after brexit.
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now theresa may faces the mammouth task of getting it through parliament. the british people want this to be settled. they want a good deal that sets us on course for a brighter future. that deal is within our grasp. and i am determined to deliver it. scientists warn the window of opportunity to tackle climate change is closing as levels of greenhouse gases reached record highs last year. the police officer poisoned in the salisbury nerve agent attack speaks exclusively to the bbc. once i'd come back from the house, the skripal‘s house,
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