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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 23, 2018 2:00pm-3:30pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm rebecca jones. today at two. theresa may takes part in a phone—in on the bbc news channel and radio five live and says the draft brexit agreement is the right deal for britain. i believe that if we were to go back to the european union and say people didn't like that deal, can we have another one, i don't think they are going to come to us and say we will give you a better deal. mrs may was also pressed on whether she would resign if her deal didn't go through. i'm not thinking about me, i'm thinking about getting a deal that delivers for the people of this country. that's what drives me and that's what is at the forefront of my mind. elsewhere, the united arab emirates considers a pardon for the british academic matthew hedges — jailed for life for spying. everyone can request a pardon from our president. mr hedges‘ family have made a request for clemency and the government is studying that request.
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police introduce a new tactic to cut the number of moped robberies: knocking the offenders off their bikes. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with hugh... and a good day forfans of england cricket. both women and men. yes indeed. jonny bairstow was back having been left out of the second test and he was at his best, with a beautifully composed century in the third test against sri lanka, while earlier england's women moved to the verge of becoming double world champions. more at half past. we look forward to that. and all the weekend weather, howard looking?” think the best advice is hang onto your thick coat, it will stay chilly and we will need our umbrellas as well in the south. more details coming up in half an hour. hello, this is afternoon live —
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i'm rebecca jones. the prime minister has called for the british people to come together over her plans for brexit. she's been taking calls from the public on radio 5live and the bbc news channel, where she said the agreement she's negotiated with brussels is the right deal for britain. she said that if parliament doesn't vote for her brexit deal, the uk will end up back at square one and warned that the eu "won't give us any more." our political correspondent nick eardley reports. it is not looking easy for theresa may. with so much opposition to her brexit plan. what happens next is farfrom certain. she is taking her argument away from westminster and trying to persuade you. the prime minister is with me...
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now is the point where i want the country to come together. for most people out there, they want us to get on with it. she had this warning. if this does not go through we end up back at square one. i believe if we would go back to the european union, and the people did not like the deal, can we have anotheri, we will not get, they are not going to say we will give you a better deal. this is the deal that works for the uk. i think we will be better off in a situation outside the european union where we have control of those things i can trade in the rest of
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the world. actually, it's a different sort of environment and a different sort of environment and a different approach that will be taken to things. that was her response to a question from michael. even if theresa may can finalise the agreement in the coming days her troubles are far from over. in parliament she faces attack from all sides. mps convinced a better deal as possible and determined to vote hers down. the man who was brexit secretary until last week wants the pm to negotiate a better deal and thinks the current offer is worse than staying in. this deal may be worse than staying in the eu? i am not going to advocate staying in the eu but if you presented me terms, we would be bound by the same rules without a voice, this would be worse than that. others are not happy. costs are going to rise big time. arguing what was promised the head of the referendum is not being delivered. they want mps to send the decision back.
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reject this deal, it is bad for businesses and the nhs and our future children and grandchildren. i would like ideally to have a general election so we can vote this shower out. the british public for the first time should have a say whether they accept these negotiations with the option of staying in the eu. there are political obstacles aplenty in the next few weeks, the road to brexit will see plenty of twists and turns. we'rejoined by radio five live's emma barnett who presented that special edition of ask this. how did you feel it went? it was lovely to have a different guest, a special edition of my own programme on five live. one of my favourite things about live radio especially and of course this is now available on television as well which is good to do the partnership on bbc news, is that ministers often come up with better and punchier questions from
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listeners, one of the questions even said don't give me waffle, give me an answer. if you're not in the middle of a general election, there aren't many opportunities to speak to the prime minister of the country and it is striking she is going out to try and sell the steel herself. this is her deal, no one knows the detail better than the banister, and ifi detail better than the banister, and if i may say, i wonder if the reasons he is doing this is because there is a struggle, there is a huge battle in the commons to get this through with that meaningful vote coming up in the second week of december, and perhaps she hopes, the public hearing her defend her own deal ahead of this historic eu summit, they will put but the let pressure on —— will put pressure on their mps to say do not put politics on this, it's not every one i wanted but get it's not every one i wanted but get it through. equally could have the reverse effect. as you save, at the listeners, it was very striking and
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they don't want waffle. but it was also striking about what she didn't say, wasn't it? it was. the questions we got and obviously we spoke to in total seven people live and got some tweets to her as well but i was looking across all morning the questions that were coming in and what is quite clear if people don't understand if her deal gets voted down, in the commons, what is next? i think it's quite crucial to understand because over the last week or so, the prime minister has started to include, "it ideal, no deal or no brexit." i wanted to drill down on what is plan b? we didn't get a clear answer. we also didn't get a clear answer. we also didn't get a clear answer on the other side which is more personal but incredibly important, a huge mass of interest, she is staked her premiership on this deal and in doing that, she has linked to it. it is completely hers. if she doesn't get it through parliament, will she was an? i asked her three times i think, she said she didn't wish to
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make it about her —— will she was i'm? people across the floor will say she is a dedicated public servant, that is her personality. evenif servant, that is her personality. even if i asked you get annoyed with the members only around her, she saysis the members only around her, she says is not great when they resign, i would say she is generous and accountable in that respect, i'm not sure i would've answered how she would have. she's still planning sending jacob rhys—mogg a christmas ca rd sending jacob rhys—mogg a christmas card despite the failed coup against her. but i would say we didn't get any answer on that either and that is noted by our viewers and listeners when they're not answered. it is striking what you didn't learn as much as what you did. it felt she was sticking to a script and she stuck to that script pretty solidly didn't she? but i had to laugh as well when you are how with celibate if you did get the deal through and it took a while to say philip and i might geta it took a while to say philip and i might get a drink. i wanted to help
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her out because we were running out of time, i would have a large glass of time, i would have a large glass of whiskey and some chips and cheese but i didn't get to do that and our listeners or viewers thought i might have been insinuating all sorts of other things. we got lots of m essa 9 es other things. we got lots of messages in at that point. she said she'd had a large drink is that like with drug yes, just think. no quantity attached. -- have a drink. no quantity attached. it's the wild west in the public, especially in a platform like radio. you have to tell us where they're from and what you will say but you try to get the chance to apply. interesting, one of the call of the mike, what's asked did the promise to ask your question and he said no. so scripts go out the window. we heard personal stuff like being sent a cupcake by a little girl to cheer her up. it is interesting how the personal stuff perhaps isn't the most comfortable spot. when i last
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interviewed her a year and a half ago, idid interviewed her a year and a half ago, i did in our office, just after the election. she talked about shedding a single tear when the election did not return the majority hopeful. i think theresa may has got a lot more comfortable perhaps with starting to share a bit of herself. she was also asked what time she goes to bed, what sleep she has, that angered people who wanted just on politics but the other thing is politics is personal and political. you try and get a sense when you have someone like that in the studio of who they are and how they are coping. i think you did. what an interesting morning you had! thanks for coming in. you deserve a big drink! our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. we know what kind of questions theresa may avoided but what did she actually answer? i think there was a couple of questions worth focusing on. what he said with a thing could
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be quite significant is that if we go back to the eu and the deal is voted down here in westminster, we will not get a better deal. i think that's interesting for this reason. effectively, what the legislation saysis effectively, what the legislation says is if this deal is voted down and about half of her backbenchers expressed concerns only yesterday in parliament, if it's rated down, the government will consider coming back with proposal. she was saying in effect, that is pointless, we won't get a better deal anyway. that has imprecations perhaps for her own future. she avoided the question as you heard about whether she will resign. but if she doesn't think there was a point negotiating with there was a point negotiating with the eu at that point, will the cabinet say it is time to move an? that question might be significant in the coming weeks. we will have around 10—12 december for it to be called. the other interesting question and the way she answered with the idea of whether her deal was actually worse than existing eu
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membership. doubly rather, the former brexit secretary, suggested it was. —— dominic raab. she was doing not in an evasive way but her own distinctive way, saying things will be distant and we could build a better future outside the eu, and will be distant and we could build a betterfuture outside the eu, and it was good to have control over her own laws but not necessarily answering directly that her deal economic lee will be better for britain. certainly the former brexit secretary was suggesting that wasn't the case and those are the kind of issues appearing over the heads of mps and talking to the public, that they want to know. thank you. our reporter adam fleming is in brussels. this summit planned for sunday to sign of the deal, how much of a done deal is that? we know that the spanish are kicking off a bit about to porter? there was a meeting in
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brussels earlier today of the sherpas,, the high ministerial advisers, and they have sealed, close, zipped up the final brexit package. —— about gibraltar. that is the agreement and the declaration that sketches out the future relationship. yvonne says that is a done deal which means the summit can go ahead but the political issue of the status of gibraltar after brexit is still unresolved —— everyone says. it is not an issue with either of those two documents, it will be solved at a political level. i've been sent some remarks made by the state secretary for the eu from the spanish government working on european affairs he was at that meeting, who apparently said there has been a small tweak to the political declaration about gibraltar, referring to the status of gibraltar, and the uk promised the spanish government there will be a written guarantee before sunday to speu a written guarantee before sunday to spell out the policy of how much of
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the future relationship will apply to gibraltar and how automatic that will be and how much say the spanish government will have over that so thatis government will have over that so that is one fall ian watson to chase in whitehall. will we get to see it on sunday? if we don't see a solution by sunday, i expect olbison fireworks on the spanish prime minister and it means this trouble toissue minister and it means this trouble to issue has gone right to the wire. —— expect to see some fireworks. but there are still a few days for it to be resolved. thank you, we will talk again. and you can see that prime minister's q&a session in full on the bbc news channel at three thirty this afternoon and on the bbc iplayer. the former english defence league leader tommy robinson has been appointed as an advisor to the ukip leader gerard batten. the party said mr robinson, whose real name is stephen yaxley—lennon, will advise on rape gangs and prison reform. mr robinson is banned from joining ukip under rules which bar former
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english defence league and british national party members. well ukip's former leader, nigel farage, is calling for a vote of no confidence in mr batten after the appointment of mr robinson. he told justin webb on bbc radio 4's today programme what he thought of the appointment. well, i'm appalled. the nec of the party voted overwhelmingly last week not to have a ballot of members, to let the man perceptuallyjoin the party, but gerard batten's got this sort of taxation with tommy robinson and discussing islam and dragging ukip into a direction of effectively being sort of street activist party, right at the moment when we have a betrayal of brexit going on by both the conservative and labour parties where ukip's potential reach out amongst the electorate is the highest it's ever been. this narrows it down, it goes against all the things i did as leader, to say we will talk about immigration, we will talk about the extreme forms of islam, we will do it
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as a non—racist, nonsectarian party. this blows a hole in all of that. well our political correspondent, jonathan blake, has been speaking to mr batten who's defending his decision to appoint tommy robinson. i'm surprised nigel has such an interest in ukip seeing as he walked away two years ago and hasn't showed any interest since and recently said he would give 100% of his efforts to leave means leave which means 0% to ukip. i have had thejob of saving the party from disappearing into oblivion. i have done a good job of that because we have membership rising, money rising, we are comfortably in the black, we have donors giving us money and we are up in the polls so i think i am making the right decisions. he says you should be focusing on the broad issue of immigration. i have been focusing on brexit
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which is why we are organising this big brexit betrayal march on the 9th of may. we are trying to get tens of thousands of people out and i encourage people to come and join ukip because the only thing that makes any difference in this whole debate is how many votes can you take away from the tories and labour at the next general election, that's the only thing they care about, and that is my goal, that is what i am doing and i'm not doing bad at the moment. why are you appointing tommy robinson as an unpaid adviser? he is merely a personal adviser on two different issues, the rape gang phenomenon which he knows a great deal about, and conditions in prison and prison reform which he also does. i have advisers on all kinds of subjects. he doesn't need to be a member of the party to do that but he will help me in that so we can develop policy going forward.
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people would call him islamophobic and he has blamed the religion of islam as a whole and held them accountable for terrorist attacks in the uk. do you agree and are you not islamophobic in the same way by association? islamophobic is a made up word that doesn't mean anything. it's an irrational fear. i do not have an irrational fear of islam. it is a prejudice against a religion. it's not a prejudice. we have never said anything about muslims, tommy robinson doesn't, we talk about islamic ideology. and critique that ideology. the reasons we have these terrorist attacks all round the world is because they derive those ideas from islamic ideology. we wa nt we want to understand that and confront that. there are plenty of other people you could ask for advice on the phenomenon of child sexual abuse in the uk, rape gang and life in prison. why are you asking tommy robinson? he put his life on the line and he is high—profile and he can bring a lot of people to the march. he will assist us in that.
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everyone knows what he stands for. he has been persecuted by the state for his views. i was in court when that case was referred to the attorney general because the judge knew there was no case whatsoever. tommy robinson was in solitary confinement forfour months because of that. i think he is a good person to have an side. a lot of people respect his stand on things and his courage. it isn't about him or nigel farage. you are appointing him as an adviser and responding to criticism so it is about that. he is a convicted criminal. he was convicted of contempt of court. you have convicted criminals sitting in the house of lords making laws over us and no one seems bothered about that. he has a few minor convictions. lots of people have had criminal convictions in the past and it doesn't mean to say they can't do something good in the present and future. by bringing him into the fold of the party, albeit as an unpaid advisor, you are flying in the face of your own rules which bans former members of the bnp and edl.
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he is not in the party. we have a proscribed list. there are ex—bnp members sitting as labour and conservative councillors. we do not do that. we have a proscribed list. i have asked the party to consider waiving that list. we can do that under our constitution, in one particular case, his. in the spirit of democracy i said this should be put to the members and they should vote on it so i am proceeding in a democratic way and it will be the members who decide it, not me. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. theresa may takes part in a phone—in on the bbc news channel and radio five live and says the draft brexit agreement is the right deal for britain. elsewhere, the united arab emirates considers a pardon for the british academic matthew hedges — jailed for life for spying. police introduce a new tactic to cut the number of moped robberies: knocking the offenders off their bikes. and in sport, jonny bairstow says he
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is desperately proud after overcoming what he called big challenges to score a century for england on the first day of the final test against sri lanka in colombo. in:‘s women just love the short form of the game, the champions have now will reach the final of the world twenty20 final by beating india. —— england's women. and david pocock will miss the game against england tomorrow with killie against england tomorrow with failed against england tomorrow with failed a late fitness test after initially being announced in the line—up. the united arab emirates is studying a request for clemency for the british academic, mathew hedges, who's beenjailed for life on charges of spying. is the uae‘s ambassador in london says he hopes an ‘amicable solution' can be found. this was also an unusual case.
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many researchers visit the uae freely every year without breaking our laws. under uae law everyone has the right to appeal after conviction and everyone can request a pardon from our president. mr hedges' family have made a request for clemency and the government is studying that request. the metropolitan police says it has cut the number of robberies using motocycles after introducing tactics including allowing officers to knock offenders off their mopeds. scotland yard said the number of offences has fallen by 44 percent since specialist teams were set up to tackle the problem. a warning viewers may find some footage in tom symonds report disturbing they can be lightning fast or deeply intimidating.
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for the met, scooter gangs have become a big problem. but modern policing in a time of dwindling resources is about careful targeting of criminals, and the new anti—scooter operation appears to be working. it's partly the kit, high power and slimline motorbikes. high powered slimline motorbikes. this new stinger system punctures the tyres of scooter criminals and then retracts to allow police cars to pass. but it's also about this. yes, that's a police car driving into a scooter rider, deliberately. they are trained to do it at a slower speed as possible. so far there have been no serious injuries. it's a high impact tactic, therefore our riders and drivers will be considering the risk to the ride they are pursuing, the risk to the public and to themselves before deciding upon that course of action. but in more cases than not,
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it's safer to bring the pursuit to a close than it is to pick continue allowing the rider to drive dangerously through london. police constantly assess the risk of starting, continuing and ending a pursuit based on all sorts of criteria. contrary to what some criminals believe, whether or not they wear are a helmet is not necessarily one of them. it's a myth. if they take their crash helmet off they think we will not pursue. they need to know that we will. it is for their safety, and we will risk assess it. crime is always changing and police believe this one has been increasing because we walking around with expensive things like phones, which are very valuable to thieves. but you can add to that the fact it is an efficient crime to carry out. one scooter can be used for a string of offences. these tactics are not entirely new, but they are now being used regularly. the met says they have helped cut scooter crime by 44% . tom symonds, bbc news, at new scotland yard. you probably don't need me to tell
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you but it's black friday — with most british retailers offering discounts. but shoppers are being warned that some promotions may be misleading. the head of the advertising standards authority has raised particular concerns about online offers. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports retailers both on and off—line are geared up for a frenzied weekend. very excited for black friday. we booked the day off work. you can get possibly some better deals online, but you can still get good deals on the high street. online is good, but today you can actually buy and take it home with you. online, you've got to basically order it and wait for it to turn up. over the next four days, the online retail association, imrg, are predicting that uk shoppers will spend £8.5 billion. there's plenty of enthusiasm for finding a deal from these shoppers in wrexham. i was walking past a shop and i saw the big sale sign. you can see something in there, you can go
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and have a look and see what they've got in there. even if you don't need it, you just... you buy it! yeah! but how easy it to spot a misleading offer? after about 12 minutes you just get mentally exhausted. we put people in the brain scanners and got them to shop online and we see they get mentally exhausted and their decision—making process drains and they suddenly start saying, oh, it's a yellow side, oh, it's a glossy one. it says best buy. i'll get one of those. and how do you know it's actually cheaper? so, like, how do you know that what they are saying is true? that's a question for the advertising standards authority. of course, the rapid pace of change online means it sometimes feels quite hard to keep up and the sheer volume of products on black friday means inevitably there are some stuff out there that isn't fair and is misleading but we're here to make
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sure we deal with any problems we can. whether you love it or loathe it, the black friday— cyber monday weekend is one of the biggest moment of the uk's retail year. from cute online players to the smallest high street cafe, shoppers are expecting money —— from cute online players. new pictures released from the international space station have provided a unique look at a rocket taking off into space. these are time—lapse images taking from the iss. that red flash you see is the soyuz—fg rocket taking off from kazakhstan. it's a re—fuelling craft heading towards the space station, carrying more than 2 and a half tonnes of supplies, including air and water. after it breaks through the earth's atmosphere you can see the main core of the rocket break off from the craft. moments later it burns up as it re—enters the earth's athmosphere. now it's time for a look at the weather.
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we can cross the newsroom to tomas. i'll see if i can see it! i'll see if! can see it! keep looking! it's long gone. the weekends are almost upon us and it's looking... ok, iguess. it will weekends are almost upon us and it's looking... ok, i guess. it will be chilly, we've had quite a bit chilly weather in the last few days now, a real teens on the way. some rain in the forecast tomorrow. but let's look at the short—term. looking angry in the atlantic line—up or the weather will have our way eventually but not in the short term. at the moment we have clout affecting the south—western parts of the country clu b we nt south—western parts of the country club went tele macro rumbles of thunder here, but for this afternoon into this evening, cornwall and devon, just indeed parts of wales, a
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risk of eight heavy shower. elsewhere predominately dry, showers lurking here and there but the best of the sunshine, lancashire, cumbria humphreys and galloway into northern ireland as well. then into eastern scotland, showers coming into the northsea. quite a easterly breeze coming with us through the weekend if anything actually strengthens. it will feel a little own the chilly side once again. this is the temperature tonight. three degrees in the north by seven in the south, less cold than last night. cold air still on top of us. this is the mild stormy weather heading our way but it can't quite come in just yet, at the moment we still have those easterly winds blowing out of the continent. this is where the best of the weather will be tomorrow with the weather will be tomorrow with the northern three quarters of the country if you get my drift. in the south, we have rain for the southern counties so plymouth, southampton,
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possibly into tunbridge wells, we expect rain on saturday. then the rain will probably beat the london area, maybe on saturday but certainly a chance of rain across the south—east and east anglia. again, best of the weather, west and wales, lake district, northern ireland, normally there is the stormy weather and rain but it's the other way round. but it will change in the coming days. this is monday. tuesday. wednesday. look at these, big storms in the atlantic heading our way, not stormy necessarily in every town or city in the uk next week that it will be increasingly windy, and more rain around. up until tuesday i think temperatures into single figures than the winds start freshening and by wednesday it really is very unsettled. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. theresa may takes part in a phone—in on the bbc news channel and radio 5 live — and says the draft brexit agreement is the right deal for britain.
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i believe that if we were to go back to the european union and say, well, people didn't like that deal, can we have another one? i don't think they will come to us and say we will give you a better deal. mrs may was also pressed on whether she would resign if her deal didn't go through. i'm not thinking about me, i'm thinking about getting a deal through that delivers for the people of this country, that drives me on is that the forefront of my mind. elsewhere, the united arab emirates considers a pardon for the british academic matthew hedges — jailed for life for spying. police introduce a new tactic to cut the number of moped robberies: knocking the offenders off their bikes. sport now on afternoon live with hugh woozencroft. and good news for english cricket fans.
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both the men and a woman. yes indeed, a greedy. great day for england's women who made it through to the world t20 final in the early hours of this morning before a solid start for england who are looking to secure a series whitewash in sri lanka. england may have solved their problems at number 3. the returning jonny bairstow starred with a controlled century on the first day of the third test against sri lanka. they won the toss and chose to bat... after a sluggish start, with openers rory burns and keatonjennings both going cheaply. bairstow‘s 110 and a half century from ben stokes helped guide england to 312 for 7 at stumps in colombo. sports correspondent andy swiss reports. it was a day defined by one man and one of sport was much more unusual
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celebrations. how often do you see a test century greeted like this, for jonny bairstow this was some way to silence his doubters. it came to the crease in england with some trouble, sri lanka sensed a collapse. button hairstyle they faced a player with deep point to prove. after being left out of the last match he set about to show his team mates what they had been missing and with a blazing 50 from ben stokes, the pair we re blazing 50 from ben stokes, the pair were soon scattering sri lanka's coax. the only distraction was a fought like it one, a dog stopped play. this was a pedigree performance, moments later his century and a roar of emotion. restriction, vindication, whatever the case, the england balcony did not seem to mind. at a the case, the england balcony did not seem to mind. ata he the case, the england balcony did not seem to mind. at a he succumbed toa not seem to mind. at a he succumbed to a weary shot at he left the field knowing this, it had been some
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comeback. from there, england faltered. a clatter of late wickets kept the gloss of things. far from perfect then, but they will be hoping to turn this intriguing start into another match—winning performance. great news for england's women's cricketers — they've already won, the 50—overs world cup and now they are through to the final of the world t20 — thanks to a dominant win over india in antigua... captain heather knight, took 3 wickets for the loss ofjust 9 runs, as they bowled out india for 112, before nat sivver and amyjones produced a 92—run partnership to see england home with 17 balls to spare. they'll play australia in tomorrow night's final, after they came past west indies. are prattling into the scheme has been so clear and we knew the game
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plan so i was feeling pretty confident and the total wasn't tysoe i knew if we batted through and got a good partnership would be a good place. was excited to play in a final and always a good game against australia, the teams of each other very well and will be plenty of match ups along the way so it will bea match ups along the way so it will be a case of who wins it on the day. it is with close, it is always fun and there is always a lots of drama so and there is always a lots of drama so i'm sure there will be more. england's aaron rai has had a spectacular australia number 8 david pocock will miss tomorrow's autumn international against england with a neck injury. he failed a fitness test after initially being named in the starting line up for the match at twickenham...coach michael cheika said that pocock was "desperate to play" but insisted that the wallabies would not risk his long—term health. chelsea midfielder n'golo kante has signed a new five—year deal. he's made 81 appearances since joining from leicester two years ago, helping chelsea to the premier league title in his first season and fa cup in his second... kante said he'd "completely
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improved" as a player at stamford bridge and was a key member of france's world cup winning squad in russia this summer. wales' lauren price will have to settle for a bronze medal after losing her semi—final at the women's world boxing championships in delhi. she was up against the european champion noosh—ka fonteen of the nertherlands but lost the three—round bout 3—2. that's all the sport for now. will have more in the next hour. well, this afternoon, theresa may has been taking part in a phone—in, here on the bbc news channel and radio 5 live — to try to sell her brexit deal to the public. the prime minister was asked, among other things, if she'd stay in the leadership should parliament vote against her withdrawal agreement with the eu. mrs may was also questioned whether her deal was better than the one the uk currently has with the eu. well many of you sent your questions to us using the ‘ask this‘ hashtag and our reality check correspondent, chris morris was
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watching the answers. he‘s with us now and we will be talking to you now in just a moment about how enlightening some of those a nswe rs we re . the first question came from caller sarah in billingham. do you think you'll get your brexit plan through parliament and if it is voted down, what is your plan b? well, first of all, thanks very much by asking that question because that is what a lot of people have been focusing on, the question of parliament and in a sense, i think there are two conversations going on in the moment. in parliament there is a lot of focus on who is going to vote for the deal and not and i think outside, people are thinking, actually, let‘s make sure we can get this through and get on and get delivering. myjob is to persuade people, i believe this is the right dealfor the uk, my deal is to persuade people in parliament to... of that view i think
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thejob of an mp is actually when they come to look at voting with this deal, to actually say to themselves does it deliver on what people voted for? i believe it does. and secondly, what do we need to focus on for our constituents, people up and down the country? and i believe people‘sjobs, people futures, the future for their children, should be at the forefront of mps minds. sarah, is there anything you want to add to that? thanks for the response, i do actually hope it does get to parliamentjust because i do want there to be certainty in the country ijust think every other option like no deal willjust cause chaos the country really. sarah, thank you so much for your call. let me just pick up on something that sarah was driving at and it was something that a lot of other people have asked, if ijust may. for a moment prime minister before we go back to the call, what is the next step if you don‘t get it through? no deal or no brexit?
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well, i think there is a risk, first of all, as i have said myjob is to persuade people to get this through. there is a process in parliamentary terms which then takes place, government comes back with a statement but i think that if this deal doesn‘t go through, what happens is we end back at square one and i think as sarah has just said, what we end up with is more uncertainty and more division. so, i believe that if we were to go back to the european union and say, well, people didn‘t like that deal, come we get another one? we would get... i don‘t think they‘re going to come to us and they‘ll say we‘ll give you a better deal. so it‘s no deal? this is the deal but i think works with the uk. i understand that, people don‘t understand what is plan b. well, we have to get through... i‘m working on making sure that we get this vote through parliament and i think
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if we don‘t get the vote parliament, what we will see is more division and more uncertainty. and i think there are people in parliament on the other side, some who will argue for no deal, some who want to stop brexit, some who want to frustrate brexit. what‘s your view? what i want to do is deliver for brexit and deliver it with a good deal. if we don‘t... my focus at the moment, my focus is... obviously, we‘ve got to finalise the deal on sunday with the european council but beyond that, it will be getting the vote. well, our reality check corresponded chris morris is here and that was a question asking about eight plan b. is there one? there is one. understandably, the bremen estate was to focus on plan a because that is what you want to do —— prime minister. she was get it through parliament but there is technically, a plan b, she alluded to it saying it would have to be a parliamentary process. if the boat in parliament fails, the government would have 2!
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days to come up with a plan, it would have to go back to parliament and tell them what that plan was within seven days there would have to bea within seven days there would have to be a parliamentary debate, precisely what the powers of mps have that stitched to amend any motion and perhaps influence because of brexit themselves, it is subject to some debate within parliament but she said it herself many times over the last few days, plan b, if her deal else is either no deal or no brexit‘s aye yes, we make back to that, might we. while that was a very good question from sarah and another question came. another question came from laura—beth from lancashire, who asked about the future for gibraltar. i'd just like a little bit for information on what has been done to protect gibraltar's sovereignty? well, thanks very much for that laura beth. you‘ve probably, you may have seen that this has, been brought up as more of an issue in the last couple of days. we are very clear about,
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as the uk, that when we negotiate for all these matters in relation to our leaving the european union and ourfuture, we do so on behalf of the whole uk family, including gibraltar, we are very clear that our position on gibraltar and its sovereignty has not changed and will not change and it is about the wish of the people of what we have done actually in looking at this phase of negotiations, the withdrawal agreement and the political equation, is actually we have been working with the government of gibraltar and the government of spain to put into place measures that actually relate to gibraltar, which and we have worked very closely with gibraltar, but our position here in the uk as the government on the sovereignty of gibraltar has not changed. chris, some people might find it a bit strange, the sudden focus on gibraltar, why is this happening
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now? i guess it there was bound to be one issue which was a blast minute drama and it turns out it was gibraltar. we know there was a long standing spanish claim of sovereignty which the uk turned back and it is also interesting that there are elections due early next month and the feared that the region are joining month and the feared that the region arejoining gibraltar. it has got caught upa arejoining gibraltar. it has got caught up a little bit in local politics but basically be spanish government i think there must be an absolute guarantee that any agreement between the eu and the uk requires the prior approval of spain relating to gibraltar and spain is saying that has been set down in european council guidelines. what we have heard in the last hour from the senior spanish officials who is involved in the negotiations in brussels is that he says we have a promise, he commented on the british government to clarify what they think the withdrawal agreement means. estate they are waiting for a
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statement in writing by sunday. theresa may will stick with her absolute determination that there is no question that anything will threaten the sovereignty of travolta but they do need to get the spanish onside and give some reassurance at the same time. —— gibraltar. onside and give some reassurance at the same time. -- gibraltar. thank you for that. several people also got in touch to ask the prime minister whether she will resign, if she doesn‘t get her deal through parliament. here‘s what she had to say. as i am sitting here, i am not thinking about me, i am thinking about getting a deal through that delivers for the people of this country. that is what drives me and that is what is at the forefront of my mind and when i say that i am going to be focused over the next few weeks, until the meaningful vote in parliament at getting that vote through, yes i will, i am going to be doing other things to. i‘m going to be around the country, i‘m going to be explaining the deal to people up and down the country because i think this is important, it is notjust about the mps in westminster looking at the deal, it is about people
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across the country, understanding what the deal is about, that is my focus. i think really she was hardly likely to say, yes, i will resign, where she? not really, no. but she is under intense political pressure? she? not really, no. but she is under intense political pressure7m course she is, and her authority is on the line but what is the alternative? four months and 70 brexiteers have been threatening in one way or another to bring her down and to force a vote in the conservative party on just in the last few days we have had promises there will be 48 letters given to there will be 48 letters given to the backbench but as we know, those letters d id the backbench but as we know, those letters did not materialise and one thing she has shown in the last few months is being able to stick around. there is no sign she will go easily because she believes it is her response polity to fulfil the wishes of the electorate as best in the referendum. you can agree or disagree with it as you like but if the mini pill boat is rejected, her
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authority is rejected. —— undermined. good to doctor you. -- good to talk to you. and you can see that prime minister‘s q&a session in full right here on the bbc news channel at 3.30 this afternoon, and on the bbc iplayer. a report today says only a third of people get the urgent mental health care they need when they go to accident and emergency departments in england. the healthcare safety investigation branch also says the care patients get — varies depending on where they live. our social affairs correspondent alison holt reports. hello. james is a psychiatric nurse based at this hospital in birmingham. so bizarre that he is having hallucinations? —— it sounds
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like. the call is from accident and emergency and james needs to seek a man quickly to work out how to help. today‘s report says that in too many places at this sort of rapid response simply does not happen. they don‘t have any records for the patient brought in by police and in the packed emergency department james now has to build up a picture of what is going on. hi, i'm james, i‘m from the rapid response team. how i‘m from the rapid response team. h ow ofte n i‘m from the rapid response team. how often are you coming down here and having to assess someone quickly? could be up to 12 or14 times per day, it varies day to day but it can be very busy. people come to accident and emergency because they need that help and support and they need that help and support and the other not sure where to go so it is the first port of call. but the branch that is where you get support like this depends on where you live. according to this report, nearly two thirds of people arriving at emergency departments with in urgent
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mental health problems do not get the help they need and even when there is a psychiatric liaison team, they are not always cold. it is all too familiarfor this they are not always cold. it is all too familiar for this woman, her brother went to accident and emergency feeling suicidal but the psychiatric team was not alerted to stop he what doubt and later died after walking in front of a car. he had been omitted 22 times and every time that he had been admitted he we nt time that he had been admitted he went to accident and emergency because he wasn't well, he was seen and he survived after it. on this occasion he was not seen and therefore, he did not survive. back at the hospital, professor george who pioneered the idea of psychiatric teams says it is vital that someone in a crisis sees the right sort of specialists are at someone that comes in with a heart
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attack or broken legs, you expect nothing but the bss by the people who are fully trained by the. you needis who are fully trained by the. you need is the in mental health. here it is decided that the young man is giving a quick decision that should help his recovery. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. theresa may takes part in a phone—in on the bbc news channel and radio 5 live — and says the draft brexit agreement is the right deal for britain. elsewhere, the united arab emirates considers a pardon for the british academic matthew hedges — jailed for life for spying. police introduce a new tactic to cut the number of moped robberies: knocking the offenders off their bikes. in the business news
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it‘s black friday and retailers are hoping that bargain prices are going to lure shoppers into a spending spree, to help boost business in the run up to christmas. but there‘s a warning from the cyber defence agency. it says black friday shoppers could be targetted by hackers. the national cyber security centre, is giving advice on how to stay safe whilst shopping online. flybe and virgin atlantic have confirmed they are in talks about a sale or closer alliance. the move comes after flybe put itself up for sale earlier this month. it says virgin is "one of the parties" it‘s been talking to. black friday, i‘m sure it is good for business but my inbox is overflowing from e—mails and offers. it is exhausting. it is exhausting,
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we are at brand oxford street in london and getting through the streets of mayhem, shoppers everywhere. so it is working? the proof of that will be when the pot up proof of that will be when the pot up how much they have made notjust today but over the weekend. the whole idea is to get spending on the run—up to christmas. it is thought the average person will spend about £244 over the black friday weekend which is a lot, it is an average figure, people will spend less or more of course. but not everybody is convinced. there is some thought that the impetus and the growth for black friday is slowing down. is every says that half of us are not going to spend anything at all on black friday and it is black friday to deep but do you know what other day it is today? no? it is national spend nothing day. all of this
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started in the us so let‘s cross over now to new york. how big a deal of it is it in the united states, that all black friday thing? of it is it in the united states, that all black friday thing7m comes after the thanks giving holiday in america, a bit like christmas when people get together with their family, sit down and enjoy a big meal and now it is followed by big friday —— black friday. in marxist art of the holiday, —— friday. in marxist art of the holiday, — — it friday. in marxist art of the holiday, —— it marks the start of the holiday. but here of course, it isa time the holiday. but here of course, it is a time for shoppers to try and ta ke is a time for shoppers to try and take advantage of deals. what's been interesting over the last three years is we have big growth of online retail and how that is changing things, for example, this holiday i've already seen one report suggesting that the number of shopping that took place yesterday
quote
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on thanksgiving so i guess people after the turkey ba by—sat on thanksgiving so i guess people after the turkey baby—sat on the couch, and apparently be —— the numberof couch, and apparently be —— the number of shoppers online increased, most on smartphones. we have got cyber monday coming up and business, and people just wouldn‘t run out of cash? the us economy is doing better thanit cash? the us economy is doing better than it was last year, we have seen a modest increase in wages and people are feeling a bit more flash asa people are feeling a bit more flash as a result of that. there has been as a result of that. there has been a forecast suggesting that americans could could spend more than the previous year but not all retailers will feel the benefit of that as there is a contrast between brick and water and the online retailers, those that are adapting to consumer taste better than others are and as you pointed out, we have the opt out
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side hashtag would have been trending in recent years is led by a sport company, trying to courage people not to shop on these days but to go outside instead. and you very much indeed. that is the business. one of britian‘s leading tv soap operas is to tackle far—right extremism in a storyline. a character from hollyoaks is seen being radicalised by a group with anti—muslim views. it‘s hoped the storyline will raise awareness about the threat of far right extremism in britain. anisa kadri reports former x factor contestant ray quinn plays extremistjohnny, a new character for channel 4 soap hollyoa ks. johnny is extreme, far—right extreme radicalisation and he is here in the village trying to befriend ste. misbah maalik killed my sister! johnny capitalises on ste‘s hatred for a muslim doctor he believes is responsible for his sister‘s death.
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i‘m johnny, by the way. i know you‘re angry. i‘ve got your back. i think this is the only storyline as well where we've been filming on set and i would say something to harvey's character, misbah, and even the crew members would come up afterwards and be like, "i really hate you right now." i've never had that with any story we have done before. they said i had acted with conviction and courage. harvey virdi plays matriarch dr misbah maalik. it's sort of a duty to look at things that are happening in society that are reflected in a soap opera, in our world here, so that perhaps when we do something, the viewers who are watching can relate to or go, "oh, my gosh, i didn't know anything about that." recently there have been warnings of a rise in far—right extremism. 968 referrals were made to the government‘s anti—radicalisation programme prevent last yea r. that is an increase of more than a quarter. they now make up 16% of all referrals compared to 10% in 2016. we were really concerned about how hate and fear is destroying communities and tearing them apart.
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i think when we did the research we felt like that is why we had to tell this story. over the last 23 years, hollyoaks has become known for its hard—hitting storylines. now the focus is radicalisation, which will hit our screens from next month. i will talk to her and put her straight. anisa kadri, bbc news. i want to bring you some breaking news that has just come into us. the cargiant news that has just come into us. the car giant vauxhall is planning a restructure at its main parkland with what it calls a phased reduction of 241 jobs, the car manufacturer has said it aimed to achieve the cuts which would be at its centre through voluntary redundancies and it did add that the decision was not accept related. it
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said the structure in was critical to insure that the planned developed its competitiveness during this difficult time within the industry. so it is planning a restructure at its main parkland with the loss of 241 jobs. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. it is going to stay cold in the short term, there is mild weather in the way but not yet. there is a bit of rain in the podcast as well, especially for the southern counties. the really unsettled weather is out there in the atlantic and that will be reaching us in the next few days with the milder air but for a time being the weather is generally still coming out of the east, that is where the winds are coming from. in the south—west of the country for cornwall and devon today we have got some very heavy showers, there have been some thunderstorms cutting parts of southern wales so the south—west and portion of the uk is at risk of further showers this evening but the
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rest of the uk is looking mostly dry. best of the sunshine, weak district, shire, dumfries & galloway and used in parts of scotland catching a few showers but for most of us across the country, it is in fa ct a of us across the country, it is in fact a dry evening and wake up —— night. that rain realigns itself the south coast which means that anywhere from plymouth to dover, there could be some rain first thing in the morning. on saturday, a lot of blue on our weather map which means the air is pretty chilly and that might look error out in the atlantic. look at the arrows here, that light breeze blowing out in the east, southern counties wet on saturday, i don‘t think it will be raining of the time, the rain will come and go but elsewhere across the uk saturday is actually not looking too bad with the best of the sunshine in some western areas. that was sunday, notice them further rain
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in the south—east. wonder concedes that —— london could see some damp weather in the afternoon but the further north west you aren‘t, the battered the weather will be. —— the better the weather will be. into next week, big weather system started spiral up into the atlantic and they will be heading in our direction, bringing some rain, some strong wind, detectors will probably pick up eventually but the winds will also strengthen the weak watching for a turbulent week next week. is hello, you‘re watching afternoon live, i‘m rebecca jones. today at three.
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theresa may takes part in a phone—in on the bbc news channel and radio five live, and says the draft brexit agreement is the right deal for britain. i believe that if we were to go back to the european union and say people didn‘t like that deal, can we have another one? i don‘t think they are going to come to us and say we will give you a better deal. mrs may was also pressed on whether she would resign if her deal didn‘t go through. i‘m not thinking about me, i‘m thinking about getting a deal that delivers for the people of this country. that‘s what drives me and that‘s what is at the forefront of my mind. the united arab emirates is considering a request for leniency for the british academic matthew hedges — jailed for life for spying. everyone can request a pardon from our president. mr hedges‘ family have made a request for clemency and the government is studying that request. police introduce a new tactic to cut
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the number of moped robberies: knocking the offenders off their bikes. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport with hugh. and england‘s cricketers are happy... yes, and jonny bairstow was back having been left out of the second test and he was at his best, with a beautifully composed century in the thrid test against sri lanka. while earlier england‘s women moved to the verge of becoming double world champions. they are into the final at the world twe nty20. they are into the final at the world twenty20. and there's all the weather. no big change this weekend, it looks it will stay chilly, with a change on the way for next week, could tell milder but also with that
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stormy. —— could turn milder. also coming up — concerns that people looking to bag a bargain in the black friday sales are being misled. good afternoon and welcome to afternoon live. the prime minister has called for the british people to come together over her plans for brexit. she‘s been taking calls from the public on the bbc news channel and radio 5live — where she said the agreement she‘s negotiated with brussels is the right deal for britain. she said that if parliament doesn‘t vote for her brexit deal, the uk will end up back at square one and warned that the eu "won‘t give us any more." our political correspondent nick eardley reports. it is not looking easy for theresa may around here. with so much opposition to her brexit plan, what happens
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next is far from certain. she is taking her argument away from westminster and trying to persuade you. the prime minister theresa may is here with me in the studio... now is the point where actually i want the country to come together. i think for most people out there, actually, theyjust want us to get on with it. and the pm had this warning. if this deal does not go through, we end up back at square one. i believe if we would go back to the european union, and say, "people did not like the deal, can we have another one," we won't get... they're not going to say, "we will give you a better deal." so it‘s this or no deal? this is the deal that i think works for the uk. but what would that deal mean for the economy? here‘s michael. i would still like to know what you think, whether we would be better off if we had stayed in the eu or if we would be better off with your deal? now, i think we'll be... i think we will be better off in a situation which we'll have
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outside the european union where we have control of all those things and are able to trade around the rest of the world. you say, "it will be better off, better off," actually it's a different sort of environment and a different approach we will be taking to things. even if theresa may can finalise the agreement in the coming her troubles are far from over. in parliament she faces attack from all sides. mps convinced a better deal as possible and determined to vote hers down. the man who was brexit secretary until last week wants the pm to negotiate a better deal and thinks the current offer is worse than staying in. this deal may be worse than staying in the eu in your mind? i am not going to advocate staying in the eu but if you presented me terms, this deal or eu membership, because we would be bound by the same rules without a voice, this would be worse than that.
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others are not happy. costs are going to rise big time for the people of britain. arguing what was promised the head of the referendum is not being delivered. they want mps to send the decision back. reject this deal, it is bad for businesses and the nhs and our future children and grandchildren. i would like ideally to have a general election so we can vote this shower out. the british public for the first time should have a say whether they accept these negotiations with the option of staying in the eu. there are political obstacles aplenty in the next few weeks, the road to brexit will see plenty of twists and turns. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster = you were listening along with the rest of us, her strategy seems to be reaching out to the public over the heads of politicians, will that work? it's a very big task. only
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yesterday when this was debated in parliament, about half of her own backbenchers were expressing concerns, publicly on the record, about 88 of her own mps have found critical of the deal or have said they will not be voting for it. it‘s a huge task and she hopes people rushed to the barricades and defend this deal at local constituencies plan put pressure on mp. but how many will read a 585 paid withdrawal agreement? her strategy has to be that this deal is better than an auto to —— 585 page. it is interesting because he was saying there is no better deal on the table, if this is voted down, the eu will not give us a better one. but that raises questions about her own future because as things stand, if parliament votes the deal down, the government collected thoughts, comes back proposals to mps, is she says it‘s not worth going back to brussels to renegotiate, something
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which her partners the dup are keen to her to do, that will raise questions about how long she will continue. interesting that she refused three times the answer in the interview earlier about whether she will resign. she says it wasn‘t about her, she was thinking of others‘ doll. the other question people are asking is is this better than the eu membership she answered and a distinct way but not a direct one, she says it was to possible to make it future outside the eu. if you do is to appeal to the public what she has -- if —— if she is to appeal to the public, she has to be more clear. this eu summit is planned for sunday to finalise the deal. now this issue of gibraltar has cropped up. i wondered how much of an obstacle you felt that might be? it looks like it isa felt that might be? it looks like it is a still rock in the road, the
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idea yesterday that it is cleared away and she did get the political declaration, county parliament and talk about it but apparently not. in the past hour or so, the spanish negotiator in brussels has come up to the press and says he wants written guarantees from britain and gibraltar when it comes to the future trading relationship, not this withdrawal agreement that brings us out of the eu but future trade, he was to make sure spain is properly consulted. he suggested britain will give some kind of written guarantee before the thunder summit orat it. written guarantee before the thunder summit or at it. when downing street we re summit or at it. when downing street were asked about this earlier, they said they were not aware of addendum is all appendices to be added —— or appendices to be added to the document. we‘ve not had a response from downing street but it will be interesting if this is might be, i wouldn‘t use the plan again, a bump in the road, or whether she‘ll get a smoother passage on sunday when the other 27 nations consider it —— when
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to use the palm again. let us know when you do get a response but for now, thank you. and you can see that prime minister‘s q&a session in full on the bbc news channel at 3.30 this afternoon and on the bbc iplayer. meanwhile, in other news... the united arab emirates is studying a request for clemency for the british academic, mathew hedges, who‘s beenjailed for life on charges of spying. the uae‘s ambassador in london says he hopes an "amicable solution" can be found. this was also an unusual case. many researchers visit the uae freely every year without breaking our laws. under uae law everyone has the right to appeal after conviction and everyone can request a pardon from our president. mr hedges‘ family have made a request for clemency and the government is studying that request. the former english defence league leader tommy robinson has been
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appointed as an advisor to the ukip leader gerard batten. the party said mr robinson, whose real name is stephen yaxley—lennon, will advise on rape gangs and prison reform. mr robinson is banned from joining ukip under rules which bar former english defence league and british national party members. well, ukip‘s former leader, nigel farage, is calling for a vote of no confidence in mr batten after the appointment of mr robinson. he told justin webb on bbc radio 4‘s today programme what he thought of the appointment. well, i‘m appalled. the nec of the party voted overwhelmingly last week not to have a ballot of members, to let the man perceptuallyjoin the party, but gerard batten‘s got this sort of taxation —— fixation with tommy robinson and discussing islam and dragging ukip into a direction of effectively
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being sort of street activist party, right at the moment when we have a betrayal of brexit going on by both the conservative and labour parties where ukip‘s potential reach out amongst the electorate is the highest it‘s ever been. this narrows it down, it goes against all the things i did as leader, to say we will talk about immigration, we will talk about the extreme forms of islam, we will do it as a non—racist, nonsectarian party. this blows a hole in all of that. well our political correspondent, jonathan blake, has been speaking to mr batten who‘s defending his decision to appoint tommy robinson. i‘m surprised nigel has such an interest in ukip seeing as he walked away two years ago and hasn‘t showed any interest since and recently said he would give 100% of his efforts to leave means leave which means 0% to ukip. i have had thejob of saving the party from disappearing into oblivion. i have done a good job of that because we have membership rising, money rising, we are comfortably in the black, we have donors giving us money and we are up in the polls
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to 8% so i think i am making the right decisions. he says you should be focusing on the broad issue of immigration. i have been focusing on brexit which is why we are organising this great big brexit betrayal, brexit means exit march on the 9th of may. we are trying to get tens and tens of thousands of people out to that and i encourage people to come and join ukip because the only thing that makes any difference in this whole debate is how many votes can you take away from the tories and labour at the next general election? that‘s the only thing they care about, and that is my goal, that is what i am doing and i‘m not doing bad at the moment. why are you appointing tommy robinson as an unpaid adviser? he is merely a personal adviser on two different issues, the rape gang phenomenon which he knows a great deal about, and conditions in prison and prison reform which he also unfortunately has
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first—hand knowledge of. i have advisers on all kinds of subjects and policy spokesmen. he doesn‘t need to be a member of the party to do that but he will help me in that so we can develop policy going forward. people would call him islamophobic and he has blamed the religion of islam as a whole and held them accountable for terrorist attacks in the uk. do you agree with him on that and by associating with him are you not islamophobic in the same way by association? islamophobic is a made up word that doesn‘t mean anything. it‘s an irrational fear. i do not have an irrational fear of islam. it is a prejudice against a religion. it‘s not a prejudice. we have never said anything about muslims, we don‘t talk about muslims, tommy robinson doesn‘t, we talk about islamic ideology. we talk about islamic ideology and critique that ideology. the reasons we have these terrorist attacks all round the world is because they derive those ideas from islamic ideology. we want to understand that and confront that. there are plenty of other people you could ask for advice on the phenomenon of child sexual abuse in the uk, rape gangs and life in prison. why are you asking tommy
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robinson about that? he put his life on the line and he is high—profile and he can bring a lot of people to the march. he will assist us in that. everyone knows what he stands for on that. he has been persecuted by the state for his views. i was in court when that case was referred to the attorney general because the judge knew there was no case whatsoever. tommy robinson was in solitary confinement forfour months because of that. i think he is a good person to have an side. a lot of people respect his stand on things and his courage. it isn‘t about him or nigel farage. you are appointing him as an adviser and responding to criticism so it is about him today in part. he is a convicted criminal. he was convicted of contempt of court on the first count. you have convicted criminals sitting in the house of lords making laws over us and no one seems bothered about that. he has a few minor convictions. lots of people have had criminal convictions in the past and it doesn‘t mean to say they can‘t do something good in the present and future.
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by bringing him into the fold of the party, albeit as an unpaid advisor, you are flying in the face of your own rules which bans former members of the bnp and edl. he is not in the party. we have a proscribed list. there are ex—bnp members sitting as labour and conservative councillors. we do not do that. we have a proscribed list. i have asked the party to consider waiving that list. we can do that under our constitution, in one particular case, his. in the spirit of democracy i said this should be put to the members and it will be the members who decide it, not me. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. theresa may takes part in a phone—in on the bbc news channel and radio five live — and says the draft brexit agreement
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is the right deal for britain. the united arab emirates considers a pardon for the british academic matthew hedges — jailed for life for spying. police introduce a new tactic to cut the number of moped robberies: knocking the offenders off their bikes. and in sport, jonny bairstow says he‘s desperately proud after overcoming what he called big challenges to score a century for england on the first day of the final test against sri lanka in colombo. england‘s women are the 50 over world champions and have reached the final of the world twe nty20. reached the final of the world twenty20. they beat india by eight wickets ample face australia for the title tomorrow. and australia robina barton eight david pocock will miss the game against england tomorrow due to failing a injury test having been initially named in the starting line—up for the match against twickenham. that‘s the sport, will have more in the next hour. a convicted paedophile has told
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a jury that he did not murder two schoolgirls in brighton 32 years ago. russell bishop is on trial for the second time for the murders of nine—year—olds nicola fellows and karen hadaway near brighton in 1986. helena lee is at the old bailey. the girls had gone out to play one afternoon after school on october 30 two years ago. their bodies were found the following following day in a woods. they have been sexually assaulted and strangled. today in court the man on trial for the murder, russell bishop, came out of the dock where he has been throughout this trial and into "to the witness box, for the oath as he gave evidence, his voice was shaking, at times his barrister had
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to ask him to speak up because he was muttering that time. the jury weren‘t able to hear him. but there was an exchange at the start of the evidence between russell and his barrister, and his barrister said to him," did you kill karen hadaway?" russell bishop replied now i didn‘t, did you kill nicola fellows, now i didn‘t, he‘s applied. do you know who did? know i didn‘t. then he described the moment they found them, it it they have been searching on october 1986 with his dog and other people, he told the court he had a couple of young boys call down that they had found the two little girl. he told the jury he went to them, went straight to the girls, he said he went to feel for a poll. but couldn‘t find one. he was then asked by his barrister, did you realise they were dead? russell bishop with
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plaid i did indeed. how did you feel, has his barrister? ifelt shocked and totally second —— he replied i did indeed. he then said to thejury he replied i did indeed. he then said to the jury he was badly treated by officers in the weeks after. he was then charged with the girls‘ murders. again asked by his barrister how he felt about that, he began crying at that stage in the witness box and said he was devastated. and the other thing the jury devastated. and the other thing the jury heard today, they already knew that he had been convicted in 1990 four kill a seven—year—old girl in brighton. he was on trial for that and was convicted, and he said today to thejury he and was convicted, and he said today to the jury he felt ashamed about what he had done. he has finished giving evidence for the defence, he will be cross examined here in court at the old bailey on monday. thank you. car—maker vauxhall is to cut 241 jobs at its main plant
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in ellesmere port in cheshire. the motor giant said it aimed to achieve the cuts through voluntary redundancies and has said the decision is not brexit related. unions have critised the timing in the run up to christmas — and said the move was unfair after workers have made "huge sacrifices and worked hard to ensure the car—maker recently returned to profit for the first time in two decades". the metropolitan police says it has cut the number of robberies using motocycles after introducing tactics including allowing officers to knock offenders off their mopeds. scotland yard said the number of offences has fallen by 44% since specialist teams were set up to tackle the problem. a warning viewers may find some footage in tom symonds‘ report disturbing. they can be lightning fast or deeply intimidating. for the met, scooter gangs have become a big problem. but modern policing in a time of dwindling resources
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is about careful targeting of criminals, and the new anti—scooter operation appears to be working. this new stinger system punctures the tyres of scooter criminals and then retracts to allow police cars to pass. but it‘s also about this. yes, that‘s a police car driving into a scooter rider, deliberately. they are trained to do it at as low a speed as possible. so far there have been no serious injuries. it‘s a high—impact tactic, therefore our riders and drivers will be considering the risk to the ride they are pursuing, the risk to the public and to themselves before deciding upon that course of action. but in more cases than not, it‘s safer to bring the pursuit to a close than it is to pick continue allowing the rider to drive dangerously through london. police constantly assess the risk of starting, continuing and ending a pursuit
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based on all sorts of criteria. contrary to what some criminals believe, whether or not they wear are a helmet is not necessarily one of them. it's a myth. if they take their crash helmet off they think we will not pursue. they need to know that we will. it is for their safety, and we will risk assess it. crime is always changing and police believe this one has been increasing because we walking around with expensive things like phones, because we are walking around with expensive things like phones, which are very valuable to thieves. but you can add to that the fact it is an efficient crime to carry out. one scooter can be used for a string of offences. these tactics are not entirely new, but they are now being used regularly. the met says they have helped cut scooter crime by 44%. tom symonds, bbc news, at new scotland yard. it‘s black friday, with most british retailers offering discounts.
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i‘m sure you don‘t need me to tell you. but shoppers are being warned that some promotions may be misleading. the head of the advertising standards authority has raised particular concerns about online offers. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports retailers both on and off—line are geared up for a frenzied weekend. very excited for black friday. we booked the day off work. you can get possibly some better deals online, but you can still get good deals on the high street. online is good, but today you can actually buy and take it home with you. online, you've got to basically order it and wait for it to turn up. over the next four days, the online retail association, imrg, are predicting that uk shoppers will spend £8.5 billion. there‘s plenty of enthusiasm for finding a deal from these shoppers in wrexham. i was walking past a shop and i saw the big sale sign. you can see something in there, you can go and have a look and see what they‘ve got in there.
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even if you don‘t need it, you just... you buy it! yeah! but how easy it to spot a misleading offer? after about 12 minutes you just get mentally exhausted. we put people in the brain scanners and got them to shop online and we see they get mentally exhausted and their decision—making process drains and they suddenly start saying, oh, it's a yellow side, oh, it's a glossy one. it says best buy. i'll get one of those. and how do you know it‘s actually cheaper? so, like, how do you know that what they are saying is true? that‘s a question for the advertising standards authority. of course, the rapid pace of change online means it sometimes feels quite hard to keep up and the sheer volume of products on black friday means inevitably there are some stuff out there that isn't fair and is misleading but we're here to make sure we deal with any problems we can. whether you love it or loathe it, the black friday—
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cyber monday weekend is one of the biggest moment of the uk‘s retail year. from huge online players to the smallest high street cafe, shoppers are expecting money off. it‘s the british comedy sketch which has become an essential part of new years‘ celebrations in germany, but has never been shown here until now. dinner for one has been broadcast on german tv every new year‘s eve since 1972. this afternoon it finally has its first uk public screening. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has the story. the same procedure as last year? a 90th birthday party. the host‘s friends are dead so her loyal butler plays every guest, getting more tipsy as the evening goes on. dinner for one is watched by millions in germany every new year‘s eve. at manchester‘s christmas
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markets, german traders say it is essential viewing. every child in germany knows dinner for one. you are waiting for it the whole year. we always thought it started being famous over here and somehow, you know, swapped over to germany. in 1963, english comedy actor freddie frinton‘s music hall performance was turned into a german tv programme. the whole thing was filmed in one 15—minute take. ten years later it became an annual institution. my brother and i impersonated this all the time. now his son, mike, is guest of honour for its much delayed uk premiere at a weekend of slapstick here in campbeltown. it is almost like seeing him do it in a theatre, live. this is the one thing he really enjoyed doing. it was his baby. when you go to germany and tell people that you are freddie frinton‘s son, what reaction do you get? if i meet a german in the street i will say, "you know my father, he‘s freddie frinton," and the reaction is always brilliant. people always want to have their picture taken with you, selfies. organisers believe the sketch will be appreciated
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by a british audience. freddie frinton is a comedy genius. his timing is perfect. it is an absolute masterpiece of slapstick. 50 years after his death, his reputation continues to grow. a freddie frinton stamp hasjust been issued in germany and next year a museum dedicated to him opens in bremerhaven. and, of course, it‘s already part of new year plans. i have some friends coming over, people to party at my house, and i think we will watch it before we start to have dinner together. they all know they will be watching dinner for one? yeah, sure, everybody does it. it is tradition. the same procedure as last year? the same procedure as every year, james. colin paterson, bbc news... i'll do my very best. ..campbeltown. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with
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tomasz schafernaker. it is chilly out there once again and this weekend it is going to stay pretty cold for most of us easterly winds, temperatures into single figures and there‘s a little but of rain in the forecast as well. but some sunshine to. at the moment we have some heavy showers, you can see on the satellite the cloud art in the south affecting acting cornwall, devon, southern parts of wales and cracks of thunder as well. this is what it looks like through the afternoon, heavy showers in the south were one or two in eastern scotland, moving through central scotland, moving through central scotland, but elsewhere across the uk it's scotland, but elsewhere across the uk it‘s relatively cloudy day. tonight, it‘s generally frost free, temperatures in towns and cities in the range of 3—7d but noticed there is some rain by the end of the night. along the south coast and
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actually saturday is not looking great for the southern counties, there could be some rain around that may last into sunday as well. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. theresa may takes part in a phone—in on the bbc news channel and radio 5 live — and says the draft brexit agreement is the right deal for britain. well, people didn‘t like that one, can we have another one? i don‘t think there are going to come to us and say we will give you a better deal. the united arab emirates is considering a request for leniency for the british academic matthew hedges — jailed for life for spying.
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