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tv   Asia Business Report  BBC News  November 26, 2018 1:30am-1:46am GMT

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the terms of the brexit agreement. the focus is now on westminster where the deal must be ratified by the british parliament. the prime minister, theresa may, has warned opponents of the agreement that it's the only one on offer. russian special forces have seized three ukrainian navy vessels off the coast of crimea, in a sharp escalation of tensions. ukraine's president is to ask parliament to declare martial law. and this story is trending online... new zealand's introduced the testimatic, a booth that allows men to have their testicles checked without having to face a doctor. testicular cancer is the number one cancer in young men in western nations, and it's hoped that the booth can help reduce the stigma around men getting themselves tested. that's all. stay with bbc world news. and one other story here in the uk: an investigation by 58 media organisations, including the bbc, has uncovered evidence that patients are being given unsafe implants. now on bbc news live to singapore
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for asia business report. brexit big day in brussels stash an agreement from eu leaders. the relationship will grow but the plan still faces opposition in parliament. cyber monday and by it may also be a gift for on line criminals and hackers. good morning, asia. hello, world. the start of a new trading week. i am glad you could join us. we start off with the mac that of the eu leaders have approved the withdrawal deal. ——
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brexit. negotiations began in march last year. theresa may urged both leave and remain voters to unite. last year. theresa may urged both leave and remain voters to unitem people think there is another negotiation to be done, that is not the case. this is the deal, it is the case. this is the deal, it is the result of tough and difficult negotiations over a significant period of time and this is that the deal on the table, the best and only possible deal. the parliament is set to vote on the deal at its approval is not guaranteed. there is something in it to annoy everybody. the brexiteers who want to make free trade deals with the rest of the world because the uk under this deal retained bound to european rules for 2 years and possibly longer, and
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those who want to remain will not be happy--- those who want to remain will not be happy... what happens next? the uk will have to decide what it wants to do. people like me want another referendum but there is not in the houses of parliament who currently supports that. theresa may could make a feigned attempt to renegotiate but she is right, the terms have been set from the beginning by europe. the uk is1 voice in 27 nations and, unlike the rhetoric, contrary to the retreat during the campaign, it is simply not possible for the uk to retain a deal... but what will make the uk parliament approve this deal? that isa parliament approve this deal? that is a very good question! it is divided right down the middle. it is ha rd to divided right down the middle. it is hard to see an outcome that pleases
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everybody. the need for unity in the tory party is likely to see supporters. what does labour do? it is not clear at this point. labour is not clear at this point. labour is divided on this topic and it is quite possible that could significant numbers of labour mps will vote against it. this indeed gives certainty to the business community which is good news for asian businesses. nothing really changed until september or longer and similar terms will roll forward after that. the current trade situation remained unchanged which is what businesses canvassed for. what is different is the uk will have no say in how the legislation which governs its trade relations with europe is shaped. simon littlewood. cyber monday is! with europe is shaped. simon littlewood. cyber monday is 1 of the biggest shopping days. many shoppers
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decided to go on line instead of heading to the stores. the comments rising by more than 26%. it is also prime season for cyber—criminals. what can we learn from last week ‘s amazon on data breach? that remains to be seen. but these are fortunate events that occur once in awhile and business has to ready for it. events that occur once in awhile and business has to ready for itm amazon on is vulnerable, small business owners have a more serious situation. the bigger you are, the more you can invest on security. smaller, less. the bigger you are, the more you get targeted and bad quys the more you get targeted and bad guys may be keener to penetrate and breach. customers however are still
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continuing to buy on line. there is no fear. that is how it goes. we are used to it. the breaches overall we get over that fast. but how can we better protect ourselves? it is the right applications at the beginning. with software, it becomes more difficult to secure things so it is important to be safe at the beginning and not increase players. we need to boost our capabilities for cybersecurity. the penalty is a fairly substantial. we need to make those investments early and big compliant for the gdp are
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requirements. the g 20 summit in argentina kicks off this friday. the number of countries represent 85% of global economic output. investors will watch the meeting between us president donald trump and chinaposmac xijinping. president donald trump and chinaposmac xi jinping. can they resolve the trade war? will they get the odd the ceremonial handshakes? how did we get to this situation? the odd the ceremonial handshakes? how did we get to this situation7m is on investors minds. whether the 2 will have a ceasefire. how have we arrived exactly at this state? the us china with 3 rounds of tariffs — $53,000,000,000 worth of goods. china then retaliated. mister
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trumpposmac10% tariff was tiny and is set tojump to trumpposmac10% tariff was tiny and is set to jump to 25% byjanuary u nless is set to jump to 25% byjanuary unless a deal is reached. the trade bought is a stark contrast to last yearposmac t20 where they had a message and this was a pledge to resist all forms of detection —ism. revised declaration was sent out a few months later. —— protective. source of income in india has been struggling in recent years. this ca rava n struggling in recent years. this caravan of camels is headed to the largest camel fair in western india.
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they walk for 15 days with these camels they plan to sell. but for the past few years, he has been struggling to get ideas. translation: earlier we sold the camel for $700 which helped to raise my family but now that by the camel for $70. last year almost 4000 camels came to the fair but only 20% we re camels came to the fair but only 20% were sold. 1 of the reasons it is hurting the business is state laws prohibiting sellers. outside the state or for slaughter. protection of camels or also paving the way for illegal trade. these men are looking to buy a baby camel. 1 tells me he
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wa nts to ta ke to buy a baby camel. 1 tells me he wants to take the camel out of the state and sell it again for a better price. translation: people need the farming. we need to do a lot of work to get them out so we should make some profit also. government officials are tightlipped about it. translation: we cannot say anything about it. the ban on camel exports was to stop illegal trading. this doctor believes there could be another solution. she is time to popularise camel milk. we are trading at 30 litres of camel milk per day and it is only at about $4 per day and it is only at about $4 per litre and a family can make about $250 per month from selling camel milk but at the moment it is only about half a dozen, a dozen family who are in a fitting. it is a small step now but she hopes in the
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coming years, the camel that can be reinvented in the 1 that can provide sta ble reinvented in the 1 that can provide stable and sustainable business in the community. before we go, let's ta ke the community. before we go, let's take a look at the asia—pacific markets... a fall in oil prices saw the all ordinaries fall. it is continuing its weak start. japan is out after a holiday on friday. thank you for investing your time with us. sport today is coming up next. before sport today... the top stories this hour: after twenty months of negotiation, european union leaders have endorsed the terms of a brexit deal. russian special forces have seized three ukrainian navy vessels off the coast of crimea, in a sharp escalation of tensions. thousands of documents relating to facebook and how it handles users' data have been seized on the demand of a parliamentary committee.
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the commons' digital, culture, media and sport committee used its legal powers to obtain the papers from an american software company taking legal action against facebook. our media editor amol rajan has the story. 2018 has been a year of turmoilfor facebook, with allegations including abuse by foreign powers such as russia and worries about social media addiction. the biggest scandal surrounded british data firm cambridge analytica. the data of 87 million users fell into the hands of the british firm. facebook accepted responsibility for the error and apologised. now a us firm, 643, has launched a legal action against facebook. 643 was hit hard when in 2014 facebook cut—off third—party access to users' friends' data, precisely the avenue that cambridge analytica exploited. 643 had an app called pikini which searched out pictures of people in bikinis, but is now redundant. as part of the lawsuit
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in california, 643 obtained thousands of documents from facebook, some of them sensitive. now a select committee of mps in britain has acquired those documents ahead of the hearing on tuesday which representatives of seven international parliaments will attend. these are really serious important issues. i think facebook has been slow to realise how seriously we take them, and other parliaments around the world do as well, and we're prepared to use all the powers that we have to try and get to the truth. facebook say the complaint brought by 643 is completely without merit and there is an ongoing case the documents shouldn't be published. however, under parliamentary privilege, the committee says it reserves that right. for years, facebook benefited from what, for them, was a benign environment. investors have to plough money in, growing demand for their products and, above all, a light touch from regulators. all that is now gone. national parliaments are putting global tech firms in the dock and the feeling is growing that the likes of zuckerberg have unleashed something they are struggling to contain. a few weeks ago facebook hired
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former british deputy prime minister nick clegg to oversee reputational matters. his inbox, already bursting, will have another deluge this week. amol rajan, bbc news. and you can get in touch with me and the team on twitter — i'm @bbckasiamadera now on bbc news sport today hello, this is sport today, live from the bbc sport centre. coming up on this programme: the second leg of the the copa libertadores final is postponed for a second time following on from saturday's attack on the boca juniors team bus. nico hulkenberg survives a fiery start to the season ending abu dhabi grand prix which is won by world champion lewis hamilton. and ireland's jonny sexton is named player of the year
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at the world rugby awards. hello and welcome to the programme where we start with the footballing news that the copa libertadores final has been postponed again. the second leg between argentine rivals river plate and boca juniors had already been suspended on saturday after violence before the game at estadio monumental — but the south american governing body say that after the boca team bus was attacked by river fans on the way to the venue in buenos aires and the injuries suffered by some of their players that the game could not be played under ‘equal conditions'. this match was in

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