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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 25, 2018 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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hello, good afternoon, you are watching bbc news. in a few minutes‘s times, we will have a full round up of it national and international news. before then, let's reflect on our main story today. you leaders have agreed on a withdrawal agreement, insisting it is the best and —— best possible deal. the 27 leaders gave their blessing to the agreement made with uk prime minister theresa may. theresa may said the deal offers a brighter future theresa may said the deal offers a brighterfuture for theresa may said the deal offers a brighter future for britain, and she is now urging mps and peers, as well as the public to support that. this is what the prime minister had to say after the agreement was signed off in brussels at a news conference she gave this lunchtime. there were those who said that reaching a brexit agreement that work for both sides was an impossible task. from the start, i've rejected the counsel of despair and set about negotiating a deal that work for the uk and the eu, one that delivered on the results of the referendum and set us
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on course for a prosperous future, while maintaining a close relationship with our friends and neighbours. thanks to the hard work of both sects of negotiators, that is what we have today agreed. i want to ta ke is what we have today agreed. i want to take a few moments to speak directly to the british people and explain what this deal means. first, control of our borders. not an emergency brake on a free movement oi’ emergency brake on a free movement or promise of greater transition controls in the future, but an end to the free movement of people in full once and for all. that is what this deal delivers. it will allow us to put in place and immigration system based not on where people come from, but on the skills and talents they have to offer. that is in our national interest. second, control of our money. not a reduction in our membership fee, not a bigger budget rebate, but an end toa a bigger budget rebate, but an end to a vast annual payments being sent to a vast annual payments being sent to the eu. that is what this deal delivers. instead, we will be able
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to spend taxpayer money on our priorities, like a £394 million per week of extra investment we are putting into our nhs. that is in our national interest. third, control over our laws. notjust the return of some areas of control from brussels, but the end to the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice in the uk. with our laws being made in our country by democratically elected politicians, interpreted and enforced by british courts. that is what this deal delivers, and that is in our national interest. in agriculture, it does not just national interest. in agriculture, it does notjust deliver a better deal under the agricultural policy, it takes us out of this eap completely, meaning we can design new systems of support for farmers in the uk. fishing, notjust to deliver annual quota with the fishing is —— fisheries policy, it is freeing us for good. the uk will
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be an independent coastal state once again. in full, be an independent coastal state once again. infull, sovereign be an independent coastal state once again. in full, sovereign controls of our waters, able to decide for ourselves who we allow to finish the microfiche in them. that is in our national interest. our borders, laws, and money, this deal delivers for the british people. the brexit deal is approved by eu leaders at a special meeting in brussels. it is the agreement that theresa may says is the right one for britain, but the task of getting mps to approve it is just beginning. i would take this deal back to the house of commons, confident we have achieved the best deal available and full of optimism about the future of oui’ full of optimism about the future of our country. in parliament and beyond it, iwill our country. in parliament and beyond it, i will make the case that this deal with all my heart. the eu says this is it. talks on our
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departure are over, but their hope is for a close future relationship. regardless of how it will all end, one thing is certain. we will remain friends until the end of days. ona landmark friends until the end of days. on a landmark day for brexit, we will look at what lies ahead at westminster and hearing the views of voters. good afternoon. eu leaders have given theirformal good afternoon. eu leaders have given their formal backing to the agreement that will take the uk out of the european union in four months‘ time. theresa may said the deal offers a brighter future for britain, urging parliamentand deal offers a brighter future for britain, urging parliament and the public to support it. she was
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talking after 27 other eu leaders signed off on two key documents and negotiated over the last 17 months. the main withdrawal agreement outlining the terms on which we leave provides for a transition period until at least the end of 2020. there is also a much shorter political declaration, which is not legally binding which sets out hopes foran legally binding which sets out hopes for an ambitious partnership with the eu in the future. our political editor laura kuenssberg is in brussels for us this evening. no celebration, no fanfare, but a huge and serious step. after more than a0 years inside... deep breath, the deal to leave is done. there were those who said that reaching a brexit agreement that worked for both sides was an impossible task. from the start, i rejected that counsel of despair. in any negotiation, you do not get
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everything you want. you need to identify what your vital interests are and stick to them but be prepared to compromise in other areas, in order to achieve a result. i think the british people understand that. herbert, many of you are bored of the rows, the spitz and stats. the officials who brokered the compromise watching on. before christmas, mps will vote on this deal. on it will depend whether we move forward together into a brighter future we move forward together into a brighterfuture or open we move forward together into a brighter future or open the door to yet more division and uncertainty. the british people don‘t want to spend any more time arguing about brexit. cani brexit. can i ask you to be very straight with the public and tell us who, if anyone, you think is pleased about this deal? what we see in this deal today is a deal that delivers for the people, delivers on the vote and protects jobs and livelihoods and protect our security and our united kingdom. and
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asi security and our united kingdom. and as i have said before, i believe our best days lie ahead of us. the eu‘s power players have agreed a brexit with caveats. a deal where the uk leaves next march but stays close to the union, with a lot of final detail yet to be agreed. ahead of us is the difficult process of ratification, as well as further negotiations. but, regardless of how it will all end, one thing is certain, we will remain friends until the end of days. and one day longer. it is time for everybody, everybody to take their responsibilities. today's agreement will help create that trust and confidence needed for negotiating our close and unprecedented future relationship. the agreement was hard fought on both sides, even though sometimes it
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feels like eu leaders still can‘t quite believe what‘s happening in front of their eyes. translation: it's front of their eyes. translation: it‘s tragic that the uk is leaving after a5 years. it‘s tragic that the uk is leaving after as years. 0! but there may be more theatre to come. mps at home might kick out the deal. with a budget here, then? this is the deal, the best deal possible and the european union will not change its fundamental position when it comes to this issue. are you concerned the prime minister might not get this deal through british parliament? i think it's not now our concern that a british concerns. this is the maximum we can do, theresa may and her government and the european union. no victors here today, nobody winning. we are all losing. there have been many moments when it has not been clear that theresa may would make it this far, but her next
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steps in these vital few weeks will determine her future and the future of the country, too. for the prime minister, there is now only one direction. she can‘t know if parliament and the public will follow along. and for more than two years, there‘s been a persistent question for theresa may, wilshire when she get a deal? well, she did, brokering an agreement after tense negotiations between the two sides, there is a deal when today is a big moment. it's deal when today is a big moment. it‘s been rubber—stamped by leaders from right around the continent. but, she has a long without an immediate big, big problem. we know already how unpopular this deal, this agreement, this compromise is right across parliament. howls of protest from former remainers brexiteers alike. many of her critics arguing strongly it doesn‘t have to be this way. there could be a route to a better or a different
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deal, or potentially even another referendum. but for theresa may, get used to hearing her again and again try to drive her argument through the middle, with the eu‘s help, her message, this is all there is. laura kuenssberg in brussels, thank you very much. let‘s turn to the detail of what is likely to happen next. now the brexit deal has been endorsed by eu leaders. it appears the biggest potential hurdle lies at westminster and mrs mabe‘s chances of getting the agreement through parliament next month. —— mrs may‘s. if mps agree it and it is a big if, it would go to the european parliament for approval. if mps vote it down, then there are an number of possible consequences. they could try to force a renegotiation, a general election, another referendum, or we could leave without a brexit deal. against all of that we can join our
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europe editor who is in brussels and has been speaking to the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker. we can‘t forget today is a very, very big day for the eu as well. the day that eu leaders signed off on their divorce papers with the uk. so their divorce papers with the uk. so the main question forjean—claude juncker in the european commission had to be, does he really think this is it for the eu? sure, brussels says there will be no renegotiation of this dealfails says there will be no renegotiation of this deal fails to get through the house of commons. but is that really the case? when we know how hell—bent eu leaders are on avoiding an no—deal brexit? this is the best deal possible and the only deal possible. so if the house will say no, we would have no deal. it's not the intention of the raina, orthe deal. it's not the intention of the raina, or the cabinet or the parliament to go for a second referendum. this is the deal. this is the deal. and you are trying to
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help the prime minister sell it by saying this is the best deal possible, but surely it can‘t be the best deal possible because right from the beginning you and other eu leaders said it has to be very clear in this deal that life on the outside can‘t be as good as on the inside. if you are out, you are out, you are not part of the process. this is a very sad moment for the european union and for britain. we will discover in future years why i am saying today that this is a sad moment. i am saying today that this is a sad moment. lam not saying today that this is a sad moment. i am not happy, saying today that this is a sad moment. lam not happy, but saying today that this is a sad moment. i am not happy, but i am happy we have a deal. there is a perception in much of the uk that this was a punishment process, the negotiations process. even today there were nice words for theresa may from the dutch prime minister, she negotiated in a very tough way, but in the end the uk had to concede most of the time. i don't understand why the people are feeling that they are
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humiliated. i don't see that. numerous points of views of the british have been taken into this deal, so this is not a humiliation for britain. there is something about the tough negotiations on behalf of the eu during these brexit talks that have made some in the uk say, ok, we are glad we are leaving. they are inflexible and don‘t listen to the needs of the people, what is your reaction? i was always respecting the dignity of the british people. britain has voted, there was a sovereign decision. we highly respect that decision, although we don't like it. it is not the end of the road of negotiations. negotiations on a future trade deal and other negotiations start in earnest after
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brexit, we will come back to gibraltar, fishing and perhaps the northern ireland border question. gibraltar, fishing and perhaps the northern ireland border questionlj don't northern ireland border question.” don't think we can come back to the northern ireland border question. we will start in the next coming months that talks about the future relationship and i don't think it will be wise if i would give you first indications on the outcome of these conversations. you said to me right at the beginning of this process you felt it would be a sad process. you also said that somehow it felt like a failure. everyone is losing in this. a failure on the eu‘s behalf? everyone is losing in this. a failure on the eu's behalf? a failure on the eu's behalf? a failure on the british behalf, if you are telling people year after year, month after month, day after day that the membership of the european union is the best thing for the european citizens? i don't think the european citizens? i don't think the european citizens? i don't think the european union is guilty of the result. it's the responsibility of britain, only of britain, of nobody else. is there a certain sense of
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relief rest at the uk was never happy, enthusiastic as a member of the european union. once the uk is gone, surely you are free to have an eu army orany gone, surely you are free to have an eu army or any other things the uk was standing on the way of? i always appreciated from the ministers and prime minister, the british sense of pragmatism. it was a gift given by britain to the european union, down to earth, common sense. we will miss that, but it was the decision of the british people to leave. the president of the european commission speaking to our political editor earlier. the next few weeks will see the government emphasise the merits of what has now been approved in brussels, both to mps in westminster and the public. our political correspondent alex forsyth has been exploring the content of the agreement. thank you. this deal is in two
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parts. the first part is the withdrawal agreement. that is a binding, legal text dealing with the way we‘re leaving the eu. it sets out a transition period, which means after we leave next march, not much will change until december 2020. there is time to keep working on things like a trade deal. it safeguards the right of eu citizens in the uk and uk citizens living in europe and it settles the divorce bill, the uk will pay £39 billion of its current obligations, but it won‘t continue large payments beyond that. here is the most contentious bit. it saysisin here is the most contentious bit. it says is in that time a trade deal isn‘t worked out, then that transition period could be extended, or the northern ireland backstop kicks in. that is an arrangement which means to stop checks that the irish border, the uk would be in a customs territory with the eu but it would mean some different trade terms for northern ireland, and the
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uk can‘t just end terms for northern ireland, and the uk can‘tjust end that arrangement when it wants, and that is a problem for some. what we are seeing in this irish protocol is much more than that. we are seeing is staying within the european union, in terms of the single market, the customs union rules will apply to northern ireland. we are in the same vat regime is europe and the same state aid is europe and there is very much aid is europe and there is very much a border down the are see as a result of this and that is why we can‘t support this deal. result of this and that is why we can't support this deal. now, the government says that backstop probably won‘t be needed because of the other part of this deal, the political declaration. that sets out plans for an ambitious and deep future partnership, including an trade, but the details haven‘t been agreed yet. the government says we will leave the single market and the customs union and we can strike independent trade deals with other countries. the free movement of people will end on the government will work out a new immigration policy. when it comes to fishing, it says the uk will be an independent coastal state, leaving the common fisheries policy, but future arrangements for access to water and
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quotas are yet to be agreed. in fa ct, quotas are yet to be agreed. in fact, there is still quite a lot about future relations to be worked out. so, it gets us a lot of what we wanted, not everything, but the question is, can this be the staging post that gets us to the point where we could get everything? i think with a lot of hard work, it can be. critics rate all the best bits of this deal and is legally enforcea ble. this deal and is legally enforceable. it is woolly, unclear, but the government and the eu says it is the best we will get and insists it does deliver on the referendum result. alex, thank you very much. we will return to brexit before the end of the programme to explore the views of voters. first, for the day‘s other news. document is believed to contain information about facebook‘s data privacy policies have been seized in london on the instructions ofa seized in london on the instructions of a parliamentary committee. it is thought to be because mps on the culture media and sport committee don‘t think facebook has been responding adequately to their
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questions. facebook says the material is legally restricted and shouldn‘t be viewed. a murder investigation is under way after a teenager was stabbed to death in coventry. the 16—year—old was found with serious injuries just before midnight. he died in hospital shortly afterwards. two other teenagers were also taken to hospital with injuries. the focus today has been on brussels on the decision of eu leaders to endorse the brexit deal but the prime minister will now be doing her utmost to sell the deal not only to mps back to their constituents, people across the country. so what do voters make of the deal that she‘s negotiated? do voters make of the deal that she‘s negotiated ? our correspondent has on the day in skipton, north yorkshire. skipton in the yorkshire dales is a prospero market town, a tt ra cts dales is a prospero market town, attracts plenty of tourists and votes tory blue. but in the red lion pub it was time for sunday lunch and a shoe over the brexit deal. it
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might be pleasing both sides, and that‘s what she is trying to do. she is trying to please everybody and it‘s not going to be a good dealfor either side. it's unacceptable. and if enough brexiteers have left the cabinet because it is so bad, then theresa may and her remain colleagues willjust push it through and it looks awful. in the referendum, 53% of people here voted to leave the eu. similar to the national result. among them, zoe, who has lived in the town all her life and helps to run the family canal business. i think it isjust dragging ona canal business. i think it isjust dragging on a little bit now, to be fair. we could do with getting the deal done and then we can move forward , deal done and then we can move forward, really, to be fair. in the townsend, the local band is on stage. the majority of them voted to remain but we took two members with opposing views aside.
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i think it‘s a deal, a piece of paper that has something on it. i can‘t see it ever happening. i don‘t think this country will leave the eu and those terms. i‘m not sure we could leave the eu, but i don‘t place a great deal of stock in this. it was presented that it was going to bea it was presented that it was going to be a simple job, a simple negotiation and actually it's been incredibly complicated. we've been tied into so many different aspects of the eu. do you think that means you, ok, do you think we are going to get a square deal out of any of this? i think the only thing we can hopeis this? i think the only thing we can hope is the country becomes more prosperous in the future, but it doesn't look like it will happen for a long time. despite their differences of opinion, the band played on. whether the same can be said for those in power is anyone‘s guests.
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—— guess. that is it from us, we‘re back with the late news at ten o‘clock tonight. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. goodbye. again, you‘re watching bbc news stop let‘s get more on our top story this hour, eu leaders have given formal backing to the agreement that will dictate uk out of the eu informal‘s time. theresa may it says it offers a brighterfuture time. theresa may it says it offers a brighter future for the time. theresa may it says it offers a brighterfuture for the uk. our europe editor has an exclusive interview now with young —— john claudejuncker, interview now with young —— john claude juncker, which was interview now with young —— john claudejuncker, which was recorded shortly after the summit and on lunchtime. he made it clear that the deal is the only one on offer to the uk. this is the deal, this is the deal. i will never change my mind day after day, this is the best deal possible for britain. and this is the only deal possible, so if the hosts would say no, we would have no
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deal. you sent to me right at the beginning of this process that you felt it would be a sad process, you also said that somehow it felt like also said that somehow it felt like a failure with yellow everyone is losing in this. but is a failure on the uk's part? year after year, month after month, day after day, the membership in the eu is the best thing for the british citizens. so i don‘t think that the european union is guilty for the result, it is the responsibility of britain, and only a britain, nobody else. john, they said the best outcome for all concerned would be if the uk remain in the eu, but given that was not going to happen, he said the draft agreement was the best option. i've a lwa ys agreement was the best option. i've always thought the best outcome for aisle —— ireland and the europe and
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the eu would be for the uk to stay in the eu, customs union and single market, but we respect the decision of the british people in the uk parliament not to do that. and while we have agreed today —— what we have agreed today is the next best outcome. it protects piece, protects the rights of europe and irish citizens, and also insulates our economy for major disruptions in trade, thus protecting jobs and people‘s standard of living. trade, thus protecting jobs and people's standard of living. while abraded deal has been signed up, it now needs the approval of westminster‘s politicians, which could prove considerably less straight forward. ian blackford is with me, thanks for coming in. in a sense, as someone said, it‘s not so much the beginning of the end as the end of the beginning. indeed. it feels rather strange because i think we all know the situation we‘re in, the prime minister does not have
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support for the so—called deal in parliament from her own party, never mind from the opposition. so we will go through this charade that she will try to see if she can win support over the next few days, we‘ll have five days of debate, and ultimately i suspect this‘ll be voted down. it is a deal that does not please anybody, especially one. . . not please anybody, especially one... that we should be staying in the single market and customs union. the brexiteers don‘t like it, and i guess the real problem is that when the prime minister is presenting this as a deal, let us look what is actually happening. we have an agreement to leave the eu, we have a transition. we don‘t know how long the transition will last for, because how do we actually affect a long—term trade deal with europe now that we are out? they say they can lot —— a can last longer than two yea rs, lot —— a can last longer than two years, that is their kind of backstop on the transition.” suspect we may be situation that will last for a considerable period of time. you look at what is
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happening with fishing, there is a document out in the eu today saying that the future relationship for fishing will start with the bargaining position being the existing quota arrangement that remains in place. this idea that taking back. scottish fishermen would not be too please? indeed, but we always knew that would be the case, that we were taking back control is a fallacy, not reality. in terms of what happens, you‘re pa rt in terms of what happens, you‘re part of scotland and norway has an arrangement which came about because they voted not to join the eu, and it isa they voted not to join the eu, and it is a transition that is never—ending, and one that a lot of norwegians seem quite comfortable with, although the uk might not want the same, which is to take the rules but also have the freedom to be outside the common fisheries policy and common agricultural policy. outside the common fisheries policy and common agricultural policym and common agricultural policym an option that appeals to you? but we have to do is build one that will do the least economic harm. in a
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sense, what needs to happen over the next few days that politicians of all parties have to recognise the position we are in... you're talking already? we are, that has been happening, and i think this is really key for your viewers, we rule out no deal. there is no support for no deal in parliament. unholy alliance between the snp, the liberal democrats, the dup? we will work with everybody that recognises we have and the micah responsibility, making sure we do not send —— a decrease in living standards. i want to say to parliament that we understand the uk's parliament that we understand the uk‘s leading the eu as we —— things stand 29 march. article 50 to give us stand 29 march. article 50 to give us breathing space, we ought to stay in the single market and customs union, that is the least worst option, and we will work through all these things. if that can be changed, then we come down to the
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position of the peoples vote. but it is no more desirable for scottish nationalist to have a situation where rules are made in brussels, which would be the case after next may. and still the paying all the rest of it that‘s almost as bad as being run by westminster. and we end up being run by westminster. and we end up with the people‘s oh, and the uk vote to stay and. given the nature of the uk and the size of our economy, i do not believe for one minute will be in a situation where we will be a rule taker, that is not the case in norway. i spoke in the politicians... we call a fax diplomacy in those days. but nonetheless, if the uk was to be in the single market and the customs
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union, i have no doubt the uk would be part of the process. the eu would recognise the significance of the uk wanting to be there. briefly, is it possible that parliament voted down, theresa may code vector brussels and gets a few tweaks, the markets react badly, mps react badly to the markets reacting badly, it is again voted through? we are trying to make sure parliament takes control of this and we can get a deal that is in the best deal democrat interest of everyone. think very much. to the weather, nick millers of the map. we now look to the west for the weather, the atlantic comes back to life, deeper areas of low pressure with better and windier, but milder. here‘s the view from north wales earlier, bigger waves hitting our coastline this week as the winds pick up, we‘ll see that in a moment. a gentle flow of air coming from the east, giving us a few showers here,
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this was the picture into this evening, the showers through the english channel, water through land, thatis english channel, water through land, that is where a lot of dry weather into this evening. we see some showers into the far southeast, then ended northeast england, clipping parts of the ease of northern ireland and into eastern scotland. clear spells and west of scotland allowing temperatures to dip away quite quickly overnight, there‘ll be a frost taking hold here and some of us a frost taking hold here and some of us down to minus four degrees go into the morning. in fact anywhere overnight, whether you are clear for any period, you can see temperatures in the low single figures, a touch of frost. showers peppering parts of eastern scotland and across northern england, still feeding to the far southeast. these are overnight temperatures, and in the country and suburbs it will be colder than this. into tomorrow morning, this flow of aircoming from into tomorrow morning, this flow of air coming from the east, air is coming in here. much of western
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scotland, wales, and england so that means more blue sky compared to today. still some single figure temperatures, and frost on monday night tuesday morning, still some fog around, but on tuesday the atla ntic starts fog around, but on tuesday the atlantic starts are to life. warm weather front coming through, and another for wednesday, the isobars getting closer together, the winds picking up as our weather turns much more active. but the wins coming in from the southwest, you can see from the colours here, meaning milder air coming in. so you will notice to bidders heading up, tuesday rain from —— coming in from the southwest. across all parts on wednesday, and thursday will have deals in the north and west, bringing the possibility of some potentially disruptive winds midweek. all parts of the weather pattern which turns much more u nsettled pattern which turns much more unsettled this week, wet and windy at times, but also much milder compared to where we are now. hello, this is bbc news.
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the headlines: theresa may urges parliament and the public to back her brexit deal after it‘s endorsement at today‘s eu summit. jean claude juncker, president of the european commission, warns mps that the agreement is the best and only deal on offer. in other news, a man has been charged with the attempted murder of a police officer after a knife attack in east london. the incident happened at ilford railway station on friday night. daniel adeyemi, who‘s 2a, will appear before magistrates tomorrow. parliament has seized documents as part of an ongoing dispute between facebook and a committee of mps investigating the technology giant‘s use of private data. sport now. arsenal have kept themselves in touch with the top four after winning 2—1 at bournemouth.
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their first premier league win for a month sees them stay in fifth butjust three points behind third placed spurs ahead of their meeting next weekend. with the three matches ending in drawers, was the train running out of stea m ? drawers, was the train running out of steam ? the drawers, was the train running out of steam? the cherries moving up the table. david brooks believing he had put bournemouth ahead. the assistant that —— put bournemouth ahead. the assistant that -- i put bournemouth ahead. the assistant that —— i disagreed. no doubting the opener. a sight to behold. not one he will want to watch again. nothing lucky about. equaliser. a king the final touch. arsenal applying the final touch. arsenal have not enjoyed a first—half lead god lead in the league this season. late pressure almost so the
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reta rda nt late pressure almost so the retardant but the boss denied him. arsenal held out even if it was not the most convincing victories. iam happy i am happy with our players, how they are working today, and our supporters are helping us. for the next week it is good. we are going to play another match with a top team. it is a good moment for us to enjoy together. the most important is to win today. looking at the two goals we conceded, an own goal and one we feel disappointed with, they had some other chances, but so did we. the game could have gone anyway. did the change in formation make it
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difficult for you? i do not think so. difficult for you? i do not think so. we did not expect it but we adapted and gave them big problems with some of our runs behind on some of our counterattacking was strong. they will be pleased with their performance. there are definitely things we can improve. what a result for huddersfield this would be. they have just squandered another chance as well. huddersfield are currently bottom of the table. about 15 minutes left to play. that would see them rocket up the table to iath and southampton would drop into the bottom three. there was a fantastic match in the championship. the second city derby saw aston villa beat birmingham city a—2. for a while birmingham looked to be heading for their first win
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at villa park in ia years, lukas jutkiewitz put them in front. but villa equalised and then what a moment this was for boyhood fanjack grealish to put them 2—1 up. tammy abraham scored a villa penalty before blues got another goal back, but then this stunning solo goal from full back alan hutton sealed a win for dean smith‘s side in one of the great derby games between these teams. mick mccarthy says that he is honoured and excited to be back with the republic of ireland. his two year contract, 16 years after his first spell in charge, has been confirmed by the fai today. he replaces martin o‘neill who was sacked last week. he will hope to take the republic to euro 2020 with four matches scheduled to take place in dublin. dundalk manager stephen kenny has been appointment as under 21 coach and he will take over from mccarthy after the 2020 finals. the copa libertadores final between buenos aires rivals
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boca juniors and river plate has been postponed again on safety grounds. violence before yesterday‘s second leg saw the match put back 2a hours to this evening. the boca team bus was attacked by river fans on the way to the estadio monumental in buenos aires. ahead of a game that was being called the final to end all finals, some of the boca players suffered injuries and had requested that the match be postponed because they were in no condition to play. no date has been set. the formula one season has drawn to a close with lewis hamilton on top of the podium at the abu dhabi grand prix. his iith win of the year saw the five—time champion become the first driver to pass a00 points for the season. nick parrott reports. after securing a fifth world title,
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it is a seasoned lewis hamilton will want to remember. securing pole position here was one of many highlights and his fantastic start set up a cruise to be finished. while he strolled, others stumbled. nico hulkenberg did not even manage to complete the first lap. a heart stopping moment for the renault driver. get me out of here, there was a fire. and everyone watching. raikkonen‘s final race for ferrari did not last much longer. with racing suspended to move his car, hamilton took advantage to make his only pit stop early. he regained the lead after everyone else had stopped and went on to claim his iith win of the year, matching his best season of 201a. while he hopes to add to his titles, they will not be any more for fernando alonso. his final race produced a pointless iith placed finish but there was a break with tradition, seeing him joining hamilton and second placed sebastian vettel on
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the grid to say goodbye to the fans in style. england were well beaten in the final of the women‘s world t20 in antigua this morning. they lost to australia by eight wickets. j°y joy and elation, australia pending a four the way to win a major trophy and showing why they are the world number ones. england ruing what could have been in the knowledge they were beaten by the better team. england opted to bat but after a couple of dropped catches australia‘s bowlers started to find their feet, australia‘s bowlers started to find theirfeet, dismissing the australia‘s bowlers started to find their feet, dismissing the opener for four. their feet, dismissing the opener forfour. she their feet, dismissing the opener for four. she was followed by amy jones to leave england dangerously poised at ai—3 without a reviewer. they needed a calm head which wyatt provided. bringing up a respectable a3 together england hope. the middle
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order could not show the same resolve as australia started to get a grip on the final. heather knight reached 25 before being caught. england limped towards the 100 mark. they eventually fell to might ball short of finishing their innings, setting is chasing 126 for victory, but would it be enough? ecclestone removed australia‘s healy early for 22. mooney followed and gardner and manning dug in sensing the other world cup in their states. the taste of the target with ease to complete an emphatic victory and a fourth title. for the world number one is the relief and elation was obvious. for england, a missed opportunity. it is raw at the moment. we have to
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reflect. i am chuffed for the young girls who have performed on the bigger stage. they may not have been able to repeat the success of last year‘s one—day world cup by greeting two world finals in 16 months capped a remarkable period for this team. now it is a time for reflection because for some of these players the opportunity to be double world champion may not come round again. england‘s men are closing in on a series whitewash against sri lanka. they need just six wickets to win the final test with two days left to play in colombo. jos buttler scored 6a before england were all out for 230 in their second innings. sri lanka chasing 327 for victory. england looked to boost their advantage. stuart broad with the catch. sri lanka four down finishing
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53-a, catch. sri lanka four down finishing 53—a, needing 27a, a lot. england looking to become the third team to com plete looking to become the third team to complete a series whitewash in sri lanka. great britain beat japan 2—1 in the champions trophy to avoid the wooden spoon in china. gb had to come from behind afterjapan went in front early in the game. but goals from hannah martin and amy costello gave them their only win. this was a 5th place play off after gb had finished bottom of their pool. the netherlands won the trophy with a 5—1 victory over australia. and in golf, england‘s aaron rai has won his first european title. he held off matthew fitzpatrick to win the hong kong open by one shot to take this first win on the european tour at rain sodden course in fanling. he started his final round six shots clear of the rest of the field but fitzpatrick‘s round of 6a wasn‘t
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quite enough to chase down rai. that is all the spot for now. i will be back in the next hour. is it isita is it a bumper crop this week? assassination nation is a violent satire. a new take on robin hood. and the return of lisbeth. there was
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a film out a few years ago which was a film out a few years ago which was a horrorfilm a film out a few years ago which was a horror film taking a film out a few years ago which was a horrorfilm taking place on a film out a few years ago which was a horror film taking place on social media andi a horror film taking place on social media and i really liked it. this is set in massachusetts. four young women finding themselves the victims of the witch hunt after there is a huge data breach. somebody hacks the conservative tone. lots of people leading conservative lives. releasing secrets onto the internet. all the anger and heed to is turned towards these four women. the division between how people feel about this divide between the older generation and the younger generation. there are people who
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have come to term with privacy being dead and the old people who are still trying to fight it. the internet is amazing. this guy in minnesota he subscribed to my amazon wish list and he buys me all the time. why? i guess he likes that i am real. if i'm, like, inspiring people, you know, and my life is so cool and, like, people connect with me on such a level, then, like, basically, myjob for the day is done. so, like, mark, did you, like, connect with this film? you laughed at that clip, though. because it is — i mean,
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it absolutely, you know, is on the money. what i like about it is, on the one hand there‘s echoes of films like heathers and actually, to some extent clueless. and then obviously the crucible, because, you know, are in salem. and it also has a very sort of strong dose of a film like the purge, in which society just descends into total anarchy. we begin with people rampaging around with masks on and a voiceover says "how is it that this civilised society turned into this?" and these four women are being chased and it basically is scratching away at the surface of the modern world and saying underneath it, all those old prejudices, all those old hatreds, all those old witch—hunt instincts are still there. i really liked it. i mean, i think it walks on sort of a knife edge between social exploration and gleeful exploitation. i think some people will find it too tough, i think some people will find it too savage, i think some people will find it just simply too violent. i didn‘t. i thought it had a real bite. i liked how self—aware it was — and i went in only knowing the title and thinking "yeah, this may work, it may not." and i was surprisingly impressed — even from an old man‘s point of view.
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no, i thought it was sharp! you‘re not old at all. um, robin hood. i think i‘ve seen almost every tv and film version of robin hood. am i gonna like this one? well, it depends. did you like what guy richie did with the legend of king arthur with king arthur: legend of the sword? no. no, exactly. well, in that case, you‘re in pretty much the same territory. what this does is it gives you robin hood, but a very, very modern robin hood, so there is a lots of kind of geezery inflections and, you know. modern camera stuff and at one point, robin is sent off to the crusades, which are filmed like the gulf war. he‘s got a bow and arrow and yet somehow, the action sequences, you keep expecting, like, helicopters to come overhead, and the whole thing‘s, like, very, very self—consciously modern and taron egerton is robin of locksley and ben mendelsohn absolutely has a ball as the sheriff of nottingham — which is always kind of the best role in the robin hood films. you remember alan rickman completely stealing robin hood: prince of thieves away from kevin costner? in the case of this, um, it‘s not so much revisionist asjust rubbishing the old version of the story. there is a bit in the beginning in which this voiceover says "you don‘t want a history lesson.
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i won‘t give you that. well, get this instead." so, on the positive front — you have ben mendelsohn having fun as the sheriff of nottingham, wearing an outfit that appears to be left over from a fetish cosplay party. and on the other side of it, you have something which makes no sense, doesn‘t attempt to make any sense, has nothing but swagger and style and doesn‘t have enough of that to carry it through. and literally leaves you thinking "is this more or less ridiculous than russell crowe‘s accent when he did robin hood?" and my own feeling is the russell crowe version was more boring, but this is more stupid. chuckles. all right, now, claire foy, formerly known as the queen, now known as the girl in the spider‘s web. yeah, so, she‘s back. she‘s the latest incarnation of lisbeth salander. this is based on a book by david lagercrantz who took over from stieg larsson trilogy, which was so well received. so she‘s a cyber—hacker, she‘s an avenging angel, she is called upon to steal
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from nasa a programme which can access all the world‘s computer codes. and, of course, everybody wants it, it‘s gonna fall into the hands of the wrong people, particularly a sinister group called the spiders. and whereas previous instalments of this series were basically psychological thrillers, this is much more an action—adventure. here is a clip. alarm clock rings. loud explosion. definitely lots of action! yeah, action—packed. it doesn‘t have the grit of the films that starred noomi rapace. it has something of the visual style of the david fincher american version, but what it does have going for it is claire foy. i mean, the story itself almost goes into superhero territory — there are points in which they are jumping into matte—black cars and big motorbikes and it starts to look like a batman movie. there‘s lots of stand—offs between people extravagantly dressed, you know, so they turned up for a battle after having just gone to a designer shop.
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but she‘s really good because even when the film doesn‘t make any sense, you believe in her character. and i think it‘s interesting from her point of view, she‘s taken this role on to see if she could, you know, ithink, you know, do something she hadn‘t done before. she described it as like flexing a new muscle. and that is what it‘s like. and she is the strongest thing about the film, and i‘d say she is a reason to see the film. the rest of it is much more sort of hollow and empty and it‘s playing to a mainstream audience. it doesn‘t have that dirt under the fingernails that the original ones did and it doesn‘t have quite the style of the fincher. because they were brilliant plots. this sounds like it is more action, less plot. yeah, i mean, this is a kind of mission:impossible plot. i mean, you know, the plot is there‘s a thing that allows you to have access to all the nuclear codes in the world. i mean, that is a mission:impossible story. that‘s — or a batman story or a superman story. not a, you know — but it is fun, but empty, but she carries it off. fun but empty? yeah! what kind of an endorsement is that?
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some of the best things are fun but empty! all right. well, best out? well, ok, widows. i love it, you saw it, you weren‘t convinced. i really enjoyed it — no, i really, really enjoyed it. i don‘t love it as much as you. i thought maybe too many characters, actually. and ironically, ithought "this would make a great tv series," to explore the characters — which is what it was originally. yeah, and this is a different version of the story that doesn‘t need to be a tv series. it absolutely needs to be a movie. and it‘s exactly the right length, ben, it has exactly the right number of characters. it is perfection. it — you know, for me, it is a 5—star film. i remember the tv series and thought it was great. this is a different beast. ok, i give it four stars. or maybe three, i‘m not sure. 3.5! 0k, best dvd? ok, skyscraper — the rock meets the towering inferno. i mean, the towering inferno and die hard are basically the same film anyway. what was it lacking? the rock. and what i really enjoyed about this film is it‘s one of those movies that really does what it says on the tin. it‘s like "ok, just leave your coherent facilities outside". this is a movie in which it‘s a bloke versus a great big building and there‘s a bunch of stuff
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is gonna happen and we‘re gonna nick riffs from the lady from shanghai and all these other things, but in the end, it‘s going to be the rockjumping from one very high thing to another very high thing, while being the rock. i think — i love the rock. i love towering inferno, i love die hard. i really enjoyed skyscraper! yeah, but you never leave your coherent facilities outside the cinema, do you, mark? well, i think — i think the smurfs sequel was a challenge. laughs. all right, mark, thanks so very much for being with us, as ever. mark kermode there with his thoughts on the week‘s releases. just a very quick reminder before we leave you that you will find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online. that‘s at bbc.co.uk/mark kermode. and you can find all of our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. that is it for us this week, though. thank you so much watching. we have been looking to the east for
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the weather but we are looking to the weather but we are looking to the west again. wetter and windy but my older. this is the view from north wales earlier. some big waves hitting our coastline this week as the waves back up. a gentle flow of aircoming infrom the waves back up. a gentle flow of air coming in from the east giving a few showers here and there. this is the picture into this evening. a lot of the showers over water rather than land, maybe the odd one into the channel islands. drier weather into this evening. a few showers into this evening. a few showers into the south—east and the north—east of england. clipping parts of the east of northern ireland. clear spells in the west of scotla nd ireland. clear spells in the west of scotland will allow temperatures to dip away quite quickly overnight. there will be a frost taking hold and some of us don‘t minus four into
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mourning. you could see temperatures taking us to a touch of frost. still a few feeding through the far south—east. these are overnight temperatures in towns and cities, in the suburbs it will be called. tomorrow morning, this flow of air coming in from the east, showers peppering eastern scotland, eastern england, some into northern ireland but much of western england will be dry and fairly sunny which means more blue sky compared with today. still single figure temperatures. some mist and fog around but on choose the bl atlantic gets back into life and we have on wednesday the wind is picking up as well as the wind is picking up as well as the weather turns much more active. the winds coming from the south west. that means it is milder air.
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temperatures heading up. choose the brain coming from the west and south—west. on wednesday that will be gills in the north and west, even severe gales, the possibility of destructive winds. all part of the weather pattern which turns it more u nsettled weather pattern which turns it more unsettled this week, wet, windy at times but also much milder compared with now. he visit bbc news, the headlight at 6pm. theresa may urges the public to endorse the new brexit deal. the british people don‘t want to spend any more time arguing about brexit. they won a good deal done that fulfills the vote and allows us to come together again as country. jean—claude juncker has issued come together again as country. jean—claudejuncker has issued a warning to those mps who think the eu can be persuaded to make further changes. this is the best deal possible for britain, this is the
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best deal possible for europe. this is the only deal possible. donald tusk said the european union wanted to remain as close as possible to the uk after brexit. regardless of how it will all end, one thing is
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