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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 23, 2018 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: fresh hope for a british student jailed for life in dubai for spying. the uk government says it's hopeful the situation can be resolved. theresa may says a brexit deal with europe is close, but spain is again threatening to oppose it over gibraltar. the not—so—smart energy meters. claims a planned roll—out is behind schedule, costs are escalating and a million of them have stopped working. and on black friday, a warning that those bargains might not be as good as they claim to be. england's big hitters eye another world cup. the women's 50 over champions, are now into the final of the 20 over world cup will face australia in antigua tomorrow. good morning. iwill try good morning. i will try and write and upa good morning. i will try and write and up a dull friday morning with this installation at chiswick house. a bit of rain around today across south—east areas but this weekend, maybe a little bit more brightness. i will have the details are on ——
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here on breakfast. it's friday november 23rd. our top story — the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, says he's had "constructive" talks with the united arab emirates about the fate of a british academic who's been jailed for spying. the uae has faced strong criticism after matthew hedges was sentenced to life imprisonment at a court hearing on wednesday. the country's ambassador to the uk is due to make a statement later this morning. our correspondent keith doyle reports, just a warning this does contain flash photography. it's been two days since matthew hedges was given a life sentence for spying in the united arab emirates. he was arrested six months ago, while researching for his phd thesis. the foreign secretary demanded his release, insisting he is innocent. but the uae has been defiant, saying he was properly tried and convicted. however, a further statement from the uae yesterday indicated a change of tone. it said... the foreign secretary described it as an olive
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branch and last night, matthew hedges‘ wife had a meeting withjeremy hunt, whom she had earlier been critical of. he has assured me that he and his team are doing everything in their power to get matt free and return him home to me. this is not a fight i can win alone and i thank the foreign office and the british public, who are now standing up for one of their citizens. tweeted that he had a constructive phone conversation with his counterpart in the uae. he said... later this morning, the united arab emirates ambassador is expected to give a presentation at the emirates embassy in london. the intense diplomatic pressure of the past few days has moved
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this case along. there may well be further developments today. matthew hedges and his family hope there are and that they lead his freedom. keith doyle, bbc news. and at ten past seven we'll be speaking to matthew hedges‘ wife, daniela tejada. theresa may says a deal on the uk's future relationship with the eu is within grasp. she's to travel to brussels tomorrow for talks on the draft political declaration. it says the uk will be allowed to pursue an independent trade policy. it will end the free movement of eu citizens wanting to come and live in the uk but that will also apply to british citizens wanting to move to the eu. and on the issue that's caused much concern, the efforts to stop a hard border between ireland and northern ireland. it says they'll work on new technology to ensure that doesn't happen. but the european court ofjustice will still play a role in uk affairs, which many brexiteers are unhappy about. well, let's talk to our political correspodent nick eardley. —— correspondent.
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spring us up—to—date on the tweet that came from spain, not welcomed for treason may. —— bring us. —— theresa may. spain is concerned that the right provisions have not been put in place to ensure they have a say on gibraltar. they have threatened to derail process, they do not have a veto but have the ability to cause trouble at the european council on sunday. even if the prime minister can get all of that on board, even if it all goes swimmingly in brussels, we have seen in them last 2a hour the tough sell she will have here, with brexiteers worried that what she is planning keeps the uk too close to the eu and on the other side, people from remain saying it takes us to faraway and it will be a big problem for the economy. a really interesting
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message from theresa may in the commons yesterday, she thinks that people want to get on with her delivering this, the debate is over and the time is to get on with it. many politicians disagree and are determined to try what she is going to do. —— to try to stop what she is going to do. thank you. the detective investigating the novichok poisoning in salisbury, has told the bbc that the amont of nerve agent found near the scene could have killed thousands of people. the bbc‘s panorama programme has also revealed new cctv images showing two russian military intelligence officers belived to be responsible for the attempted murder of former spy sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia. police officer nick bailey ended up in intensive care while investigating the case. he's been giving his first interview since it happened. such a outrageous, dangerous way of doing some impact it and give me. i said all along, "i want to walk
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out of hospital with my wife," which we did in the end. and being able to do that, to walk out of hospital after two and a half weeks of going through what i went through, was incredible. there's no realistic prospect of the government meeting its own deadline to install smart energy meters according to the national audit office. every home in britain is supposed to have a smart meter by 2020. they will allow readings to be read remotely and are supposed to help customers save money. well, lets talk to ben, this programme has been dogged by criticism hasn't it? you are going to be talking to somebody to date about it. a little later on in the programme will put it to those in charge. they had an ambitious target, they want to get 53 million of them installed around the country by 2020. they are nowhere on track to meet that. so far, the audit office says the problem will get about 37 million, clearly a big shortfall there. what the government has now tried to do is fudged this and said we will offer everyone a smart metre by 2020
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but we probably won't get them all installed. the idea is simple, it avoids you having to peer into your cupboard to find the little numbers, to work out how much that cost and how much you have used, it stops estimated bills because the reason it is smart it will automatically send to your energy supplier. all of those things intended to make things easier, but as we have discussed, it hasn't quite borne according to plan, they have not got enough in. — gone. plan, they have not got enough in. —— gone. some of these first—generation ones have not worked and a lot of the problems mean that people think we are not using them. respect to the national audit office and they explained some of the problems. the cost of the programme is also escalating and of the 4.5 million smart meters that have been installed in people 's homes, around 1 million of those are not working as they meant to as a result of people changing their suppliers which has caused a smart
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metre to stop working. finally, we say that one in three cases where people have had a smart metre installed, they have not received the advice that they should have got from the installer about how to make best use of the smart metre and therefore start saving energy. that is the national audit office, which has been critical. they say it is clearly of national importance to get these installed and it will save money in the longer term is on hills and for energy firms. we will pay for these to our bills, about £17 per household, but there is a worry that the cost is escalating and it could cost more. we will be talking about something that people are really engaged with a. if you have any thoughts, get in touch with us. the former english defence league leader tommy robinson has been appointed as an advisor to the ukip leader gerard batten. the party said mr robinson, whose real name is stephen yaxley—lennon, will advise on rape gangs and prison reform. he's currently banned from joining
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ukip under rules which barformer english defence league and british national party members. thousands of people left homeless by devastating wildfires in california have been taking part in annual thanksgiving celebrations. chefs from across the country travelled to the state to rustle up turkey, pumpkin pie and all the trimmings. 0rganisers said they served up to 15,000 people. a plane that has no jets or propellers has successfully flown for a distance of 60 metres. this prototype uses technology which is greener and quieter than traditional aircraft. scientists say the flight could open up the possibility of carbon—neutral air travel in the future. is that a plane? no,
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is thata plane? no, it is that a plane? no, it is surely i thought it was a funny animal with 20 years. —— funny ears. thought it was a funny animal with 20 years. -- funny ears. questions about it, where does it take off? 60 metres, what does that prove? the whole idea is that it is better for the environment. that is the idea behind it. important research, isn't it? talking about women's cricket this morning, i love the fact that the two women cricketers that built england's wind has taken their team toa england's wind has taken their team to a another world cup final. not the normal house make chatter. —— housemate. what happens after the game if it has been bad? they can consult each other back in the house. 0vertake consult each other back in the house. 0verta ke weight consult each other back in the house. 0vertake weight may be, watching tv. —— over takeaway may
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be. —— over takeaway maybe. england's womenjust love the shortest, form of the game and have now reached 4 of the six world t20 finals to be played. a solid partnership from housemates nat sivver and amyjones, saw them past india, with 17 balls to spare — they won by 8 wickets, to set up a meeting with australia in tomorrow's final in antigua. england's men are chasing a series whitewash in sri lanka. a 3rd straight win. it's day one and after losing early wickets they're digging in as lunch approaches, they're 80—2. sadio mane has agreed terms, on a new long—term contract with liverpool — talks began at the end of last season, but they've only now been finalised. and great britain's women hockey players, must beat argentina tomorrow to have any chance of getting a bronze medal at the champions trophy. the olympic gold medallists, were thrashed 4—0 by the netherlands yesterday.
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more in the papers in a moment. the opinions from some on the big golf contest, the showdown, more like a boxing match. woods and nicholson. have you seen the pictures with lots of money around? it's good. it is good picture. matt's at chiswick house and gardens with a look at this morning's weather. what a dramatic location you have got there. they have laid on a light show for you. they knew i was coming, very good morning to you. i am at chiswick house and gardens, probably not what the earl of burlington inspected when he designed this in the early 1700s, but it is illuminated as part of the after dark installation here all the way through to the end of december. just part of the installation, it also includes a 2.5 mile trail full of lights and we will take a look at those installations as we go to the rest of this morning. here, at least
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it is not quite as cold as was this time yesterday but still, a chilly start here and actually start across the country and if we take a look at the country and if we take a look at the forecast it is a cloudy one as well. a goal start to your friday. -- dal. —— dull. thicker cloud to the south try to bring in showers, down to pressure in the south—west, which will be thereabouts into the weekend, with parts of south—west england, wales continuing to see showers to the days. some of those heavy and thundery. away from that, an easterly flow, some outbreaks of rain, misty conditions across scotla nd rain, misty conditions across scotland this morning. 0ne rain, misty conditions across scotland this morning. one or two hour slot —— isolated showers but many will get away with a dry deck away from scotland and the far south—west of the country. the best of any breaks in the cloud will continue to be across north—west england, northern ireland and later it is south—west scotland. may be the glimmer of sunshine through the cloud elsewhere. temperatures
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yesterday, still in single figures like it was yesterday, down on the south coast you may have heavy showers but we could see tempertaures back into a 11 or 12 degrees. feeling not quite as chilly as it did yesterday. into tonight, we continued some heavy and thundery showers around the english channel and the south—west, including south—western parts of wales. they will start to come into longer spells of rain across the south coast. further showers across the eastern parts of scotland. when we see cloud breaks the night, there could be the chance that temperatures drop low enough with a touch of frost. into the weekend we 90, touch of frost. into the weekend we go, cloudy and dull for many, a wet day south of the m4, heavy and persistent rain. parts of devon, cornwall and dorset, the isle of wight there could be flooding. best of the sunshine towards north—western areas. into sunday, we will see a little bit more sunshine across the country as that cloud
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brea ks across the country as that cloud breaks up at times, especially in the west. still have that easterly wind, but the showers across the far south of the country not quite as persistent as it will be on saturday. may be that day the weekend. temperatures still, for many, in single figures and we continue with the cool theme as we go into next week too. more from the morning, back now to you. thank you, see later. —— see you later. let's take a look at today's papers. there they are, we will start with the guardian the. people spend a lot of time working on those graphics, given a moment. should have a sound effect for it. let's work on a. what is on the front page of the guardian? the paper also carries a picture of fiona bruce, who is tipped to be the next host of question time. there was news that was offered the job and nothing was confirmed. the guardian reports theresa may will have a fight on her hands
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to get her brexit deal through parliament. negotiating with her backbenchers and european leaders. pictured is daniella tejada, the wife of matthew hedges, after her meeting withjeremy hunt. we'll be speaking to her later in the programme. just after 7am. there have been developments in connection with his situation. there are, sage and is about the events in the house of commons, and tory mps with various messages for theresa may —— there are conversations. the daily mirror leads on a report by mps suggesting m15 was too slow to act in tracking the man who carried out the bombing of the manchester arena. saying the terrorist who did this had visited an extremist in jail, went to libya and had no referral to the anti—terrorist scheme, prevent.
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the report chair said an opportunity had been missed. and the times' lead focuses on the recommendation that advertisers should boycott tech firms such as facebook and google until they show they are serious about tackling the scandal of online terrorist material. that is according to mp5. that is according to mps. ballet dancers on the front. the picture is two british ballet dancers who are the first to dance together at the mariinsky ballet in st petersburg. the first time british dancers have danced there? yes. who is going to start? good morning. you look a bit sad. i'm not very well. don't leave it there, what is up? under the weather i think. what remedy can we offer you? i've had a lot of honey and lemon already this morning. that's good! we should open this up, lots of people have things they do
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to pick themselves up. what were you going to offer? honey and 11 is the popular one. the alternative is snapped out of it and get on with the day —— lemon. alternative is snapped out of it and get on with the day -- lemon. more what i was expecting! that's what i'm thinking! you could get the day off! this sporting story has a bit of financial business about it, this picture is causing a lot of upset among golf fans because it's a 1—off match of 18 holes tonight, phil mickelson and tiger woods. this photo shows the money that either could win in las vegas tonight. because they really need it! £7 million, $9 million, it isjust more sky sports only. you've got people like eddie pepperell saying this is everything golf shouldn't be about. 1—man earning £7 million is not attractive. rory mcilroy is saying he would be watching. it might have attractive 15 years ago, a bit of a dig at the old—timers. lots of
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outrage on social media this morning. it is more like boxers getting ready for a fight!m morning. it is more like boxers getting ready for a fight! it is one thing to earn a lot of money, it's another thing to have a picture like that. very crass. they are just upping the ante. very vegas. it's got us talking about it, hasn't it? if you're cheering on your kids at football, would you be able to keep quiet if they scored a goal? no cheering. surrey fa are having an initiative this weekend to promote respect amongst parents on the touchline, asking people not to cheer, complete silence, during kids' under 12 football matches. that would be hard to do. a lot of swallowed cheers and grumbles. are they allowed to clap?|j swallowed cheers and grumbles. are they allowed to clap? i think it is cheering that is banned. are you meant to do that thing, silent clapping? jazz hands! for people that suffer certain conditions, that's one of the good things you can do. can you manage? i
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will struggle through one more, that's taken all my energy this morning! a quick one on the times... that was like origami the way you folded that! mike is at chiswick looking at christmas lights. this is london zoo. if you buy a new car and it comes with the new car smell, lots of people here love it, a sign ofa lots of people here love it, a sign of a fancy new car, in china, they hate it, so ford has come up with a plan of getting rid of it. the odour removing process and it is a car that will drive somewhere, sit in the sun and get all of the snow out, gets rid of the new plastic, new leather, new diesel kind of smell. it means the cars sell better because they don't smell like a new car. it shows how different our perception is. in china, they hate it. in the uk, amazon sells 800 varieties of new car air freshener. if you want to get rid of it, get a
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couple of wet dogs! that will get rid of the new car smell! we've spent a lot of money researching that one! why wouldn't you want your car smelling of wet dog? but has poked you up. that's made me feel better! if you've walked past a shop or visited a retailer's website in the last few days, you might have noticed a few subtle hints that today is black friday. with uk shoppers expected to spend more than £8 billion this weekend, it's no wonder that businesses are doing their best to grab our attention. but the advertising regulator has issued a warning, saying some black friday deals may be misleading. consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has been with shoppers in wrexham to learn about the tricks deployed to make us spend. morning! its discounted afternoon teas on offer here over the black friday weekender. salted caramel cake,
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please. yep! staff and customers are hoping to get good deals wherever they are shopping. the fantastic. i was walking past the shop and i saw the big sale sign. 0h, walking past the shop and i saw the big sale sign. oh, i can see someone is in there, i'll go and have a look to see what they've got. even if you don't need it, you buy it! you're thinking, i've got an offer here, evenif thinking, i've got an offer here, even if you don't need it! i brought a consumer psychologist with me to help us see through the tactics retailers use. after about 12 minutes, you just get mentally exhausted. we put people in the brain scanners and got them to shop online and see their mentally exhausted, and their decision—making process changes and they suddenly started saying, it's a yellow sign, it is glossy, it says best buy, i'll get one of those and you don't start thinking and analyse it. does that sound familiar? any of you zone out after 12 minutes? sound familiar? any of you zone out after12 minutes? yeah! when it comes to online shopping, do you think you've made some daft
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decisions? i did it yesterday! iwas looking for a dress for the work christmas party, it was a 30% off discount on the third website i'd been on. i wasn't shopping for something specific, just something for that party, then i was looking at what they had available. the 30% discount had a countdown timer, you've only got 70 seconds left to order so i checked out, got a few more things i maybe wouldn't have bought otherwise. i definitely by the end thought, i don't really care any more. i need something, i don't even know what i'm buying! it is weird! with a certain price and you get the free shipping, i'll buy a bit more to get the free delivery. how do you know it is actually cheaper? how do you know what they're saying is true? that's a question for the advertising standards agency. it's theirjob to spot any fake or misleading deals. of course, the rapid pace of change with online means it sometimes feels quite hard to keep up. the sheer
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volume of products on offer at times like black friday means there is inevitably going to be some stuff going on out there that isn't treating people fairly and is misleading people, but we're here to make sure we deal with any problems we can. with more fake deals and clever retailers working out the best ways to get us to spend, really saving money is harder than you might think. i think you believe you're getting a good deal, but now with everything we've discussed today and the tactics people use, it does make you question if what we're spending is as good of a deal as we actually think it is. colette smith, bbc in wrexham. many people out and about this black friday grabbing an extra present to give to their children's teachers on the last day of term. one parentage or group is asking you to think twice, saying the tradition has got out of control and puts financial strain on poorer families. we've asked you what you thought. my
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my son is actually a teacher and all the rubbish that he gets from the kids is not on. no, they don't need it. he re—gifts a lot of it. while i think it's a nice thing to do, ithink while i think it's a nice thing to do, i think it puts a lot of pressure on some people. ido pressure on some people. i do think something made from a heart from a little kid is a lot nicer and more heartfelt than spending some money on something probably insignificant that they'll probably insignificant that they'll probablyjust put away in a drawer and not rememberwho probablyjust put away in a drawer and not remember who gave it to them. probably a bit too much, there's enough pressure at christmas as it is. there's too much present giving. what people want is generosity. that's the real thing. small things given in the right attitude of mind, with a generous attitude of mind, is fine. what wise words! yeah. i think the teachers would like it if all the kids behaved. or eve ryo ne like it if all the kids behaved. or everyone was nice and kind to each other, as the gentleman just said. we'd love to hear your experiences of this issue. have you felt pressure to splash out
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on gifts for teachers? or perhaps you're a teacher who has been surprised by the generosity of parents. get in touch via email or social media. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. nearly 18 months since the grenfell tower fire, less than 4% of council—owned high—rise tower blocks in london are fitted with sprinkler systems. that's according to information compiled by the labour party. it says that only 32 council tower blocks over 10 storeys high have sprinklers, although there are more planned to be fitted across london. the government says that if councils have concerns about paying for fire safety works, they should speak to them. many councils can't afford, with big, deep cuts to their budgets, to pay for this. and because this was
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such a serious national disaster, it really falls to national government to provide the response. there's a call for more inclusive and compassionate care for the terminally ill. joy watkins had cancer and died in a hospice earlier this year. now her mp for enfield southgate has proposed a private members bill called joy's bill to help other people nearing the end of their lives. joy's friends have also joined the campaign for palliative care to be a statutory requirement. i was iwas in i was in the room when she was dying andi i was in the room when she was dying and i know there's way of facing death in a way that is not traumatic, that you're taken care of, and its dignified. let's take a look at the travel situation now. good news on the tube this morning, currently all london underground lines are running a good service. the usual build—up on the a102 blackwall lane towards the blackwall tunnel. a301 strand underpass closed northbound at the junction with a4 aldwych due
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to emergency repairs. edgware, the traffic lights are still out of action at apex corner, the roundabout for the a1 and the a41. and regent street closed southbound from oxford circus to little argyll street for utility works. 20 bus routes are on diversion. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather grey, misty and murky start out there this morning, and, i'm afraid, this cloud is going to stay with us for much of the day. good news, though, it should stay predominantly dry. this cloud, you might get thinner areas here and there leading to perhaps brighter spells, but there's really not much in the way of some tried to get excited about. the breeze, although reasonably gentle from the east, still chilly but not as cold as yesterday, the maximum temperature between nine and ten, so double figures at least. overnight tonight, you can see we still have a lot of cloud. it may break here and
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there leading to mistiness by dawn tomorrow morning. the minimum temperature, relatively mild, between 5—7 celsius. again a rather great, misty, murky start to saturday. we could see a few showers, but predominantly further south, where it should fizzle by the afternoon. temperatures in double figures. for sunday, a drier day with the chance may be of one or two spells of sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the time now is just coming the time now isjust coming up the time now is just coming up to 630 a.m. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, also on breakfast this morning: we'll hear from the dynasties team on getting close up with lions and waiting 20 hours at a time for the animals to wake up.
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a nice gesture, or shaming poorerfamilies? we'll hear why a group of parents want a crackdown on christmas gifts for teachers. the same procedure as last year. it's been a yuletide tradition in germany for decades, but this classic british comedy sketch has never been shown here, until now. we'll take a look at the story behind the show ahead of its uk premiere. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, says he's had constructive talks with the united arab emirates about the fate of a british academic who's been jailed for spying. matthew hedges was sentenced to life on wednesday. he's always maintained he is innocent and says he was in the country researching security strategy. mr hunt says he believes moves have been made to resolve the situation. theresa may says a brexit deal
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is "within our grasp". she'll travel to brussels tomorrow for talks on the draft political declaration. the prime minister has called the agreement on post—brexit relations "right for the whole of the uk". she presented the draft deal to mps yesterday. but the spanish prime minister has threatened to veto the deal over concerns for the future of gibraltar. eu diplomats are meeting this morning to address his objections. the detective investigating the novichok poisoning in salisbury, has told the bbc that the amount of nerve agent found near the scene could have killed thousands of people. the bbc‘s panorama programme has also revealed new cctv images showing two russian military intelligence officers believed to be responsible for the attempted murder of former spy sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia. police officer nick bailey ended up in intensive care while investigating the case. he's been giving his first interview since it happened. such an outrageous, dangerous way of doing something that it angered me as well. i said all along, "i want to walk
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out of hospital with my wife," which we did in the end. and being able to do that, to walk out of hospital after two and a half weeks of going through what i went through, was incredible. there's no realistic prospect of the government meeting its own deadline to install smart energy meters, according to the national audit office. the public accounts watchdog is the latest body to claim the plan for every home in the uk to have a smart meter by 2020 is unachievable. the government says it will meet its commitment. the former english defence league leader tommy robinson has been appointed as an advisor to the ukip leader gerard batten. the party said mr robinson, whose real name is stephen yaxley—lennon, will advise on rape gangs and prison reform. he's currently banned from joining ukip under rules which barformer english defence league and british national party members. thousands of people left homeless by devastating wildfires
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in california, have been taking part in annual thanksgiving celebrations. chefs from across the country travelled to the state to rustle up turkey, pumpkin pie and all the trimmings. organisers said they served up to 15,000 people. a plane that has no jets or propellers has successfully flown for a distance of 60 metres. this prototype uses technology which is greener and quieter than traditional aircraft. scientists say the flight could open up the possibility of carbon—neutral air travel in the future. quite hard to work out from those images, to scale how big it is. yeah. we will get more information to you about it. mike, what have you got for us? england's cricketers, the women, a victory again. it is a
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victory forged across the breakfast table, the housemates, they now face the old foes in australia. they've already won the 50—overs world cup and now england's women are through to the final of the world t20. captain heather knight took 3 wickets for the loss ofjust 9 runs, to help bowl out india forjust 112. england lost two early wickets but housemates nat sivver and amyjones produced a 92—run partnership to see them home with 17 balls to spare. our preparation coming into this game has been so clear and we knew our gameplan, so it isjust us feeling pretty confident and the total wasn't really high, so i knew if we batted through and got a good partnership we would be in a good place. and england will take on the three—times champions australia for the title. they thrashed the hosts and defending champions west indies, aliss healy, recovered from concussion to hit 46 off 28 balls, before they ripped through the windies batting order, bowling them out for just 71,
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exactly half australia's total. it's lunch on day one of the third and final test for england's men in sri lanka. england are ging for a series whitewash. they lost the early wickets of rory burns adn keatonjennings for 14 and 13 respectively. jonny bairstow and skipper joe root have since taken up the reins. england will resume after lunch on. —— on 102 for 2 with bairstow on 42 and root 28. liverpool fans will be happy to hear, that sadio manw is going nowhere soon. afterjoining from southampton two years ago, he's scored 40 goals for the club and he's now agreed to extend his deal, and says its the best decision of his career. in rugby union, it's the final weekend of autumn internationals, and wales are hoping to make it a clean sweep of wins.
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victory over south africa in cardiff, would be their ninth test win in a row. they've made 13 changes to the side that beat tonga last weekend. they are really motivated and they wa nt to they are really motivated and they want to do well. ijust they are really motivated and they want to do well. i just see the effort that the players are putting in on and off the field and keep saying we are in a good place. we are ina saying we are in a good place. we are in a good place for the depth that we are creating and the squad and we are up to confident we will have a good 12 months. the best that great britain's women hockey players can now do, at the champions trophy is win bronze — but they'll have to beat argentina, in theirfinal group game tomorrow, to have any chance of that. the olympic champions haven't won a game in china, their latest defeat, a 4—nil thrashing by the netherlands, in the first meeting between the sides since the rio 2016 final. talking about comebacks, how about this? world champion lewis hamilton says it's exciting for fomula one that robert kubica is returning to the sport. remember what happened to him?
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he was nearly killed in a rallying crash in 2011 that left him with a partially severed arm. but he'll be back with williams next year, after tests with former team renault failed to lead to a comeback. he was always one of the most talented drivers that i had the pleasure of racing against. i know he has had a really difficult time over the last few years now and it is great to see he has got the opportunity back and i hope he works ha rd opportunity back and i hope he works hard on his strength and getting his mind back into gear like he was in the past and i think it is exciting for the sport to see him back in the action. it is interesting to see who lewis hamilton talk about that, we had billy munger on and lewis hamilton has been really supported ——
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supportive of billy munger. is interesting him supporting this gentleman as well. is arm was partially severed. —— he is. —— he is. -- his. it was 2011, you would it was longhorn, but he is coming back. stop whatever you are doing, put down your post because you will be left openmouthed with this. british gymnast ashley watson has leaped into the guinness book of world records, with the longest back flip between horizontal bars. watson, who trains alongside olympian, nile wilson, sailed 5.87 metres into the air. that's more than 19 feet in old money! that is further than a giraffe, to give you a sense of the distance. that is remarkable! doesn't that make you want to have a go?|j that is remarkable! doesn't that make you want to have a go? i am not sure your distance metre of a lying
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down giraffe is accurate. you know when we threw to ben... a lot further than that. i would say to the end of the studio. to the water, where there quays are outside. let's measure it out on the studio and show people how far. it is coming up to 20 minutes to seven. the prime minister travels to brussels this weekend, hoping to secure a deal on the uk's future relationship with the eu. she says an agreement is "within our grasp". but theresa may will then need to win over support back home. so far, her proposal has faced a tough time in the house of commons. this empty document could have been written two years ago. is peppered with phrases such as, "the parties will look at", " the parties will
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explore". what on earth has the party be doing over the past two yea rs ? party be doing over the past two years? we should jump for with on the back stock according to which this declaration will be based and which makes a complete nonsense of brexit. outside this house, there is a much higher appreciation of the tenacity of the prime minister in pursuing this deal then we sometimes hear inside it. is it not the case that she has just lost further critical vote is on the deal, because the scottish tory mps could not possibly vote in favour of this sellout of scottish fishing interest. the education secretary damian hindsjoins us from westminster now. thank you for your time this morning. ijust wonder if thank you for your time this morning. i just wonder if what you witnessed yesterday in terms of the reaction in the commons, from mps of all parties, to that encourage you that a vote, a win in the commons
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for theresa may is possible, or has become less likely? well, we have got a deal now, we have got a political declaration as well as the withdrawal agreement. is strong deal. it contains aspects that people do not think were possible just a few months ago. of course now it is for members of parliament to give that proper scrutiny, have full debate, have in analysis, at the end of it we will have a vote and i think we'll have a very good debate over that time. i do think at the end of it, i do think that minds will be focused, i think people will come to see that as well as delivering firmly on brexit, delivering firmly on brexit, delivering the democratic construction of british people, it also does that in a way that is good forjobs and livelihoods. how concerned are you about that tweet from the spanish prime minister, saying that the differences remained? this is over gibraltar specifically, quite a common issue, but they are saying we are not in the same place and at this stage the
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veto from spain is quite likely. there are 27 other countries involved in the european union and of course, everybody has their different respect this and priorities. our progress has been absolutely clear about any behind rajesh sovereignty for gibraltar and meeting short it is a deal that works for the whole of the uk. —— british. the question was, how concerned are you? this weekend, you are right it will affect things, but in the end they can veto the whole thing. that is a real concern, isn't it? discussions continue and there will be the council meeting on sunday. obviously, the prime minister will be in brussels on saturday to talk with the commission about making sure the deal is landed. it is quite right that the spanish have made these points, it is not the first time there have
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been issues with spain regarding gibraltar, but the prime minister has been very clear on what our position is, what her position is, in any behind the interest of gibraltar and that is what we intend to do. you are the education secretary, i know the education motto is a six, on that theme can we doa motto is a six, on that theme can we do a act to basics on the agreement. can you clarify something for me, at the end of march when we leave the eu, assuming we do, do we carry on paying instalments, payment instalments to the eu? first of all, iam not instalments to the eu? first of all, i am not sure that we do like that phrase, back to basics, these days. on that specific question in the implementation period, it is well—known that there are contributions to be majoring that period. —— to be made during. but then we stopped adding ad infonet
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and payments. that sounds a little vague to me. after the 29 of march, do we carry on paying, this lump sum, £39 billion, which has been agreed, do we carry on paying monthly sums of money to the eu and when do they stopped? how much are they and when do they stop? well, we are in the current budget cycle, without getting into technical detail. the agreement is that we carry on our current payments in that budgeting cycle during the course of the implementation period. pa rt course of the implementation period. part of the whole point about leaving the eu is that we then stopped giving forever, these large annual payments. when do we stop? at the end of the implementation period. ok, all those payments stop them, that's the date, but the backstop arrangement, if we didn't come to an arrangement by then, we'd
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carry on paying by that date? no. so the backstop is about carrying on payments. to be very clear, we'll be a sovereign, independent nation. there may be independent nation. there may be independent programmes you want to ta ke independent programmes you want to take part in, but that will be our decision, a decision for the british parliament. that's the important thing. people want to make sure we have control over our money, as well as our borders and laws, and we want to make those decisions ourselves. thank you. we will follow those events closely over the weekend. theresa may going to brussels tomorrow to continue those negotiations. what's really clear is there's so much that isn't clear. i'm not criticising damian hinds, he's trying to explain it, but so many questions don't have an answer in terms of what's being negotiated. the fallback position is that is pa rt the fallback position is that is part of negotiations, but it doesn't help when people want clear answers to what, on the face of it, look
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like straightforward questions and. it's tricky, we'll keep trying to explain it to you. matt has a laser show at chiswick house and gardens this morning. they know how to put ona this morning. they know how to put on a show, you don't ask for much! i expect this every time, every outside broadcast on. good morning, we're at chiswick house and gardens in west london. looking at the after dark installation, running till december. the lasers are called vortex, lots of lovely bright colours, what you can't tell, most of these installations, stretching over a 2.5 mile trail, they are musically curated. curated by none other than serge from the sabbir and. sorry we can't bring you that this morning, but what i can bring you is the forecast! —— kasabian. for many, not as cold as yesterday morning, but a touch on the cool side this morning. for many, a grey, cloudy start but
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it will turn a bit milder towards the south—west. you're going to see quite a bit of rain, courtesy of an area of low pressure to the south—west of the country. that's going to be there or thereabouts all the way through the weekend and areas closest to it, devon, cornwall, dorset, parts of wales, seeing showers through the day and some of those could be heavy and thundery, drifting northwards and westwards. away from that, again, outbreaks in central and eastern scotland, particularly dull and misty morning. lots of cloud across the rest of the country with some isolated showers. most will be dry. if you want sunshine today, parts of north—west england, northern ireland and later south—west scotland most likely to see it. the cloud could break elsewhere but overall, more they grey friday than a black friday for many of you. with the easterly winds, temperatures staying in single digits for the vast majority but i said milder in the south, we
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could hit 12 in the afternoon here. into tonight, showers keep going to the south—western corner of the country and a few more will creep onto south—western counties and the channel islands, some could be heavy and thundery. down for eastern scotland, many will be dry. clear skies could produce frost into tomorrow morning and the start of your weekend. on saturday, we look to the far south—west for the wettest conditions. parts of devon, cornwall and dorset could be at risk of minorflooding cornwall and dorset could be at risk of minor flooding and cornwall and dorset could be at risk of minorflooding and again, heavy flooding with hail and thunder. some showers in eastern scotland and eastern england but many will be dry, the best of the sunshine in sheltered western areas and the best temperatures or many will be single figures. the same on sunday, the greater risk of frost in western not as west in southern coastal counties of england and. still showers from the north sea, but many in the west will stay dry with sunny spells, single figure temperatures and the cool theme will continue into the start of next week. that's
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how it's looking, back to charlie and naga. sorry, matt! we were having a discussion, obviously discussing the weather and how interesting it was! of course, of course! yes! love you, matt! and that little thing called brexit! ben, what are you going to talk to us about? you were paying no attention to that either, were you? i could read this here or you could just tell us! you carry on your conversation and i'll tell people about astronomical fees when it comes to renting homes, and some of them are fairwhen comes to renting homes, and some of them are fair when you rain a new property, but some aren't! good morning! when you move into a rented house or flat you have to pay a deposit and when you move out you might have to pay for any damage incurred. but for a lot of people, they're also being hit with a whole series of exta costs for spare keys, changing lightbulbs, or evenjust to renew the same contract. the government says it wants to clamp down on these fees, and introduced a new law on it.
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but the housing charity, shelter, says it's just not enough. here's what you told us. when we moved into our last property, we were hit with nearly £3500 worth of these before we even got the keys. £600 worth admin fees, £120 employer reference for me and my partner and an inventory check the fee as well. to draw up the contract expired minutes. you have a template, you insert the names and addresses and the type of the property in a few fields. it's, like, a five—minute job and you charge anything from £300- £500. letting agents are anning a business and their business is managing properties, so they ought to be able to calculate the general costs they will incur in the course of their business and not charge people surprise fees. when you take on a property, you expect it to be in a
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good order when you arrive. it's yourjob to make it neat and in a good order when you leave. it's your muggy, it's your deposit, if your muggy, it's your deposit, if you want it back then you leave the place in a good state. getting people to show up to your door no matter what you do, £15 in that region. if a tenant was to leave a bit of fluff somewhere, someone still has to take an hour to go there, do it and go back. that's a taste of the problem. richard lambert, the chief executive of the national landlords association, joins me now. we got a taste of some of the fees that are being incurred and why they are incurred. some would say they don't mind paying for the things you got to do, a deposit when you move m, got to do, a deposit when you move in, cleaning the flat when you move out, but lots of these fees are unfair, aren't they? that's what the government has introduced legislation to ban the fees to te na nts legislation to ban the fees to tenants when setting up a tenancy, some agencies have taken the opportunity to squeeze every pound out of every opportunity. it's reached the point where it's been
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seen as unreasonable and the government is looking to ban it. will that go far enough? in the introduction, shelter, the housing charity, said it didn't go far enough to protect people who are vulnerable. they need somewhere to stay, they find somewhere and then they get hit with fees. it should set up people at the setup hash protect people. shelter are worried about the default fees —— protect people. default fees are legitimate because people have to comply with contractual obligations, sometimes there needs to be financial consequences. the government has been clear to us in the draft guidance their putting forward to explain how this legislation works, if a default fee is charged, it has to be established in the contract, the tenancy agreement, and it has to be reasonable. the landlord and agent charging has to show why they're charging has to show why they're charging what they're charging. les give you an example, lots of people are getting in touch. charlotte
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says, i had to pay a deposit when i moved in, month's rent, but there was £875 worth of letting agent fees, £600 in admin fees, was £875 worth of letting agent fees, £600 in adminfees, £120 was £875 worth of letting agent fees, £600 in admin fees, £120 for an employer's reference and then £155 for an inventory check. a hell ofa £155 for an inventory check. a hell of a bell when you're moving into a new house! it is a lot of money. -- bill. some of those fees are legitimate, some are inflated. bill. some of those fees are legitimate, some are inflatedm bill. some of those fees are legitimate, some are inflated. it is that inflated thing, something that could cost £10, changing a light bulb, could cost you £100. the fees we re bulb, could cost you £100. the fees were at the start of the tenancy, with that legislation the government is pushing through, they could be banned by the end of next year. but looking at fees through the tenancy, looking at fees through the tenancy, looking at fees through the tenancy, looking at the light bulb example. most people would say if you live in a house, you could change a lightbulb, you buy it for a couple of pounds and you do it yourself. if you ask the agent to come out, that
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is their time, they might have to drive a distance. if the reason you can't change the lightbulb is because you can't reach the light bulb, maybe the landlord has to bring a ladder and maybe they have to hire one. there's those costs. if charges are made, the landlord and the agent has to set out those charges and what the costs to him have been, and then make that charge reasonable. if people are in that situation and they are facing a big bill from their landlord, and they think many of the charges on it are unreasonable, what can they do? where can they go? where can they call that landlord out? under the legislation coming in, if they think the fee is unreasonable, they can question it and if necessary, they will be able to take it to court. what will really be needed is a couple of test cases quite early on to establish the principle is very firmly and clearly, and if people are overcharging, to crack down. once people understand this is the
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way things will be, people will work legitimately. i have to say, most people don't charge unreasonably. most people recognise there's a limit to what the tenant can pay and there's a reasonable charge, but they're not looking to rip people off. this is to stop rip—offs. fundamentally it's the balance in power in favour of the landlord, if you're a tenant, you find somewhere you're a tenant, you find somewhere you like. you're emotionally connected with somewhere you want to live, then you put in your charge and you end up with the extra fees at the end of it. that's the problem, the balance. if you get into of power, you can distort the relationship. the landlord is providing a service under a contract, there are legitimate costs for that service and the tenant needs to pay for that. but there has to bea needs to pay for that. but there has to be a balance. you don't have the right to rip people off. richard, good to talk to you, thanks for explaining. richard lambert, the chief executive of the national landlords association. you got in touch with us before this programme. you can hear more of this by listening to wake up to money on the bbc sounds app.
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we will be talking about that through the morning so keep your comments coming in. see you later. thanks, ben. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. nearly 18 months since the grenfell tower fire, less than 4% of council—owned high—rise tower blocks in london are fitted with sprinkler systems. that's according to information compiled by the labour party. it says that only 32 council tower blocks over 10 storeys high have sprinklers, although there are more planned to be fitted across london. the government says that if councils have concerns about paying for fire safety works, they should speak to them. many councils can't afford, with big, deep cuts to their budgets, to pay for this. and because this was such a serious national disaster, it really falls to national government to provide the response. there's a call for more inclusive and compassionate care for the terminally ill.
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joy watkins had cancer and died in a hospice earlier this year. now her mp for enfield southgate has proposed a private members bill called joy's bill to help other people nearing the end of their lives. joy's friends have also joined the campaign for palliative care to be a statutory requirement. i was in the room when she was dying, and i know there's way of facing death in a way that is not traumatic, that you're taken care of, and it's dignified. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. traffic building into town on the a13 from the goresbrook interchange, dagenham. very slow, as you can see at the top of the picture. a301 strand underpass closed northbound at the junction with a4 aldwych due to emergency repairs. edgware, the traffic lights are still out of action
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at apex corner, the roundabout for the a1 and the a41. and regent street closed southbound from oxford circus to little argyll street for utility works. 20 bus routes are on diversion. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather grey, misty and murky start out there this morning. and, i'm afraid, this cloud is going to stay with us for much of the day. good news, though, it should stay predominantly dry. this cloud, you might get some thinner areas here and there, leading to perhaps brighter spells, but there's really not much in the way of sunshine to get excited about. the breeze, although reasonably gentle coming from the east, still chilly but not as cold as yesterday. the maximum temperature between nine and ten celsius, so double figures at least. overnight tonight, you can see we still have a lot of cloud. it may again break here and there, leading to mistiness by dawn tomorrow morning.
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the minimum temperature, relatively mild — between 5—7 celsius. again ,a rather grey, misty, murky start to saturday. could see one or two showers, but predominantly further south, where it should dry out in the afternoon. still that cloud sticking with us. temperatures again in double figures. for sunday, a drier day with the chance may be of one or two spells of sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: fresh hope for a british student jailed for life in dubai for spying. the uk government says it's hopeful the situation can be resolved. theresa may says a brexit deal with the eu is close, but spain is again threatening
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to oppose it over gibraltar. the not—so—smart energy meters. claims a planned roll—out is behind schedule, costs are escalating and a million of them have stopped working. and on black friday, a warning that those bargains might not be as good as they claim to be. england's big hitters eye another world cup. the women's 50 overs champions, are now into the t20 final. they'll face australia tomorrow. iamat i am at the after dark installation at chiswick house, trying to break up at chiswick house, trying to break up what will be a dull friday, rain across the south—west and scotland. details on that and right here on brea kfast. it's friday november 23rd. our top story — the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, says he's had "constructive" talks with the united arab emirates about the fate of a british academic who's been jailed for spying. the uae has faced strong criticism
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after matthew hedges was sentenced to life imprisonment at a court hearing on wednesday. the country's ambassador to the uk is due to make a statement later this morning. our correspondent keith doyle reports, just a warning this does contain flash photography. it's been two days since matthew hedges was given a life sentence for spying in the united arab emirates. he was arrested six months ago, while researching for his phd thesis. the foreign secretary demanded his release, insisting he is innocent. but the uae has been defiant, saying he was properly tried and convicted. however, a further statement from the uae yesterday indicated a change of tone. it said... the foreign secretary described it as an olive branch and last night, matthew hedges' wife had her first meeting with jeremy hunt, whom she had earlier
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been critical of. he has assured me that he and his team are doing everything in their power to get matt free and return him home to me. this is not a fight i can win alone and i thank the foreign office and the british public, who are now standing up for one of their citizens. after the meeting, the foreign secretary tweeted that he had a constructive phone conversation with his counterpart in the uae. he said... later this morning, the united arab emirates ambassador is expected to give a presentation at the emirates embassy in london. the intense diplomatic pressure of the past few days has moved this case along. there may well be further developments today. matthew hedges and his family hope there are and that they lead to his freedom. keith doyle, bbc news. and at ten past seven we'll be speaking to matthew hedges' wife,
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daniela tejada. theresa may says a deal on the uk's future relationship with the eu is within grasp. she will travel to brussels tomorrow for talks on the draft political declaration. it says the uk will be allowed to pursue an independent trade policy. it will end the free movement of eu citizens who want to live in the uk and that will also apply to british citizens who want to move to the eu. and on the issue that's caused a lot of concern, a potential "hard border" between ireland and northern ireland. there will be new technology introduced to prevent that from happening. the european court ofjustice will still play a role in uk affairs, which many brexiteers are unhappy about. let's talk to our europe reporter, gavin lee who's in brussels. this week we have drawn from theresa may try to persuade everybody in the uk, at least those in parliament, to back her. now we are hearing that
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dissenting voices coming through much more strongly from the eu. there are two ways to read this. in particular, the big one now to block the deal, the withdrawal agreement, the deal, the withdrawal agreement, the legal text between the eu and the legal text between the eu and the uk and the declaration is 23 pages public —— published yesterday, due to be confirmed today. the final thing is it's being over gibraltar, saying he wants the final say over any relationships not just saying he wants the final say over any relationships notjust for the eu, but is being. two ways to look at it. i spoke to the spanish prime minister yesterday who said all was well and good. this is a last—minute of text that has annoyed the spanish, or that there are elections in the region were 10,000 workers go across to gibraltar and the prime minister has been accused of not being hard enough on gibraltar as well. it could be domestic
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theatrics. it is hard to decide for theatrics. it is hard to decide for the moment are clearly that is the main stumbling block ahead of sunday's dig summit. —— the summit. —— big summit. and theresa may will take your questions on brexit and any other issues, in a special programme presented by emma barnett on radio 5 live and the bbc news channel at 12.30. you can text your questions to 85058 or use the hashtag #bbcaskthis. the detective investigating the novichok poisoning in salisbury, has told the bbc that the amount of nerve agent found near the scene could have killed thousands of people. the bbc‘s panorama programme has also revealed new cctv images showing two russian military intelligence officers believed to be responsible for the attempted murder of former spy sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia. police officer nick bailey ended up in intensive care while investigating the case. he's been giving his first interview since it happened. such an outrageous, dangerous way
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of doing something that it angered me as well. i said all along, "i want to walk out of hospital with my wife," which we did in the end. and being able to do that, to walk out of hospital after two and a half weeks of going through what i went through, was incredible. there's no realistic prospect of the government meeting its own deadline to install smart energy meters according to the national audit office. every home in britain is supposed to have a smart meter by 2020. they will allow readings to be read remotely and are supposed to help customers save money. we have talked about this a lot, haven't we? what is this report saying? frankly, that they will not be installed in time and they will
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cost much more than previously thought. any people might have a smart metre already installed at home and the ideas that you don't have to crawl around in the cupboard looking at and sending those getting someone to come to your house. it will be done automatically. it sends it from your metre to your energy supplier. it also means that we don't have to have estimated bills any more, or you end up with too much credit, all of those sorts of things are supposed to end with smart meters. the government said it wa nted smart meters. the government said it wanted to install 53 million of them by the end of 2020, but the national audit office saying there is no way that can happened. so far, they think about 37 million will be installed by the end of 2020. they say it is crucially important for all of those reasons we have discussed, but there are huge problems. a lot of the meters that we re problems. a lot of the meters that were installed, the first generation, have stopped working. sometimes they stop working if you move to a different energy supplier. if you live in a big, old house, it
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is difficult to connect to the system. is usually concentrated and the national audit office just said there will be no way they will meet that target. the cost of the programme is also escalating and of the 4.5 million smart meters that have been installed in people's homes, around 1 million of those are not working as they meant to as a result of people changing their suppliers which has caused a smart metre to stop working. finally, we say that one in three cases where people have had the smart metre installed, they have not received the advice that they should have got from the installer about how to make best use of the smart metre and therefore start saving energy. that is the national audit office, pretty damning verdict. the government says they are committed to the rollout, they want to offer at every home and business a smart metre like 2020, a slight change from their original plan, they will expect it to be offered but quite clearly many people will not have
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them in time. thank you very much, see later. —— see you later. the former english defence league leader tommy robinson has been appointed as an advisor to the ukip leader gerard batten. the party said mr robinson, whose real name is stephen yaxley—lennon, will advise on rape gangs and prison reform. he's currently banned from joining ukip under rules which barformer english defence league and british national party members. two policemen have died in an armed attack in the pakistani city of karachi. eyewitnesses reported a blast and gunfire near the chinese consulate in the clifton area of the city. security forces are at the scene and the area has been cordoned off. a plane that has no jets or propellers has successfully flown for a distance of 60 metres. the prototype uses technology which is greener and quieter than traditional aircraft. scientists say the flight could open up the possibility of carbon—neutral air travel in the future, with flights using a powerful electric field as thrust rather than burning fossil fuels. the time is ten minutes past seven.
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it's reported officials could be close to resolving the case of the british academic convicted of being a spy in the united arab emirates. matthew hedges says he was in the country researching security strategy and has always maintained he is innocent. we'rejoined now from central london by his wife, daniela tejada. very good morning to you. they give very much for your time this morning. ijust wonder if very much for your time this morning. i just wonder if you very much for your time this morning. ijust wonder if you could give us your latest understanding of those can indication is between the british government and the uae. what is your understanding this morning? thank you for having me. my understanding, as yours, is that the foreign secretary has been engaging in conversations with his counterpart. he has already had representations with the ground and
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is -- representations with the ground and is —— crown prince in abu derby last week. we are hoping that after reassu ra nces of week. we are hoping that after reassurances of his innocence, they will condone this appalling sentence and the violation of his rights to liberty. —— abu derby. —— abu dhabi. we know the foreign secretary has spoken to his foreign counterpart on wednesday night. he tweeted, referring to a constructive conversation, saying he trusts he is working hard to resolve the situation as soon as possible. you are taking that as a positive step forward and quite a change in tone from what had happened previously? yes. it is definitely a change in tone and it brings hope to matthew's family and his friends, myself
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included. after six months of continuous hopes being shattered, i feel at this moment i will only feel content with true results and the only result i expect is to have my husband back home safely. we know also that the uae ambassador is making a statement, i think it is just after ten o'clock this morning, do you know anything about significance of that?” do you know anything about significance of that? i don't know. i don't have any indication as to what this statement might say. i am hoping that it will be concealer tory —— conciliatory statement and might bea tory —— conciliatory statement and might be a right step towards matt's liberation. we appreciate you talking to us this morning. matthew himself, what do you know about how
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he is since the verdict?” himself, what do you know about how he is since the verdict? i got a call from him last night. he has lasted —— it lasted about five. he is not well. —— five—minute. he mentioned that his panic attacks have become worse than they were before. —— five—minutes. however, he did say that he has access to a doctor. i don't know yet whether he has been able to have access to the prescription that had —— he had been given during his time on bail, which was working wonders for him. i was not allowed to know where he is, so we still don't know it anything about his whereabouts. i think he isjust it anything about his whereabouts. i think he is just absolutely terrified at the idea of of having to spend the rest of his life behind bars foran to spend the rest of his life behind bars for an offence that he has not committed. daniela, were you able to
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offer it in any reassurance, given the various conversations and the meetings you have had? as i mentioned before, our conversations have always been very closely monitored, so i did not want to put his safety at risk in any way by disclosing to him any details. but of course, i tried to reassure him and telling him that he had ten times as much support as he did before. he was already very overwhelmed and incredibly surprised at how much support he had received from the international public. i made sure to tell him that he has an international army of advocates coming out for his freedom. i do hope that my words of encouragement helped him. but as i said, i think
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helped him. but as i said, i think he sounds in the same place as i do. his hopes have been shattered on many occasions and he is very sceptical about what may happen to him. until he is back home safely, i know that he would feel entirely well. —— woke field. know that he would feel entirely well. -- woke field. many people have praised you for the way you have praised you for the way you have held yourself during this process. “— have held yourself during this process. —— woke field. it must have been terrible to be there at that time. we are in a slightly better place now, but those moments with large in your memory. yes. i never thought that the hope for the best, prepare for the worst, sort of, state of mind would prepare
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me for such an appalling sentence. matt and i have tried to talk about things, and we were prepared to have... to have to face a very hard reality simply because the emirati judicial system is so abysmally different from the one here in the uk. states were always against him. but having to face this whole scenario of just but having to face this whole scenario ofjust sheer injustice, and having to hear those words, " life in prison", it was more than either of us were ready to hear. i have tried to keep a lot of composure and to stay strong for
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him, because i know he needs mejust as much as i need him, but i could not stop crying the second i left that court room. naturally, my anguish is still there, but i'm just trying to contain my emotions for the sake of matt. daniela, thank you so much for speaking to us today. people will understand it's a difficult time for you and we await developments as they happen today. thank you very much for your time. thank you very much for your time. thank you very much for having me. that's daniela tejada. matthew's situation, we are waking this morning for 10am, there will be a statement from the uae ambassador —— awaiting. and those comments from the foreign secretary saying there's been a constructive conversation. hopefully the response will be
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positive! matt's at chiswick house and gardens with a look at this morning's weather. i'm glad to see you have your scarf and big gloves on, because it is chilly, despite the rather impressive laser show. looks like kryptonite, something out of an old superman film. it does a bit. the cameraman, paul, looking at the reflections and says it looks like a spider! we are at chiswick house and gardens by the ionic temple just behind me, this is one of the installations over the coming weeks. it runs until the end of december, the 30th of december. it's the after dark installation. 2.5 miles of trails involving lights, lasers and a giant moon. brightening up a dull morning this morning here and across the uk. let's look at the forecast. a fairly cloudy day almost all over the country, but there are exceptions. north—east england and northern
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ireland starting with sunshine. a bit different in the south—west compared with yesterday, touch milder in southern counties with temperatures up to 12 this afternoon. here close to that area of low pressure we will see that every of showers. south—west england and wales already this morning seeing showers, some will be heavy and thundery and they will continue to run north and west through the day. good parts of scotland seeing outbreaks of rain, most persistent on the eastern side of the grampians. away from that, only the odd isolated shower, grey and misty over the hills but for most, dry start. as i said, northern england, northern ireland and later in south—west scotland, you will see sunshine. temperatures today, we from the south coast, where we could hit 12, most in single figures again thanks to the easterly flow. the easterly wind will remain with us tonight and through the weekend, but tonight and through the weekend, but tonight more heavy and thundery showers in the south—west towards being this channel, pushing to other southern counties. damp in eastern
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scotla nd southern counties. damp in eastern scotland but with gaps in the cloud, the chance of a touch of frost into saturday morning but most will start the weekend frost free. remaining cool on saturday. grey and gloomy for many to begin the day, and if you're on southern counties of england, this is where we will see heavy and persistent rain. parts of devon, cornwall and dorset at risk of minorflooding as devon, cornwall and dorset at risk of minor flooding as the devon, cornwall and dorset at risk of minorflooding as the rain continues. showers in eastern england and particularly eastern scotland, but many to the north and west, the best weather in sheltered easterly wind areas with sunshine at times, temperatures uk wide in single figures. single figures on sunday. optimistic to say there will be more sunshine here and there, better in southern coastal counties, but the channel islands in particular could see heavy rain. we'll see further showers in eastern scotla nd we'll see further showers in eastern scotland and eastern england too. as you can see, temperatures staying in single figures for the vast majority. the cool theme will continue into next week. brightening up the garden here at
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chiswick house and gardens, but did you know, naga and charlie, one of the world's first music promotional videos was recorded in these gardens by none other than the beatles in 1966, chiswick house and gardens was home to paperback brighter. paperback brighter! amazing! as a parent, we're talking about teachers' presents —— paperback writer. one school, one body, has said pupils shouldn't give them presents because it gets competitive among pupils and the presence are becoming ridiculously expensive. how do you judge it? it's that time of year where a b1 is doing their shopping for these —— presents presents. it should be up to the child, if they want to give them a present, they want to give them a present, they should, but something small, little token. not up to the parents, it's up to the children. but the
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pa rents it's up to the children. but the parents give them the money. yeah, but the children may ask for something small. you've got to put a limit on it, surely, haven't you?” agree. lots of you have been talking to us about this this morning. heather says i've been a teacher and every christmas, so sad kids gave me gifts. i would rather every christmas, so sad kids gave me gifts. iwould rather the every christmas, so sad kids gave me gifts. i would rather the school nominated the charity and parents donated to the charity instead. mali has an interesting thought, she said the best present ever received was a book and it was made by her class of everything they had learned with her. so nice! it showed they had been learning. teachers also feel under pressure to buy appropriate presence for their class. vicky has got in touch and she said i've been a teacher for 26 years, i love getting a present from the pupils at school for christmas or at the end of the year, this is because the end of the year, this is because the presence are accompanied with a
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ca rd the presence are accompanied with a card and a heartfelt message. the theme developing is it's not about theme developing is it's not about the gift, it's the thought behind it. could be something silly, handmade, something written by the kids. something personal. we will read more of those later. it is quite timely, it is black friday today! if you've walked past a shop or visited a retailer's website in the last few days, you might have noticed a few subtle hints that today is black friday. with uk shoppers expected to spend more than £8 billion this weekend, it's no wonder that businesses are doing their best to grab our attention. but the advertising regulator has issued a warning, saying some black friday deals may be misleading. it is everywhere! it makes me want to hide! consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has been with shoppers in wrexham to learn about the tricks deployed to make us spend. morning! it's discounted afternoon teas on offer here over the black friday weekend. salted caramel cake, please. yep! staff and customers are hoping to get good deals wherever
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they are shopping. looks fantastic. there we go. i was walking past the shop and i saw the big sale sign. oh, "i can see someone is in there, i'll go and have a look to see what they've got." even if you don't need it... you buy it! you're thinking, "i've got an offer here, even if you don't need it!" i've brought a consumer psychologist with me to help us see through the tactics retailers use. after about 12 minutes, you just get mentally exhausted. we put people in the brain scanners and got them to shop online, and we see they get mentally exhausted, and their decision—making process changes, and they suddenly started saying, "it's a yellow sign, it's glossy, it says best buy, i'll get one of those," and they don't start thinking and analyse it. does that sound familiar? any of you zone out after 12 minutes? yeah! when it comes to online shopping, do you think you've made some daft decisions?
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i did it yesterday! i was looking for a dress for the work christmas party, it was, like, a 30% off discount on the third website i'd been on. i wasn't shopping for something specific, just something for that party, and then i was looking at what they had available. the 30% discount had a countdown timer, you've only got 70 seconds left to order, so i checked out, got a few more things i maybe wouldn't have bought otherwise. i definitely by the end thought, "i don't really care any more. i need something, i don't even know what i'm buying!" it's weird! with a certain price and you get the free shipping, "i'll buy a bit more to get the free delivery." exactly, yeah! how do you know it is actually cheaper? how do you know what they're saying is true? that's a question for the advertising standards agency. it's theirjob to spot any fake or misleading deals. of course, the rapid pace of change with online means it sometimes feels quite hard to keep up. the sheer volume of products that
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are on offer at times like black friday means there's inevitably going to be some stuff going on out there that isn't treating people fairly and is misleading people, but we're here to make sure we deal with any problems we can. with more fake deals and clever retailers working out the best ways to get us to spend, really saving money is harder than you might think. i think you believe you're getting a good deal, but now with obviously everything we've discussed today and the tactics people use, it does make you question if what we're spending is as good of a deal as we actually think it is. coletta smith, bbc in wrexham. black friday dilemmas. i rather like the tinkle of the bell at the taoiseach they were sitting in, a nice touch! very nice touch -- key shop. makes you feel cosy! —— t shop. still to come this morning: we'll hear from the dynasties team
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on getting close up to lions, and waiting 20 hours at a time for the animals to wake up. sometimes having to wait to see them. we will talk to them later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. all adverts forjunk all adverts for junk food are all adverts forjunk food are to be banned across london's transport network. the decision by the mayor, sadiq khan, is part ofa network. the decision by the mayor, sadiq khan, is part of a drive to tackle what he says is the ticking timebomb of childhood obesity. the capital has one of the highest rates in europe. the advert ban will come into force on the tube, trains and busesin into force on the tube, trains and buses in february. nearly 18 months since the grenfell tower fire, less than 4% of council—owned high—rise tower blocks in london are fitted with sprinkler systems. that's according to information compiled by the labour party. it says that only 32 council tower blocks over 10 storeys high have sprinklers, although there are more planned to be fitted across london. the government says that if councils have concerns about paying for fire safety works, they
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should speak to them. many councils can't afford, with big, deep cuts to their budgets, to pay for this. and because this was such a serious national disaster, it really falls to national government to provide the response. there's a call for more inclusive and compassionate care for the terminally ill. joy watkins had cancer and died in a hospice earlier this year. now her mp for enfield southgate has proposed a private members bill called joy's bill to help other people nearing the end of their lives. joy's friends have also joined the campaign for palliative care to be a statutory requirement. i was in the room when she was dying, and i know there's way of facing death in a way that is not traumatic, that you're taken care of, and its dignified. there's a good service on the tubes this morning.
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traffic building into town on the a13 from the goresbrook interchange, dagenham. a301 strand underpass closed northbound at the junction with a4 aldwych due to emergency repairs. and regent street closed southbound from oxford circus to little argyll street for utility works. 20 bus routes are on diversion. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather grey, misty and murky start out there this morning. and, i'm afraid, this cloud is going to stay with us for much of the day. good news, though, it should stay predominantly dry. this cloud, you might get some thinner areas here and there, leading to perhaps brighter spells, but there's really not much in the way of sunshine to get excited about. the breeze, although reasonably gentle coming from the east, still chilly but not as cold as yesterday. the maximum temperature between 9—10 celsius, so into double figures at least. overnight tonight, you can see we still have a lot of cloud. it may again break here and there, leading to mistiness by dawn tomorrow morning.
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the minimum temperature, relatively mild — between 5—7 celsius. again, a rather grey, misty, murky start to saturday. could see one or two showers, but predominantly further south, where it should dry out in the afternoon. still that cloud sticking with us. temperatures again in double figures. for sunday, a drier day with the chance may be of one or two spells of sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. theresa may says a brexit deal is "within our grasp". she'll travel to brussels tomorrow for talks on the draft political declaration. she presented the draft deal to mps yesterday but the spanish prime minister has threatened to veto the deal over
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concerns for the future of gibraltar. earlier the education secretary damian hinds said mrs may will stand behind the interests of gibraltar. it is quite right that the spanish have made these points. is not the first time that there have been issues with spain regarding gibraltar, but the prime minister has been very clear on what our position is, what her position is, in standing behind the interests of gibraltar and that is what we intend to do. the wife of a british academicjailed for spying in the united arab emirates says he is suffering from panic attacks. matthew hedges was sentenced to life on wednesday. he's always maintained he is innocent and says he was in the country researching security strategy. his wife daniela told us she was growing increasingly concerned for his health. i got igota i got a call from him last night, it lasted about five minutes. he is not
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well. he mentioned that his panic attacks have become worse than they we re attacks have become worse than they were before. however, he did say that he has access to a doctor. i don't know yet whether he has been able to have access to the prescription that he had been given during his time on bail, which was working wonders for him. i wasn't allowed to know where he is, so we still don't know anything about his whereabouts. and i think he isjust absolutely terrified at the idea of having to spend the rest of his life he hired bars foreign and defence that he has not committed. —— rest of his life behind bars for an offence that he has not committed. the detective investigating the novichok poisoning in salisbury, has told the bbc that the amount of nerve agent found near the scene
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could have killed thousands of people. the bbc‘s panorama programme has also revealed new cctv images showing two russian military intelligence officers believed to be responsible for the attempted murder of former spy sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia. police officer nick bailey ended up in intensive care while investigating the case. he's been giving his first interview since it happened. such an outrageous, dangerous way of doing something that it angered me as well. i said all along, "i want to walk out of hospital with my wife," which we did in the end. and being able to do that, to walk out of hospital after two and a half weeks of going through what i went through, was incredible. there's no realistic prospect of the government meeting its own deadline to install smart energy meters, according to the national audit office. the public accounts watchdog is the latest body to claim the plan for every home in the uk to have a smart meter by 2020 is unachievable. the government says it will meet its commitment. the former english defence league
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leader tommy robinson has been appointed as an advisor to the ukip leader gerard batten. the party said mr robinson, whose real name is stephen yaxley—lennon, will advise on rape gangs and prison reform. he's currently banned from joining ukip under rules which barformer english defence league and british national party members. thousands of people left homeless by devastating wildfires in california, have been taking part in annual thanksgiving celebrations. chefs from across the country travelled to the state to rustle up turkey, pumpkin pie and all the trimmings. organisers said they served up to 15,000 people. mike is here with the sport. you have extraordinary images of a gymnastics feet that we will see. the human flying fox. she was right? of course you were. we will see the
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pictures in the moment. they've already won, the 50—overs world cup and now england's women are through to the final of the world t20. they'll take on australia on saturday for the title. our reporterjo currie is in antigua. world cup finals are becoming a bit ofa world cup finals are becoming a bit of a habit for england was that women and this one appears relatively simple. india won the toss but on poor pitch they struggled as england's bowlers dominated. had the night led from the front, taking three wickets, while 38 woolston and kirsty gordon finished with two apiece as england that india for 112. the world cup final was calling. england's batters got off to a slow start as beaumont and why it were missed early on. amy
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johns and that sevare were made of sterner stuff and an inspiring partnership followed, with both making half centuries. the housemates calmly leading their team to anaconda should treat eight wickets as they sealed england's place in the final, having claimed the one—day world cup last year, england are now just the one—day world cup last year, england are nowjust one game away from being crowned double world champions, something they have not done 2009. victory against australia on saturday night will surely seal their place in history books. and england will take on the three—times champions australia for the title. they thrashed the hosts and defending champions west indies, alissa healy, recovered from concussion to hit an impressive 46 off 28 balls, before they ripped through the windies batting order, bowling them out forjust 71 — exactly half australia's total. the final starts at midnight our time on saturday. england are going for a series whitewash
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in sri lanka. it's day one of the third and final test. they made a sluggish start with rory burns falling foul of dilruwan for 14. keaton jennings didn't hang around for long either — he was caught for 13. jonny bairstow and skipper joe root have since taken up the reins. after lunch england are 118—2 with bairstow on 45, root 34. in rugby union, it's the final weekend of autumn internationals, and wales are hoping to make it a clean sweep of wins. they've made 13 changes, to the side that beat tonga last weekend and victory over south africa in cardiff, would be their ninth test win in a row. they are really motivated and they want to do well. i just see the effort that the players are putting in on and off the field and keep saying we are in a good place. we are in a good place for the depth that we are creating and the squad and we are pretty confident we will have a good 12 months. manu tuilagi is on the verge
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of a long—anticipated return for england after more than two years. he's been named on the bench for the match against australia at twickenham. he's had a string of injuries and he's been taking out his frustration on the snooker table, playing in a local league in leicester. his highest break is 55, we're told. not bad. that comes you down. —— calms. british gymnast ashley watson has leaped into the guinness book of world records, with the longest back flip between horizontal bars. first of all, let's see it. i said it was like a —— giraffe lying down.
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she has got some nerve to do that. he. he has got some nerve. just to think, the number of times they have practised it and maybe it went wrong, absolutely incredible, that distance. we were arguing how far it is in the studio. it is the edge of giraffe —— ben's territory, right over there. it looks deceptive. that is 5.8 metres. what gets me is that you are spinning anyway, you are probably feeling dizzy and you go through the effort being like that and catching the next part! do you know what that shot tells me, if we can see it again,. the magic of tv!
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it is 740 a.m.. will have the weather coming up shortly. the amount of novichok found at the scene of the salisbury bbc‘s uses hunt —— the police officer poisoned by novichock in salisbury last year last year says he's lost his home and all of his possessions, after fears they could be contaminated. nick bailey ended up in intensive care while investigating the attempted murder of former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia. he's been speaking to the bbc‘s panorama in his first interview since it happened. we had to make sure that there was the other casualties in the house or anything in the house that was vital to find out what had happened. once icame to find out what had happened. once i came back from the skripal‘s house, my eyes were like pinpricks. once i'd come back from the house, the skripals' house,
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my pupils were like pinpricks and i was quite sweaty and hot. at the time, i put that down to being tired and stressed. what was your reaction? scared, because it's the fear of the unknown. because it's such a dangerous thing to have in your system. knowing how the other two were, or how badly they'd been affected by it, i was petrified. such an outrageous, dangerous way of doing something that it angered me as well. i said all along, "i want to walk out of hospital with my wife," which we did in the end. and being able to do that, to walk out of hospital after two and a half weeks of going through what i went through, was incredible. yes, it was. and bbc panorama's jane corbin joins us now from london. thanks very much forjoining us. remarkable, isn't it? such a relief to see him looking well. how was he, what was the sense you got when talking to him? physically, there is no doubt he is recovering well. he
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says that the psychological after—effects of what happened to him are difficult to cope with. i think particularly coming to terms with the fact that unwittingly decontaminated his police station and his home and because of that the family cannot live there any more. everything that they owned has had to be destroyed and what really affects him the most is everything that his children owned, had to be destroyed. the cars they used and everything in the house and they are no likely able to live there. that is more difficult for him to come to terms with. what are the next steps in terms of recovery and where the family moves to and get on with their lives? he is very much looking forward to going back to work. he is a detective sergeant in the wiltshire area and i know that is what he wants to do. obviously with something like novichok, which is very, very toxic and he has got to be monitored and his health has got
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to be looked at and there is a particular timescale on that. but he is very much hoping to return to work as soon as he can be —— can. the police have revealed that there was enough novichok in that bottle to kill thousands of people. potentially. the fact that there was such large quantities of this, so carelessly left behind, what do you think that tells us about the attack? the thing about novichok is that it can be fatal in the tiniest those. iced boat to the russian scientists who fled russia in the 90s who is partly responsible for developing this and he said between 1-2 developing this and he said between 1—2 mg is enough to kill a person. even though this fake perking bottle that the would—be assassins used to bring the novichok into britain, even though that perfume bottle was quite small, the fact that he had a view good counters of novichok in it
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actually had the potential, according to the detectives leading the investigation, had the dental to kill thousands if it had gotten out of the bottle and spread a round. accurately is spread by touch, it isn't just where accurately is spread by touch, it isn'tjust where it is deposited, it isn'tjust where it is deposited, it is where it is touched and spread to another place. that is what makes it so dangerous a and obviously it was a very reckless act firstly use this to kill one person, the former russian spy, obviously it affected and poisoned for people who were lucky to be alive and one woman on the gone sturgess, very sadly died because she came into contact with it. it was a very reckless act. thank you so much for talking to us. panorama was on last night. you can catch that on our website. a tiny 7:45a.m.. matt's at chiswick house and gardens with a look at this morning's weather. you have your corduroyjacket on, is
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itan you have your corduroyjacket on, is it an indicator of the weather conditions? it is, and it's a nice warm one as well, charlie. a bit chilly this morning. good morning, we're at chiswick house and gardens. looking at the after dark installation, running to the 30th of december. one of those mornings where we could do with it staying dark to see the benefit. vis—a—vis images from earlier, designed in the 17005 -- images from earlier, designed in the 1700s —— vis—a—vis images. brought to life by the light and the music, created by kasabian's serge —— visa the images. you can see it for the next few weeks across this 2.5 mile trail. this is the back. the skies area bit trail. this is the back. the skies are a bit grey at the moment. a bit gloomy to start. it could be grey
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friday rather than black friday! so much cloud around keeping the skies rather grey, but some sunshine, especially in parts of north—west england, northern ireland and later, south—west scotland but also rain in scotland and the south—west and wales. south—west and wales, but area of low pressure to the south—west of us will be around all weekend. the showers we see here will be heavy and thundery at times and could even have hail mixed in, and could even have hail mixed in, and it will continue to drift up here and across the channel islands. away from that and the rain in central and eastern scotland, the odd isolated shower. many will be dry, the odd break in the crowd here and there but the best of the sunshine in cumbria, lancashire, northern ireland and dumfries and galloway. temperatures this afternoon could get to 12 in southern counties of england. that will be the exception rather than the rule. for most, staying cool. temperatures in single figures for many. an easterly wind rings the
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cool air, that will still be with us tonight, showers in eastern areas. in the south—west and other counties of england, and the channel islands, we could see further heavy and thundery downpours merging into longer spells of rain. temperatures will hold up for most above freezing, but where we have the clear skies amongst an rule cloudy picture, touch of frost on saturday morning. saturday, the same as today for many, misty and grey and gloomy to begin with, but southernmost counties of england, around the channel coast, heavy and thundery rain could amount to the risk of minor flooding rain could amount to the risk of minorflooding in devon, cornwall and dorset. some showers for scotla nd and dorset. some showers for scotland and eastern england, many will be dry and the best of the brightness in the west and that will be the case on sunday. sunday, more sunshine in places. optimistic of a better day in the weekend. southernmost counties should be dry and bright. channel islands, always the threat of further thunderstorms, maybe cornwall as well. with the
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easterly wind, bringing the odd shower to eastern parts, with temperatures in single figures for just about all. the cool theme will continue into the start of next week too. that's how it's looking. back too. that's how it's looking. back to you both. stay warm, matt, looks pretty! people will be thinking about their central heating and there are ways of monitoring your central heating. things not working out as planned. icy what you did there. thanks! many of you might have a smart metre already. —— metre. they are the new meters that show you how much energy you're using and how much it costs. they also send readings to your supplier automatically, so you don't have to make do with estimated bills. the government wanted 53 million of them to be installed by the end of 2020, but today a report from the government's own watchdog, the national audit office, says just 37 million will be installed by then. rob cheesewright is from smart energy gb, the campaign to promote smart meters.
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he's in our london newsroom. good morning. pretty damning report from the anao, saying you're not going to be ready. you want 53 million by the end of it but you won't hit that target, why not? the national audit office have made serious recommendations that government needs to consider to finish the rollout as fast as possible. that's crucial. the context is our energy infrastructure is urgently in need of an upgrade and we can't deal with the future demands of the energy system, increasing electricity demand or using wind turbines or solar panels to increase the amount we generate, we can't have that complexity without a smart grid. we need them and we need them quickly and it's important the government and industry work together to finish the rollout as quickly as we can, because the planet and the british public deserves it and arms it. no question about why they are beneficial. as i touched on, good for customers, they can see what
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they are using and reduce usage if they are using and reduce usage if they think they're spending too much —— and demands it. but there are serious flaws in. lots of those initially installed have gone down because they don't talk to the energy supplier. if you move to a different firm, some have stopped working. 1 million don't work. and it will cost £500,000 more, more than planned. the £500 million that will cost because of these delays, it's important to remember this is a massive national infrastructure upgrade. they are always complex and a lwa ys upgrade. they are always complex and always difficult, things don't go a lwa ys always difficult, things don't go always to plan and the national audit office has pointed that out, as well as saying this will save billions of pounds for the public. sorry to interrupt, you're talking about it being £500 million, we're throwing around numbers like it's nothing, it's a lot of muggy, who will pay? the customer? it's lost muggy. will pay? the customer? it's lost muggy- -- will pay? the customer? it's lost muggy. —— lots of muggy. it's all about getting this rollout finished
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and doing it as cost—effective as possible —— money. it is challenging, difficult, it is an imperfect world and it's hard to do these things. that is £500 million more than we are going to have to pay more than we are going to have to pay " more than we are going to have to pay —— that we're all going to have to pay. but the rollout will bring down bills by billions of pounds. everyone will be £50 a year better off after this rollout of smart meters. it's frustrating it's not good as we hoped, but it is so much better than an old analogue outdated system but it's for the best and we need to finish it. short-term pain for longer term gain. the audit office is damning, they say the government decided to roll out the scheme without economically assessing the implications. that essentially we will all pay for this because you've not got it right. that's a matter for government and. the national audit office makes its recommendations to government. as the consumer organisation that arc
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of talks to the public. —— that's a matter for government. they love their smart meters. this is actually working, its benefiting people. yes, there are economic consequences of it taking a bit longer than we would like, that's the challenge. it's taking longer than we'd like, but fundamentally it is working, working for people that have them and it will work for the planet and energy infrastructure. good to speak to you, rob. thanks for explaining that. a monumental task ahead for them to get those introduced. intending to get 53 million installed by the end of 2020. so far the national audit office thinks that figure will be 37 million. a lot of work still to do. more from me after 8am. thanks very much, ben. it's become a christmas tradition and essential viewing for millions on german tv, but british comedy sketch dinner for one has never been shown here. now, nearly 40 years since making comedian freddie frinton a househould name in europe, it will finally get its uk premiere. our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, has been
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to find out more. the same procedure as last year, miss? a 90th birthday party. the host's friends are dead, so her loyal butler plays every guest, getting more tipsy as the evening goes on. dinner for one is watched by millions in germany every new year's eve. manchester's christmas markets, german traders say it's essential viewing. every child in germany knows dinner for one. you're waiting for it all year. it started being famous over here and somehow it's what over to germany. in1963, what over to germany. in 1963, english comedy actor freddie frinton's musical performance was turned into a german tv programme. the whole thing is filmed in one 15 minute take. 20 yea rs later filmed in one 15 minute take. 20 years later it became a national institution. my
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institution. my brother and i impersonate this all the time. now his son is guest of honour at a weekend of slapstick in campbeltown. it's almost like seeing him do it in a theatre live. this is the one thing he enjoyed doing, his baby. when you go to germany and you say you're freddie frinton's son, what do you get is a reaction? ifi do you get is a reaction? if i meet a german industry and they said my father —— i say my father is freddie frinton and their reaction is brilliant. they want a picture, selfies! organisers believe the sketch will be appreciated by a british audience. freddie frinton is a comedy genius. his timing is perfect. it's an absolute masterpiece of slapstick. 50 yea rs absolute masterpiece of slapstick. 50 years after his death, his reputation continues to grow. a freddie frinton stamp hasjust reputation continues to grow. a freddie frinton stamp has just been issued in germany, and next year a museum dedicated to him opens in bremerhaven. and, of course, it's already part of new year plans. i have some friends coming over. we
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will party at my house, and i think we will watch it before we start having dinner together. they all know they're going to be watching dinner for one? sure, eve ryo ne watching dinner for one? sure, everyone does it. its tradition! the same procedure as last year? the same procedure as every year! well, i'll do my best! colin paterson, bbc news, campbeltown. we don't have an equivalent, certainly that dates back that far. eric and ernie maybe. only fools and horses. fabulous, and now we get to see it! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: # sing, sing, sing, everybody start to sing... that's what he does. alfie boe... how singing for the queen renewed his love for classic tunes from the 1930s. he's here to talk about going solo for the first time in three years.
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who knows, maybe singing for us!” think we can persuade him to sing. it might happen! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. all adverts forjunk food are to be banned across london's transport network. the decision by the mayor, sadiq khan, is part of a drive to tackle what he says is the ticking timebomb of childhood obesity. the capital has one of the highest rates in europe. the advert ban will come into force on the tube, trains and buses in february. nearly 18 months since the grenfell tower fire, less than 4% of council—owned high—rise tower blocks in london are fitted with sprinkler systems. that's according to information compiled by the labour party. it says that only 32 council tower blocks over 10 storeys high have sprinklers, although there are more planned to be fitted across london. the government says that if councils have concerns about paying for fire safety works, they should speak to them. many councils can't afford, with big, deep cuts
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to their budgets, to pay for this. and because this was such a serious national disaster, it really falls to national government to provide the response. there's a call for more inclusive and compassionate care for the terminally ill. joy watkins had cancer and died in a hospice earlier this year. now her mp for enfield southgate has proposed a private members bill called joy's bill to help other people nearing the end of their lives. joy's friends have also joined the campaign for palliative care to be a statutory requirement. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. traffic building into town on a40 westway over the northern roundabout, white city. slow traffic towards london bridge,
quote
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babs slow traffic towards london bridge, ba bs tower slow traffic towards london bridge, babs tower hill. a301 strand underpass closed northbound at the junction with a4 aldwych due to emergency repairs. edgware, the traffic is lights out of action at apex corner —— traffic lights. and regent street closed southbound from oxford circus to little argyll street for utility works. 20 bus routes are on diversion. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather grey, misty and murky start out there this morning. and, i'm afraid, this cloud is going to stay with us for much of the day. good news, though, it should stay predominantly dry. this cloud, you might get some thinner areas here and there, leading to perhaps brighter spells, but there's really not much in the way of sunshine to get excited about. the breeze, although reasonably gentle coming from the east, still chilly but not as cold as yesterday. the maximum temperature between 9—10 celsius, so into double figures at least. overnight tonight, you can see we still have a lot of cloud. it may again break here and there, leading to mistiness by dawn tomorrow morning. the minimum temperature, relatively mild — between 5—7 celsius.
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again, a rather grey, misty, murky start to saturday. could see one or two showers, but predominantly further south, where it should dry out in the afternoon. still that cloud sticking with us. temperatures again in double figures. for sunday, a drier day with the chance may be of one or two spells of sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning and welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: theresa may says a brexit deal with the eu is close, but spain is again threatening to oppose it over gibraltar. fresh hope for a british student jailed for life in dubai for spying, but matthew hedges' wife has told breakfast his health is deteriorating. staying safe on black friday. government security services warn of a growing risk to shoppers, with more than £1 billion set
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to be spent online today. england's big hitters eye another world cup. the women's 50 overs champions are now into the t20 final. they'll face australia tomorrow. getting up close and personal with lions, the dynasties documentary team tell us about their latest wildlife drama. iamat i am at chiswick house trying to put some brightness into a mag otherwise dull start to friday. a bit of rain in the south and east of scotland. we have the weekend forecast as well. theresa may says a deal on the uk's future relationship with the eu is within grasp. she will travel to brussels tomorrow for talks on the draft political declaration. it says the uk will be allowed to pursue an independent trade policy. it will end the free
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movement of eu citizens who want to live in the uk and that will also apply to british citizens who want to move to the eu. and on the issue that's caused a lot of concern, a potential hard border between ireland and northern ireland, there will be new technology introduced to prevent that from happening. the european court ofjustice will still play a role in uk affairs, which many brexiteers are unhappy about. let's talk to our europe reporter, gavin lee, who's in brussels. even before this deal is agreed, spain is threatening to try and stop it? yes. there are two mag ways to look at this. this could be serious political drama. the spanish prime minister tweeting in english last night saying he spoke to theresa may and he is still not happy with the situation over gibraltar. he says they must have in writing somewhere either the withdrawal agreement or the political declaration that spain
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must have a final say with the uk on anything affecting the future of gibraltar. i spoke to him a few weeks ago and he said he was happy with the negotiations so one take is this as a last minute thing that spanish negotiators had not seen. andalusia is a region close to gibraltar. there are elections in a few weeks and pedro sanchez has been accused of not doing enough to support spanish workers in gibraltar over brexit so perhaps domestic politics involved as well. but there is confidence that this historic deal to get past the european stage of the divorce deal will go through. what will that look like? it is still up what will that look like? it is stillup in what will that look like? it is still up in the air as to whether it will be happening but will there be p°mp will be happening but will there be pomp and circumstance? no. i think that would be fascinating if there was because it is such a strange
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moment. the rhetoric that comes from the european council and donald tusk, constantly talking about the sadness of losing the uk, so the p°mp sadness of losing the uk, so the pomp and ceremony will not be there from the europeans. 9:30am is when the leaders meet fully working brea kfast the leaders meet fully working breakfast on sunday. theresa may will not be there. she will be there an hour later. if they sign the deal we expect what we call the family for two. family photograph. it might not be a happy family. and theresa may will take your questions on brexit and any other issues in a special programme presented by emma barnett on radio 5 live and the bbc news channel at 12:30pm. you can text your questions to 85058 or use #bbcaskthis. the wife of a british academicjailed for spying
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in the united arab emirates has told breakfast that she has spoken to him last night and his health is deteriorating. matthew hedges was sentenced to life on wednesday. he's always maintained he is innocent and says he was in the country researching security strategy. his wife daniela told us he was suffering panic attacks. i got a call from him last night, it lasted about five minutes. he is not well. he mentioned that his panic attacks have become worse than they were before. however, he did say that he has access to a doctor. i don't know yet whether he has been able to have access to the prescription that he had been given during his time on bail, which was working wonders for him. i wasn't allowed to know
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where he is, so we still don't know anything about his whereabouts. and i think he is just absolutely terrified at the idea of having to spend the rest of his life behind bars for an offence that he has not committed. just after 10am we understand the uae ambassador is due to make a statement of some kind just outside the embassy. the foreign secretary discussing the case said he had a constructive conversation with his cou nterpa rts constructive conversation with his counterparts in the uae and says he is working hard to resolve the situation as soon as possible. the detective investigating the novichok poisoning in salisbury has told the bbc that the amount of nerve agent found near the scene could have killed thousands of people. the bbc‘s panorama programme has
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also revealed new cctv images showing two russian military intelligence officers believed to be responsible for the attempted murder of former spy sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia. police officer nick bailey ended up in intensive care while investigating the case. he's been giving his first interview since it happened. such an outrageous, dangerous way of doing something that it angered me as well. i said all along, "i want to walk out of hospital with my wife," which we did in the end. and being able to do that, to walk out of hospital after two and a half weeks of going through what i went through, was incredible. there's no realistic prospect of the government meeting its own deadline to install smart energy meters, according to the national audit office. the public accounts watchdog is the latest body to claim the plan for every home in the uk to have a smart meter by 2020 is unachievable. the government says it
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will meet its commitment. the benefit of the uk economy will be almost £6 billion so of course we wa nt to be almost £6 billion so of course we want to do this in the most cost—effective way but the case for doing this, i have been going on, round switching off lights, i switched off an old freezer, that will be delivered, and the energy system will be much quicker to administer. nigel farage is calling for a vote of no confidence in the ukip leader gerard batten after he appointed the former english defence league leader tommy robinson as an adviser. the party said mr robinson, whose real name is stephen yaxley—lennon, will advise on rape gangs and prison reform. mr farage, who led ukip for around ten years, said he was appalled by the appointment and accused mr batten of dragging us in a shameful direction. two policemen have died in an armed attack in the pakistani city of karachi.
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eyewitnesses reported a blast and gunfire near the chinese consulate in the clifton area of the city. security forces are at the scene and the area has been cordoned off. black friday is upon us — stores have been advertising deals and inboxes have been bombarded with encouragements to get us online shopping. you cannot avoid it. traditionally you had black friday and cyber monday. it has guidance merged into a week. i would like to put a ban on talking about it because i think it isa talking about it because i think it is a lot of rubbish. everyone has seen it. gchq, the government communications body, their security department have put out an official
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warning relating to fraud over a black friday and cyber monday the cause £8 billion is set to be spent online this weekend and they are worried about people being victims of attacks and cyber fraud that might go with it. it is an official warning. they say do not be worried about it but take common—sense precautions to make sure you do not fall victim to cyber attacks because in the last year they have closed 140,000 phishing websites where you are duped into putting your bank details into what you think is a retailer. something comes up on your screen, by now, how can you know? that is the point. you are in a rush to get to the offer before it closes and people might make decisions that they would not normally make, so they would not normally make, so they have issued advice that people can bear in mind when shopping. one
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is to make sure that your computer system is up to date, choose strong passwords for each website and make sure you have a different one for each shopping website. they say make sure you type in the website address of the retailer rather than clicking on the link in an email because that is where you go wrong. it could take you to a side that is not that retailer so make sure you type in the one you want to go to. if you find a been a victim of fraud keep an eye on your bank account and make sure there are not transactions going out that were not yours and keep an eye on it and reported to your bank because they can sort it out but be careful online. good advice. beware if you are buying on black friday. junk food adverts are to be banned on the entire
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transport for london network, in a bid to reduce childhood obesity. nearly 40% of ten and 11—year—olds in the capital are overweight or obese. the scheme is backed by child health experts but the advertising association said it would have "little impact". let's speak to the mayor of london, sadiq khan, who joins us from westminster. there is criticism. you have heard that. we will play what the other side in doorman advertising standards ability have said. in london we have one of the worst levels of child obesity and overweight children of anywhere in europe. almost 40% of ten and 11—year—olds are overweight or obese. diabetes uk have said they have seen a massive increase in the number of young people and children who have take two diabetes. it is a huge cost to the nhs and to our economy. this one policy will not solve the issue but it is part of a package of measures we are taking.
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we have appointed the first ever task force with leading experts. i am consulting plans to ban fast—food restau ra nts, am consulting plans to ban fast—food restaurants, new ones, opening the schools. we are encouraging primary schools. we are encouraging primary schools to do daily exercise. we are hoping their studies and children's centres have an early years programme that gives advice on nutrition and also exercise and encouraging people to work and cycle. if you listen to clinicians and medical experts rather than the advertising industry, it makes millions of pounds by marketing junk food towards young children. let me play what he says and then we can talk about this. this is what the chief executive of the advertising association has said. we'll ready have the strictest rules in the world when it comes to advertising
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high—fat salt sugar foods. you cannot target under 16 is, you cannot target under 16 is, you cannot design the advertising to appeal to them, you cannot use a medium where under 16 is make up more than one in four of the audience. that is way below the threshold. the impact of this particular ban, it will impact on chip travellers. this will lose revenue from advertising for transport for london and that will impact on fares. passengers may suffer. the point about revenue. transport for london has calculated that the revenue from advertising from junk food advertising is approximately £13.3 million. transport for london is in deficit when it comes to accounts. not a knock they can afford to take.” love that his concern is the hard
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pressed fare payers of london. we have frozen fears of the last two and a half years and i intend to freeze them over the next two and a half years. journeys on public transport in london every day, 1.2 million children used the transport system and the evidence is that children who see these adverts for junk food put pressure on mum, dad, care, to buy these less healthy high—fat high sugar high salt options. we have the choice, we can continue to increase the profits of the advertising companies who are marketing junk food at children or we can take action as part of a package of measures. i will not apologise for choosing to take action. the nhs spends £6.1 billion addressing because his ofjunk food advertising and the economy is affected by 20 to £10 billion a year. i choose to accept the advice from the chief medical officer. the
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advertising benefits the junk food providers, the restaurants that providers, the restaurants that provide thejunk providers, the restaurants that provide the junk food. we would all accept that. you want to get the devout. 1.2 million children travelling on transport for london compared to the daily travel. you have this child obesity task force, you do not want fast—food restau ra nts you do not want fast—food restaurants near schools, why do you not take them out of the transport for london stations? that is where might the children are buying the food. some of the fast-food restau ra nts, ma ny of food. some of the fast-food restaurants, many of them, all of them, have healthier options and it is important to put it into the context. let them advertise then if it is fine. we are. the ban is on adverts for thejunk it is fine. we are. the ban is on adverts for the junk food not on the brand. so for example that is
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possible for a fast—food restaurant ora possible for a fast—food restaurant or a manufacturer of foods to advertise healthy options. we are not allowing them to advertise foods high infat not allowing them to advertise foods high in fat sugar or salt, following the criteria used by the food standards agency and public health england. it is not simply something i have invented without looking at what others are doing. in amsterdam they have similar problem and the earlier this they introduced a ban on adverts for junk food earlier this they introduced a ban on adverts forjunk food as part of a package of measures and in amsterdam over the last few years they have seen fewer overweight children. we have in london poorer children. we have in london poorer children almost twice as likely to be overweight or obese in —— as children in more affluent backgrounds. it is important to understand the consequences of these adverts on families. i have to dock to you about brexit. jeremy corbyn's strategy. based on the concept he
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would be a better negotiator and his tea m would be a better negotiator and his team would be better at negotiating a brexit deal. the eu was not open to negotiation. what is the point in putting this forward? why notjust support the deal? the point jeremy corbyn is making it had he embarked on these negotiations two years ago we would not be where we are now. i'd say it is a wonderful thing. —— hindsight. absolutely. what is being offered by the prime minister now is 1 million miles away from what was promised two and a half years ago and it is in that context, the choice between a bad brexit or worse no deal, give the british public face for the first time on whether they accept the outcome of the negotiations with the option of staying in the eu. is that another
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referendum? he was in a position to call for another referendum and he did not take it. no. what jeremy corbyn is saying is when this cold comes to parliament they will vote against the deal and they will move an amendment to have a general election and if that is defeated in the house of commons many mps will be supporting an amendment to give the british public is safe for the first time on the outcome of these negotiations with the option of staying in the eu. if you are the leader of the official opposition, it is not surprising, if it fails, the next best thing is for the british public to have easy for the first time on whether they accept this deal with the option of staying in the eu. now know what the promises made were false. do you think that can be done by the 29th of march? one of the things i asked
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michel barnier when i met him two weeks ago is will the eu begin preparations to extend article 50 so we do not have to leave on march the 29th, i asked we do not have to leave on march the 29th, iasked him we do not have to leave on march the 29th, i asked him to begin that work now, so if it is the case in december that mps reject theresa may's deal and they amendment is passed fully public fault, i think the european union would be extending article 50 to allow a public vote. thank you. some things are confusing and some things are beautifully simple, like a sunrise ona beautifully simple, like a sunrise on a friday morning. that is lovely. how is looking elsewhere? not sunny here in chiswick lake in salford but north—west england and parts of northern ireland have the best of the sunshine. it is a bit gloomy. we
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are trying to brighten up friday morning. this was designed in the early 1700s. this is what it looked like earlier this morning when we had the light show after dark installations in full flow. a stunning sight. music goes with that. it is all part of the two and a half mile trail full of lights and a half mile trail full of lights and a giant moon which will be here until the 30th of december every sunday. even without these shade of darkness it still looks stunning here this morning even if it is under grey skies. it is a bit of a grey friday for people. it is cloudy across most of the uk. to the south it will be a little bit milder than yesterday. temperatures could get into double figures. "
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which is to the south west. that is growing up all those showers in the channel islands. some of those showers could be heavy and thundery. maybe a little bit of brightness in between. elsewhere rather grey, misty and gloomy, wet across central and eastern scotland. the rain will continue on and off. away from eastern scotland and the far south west and wales should be dry. showers few and far between. the best of the sunshine lancashire, cumbria, parts of northern ireland and later dumfries & galloway. temperatures 12 degrees around the english channel but for most of you it is easterly wind, feeling cold, temperatures in single figures, get used to that, that will be with us all weekend. little changes to the pressure patterns, still easterly winds, a few showers tonight. the low pressure brings a few more
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showers towards southern coastal counties. in between with clear skies it could be cold enough for a touch of frost but a cold start to the weekend and a gloomy one as well. plenty of cloud to start saturday. the bulk of the rain is going to be in the coastal counties of southern england and the channel islands. it could become heavy and persistent. there's a risk of minor flooding across devon and and dorset. parts of sheltered north—western areas will continue to see the sunshine. you will have the best of the sunshine on sunday as well. a bit more sunshine uk wide on sunday. a better day compared with saturday on coastal counties of southern england. still a few showers and eastern england and eastern parts of scotland. wind is still coming in from the east, temperatures still in single figures, and it will remain that way into the start of next week.
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just before the start of the second world war, thousands ofjewish children were evacuated from germany to escape persecution by the nazis. among them was ten—year—old paul willer, who found himself in england at the home of the future prime minister clement attlee. almost 80 years later, he's been reunited with mr attlee's granddaughter for the first time. pauljoins us now from his home in gloucestershire, along with his daughterjo. lovely to see you. can you explain what your recollections are when you we re what your recollections are when you were ten years old and you came to this house? what are your recollections of that time?” this house? what are your recollections of that time? i was very warmly welcomed by the family
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and it was a pleasure to be in their home. you had no idea, not surprisingly, you were only ten, of who clement attlee was. is that right? sorry, who? you did not know at that time when you were ten who clement attlee was. you did not realise the significance of who he was and what he did. no. i had no idea. he was simply the father figure of the household. very gentle, very kind to the children, used to play games with us, and it was a pleasure to be there. how was it? when did you first realise the family who you had been staying with was the man who was later to be prime minister? i certainly did not realise it then. although i moved he
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was a member of the house of parliament i had no idea that he was going to be prime minister one day. he was a modest man, a gentle man. later, as time went by, you realised who the family were and the significance. yes. years later. joel significance. yes. years later. joel, tell us a little bit about the reunion because this was extraordinary. it was extraordinary. it was a great privilege to actually meet the grandchildren and be able to thank them for everything they did for my father, that the family did for my father, that the family did for my father, that the family
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did for my father, it was an extraordinary privilege and a great moment. i do not think i will ever forget it. when did you become aware of the whole story? sometimes in families things do not get talked about. when did you first realise what had happened to your dad? we did not talk at all about my father's past when we were younger. my grandmother wrote a book so we knew from her what had happened but for my father we did not know much. the one thing we knew was his time with the attlees and i wondered if that was because it was the happier times. the games he played were games that we played around the table as children. he can tell you that better than me, the holding up of the coins, that was something that we did. the reunion for you
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with clement attlee's family, that was emotionalfor you. with clement attlee's family, that was emotional for you. it was very touching. i shall never forget it. it is the first time i had any sort of communication with the attlee family after all those years. thank you. thatjust made me smile. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hi, there. good morning. it's not been quite as cold this morning because we've got more cloud around at the moment. some rather misty and murky conditions out and about. towards the south—west of england, with this area of low pressure here,
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the weatherfronts, some heavy showers in south—west england and the south—west of wales. elsewhere, misty and murky. much of that should tend to lift away. it should stay quite cloudy for many of us. still some showers and some rain across northern and eastern areas of scotland. and showers continuing down toward south western areas of england as well. those showers could be on the heavy side, perhaps even the odd rumble of thunder towards parts of cornwall and into devon perhaps later on. some of those showers into wales as well. some brighter skies developing in parts of north—west england, through northern england in general, south—west scotland, northern ireland. for scotland, it will stay quite cloudy through the afternoon. still those showers coming in on an easterly wind. maximum temperatures going up to round about seven to ten or 11 degrees. so, not quite as cold as recent days. through tonight, these heavy showers will continue around the south—west. that's where we could see quite high rainfall totals by the end of the day into the night. elsewhere, again, with lots of cloud around, misty and murky conditions, it's going to be largely frost free.
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into the weekend, that whether register with into the weekend, that weather front with you the english channel. around southern coastal counties are going to be quite a wet day on saturday. some showers, longer spells of rain right along the coast. but that could be as far north as, say, the m4 corridor. further north than that, it's dry again on saturday. there will be sunny spells for a time across northern areas. temperatures about 7—10. by sunday, it will be a drier day across the south. we lose that rain. for many parts it will be dry. again, there will be some spells of sunshine developing throughout the day. not too bad at all, really. temperatures, well, they will be down a little bit. 7—8 celsius. but still not as cold as recent days. this is business live from bbc news with victoria fritz and maryam moshiri. that black friday feeling. retailers are bracing themselves for a multi—billion dollar shopping onslaught. the 23rd of november.
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yes. black friday is here once again, heralding a weekend—long shopping frenzy. but are consumers really getting a good deal? nissan sacks its chairman after almost two decades in the driving seat. but what's up the road for the car giant — its partners — and its former boss? and we'll get the inside track on all the turmoil at nissan

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