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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 25, 2018 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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and this through and this agreement will be the agreement then negotiations will start soon after. 0k. thank you very much indeed. that's just start soon after. 0k. thank you very much indeed. that'sjust an start soon after. 0k. thank you very much indeed. that's just an example of national interests which might come to the fore once this initial brexit process comes to an end, donald tusk seeing yesterday in his letter to european leaders ahead of the summit they have managed to keep this unity among the 27 and that was something to congratulate themselves on but what will happen in the next stage as denmark and the start talk about fishing and france wants something on the level playing field and spain want something on gibraltar? you can see all the bubbling up down the line which will no doubt because theresa may are one or two headaches. plenty of reaction from here in brussels and we will bring you the arrival of the prime minister when she gets here at the summit building but now we will pause and look at the weather. another day where we see large
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amounts of cloud. bright and sunny spells, more than we saw yesterday. still some showers pushing in with a brisk easterly wind, working for the west. as many showers as we saw yesterday. in southern parts of england. cold, wet exposed to the wind. highs of 7—9d. showers overnight, chiefly on the eastern coasts. wintry in nature over high grounds of northern england and scotland. clear skies, frost in northern england and northern ireland. temperatures close to freezing. a cold start the new week. bright for many. sunshine to be found tomorrow. showers, chiefly eastern coasts. temperatures tomorrow between six and 9 degrees. through the week, things turn milder, wet and windy with a risk of gales. that's all from me, goodbye. hello, this is bbc news.
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the headlines. after 18 months of negotiations, european union leaders are meeting to decide whether to accept the terms of britain's withdrawal from the eu. if it's approved, the deal will face a much tougher vote in westminster. theresa may has written an open letter to the british public appealing for support. and in other news — a man has been charged with the attempted murder of a police officer after a knife attack in east london. the incident happened at ilford railway station on friday night. daniel adeyemi — who's 2a — will appear before magistrates tomorrow. before the papers — sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good morning. england lost to australia in the women's world t20 final in antigua, as they failed to follow up their world cup win last year in the shortest format of the game.
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it was their batting which proved their downfall, opener tammy beaumont out for just four. only two players made it into double figures, as england failed to bat out their 20 overs— all out for 105. australia lost two wickets in their run chase — some big hitting from ashleigh gardner saw them reach the total with eight wickets in hand. so disappointment for heather knight and her team after their success in the world cup last year — the 50 over tournament. our reporterjo currie is in antigua. coming into the final, england were dreaming of being crowned double world champions. attempting to add the t20 title to the one—day world cup they claimed last year. instead it has ended in bitter disappointment. they were left reflecting on what could have been, and having to watch on as australia
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ended their four—year wait for a major trophy. it is quite raw at the moment. we have to reflect and get back home, and reflect on where we go potentially as a side but i'm chuffed for the young girls, who have come out here and rarely performed on the biggest stage. there will be some big celebrations. we've been waiting for this moment for a long time. as i said, is very satisfying to win, and yes, we will celebrate accordingly! the girls have worked extremely hard to get their success, and you don't know what will happen in future so we are going to make the most of it and enjoy one another's company. the england women may not have been able to repeat the success they enjoyed at the one—day world cup last year. richard dawes world finals in the space of 60 months captive remarkable period for this team but for now, it is a time for reflection. for some of these players, the opportunity to be crowned a double world champion may not come round again. joe curry, bbc
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news, antigua. england lost a flurry of wickets in the morning session on third day of the third test with sri lanka beforejos butler steadied their second innings keaton jennings was one of four wickets to fall in the morning session — the opener out first ball of the day. but joss buttler steadied things as he made a half century. he departed for 64 — england with a lead of 306 — and hoping to win the series 3—0 with victory in this the final match in colombo. all the home nations signed off with wins in rugby union's autumn series. scotland beat argentina, ireland were too strong for the usa. england had a convincing victory against australia and wales completed their first clean sweep of november internationals. they beat south africa in cardiff as patrick gearey reports. wales have enjoyed their autumn at home, by the fire. in the comfort of cardiff, they'd won three from three.
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and what a start against south africa. atjust the right moment, up popped a prop — tomas francis over, wales away. they didn't let up. overlapping then overwhelming. liam william's try — 14—0, 16 minutes in. that was the easy part. wales knew they would have to deal with the springboks in wilderbeast mode. their pressure creating space forjesse kriel to score. south africa got back to within three points but, as the pressure grew, the welsh got bigger. dan biggar‘s two penalties carried them clear, all the way to an autumnal clean—sweep and nine wins in a row going into a world cup year. speaking of world cups... commentator: this is the one that's coming back forjonny wilkinson! he drops for world cup glory! it's over, he has done it. ian robertson's most famous bbc radio commentary and, for his final match on the mic after 47 years, england was sson beating australia once more. jonny may the finisher
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of his side's perfect start. england were in control, ten points ahead but israel folau spotted a hole in their plan. blink and you'll miss him. england did. they were lucky to still be level at the break. then afterwards, elliot daly found the fast lane. once he does that, the result becomes inevitable. if daly is the express, joe cockanasiga is a freight train with several heavy carriages. no stopping him neither. but finally, he will be stopping after a memorable end to england's year and a legendary career. i have loved every minute of it. and thank you very, very much. patrick geary, bbc news. chelsea's unbeaten premier league record is over after a 3—1 defeat to spurs at wembley. heung—min son scored his first league goal since march to seal the win, and what a solo effort it was when you consider how far out on the touchline he was. a brilliant run and finish adding to dele alli's header and a long range effort from harry kane as spurs move above chelsea into third. elsewhere leaders manchester city thrashed west ham 4—0 to remain unbeaten, liverpool stay second after a 3—0 win at watford.
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celtic continue to top the scottish premier league thanks to a 3—0 win over struggling hamilton academical. this well—worked move was finished off by ryan christie to put the champions 1—0 up early on. in the second half, scott martin scored an own goal and leigh griffiths struck with a free kick. rangers are now second after beating livingston and hearts have dropped to third with defeat at st mirren. lewis hamilton will be hoping for the perfect finish to his formula one season with victory at the abu dhabi grand prix later. the world champion broke the track record at yas marina three times on the way to claiming his eleventh pole of the season. he's joined on the front row by his mercedes team mate valtteri bottas. ferrari's sebastian vettel starts from third. that's all the sport for now. news coming in from brussels, we
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will show you this tweet that donald tusk has just will show you this tweet that donald tusk hasjust aired. will show you this tweet that donald tusk has just aired. the european council president saying, as you can see, the eu 27 has endorsed the withdrawal agreement, that is the legally binding element of what is being discussed in brussels today. the political declaration, the less legally binding document, on those future eu uk relations, you have seen the various arrivals. they have sat down and contemplated those documents and according to donald tusk they have endorsed them. in the next 20 minutes we expect theresa may to arrive in brussels and no doubt say something about what the leaders have decided in the last few moments. more to come but before that, it is time for a look at the papers. hello and welcome to our sunday
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morning paper review. with me are lucy fisher, defence correspondent at the times and james rampton, features writer for the independent. lets take a look at the front pages. the mail on sunday says the prime minister is making a plea directly to the people with a letter urging the public to back her brexit deal. the sunday express also has theresa may's letter to the nation as its front page. the sunday telegraph has a photograph of the prime minister meeting the european commission president today but its lead article says both the cabinet and the eu are plotting separate plan b proposals for brexit based on a growing assumption that theresa may's plans will be blocked by parliament. the independent says the prime minister is facing a backlash over her agreement on gibraltar. it has a picture of the fuel protests in paris. and the sunday times leads on an investigation into an apartment block in london owned by a conservative donor. and the sunday times leads on an investigation into an apartment block in london owned by a conservative donor. that's a flavour, i have a feeling
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it will be brexit heavy! but we will see what lucy and james have to say. take us to the mail on sunday, pm plea to the people? they are leading with the prime minister's public letter today to the public. that seems a little precipitate in light of the fact that she had signed the withdrawal agreement with the eu and nobody really thinks that she is going to have an easy time getting any of this through parliament. a lot around today about plan bs and other ideas to make it goes soft, in norway option, or harder and go for no deal. i do agree with lucy, that it isa no deal. i do agree with lucy, that it is a bit hasty, given the number of opponents that there are still swarming around, and the daily mail
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has a lot of good bullet points about potential pitfalls that lie ahead. apparently, the chancellor has threatened to quit if mrs may goes for a no deal option. mr hammond and sajid javid have warned of their economic impact of stopping and skilled migrants coming to the country. michael gove decided against resigning, after reading apocalyptic warnings about the effect of no deal on the uk's water supply. an apocalyptic warning i have not heard before! more and more terrifying potential outcomes there. which particularly delights me, more warfare between brexiteers. i am delighted about that! the idea of a letter, effectively, that is to an extent by passing a lot of that, isn't it? directed at the british people, this is what i have done,
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significant portions of you admire my resilience to get this far. so, come with me? that is the message. absolutely, she makes a good point that the labels of remain and league needs to be left behind. there is recognition that this is riddled by brexit and there has to be an effort for people to come together and reunite and move forward. i do not think we are there yet. and a letter writing is being revived! yes, jane austen would be delighted! i agree with you, i think she is appealing over the heads of parliament. is that a smart tactic? she was during the phone and offensive, it is not offensive but very early on to some people but she is trying to bypass parliament and it is intriguing but ido parliament and it is intriguing but i do not think she is at the point, or the country is at the point, where we can leave behind labels. in my view the debate is more toxic than ever. people are more furious
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oi'i than ever. people are more furious on both sides, and more worked up about it than they even were in 2016. i agree. it's about it than they even were in 2016. iagree. it's a about it than they even were in 2016. i agree. it's a clever move by number10, 2016. i agree. it's a clever move by number 10, the idea that theresa may could have a public debate withjeremy corbyn. he has been shown up in recent weeks to not be on top of brexit‘s own labour policy. the war game going on inside downing street is that she helps solve a deal and better if they can stand next to the labour leader. can you imagine that happening? i could because i think jeremy corbyn is a pretty poor public speaker. there were allegations last week that there was allegations last week that there was a very between him and keir starmer, his shadow brexit secretary over what happened at the labour party conference. they appeared to contradict one another on brexit. i thinkjeremy corbyn has played an ambiguous game. my own view? that he isa ambiguous game. my own view? that he is a brexiteer and believes the eu is a brexiteer and believes the eu is cosy and capitalist. didn't he
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vote remain? yes but in 1975 he voted to leave. he campaigned in a very lukewarm manner and i voted to leave. he campaigned in a very lukewarm mannerand i think voted to leave. he campaigned in a very lukewarm manner and i think his long—standing ideology is outing the eu as long—standing ideology is outing the euasa long—standing ideology is outing the eu as a capitalist club that harms workers' rights. let's talk about one of these plan bs that you mentioned. in the sunday telegraph, a secret plan b, in quotes, for brexit. according to the telegraph, a cabinetand brexit. according to the telegraph, a cabinet and eu plot? it is double pronged war—gaming going on here. interestingly we have heard a lot about what the brexiteers are doing and what they have been conspiring and what they have been conspiring and convening, and organising themselves better in the early stages of the process. it's interesting, today we have seen a lot of use of cabinet remainers, threatening to walk if they no deal looks likely. instead,
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for some of these remainer pull at least in the daily telegraph, there isa least in the daily telegraph, there is a norway option where the uk stays in the european economic area but without full membership of the eu. james, do you buy this as another plot at the 11th hour?|j eu. james, do you buy this as another plot at the 11th hour? i do, andl another plot at the 11th hour? i do, and i like that they call it a meeting without a pizza, in contrast to the pizza plotters, the brexit groupa to the pizza plotters, the brexit group a couple of weeks ago! i think it is hilarious. and possibly quite appropriate, that donald tusk, as we are quoting, freddie mercury today, he passed away exactly 27 years ago, friends will be friends until right till the end. friends will be friends until right tillthe end. i'm friends will be friends until right till the end. i'm afraid not in the uk. look at families and friendships torn apart by this. i know david cameron apparently will never speak to michael gove, who is godfather to one of his children again. it has torn people apart. it's a very sad upshot of the whole thing. the toxicity in the public discourse
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i'iow. toxicity in the public discourse now. the implication is that the eu is prepared to shift again, albeit a little bit, where the rhetoric coming out of brussels is that this isa coming out of brussels is that this is a deal, take it or leave it? well, quite. that element will cause confusion, or at least that is what people have to calculate in parliament. those remainers who would like a softer brexit, will they think that the eu would look again at something that would allow them to get that, or will the eu stick firm to the claim that it is this deal, or no deal? mrs merkel said last week that there was no chance of negotiating again, but if the uk crash out with no deal or the possibility of a norway style deal, thenit possibility of a norway style deal, then it kicks in and the eu renegotiated because it would rather have a friendly and profitable trading relationship with the uk rather than some sort of animosity.
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there will be animosity anyway that they would want to reduce the possibility of that. the gibraltar issue has gone away, we are told, in the last 2a hours but the sunday telegraph still mentions it on the front page. some accusations levelled at theresa may and others at the spanish. it is hard to pick your way through. to me it seems like one of the great issues that the brexiteers can take a stand on still. there is a lot of talk on the trail -- still. there is a lot of talk on the trail —— on betrayal and how they can be doing this at the last minute. but i think that the spanish have come onside. they realise that the future of the eu would be very much in enhanced by a good deal with the uk. remember, we do 60% of trade with the eu at the moment. it is a massive cash inflow to the eu and if it is messed up by the deal, countries like spain, who are already economically suffering, they will suffer even more. the spanish
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have realised, they also have an election coming up... it concentrates the mind. if they make as much as what happened in argentina and the falklands, if they make noises about fighting for gibraltar, it goes down well with a certain sector of their electorate but in the end pragmatism will win and gibraltar will succeed. but in the end pragmatism will win and gibraltar will succeedm but in the end pragmatism will win and gibraltar will succeed. it is in andalusia, closest to gibraltar? there is clearly an element of domestic politics happening here but it's not the end of the issue. we will hear more from this from brexiteers. there is uncertainty about sovereignty in future. down the line, with this last—minute concession. we the line, with this last—minute concession . we are the line, with this last—minute concession. we are going to talk about something else now... what? is there anything else! in the sunday times, two stories which tied to a degree. let's begin with the first pa rt degree. let's begin with the first part of it, top state schools close
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gap on private rivals?|j part of it, top state schools close gap on private rivals? i love the headline. it is a win for equality and anyone who goes to any school to have the best chance. looking at the details of which state schools are closing the gap with their private rivals, the there are more grammar schools in this elite club but this is all about the league tables in light of the new and harder gcses, moving away from a star, a grade system. the best elite grammar schools are doing much better than private rivals. it is interesting. i ta ke private rivals. it is interesting. i take the point but it is interesting, that state schools now account for almost one third of the elite club compared to just 20% two years ago. things are changing, it was the same group of state schools that were competing in the league tables. there has been some sort of sea change. forgive me for a moment,
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you can see the prime minister is arriving in brussels. we will pause for a moment to see if she's going to say anything, as she walks in. that probably answers our question! we are aware, of course, that the endorsement has already taken place of both the withdrawal agreement and the policy document. those were the two issues that are at stake today, as the 27 other eu leaders contemplate brexit in detail. the prime minister is obviously now arriving knowing that. we are going to the room where the other leaders have gathered and will say something at some point but clearly not at this point! in which case, james, i so rudely interrupted you! on that bombshell! i was in mid—education flow, 20 odd years ago tony blair talked about his priorities being
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education, education, education. i ta ke education, education, education. i take the point about it being a grammar school elite but that is a big change from 20% to 33% now of the elite club being state schools. in my view, that can only be a good thing. if you lessen the power of the public school system, which i believe has had a malign effect on our society in many ways, i think it isa our society in many ways, i think it is a positive effect on society. and they are cutting their fees? there is an interesting part here about the headmaster of the school, saying they look the way with a 10% fee cut and other schools should follow. 0ne wonders whether they are having difficulty enrolling enough students. it is a lot of money. i would look down the back of the south and find it easily. it's an extraordinary amount of money, after tax! iagree, who extraordinary amount of money, after tax! i agree, who on earth can afford that? hedge fund managers,
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russian oligarchs, definitely, chinese businessmen, but there is a very small part of society that can afford that. the fact that they are trumpeting and making a song and dance about a 10% cut? 3.8 thousand? it is still 34,000 which i will struggle to find down the back of the sofa. it's a good point. an insight into your finances! it is saved on the back of the sofa. banks can crash...! saved on the back of the sofa. banks can crash. . .! the point you saved on the back of the sofa. banks can crash...! the point you make about those who can afford it, a lot of russian oligarchs and very wealthy foreign families, sending their children to elite british public schools, one would wonder whether there is a sense as to the reason they want this english education, they cannot get enough english people who can afford to go? and many are setting up branches in china because there is a huge market to tap into. i am not criticising
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them, even though they are charities, they have a business approach to generate more pupils but 38,000 a year? that would make most of us blanche. and finally, a chance to reflect on what is without a doubt and entrancing image. tear gas above the champs—elysees in palace, the yellow jackets, above the champs—elysees in palace, the yellowjackets, those in the high theirs, protesting the diesel fuel tax rise in france. james, what do you make of it? is it interesting to see this, the attitude to the environment and the cost of fuel?m plays a lot into the narrative that we have been talking about, the brexit vote that came in, with a feeling of discontent and feeling marginalised and ostracised. within
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france's huge discontent, it is fuelled by the right wing. marine le pen has called on demonstrators to come out. it has got violent. two people died last week. this is of a piece with trump in america, brexit and massive discontent that is finding a different way to express itself. sadly, very violent here. thank you to both of you. that's all for the papers this morning. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. and if you missed the programme, in the morning or the evening, watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you to lucy and james, and goodbye. hello, if you were stuck under the
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cloud yesterday, the prospect of something a little brighter today. still large amount of cloud, some showers around. this is yesterday's area of low pressure that brought rain to the uk. a legacy of cloud, affecting parts of sussex and kent. this east and the wind pushes more showers on to eastern coasts. colder airto the showers on to eastern coasts. colder air to the middle of the week, we see something milder. through sunday afternoon, showers, in eastern and north—eastern coasts, some working westwards. going as the eastern side of northern ireland. bright and sunny spells, the best of the sunshine in western scotland. temperature is tempered by a brisk east or north—easterly wind. highs of 7—9d. east or north—easterly wind. highs of 7-9d. a east or north—easterly wind. highs of 7—9d. a chilly feel where ever you are. through the evening, further showers. especially on eastern and north—eastern coasts. wintry over the high ground of yorkshire and southern scotland. clear skies, and under the clear
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skies, across scotland, northern ireland northern england, widespread frosts. temperatures in the countryside are close to freezing. for— five in the centre of town. a chilly started the day tomorrow. buried cloud, bright and sunny spells, more than we have seen through the weekend where some of us have been under grey and gloomy skies. showers on the east and north—east coast. temperatures not much higher than 7—9d. then, some changes. this atlanta front comes m, changes. this atlanta front comes in, pushing eastwards as we go into tuesday. this squeeze in the ice bars mean outbreaks of rain. windy and a blustery start on tuesday. most of it will be working eastwards as the day goes on. as it bumps into colder air, we have snow for some time. not amounting to much over the pennines. it is a windy day, especially on western coasts. these are the average speeds. gusts likely
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to be higher. temperatures of six or 7 degrees further east but the mild air arrives from the west. a sign of things to come in the week ahead. turning milder, we see a brisk of gales and some heavy rain. goodbye. i'm christian fraser live in brussels as eu leaders gather for a special brexit summit. as theresa may arrives at the summit, donald tusk says european union leaders have endorsed the terms of britain's withdrawal from the eu. they've also agreed the text which will outline the terms of britain's relationship with the eu for years to come — with negotiators now hoping they will be able to move on to the next stage of the brexit talks. we need to build to the next phase this unprecedented and ambitious partnership. we will remain allies, partners and friends. with the deal approved, next it will face a much tougher
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vote in westminster. theresa may has written an open letter to the british public appealing for support. throughout the hour we'll be turning to our reality check correspondent for clarity on what exactly is
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