Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 25, 2018 7:00pm-7:31pm GMT

7:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at 7pm. theresa may urges parliament and the public to back her brexit deal after its endorsement at today's eu summit. the british people don't want to spend any more time arguing about brexit. they want a good deal done that fulfills the vote and allows us to together again as a country. jean claude juncker, president of the european commission, issues a warning to those mps who think the eu can be persuaded to make further changes. this is the best deal possible for britain, this is the best deal possible for europe. this is the only deal possible. donald tusk, who chaired the summit, says the european union wants to remain as close as possible to the uk after brexit. regardless of how it will all end, one thing is certain. we will remain
7:01 pm
friends until the end of days. we'll have reaction to today's developments, as well as a look ahead to what's expected in westminster this week. also in the news this evening: unsafe and poorly—tested medical devices are being implanted into patients, according to a global investigation. parliament has seized documents as part of an ongoing dispute between facebook and a committee of mps investigating the technology giant's use of private data. and in 30 minutes, we'll bring you the latest sports news, including arsenal's win at bournemouth. that's sportsday at 7:30pm. eu leaders have given theirformal backing to the agreement that will take the uk out of the european union in four months' time.
7:02 pm
theresa may said the deal offers a brighter future for britain, urging parliament and the public to support it. she was speaking after 27 other eu leaders signed off on two key documents negotiated over the last 17 months. the main withdrawal agreement, outlining the terms on which we leave, provides for a transition period until at least the end of 2020. there is also a much shorter political declaration, which is not legally binding, butsets out hopes for an "ambitious pa rtnership" with the eu in the future. our political editor laura kuennsberg reports. no celebration, no fanfare, but a huge and serious step. after more than a0 years in sight... deep breath, the deal to leave is done. there were those who said that reaching a brexit agreement that worked for both sides was an impossible task.
7:03 pm
from the start, i rejected that counsel of despair. in any negotiation, we you do not get everything you want. you need to identify what your vital interests are and stick to them, but be prepared to compromise in other areas in order to achieve a result. i think the british people understand that. her bet, many of you are bored of the rows, splits and the spats, the officials who've broked the compromise watching on. before christmas, mps will vote on this deal. on it will depend whether we move together into a brighter future, or open the door to yet more division and uncertainty. the british people don't want to spend time arguing about brexit. can i ask you to be very straight with the public and tell us who, if anyone, you think is pleased about this deal? what we see in this deal today is a deal that delivers for people, delivers on the vote, delivers in a way that protects
7:04 pm
jobs and livelihoods, and protects our security and our united kingdom. and as i've said before, i believe our best days lie ahead of us. the eu's power players have agreed to brexit with caveats. the deal where the uk leaves next march, but stays close to the eu with a lot of final detail yet to be agreed. ahead of us is the difficult process of ratification, as well as further negotiations. but regardless of how it will all end, one thing is certain. we will remain friends until the end of days, and one day longer. it is time for everybody to take their responsibilities. today's agreement will help create the trust and confidence needed for negotiating our close and
7:05 pm
unprecedented future relationship. the agreement was hard fought both sides, even though sometimes it feels like eu leaders still can't quite believe what is happening from their eyes. translation: it is tragic the uk's leaving after 45 years. but there may be more theatre to come. mps at home might kick out the deal. would they budge here then? this is the deal, this is the best deal possible, and the european union will not change its fundamental position when it comes to this issue. are you concerned the prime minister will not get this deal through parliament? i think it is not now our concern. it is a british concern. this is the best we can do, both theresa may and her government, as well as the eu.
7:06 pm
no victors here today, nobody winning. we are all losing. there have been many moments where it has not been clear that theresa may would make it this far, but her next steps, these vital few weeks will determine her future and the future of the country, too. for the prime minister, there is doubt only one direction. she cannot know if the parliament and the public will follow along. so what happens next, now that the brexit deal has been been endorsed by eu? as you've been hearing, the biggest potential hurdle lies at westminster, and mrs may's chances of getting the agreement through parliament next month. if mps do approve it, and it's a big if, it would then go to the european parliament for approval. if mps vote it down, then there are a number of possible consequences. they could try to force a re—negotiation, a general election, another referendum, or we could leave without a deal. that is a battle theresa may has
7:07 pm
promised to fight with her heart and soul, but it could be an uphill one, with many pub —— mps publicly speaking out against her deal. this morning, the dup leader eileen foster confirmed that her ten mps will vote against that deal. what we're seeing in this irish protocol is much more than that, we're seeing a staying within the european union in terms of the single market, the customs union rules will apply to northern ireland where we will see that regime in europe where the same state aid is europe, and —— a border through the irish sea as well, which is why we cannot support this deal. in blackford told this programme that all his party's 35 mps will reject the deal. we all know the situation we're in, the prime minister does not have support for
7:08 pm
the so—called deal in parliament from her own party, never mind from the opposition, so we will go through the charade that she will try and see if she can win support over the next few days, we will have five days of debate. ultimately i suspect this will be voted down, it isa suspect this will be voted down, it is a deal that does not really please anybody. it does not please those of us who wanted to stay in europe or that we have accepted a compromise we should stay in the single market and customs union. the brexiteers don't like it, and the real problem is that when the top —— by mr presents us as is the deal, but look at what actually happens. we have a transition, we don't know how long the transition will last for because how do we actually affect a long—term trade deal with europe now that we are out? i think ina europe now that we are out? i think in a sense what needs to happen over the next few days that politicians of all parties have got to recognise the position we're in. and you are talking already? we are, that has been happening, and i think it is really important, and this is key for your viewers, we have ruled out no deal. there is no support for no
7:09 pm
deal in parliament. will pick up on some of those moments, becausejoins destroying the is rick stewart. let me ask you the is rick stewart. let me ask you the question —— rory stewart —— that laura kingsburg asked the predator, who is pleased with the steel?|j laura kingsburg asked the predator, who is pleased with the steel? i am pleased with this deal —— this deal, because it delivers on the referendum result, also keeping us close to europe. i think it is the best possible ref —— brexit deal you could have come and many of the people who are opposing it either wa nt to people who are opposing it either want to deny the brexit referendum happened and remain in europe, or those who prefer to have no deal with europe. but it is tricky to sell a deal on the basis that it lacks the freedom of movement, which was a issue for many who voted, but not the only issue. it wasn't the only issue, but it is a deal that
7:10 pm
accepts that as we negotiate over the future that if britain wants to divert more from the eu and its customs arrangement, they will have consequences. in other words, customs arrangement, they will have consequences. in otherwords, it customs arrangement, they will have consequences. in other words, it is a dynamic arrangement being proposed, and it is sensible. i don't see anyone in the wealth of criticism coming forward actually producing an alternative plan that works. is it a dynamic way of saying thatis works. is it a dynamic way of saying that is not fixed yet, which there is still so much to go through that people don't quite know what is they would up for? what they signed up to isa would up for? what they signed up to is a head of terms, and understanding. but it is important to understand that one of your‘s great strengths is a legally based organisation. if it puts down in black and white that it states it wa nts to black and white that it states it wants to have the closest partner ship with britain, it will. there'll be controlled over the movement of
7:11 pm
people, and will negotiate on that basis. looking over the document, one of the things that makes me confident is that people who were worried two years ago that part —— europe would push up —— punish britain, this document is surprisingly positive and warm and it's liquid stores britain. you saw in the exit from laura where people say they want to remain the closest of friends, that is a good position to be in. but surely we should be at the end of the negotiations by not? the point being the customs union, as we just the point being the customs union, as wejust mentioned, the point being the customs union, as we just mentioned, we are in the point being the customs union, as wejust mentioned, we are in it but have a transition period, we may stay in it, people don't quite know, we are wrestling with jelly. is in a mould, and the mould has defined the freedom of movement, so that is britain getting control over immigration, defining we will not pay billions of pounds to the eu every year, defining we will not be pa rt every year, defining we will not be part of the european political institutions and people worrying about the eu army and things like
7:12 pm
that, we will not be a part of that. but it all —— is also a assuring bremainers worried about the economy that we will retain single market access that we will retain single market a ccess 0 n that we will retain single market access on industrial goods and have access on industrial goods and have a close trading relationship... but without much of a say on the boundaries of all this? some things on this like if you are trading to another person's market, you have to accept the regulations or standards in order to sell them goods, that is a normal part of the customs deal, and i'm a bit surprised that we are interpreting this as though this is somehow interpreting this as though this is somehow economy interpreting this as though this is somehow economy status, this would be the same as if you are selling to the us or china. i want to move on to what happens next, because a lot of people almost say that what happened today with the signing of the deal in europe was beside the point, we knew that what happened, but what happens next is so crucial on home turf, and so many people are saying that theresa may's deal cannot go through parliament. what is your take? we all knew it would
7:13 pm
get to europe, six months ago people thought we would get no deal out of europe, we now have it. now people are saying we will never get it to parliament. my gut instinct is that we will get it through parliament. but what are the maths telling you? but what are the maths telling you? but people say we do not have the numbers. listen to what ian blackford said in the interview, he said there are few people in parliament who want no deal. and thatis parliament who want no deal. and that is the beginning of everything. there are very few people who want no deal, and there are very few people in parliament who want to rerun the referendum. then you are talking about a deal, and that deal will look very like this deal. so in the end, i think sense has to prevail because actually the people who are pushing for no deal are just so small. but what about the idea that there may be people who have been holding out thinking that we will go with it because we can maybe make some tweaks? we have heard very clearly from europe today that there are no tweaks to be made, the idea stands that people might vote it
7:14 pm
through that they can make more renegotiations, that is not up for grabs. no, it is unreasonable. in a negotiation of this sort, you have an individual negotiating with over 20 other member states in the european commission, said it is not a situation where 650 people in parliament can demand a tweak that you can with domestic uk legislation. it has to be acceptable to both sides, and to .5 years of work have gone into getting the best deal we can work have gone into getting the best dealwe can —— work have gone into getting the best deal we can —— to .5 years. the question is to parliament, do we wa nt question is to parliament, do we want this deal or not? we have just heard the dup saying they will take their ten mps to vote against the deal, we have this mp saying they will vote against the deal is a stance. where are you getting your optimism from? my optimism is from the end of that smp interview. what he is actually acknowledging is that nobody wants no deal, he also
7:15 pm
acknowledges that he wants to leave the european union, or has at least accepted that we have to leave the eu as accepted that we have to leave the euasa accepted that we have to leave the eu as a result of the referendum. he is talking about eu after, which have no control over the borders. this is close to a lot of the advantages, with the added advantage of controlling and root —— immigration. i don't see how the snp and others would not accept that although they don't see it as ideal, it is better than no deal, and in the end we have to vote for this for the end we have to vote for this for the sake of the country? a crucial few weeks coming up, very good of you tojoin us, rory few weeks coming up, very good of you to join us, rory stewart, thank you. it is now 7:15pm, let's look at the headlines. theresa may urges the parliament and public to back or break the deal after its endorsement at today's eu summit. unsafe and poorly tested medical devices are being implanted into patients, according to a global investigation. and parliament has seized documents
7:16 pm
as part of an ongoing dispute between facebook and a committee of mps investigating the knowledge he giant's use of private data. returning to one of those headline stories, medical devices that are unsafe and have not been adequately tested are ending up in pa rt adequately tested are ending up in part —— in patients. bbc panorama, together with the international consortium of investigative journalists, the guardian and bm] have been investigating how potentially dangerous products get approved. they found medical implant that had failed in the booths or we re that had failed in the booths or were tested only on pigs and dead bodies before coming to the market —— baboons. the industry says millions of people have benefited from devices like heart pacemakers and artificial knees and hips. debra cohen has this report. medical devices can transform our health. they keep us walking and seeing, and our hearts beating.
7:17 pm
there are thousands of companies trying to say it —— so the latest gadgets. what they will not necessarily tell you is that new does not always mean safer or better, or the devices may ask for damage or health. here we go, that's where you put it. this woman was the first person in the uk to be fitted with a new type of pacemaker that sits inside the heart. but the battery died afterjust three years and doctors could not get it out. battery died afterjust three years and doctors could not get it outlj don't like the thought that i've got a piece of metal in my heart that is doing nothing, and it'sjust laying there. the pacemaker was withdrawn for safety reasons stop at least two deaths and —— and 90 events where patients were seriously harmed by the device were recorded. 0ur investigation also found an implant that was approved for humans, despite failing in a study on baboons. and a treatment for children with curved spines that was only tested on pigs and dead bodies
7:18 pm
before being approved for use in the uk. critics say medical devices should be tested more thoroughly, and that the results of studies should be made public. as a patient, i would be terrified not to know the. but you have to have data to notice something is safer dangerous. we are talking about people's lives, it is really important to know whether these devices are safe or not. the european union has legislated to make the industry more transparent, but panorama understands that crucial information about medical devices will not be shared because it might scare the public. is not about scaring patients, there are risks. that's theissue, patients, there are risks. that's the issue, you have to inform people, even if it is one in a million, you have to tell people, you cannot withhold it. that is him 0 ra cle you cannot withhold it. that is him 0racle —— immoral, unethical, illegal, in my mind. the products
7:19 pm
we re illegal, in my mind. the products were tested regularly and met all industry they insist they're already checks in place to protect their patients. debra cohen, bbc news. you can see more on that story in tomorrow night's panorama, the great implant scandal at 8:30pm on bbc 0ne. documents believed to contain information about facebook‘s data privacy policies have been seized in london on the instructions of a parliamentary committee. it is thought to be because mps on the... sports and culture committee don't believe facebook has been responding the dutch adequately to their questions. facebook says the material is legally restricted and should not be viewed. 2018 has been a year of turmoil for facebook, with allegations including abuse by foreign powers such as russia, and worries of social media addiction. the biggest scandal surrounding the british data from cambridge analytica, the deity of the state of 87 million fell into
7:20 pm
the state of 87 million fell into the hands of the british firm. facebook accepted responsible for the error and apologise. now a us firm, 643, has launched a legal action against facebook. 643 was hit ha rd action against facebook. 643 was hit hard when, in 2014, facebook, third—party access to users's friends data, precisely the avenue q jedlicka exploded. 643 had an app which searched out because of people in bikini, but is now redundant. as pa rt in bikini, but is now redundant. as part of the lawsuit in california, 643 obtained thousands of documents for facebook, some sensitive. now a select set of mps and britain have acquired those documents i had a hearing on tuesday which are representative of seven national parliaments will attend. these are serious and important issues. facebook has been slow to realise how serious it would take them, and other parliament around the world do, as well, and we are prepared to use all the powers we have to get to the truth. facebook say the complaint brought by 643 is complete without merit, and there is an ongoing case that document should
7:21 pm
not be published. however under parliamentary privilege, the committee says it reserves that right. for years, facebook committee says it reserves that right. foryears, facebook benefited from what for them was a benign environment. investors have to plough money and, getting money for their products, and above all, a light touch from regulators. all thatis light touch from regulators. all that is now gone. national parliaments are putting global tech firms in the dark —— dog, and the feeling is growing for the likes of zuckerberg have unleashed something they are struggling to contain. a few weeks ago, facebook hired former prime minister —— british deputy... his inbox already bursting will have another delusion is weak. 0ur our business correspondentjoe miller is here. what can you tell us? is centrally unusual. it was really unusual, it was a very rare use of a centuries—old parliamentary power. here's what reportedly happened, the dms select committee sent the sergeant at arms, you who may be familiar to many viewers from parliamentary ceremonies like the
7:22 pm
speakers per session, they sent him toa speakers per session, they sent him to a hotel in london where an american tech executive was staying. he was visiting on a business trip, and he had a stash of papers that he had obtained to this court case that was mentioned to be going on in california. no dcms select committee will not say how many documents there are or what is in them, there are reports it may contain private m essa 9 es are reports it may contain private messages between mark zuckerberg and other facebook executives. we don't know that, but what we do know, and damien collins, the chair whom we heard from there, has said that the committee has moved to do this because it felt it was not getting adequate answers from facebook. because it felt it was not getting adequate answers from facebookm sounds rather dramatic, is anything more than a stunt? this is coming after the committee's repeated attem pts after the committee's repeated atte m pts to after the committee's repeated attempts to get mark zuckerberg to appear before mps, and they have been rebuffed. and to some extent, this is damien collins in the select committee using what few powers it has to send a message to facebook in
7:23 pm
silicon valley, saying there are still things we can do to get a hold of things that you don't want us to get a hold of. and i think they will wa nt to get a hold of. and i think they will want to see this story hit the american press, hit mark zuckerberg's inbox tomorrow and see if it tempts facebook to come and actually talk to parliament. we shall see, thank you very much, joe. west midlands police have named the teenager stabbed to death in coventry last night as jaded washingtonjames. coventry last night as jaded washington james. the 16—year—old was found with serious injuries just before midnight. he died in hospital shortly afterwards. a murder investigation is under way. amy cole sent us this update. this has been described as a tragic incident which has shocked the local community here. west midlands police say they were contacted by their ambulance colleagues, following reports of a 16—year—old boy who was found injured at d'amour road in coventry around 22 midnight last
7:24 pm
night. the boy was taken to hospital with serious injuries but was confirmed dead a short time later. two other teams with less serious injuries were also taken to hospital for treatment. next of kin has been informed and there being supported by specialist officers. today the bbc has spoken to a family friend who has told us that their utter shock and devastation by what has happened, they say he was a quiet lad who was simply in the wrong place at the wrong time, and they are speculating this is gang related. west midlands police say they are working round—the—clock to establish what happened and to find those responsible. anyone with information is asked to get in contact with them. meanwhile this is a community that is grieving and struggling to comprehend what has happened. amy cole, bbc news. the ukrainian navy has accused russia of opening fire on some of its ships in the black sea. they made a statement on their facebook
7:25 pm
page after a day of tension during which russia stop ukrainian navy vessels from entering the sea of as all by placing a huge cargo ship beneath a russian controlled bridge. more now on our top story, eu leaders have given their formal backing to britain leaving the european union. theresa may says the deal offers a brighter future for britain and urged parliament and the public to support it. the prime minister will now be doing her utmost to sell the deal. not only did mps, but to their constituents of people across the country. what do voters make of the deal she is negotiating? bolivia richwine has spent the rate —— dan skipton. skipton in the yorkshire dales is a prosperous market town of attracting plenty of tourists and votes tory blue. but in the red line, part of it was time a sunday at lunch and issue over the brexit deal. it might
7:26 pm
be pleasing both sides, and that is what she is trying to do. she has tried to please everybody, and it will not be a good deal for either side. it is unacceptable, and if another —— and if brexiteers have left the cabinet because it is so bad, then theresa may and all that remained colleagues are pushing it through, it looks awful. in the referendum, 52% of people here voted to leave the eu, similar to the national result. among them, so event, who has lived in the town all her life and help to run the family canal business. i think it is is dragging ona canal business. i think it is is dragging on a bit now, i think they could just do with getting the deal done and we can move forward. in the town centre, the local band is on stage. the majority of them voted to remain, but we took two members who asked with opposing views aside.|j think it is a piece of paper that
7:27 pm
has something on it, i cannot see this deal ever happening. i don't think this country believe the eu on those terms. i'm not sure we could leave the eu. but i don't place a great deal of stock in this. is presented being a simple job, a simple negotiation, and actually it has been incredibly tied into so many aspects of the eu. do you think that me and you, that we will guess where deal out of any of this?” think the only thing we can hope for is that the country becomes more prosperous in the future, but it doesn't look like it will happen for a long time. despite their differences of opinion, the band played on the stop whether the same could be said for those in power is anyone's guest. alleged —— 0livia richwine, bbc news, skipton. if you're not in the festive spirit,
7:28 pm
maybe this magpie called mike can help you. i'm hoping you got that he was saying merry christmas before we had to put underneath. apparently he listened to listening to those around him. let's get a look at the weather now. after days of chilly wind and cloudy weather, a complete change on the way in the coming days. atlantic weather systems will start knocking on our doorfrom today weather systems will start knocking on our door from today onwards. monday is to looking fine across the uk, that is if you don't mind this chilly easterly winds. this is what it looks like over the next few hours, so the wind out of the east continues to drag in some clout, there will be further showers across yorkshire, eastern scotland. the temperatures by early on monday, above freezing in city centres also outside of town there will be a frost across northern and northwestern areas. tomorrow very much in east — west split. the easterly wind will continue to bring a lot of thick cloud to the east of
7:29 pm
the country, so from london to edinburgh, whereas in the west, will have sunshine in places like cardiff, liverpool and glasgow. tuesday morning onwards, those weather fronts start to line themselves up in the atlantic and had way. on top of that, increasing winds. the rain week —— reaches cornwall and devon, by the afternoon central parts of the uk, but it looks i do most of the day, northern areas will stay dry, and i could even be misty and for the microphone you for time. dominating the whole north atlantic, look at these isobars, which comes with much milder weather, reaching all parts of the country by wednesday, lots of showers, gale force winds inland, even showers, gale force winds inland, eve n severe showers, gale force winds inland, even severe gales around some of these western coasts. these are the average wind speeds, and in many cases you could maybe double or triple some of these northern areas, the average wins to get the guest.
7:30 pm
temperatures 14 degrees in london, double figures throughout the country. on thursday, low—pressure, very close to our neighbourhood, sending strong winds and mild air. but in between showers, you will get the sunshine. that is if you're not stuck underneath a weather front, and there will be

37 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on