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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 26, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's eleven am and these are the main stories this morning: the bbc has learned that the british academic matthew hedges has been released from detention after the united arab emirates gave him a presidential pardon. in consideration of the historical relationship and close ties between the united arab emirates and the united kingdom, his highness has decided to include mr matthew hedges among the 785 prisoners released. theresa may is meeting cabinet ministers as she begins a campaign to sell her brexit deal — warning of division and uncertainty if mps oppose it. the prime minister's secured the deal, a very good deal for the united kingdom, and it's now the job of all of us in the cabinet to make the case. but an uphill struggle awaits her — as the democratic unionist party, dozens of tory backbenchers and all opposition parties say they won't vote for it in parliament we do not accept that this is the best deal, it is a bad deal. and i'm not...
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you would say, "well, you're the opposition," you would say that. but look what's happening. mps from all parties are saying, this is not a good deal. i'm ben brown, reporting live from westminster or the prime minister will make a statement to mps on her brexit deal this afternoon. in other news — tensions escalate in waters off the crimean peninsula as russia seizes three ukrainian ships. these pictures appear to show a russian ship ramming a ukrainian naval vessel during the incident. bernardo bertolucci, the oscar—winning director of last tango in paris and the last emperor, has died of cancer aged 77. mission to mars — after a 90 million milejourney, nasa hopes to land a robotic probe on the red planet today. and england's cricketers beat sri lanka by 42 runs in the third
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test in colombo to seal a three—nil series whitewash. good morning. it's monday 26th november. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm rachel schofield. in the past few minutes it's been confirmed that the british academic, matthew hedges has been released from prison in the united arab emirates after being granted a presidential pardon. the durham university phd student was jailed for life last week for spying. his wife, daniela tejada, said she couldn't wait for him to return home. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt said he was grateful to the uae government for resolving the issue speedily. well, speaking at news conference a little earlier, a uae government spokesman said matthew hedges was being granted clemency along with hundreds of other prisoners to mark a national day — but he insisted that mr hedges had been spying for the uk. in response to a letter
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from the family of mr hedges requesting clemency, and in consideration of the historical relationship and close ties between the united arab emirates and the united kingdom, his highness has decided to include mr matthew hedges among the 785 prisoners released. mr hedges will be permitted to leave the country once all the formalities are complete. his wife, daniela tejada has been giving her reaction this morning to the bbc‘s today programme. to be honest, i was not expecting it. it took me by surprise. i am so happy and so relieved and really incredulous that this is all happening, finally. it has been an absolute nightmare this six, seven months. i cannot wait to have him back. do you know when you will see him? i don't know yet.
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the news has just been announced and we're trying to coordinate the details. i'm trying to see if i can go and pick him up. we're absolutely elated at the news. what was the last time you saw matthew and what did you think? i saw him on the day of his hearing, and sadly the last time i saw him we were both walking out of the court room. we were not able to say goodbye. i am glad that it will not be long to say hello again. the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt says the british govenrment are still ‘deeply perplexed' by the case, but has today thanked the uae for pardoning mr hedges. we've seen no evidence to support
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these accusations against mr hedges, but today we want to thank them for the fact they have microphone could the fact they have microphone could the strong applications we have made. we had made it clearfor a number of months now that we see no basis for these allegations, they have reflected on that and take on what action they can which means matthew hedges will be reunited with his family. —— they have reflected on the strong representations we have made. radha stirling is a human rights lawyer and ceo of detained in dubai. she also advised daniela tejada to take matthew's case public by going to the media. thank you for being with us, a day of great relief. we are surprised it didn't happen sooner, actually come in many of these cases, the british government intervened at an early stage, they could actually prevent the conviction from happening in the first place. the fact that he has been pardoned as a way for the uae
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to almost say he was guilty, we pardoning him to impress the uk but in reality, they have released a video showing matthew hedges allegedly confessing to the allegation of being a spy. but i see that as, if he were a spy, i don't think that he would have confessed, especially in the absence of porter in this case. —— the absence of torture. the foreign secretary has said there is no basis for these allegations and now he has come the conviction and sentence, which may affect his ability to travel in future. it seems he has been, like many other british, been subject to run for allegations, wrongful detention in the absence of any true form of evidence against him. —— wrongful allegation. and there is no way friend access compensation from the uae government for its treatment. do think would have been a way of handling this differently
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if the british government had acted sooner? chat i think they could have acted sooner but it's really when the international spotlight is on the international spotlight is on the uae that they respond to such requests. previously when they have been dealt with, says the press is focused on the uae and human rights abuses and that is affecting tourism and investment, that is when they get involved that issue pardons or if people have not been convicted yet, they just if people have not been convicted yet, theyjust intervene and immediately release that person. you know you're advised daniela tejada to ta ke know you're advised daniela tejada to take this case public because it is the case, is it not, that the british government wants more of a softly softly approach and advises families to get the low profile initially to not rock the boat, perhaps? absolutely. i think before novices advised several people i beenin novices advised several people i been in touch with, and probably more, not to go to press. —— the foreign office has advised. and i
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think if that is the case, that is com pletely think if that is the case, that is completely in the interests of the diplomatic relationship between the uk and uae and certainly not the best advice for citizenship in detained. people who do not go to the press can end up actually serve in his life sentences or several yea rs in his life sentences or several years in prison when they could have phrased it to the international press and been released like the otherss. it is turbulent advice not to speak out about human rights abuses. —— terrible advice. to speak out about human rights abuses. -- terrible advice. looking to the future, obviously it's great for his family that matthew hedges is coming home, but you're outlining these criticisms of the uae‘s legal system. with a compromise like this, does this mean nothing eventually changes, that there is criticism levelled but no great diplomatic moves that will ever see an alteration to their legal system or the way the uae behaves? certainly do relationship between the uae and uk at this first detainees is concerned has been working the same way for the decade i've been
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operating with detained in debayo. and as pardon is insufficient, in my opinion, freddie uk to continue this relationship as it has been because it will happen again and again and again. we will not see changes, we're not seeing improvements to the judicial system in the uae, the burden of proof, the evidence requirements. i think what we really need to see is the sco increasing their warnings to british citizens. i had their warnings to british citizens. ihada their warnings to british citizens. i had a look this morning and there are so many i had a look this morning and there are so many incidences of british nationals being arrested for silly things, what we would consider silly, for example, we twitching in news story that was considered detrimental to the uae government. —— re—tweeting. the government is continuing to allow the uae to advertise and promote their contradictory starts all over the country who could be delivered into believing that the uae is more like
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bangkok las vegas unlike saudi. and this causes so many wrongful detention, it's the most likely country for british nationals to be detained abroad, the government needs to do a lot more to sanction oi’ needs to do a lot more to sanction or encourage the uae to actually make the changes that are required to host it is that they want. thank you very much for your thoughts this morning. thank you. there has been word that there has been a treat put out by daniela tejada, matthew hedges‘s why. you can see there. —— his wife. we don't know how quickly he will get back to uk but we will of course followed this story. now, a busy day — probably a busy
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week at westminster — ben brown is there. it certainly will be busy. for theresa may, it's a start her big sell, to rally support for her brexit deal, urging mps to get behind her or risk going back to square behind her or risk going back to square one, behind her or risk going back to square one, she says. that's what she will say when she addresses parliament this afternoon. mps are likely to vote on it on december 12th. the prime minister is holding a cabinet meeting at downing street ahead of that commons statement. speaking to the bbc this morning, the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, acknowledged that getting the deal through would be a challenge, but said it was the right course for the country. opposition parties, the dup and many of her own backbenchers have already said they will oppose the plan. our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. theresa may arrived home yesterday with the ink fresh on the deal that will take us out of the eu.
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in brussels, she got the backing of eu leaders. now she must sell it to sceptical mps and the public. there were those who said that reaching a brexit agreement that worked for both sides was an impossible task. from the start, i rejected that counsel of despair and set about negotiating a deal that worked for the uk and the eu, one that delivered on the result of the referendum and set us on course for a prosperous future. there's two parts to this deal. the withdrawal agreement deals with our exit. there will be a transition period after we leave in march when not much changes until december 2020 so new arrangements can be worked out. it settles the divorce bill and guarantees the rights of eu and uk citizens living abroad and it contains that controversial backstop plan to avoid a hard irish border if there is no trade deal. then there is a political declaration which talks about an ambitious future
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partnership in trade, free movement will end, but the details have not been agreed and this document isn't legally binding. the prime minister and other eu leaders say this deal is the best it gets but back home, many disagree. what she has created is something that satisfies very, very few people. so, the chances of getting through, this deal through parliament i think is effectively nil. here, all the opposition parties and many conservative mps have said they will not support this deal. so, the challenge for the prime minister is to try to win them round before a crucial vote in a few weeks. theresa may's new brexit secretary, stephen barclay, has been speaking to the bbc this morning. he acknowledged that getting the deal through would be a challenge — but said it was the right course for the country. the fact is, this is the only deal on the table. it has taken two years of tough
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negotiation to get to this point. this deal delivers on the referendum and, ithink, the biggest democratic vote in our history. it would be highly damaging to our democracy not to deliver on that vote, but we need to move forward in a way that maintains our security cooperation with europe and protects jobs, protects the supply line, which is so important to manufacturing and other industries. but shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, criticised the prime minister's deal. this is a bad deal, a lot better than this could have been negotiated if the prime minister had started in a different place and i do not accept that this is the best deal. it is a bad deal. and i'm not... you would say, "well, you're the opposition, you would say that," but look what's happening. mp5 from all parties are saying this is not a good deal and we cannot pretend that it is and that's why it's almost certainly not going to get through. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at downing street.
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that cabinet meeting is a direct now, and keir starmer saying it's almost certainly not going to get through, and that's how the maths looks. but theresa may has got to try to campaign for her ordeal in the next few days to try to change mps' minds? that's right. this negotiation has obviously been detailed, it has gone on for months and months and the idea that she's just going to accept that it's not going to get through, it's not going to happen. she feels strongly that it is the best deal she could have got and is the only option on the table, so now it's a question of how does she sell that? we're been given a glance about already, doing radio phone—ins, she's likely travel around the country to get the message out to people and in some ways circumventing b6 and 50 mps in parliament and try to get away i think from the legalistic arguments
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of the text of the withdrawal agreement and the political declaration and try to make it more wheeled people, talk aboutjobs, try to talk about why she's ended up with the deal she has come an end to freedom of movement, an end to large payments to the eu, but wanting to make sure that trade relationship is close enough to make sure that car factories in the midlands can keep working and being efficient and keep people in theirjobs. i think that is the strategy. whether it works or not is of course a different matter but i think cabinet ministers helped the narrative will change, that after a while of getting that message out, that pressure will be put on mps by their constituents to say, hang on a minute, this is a decent enough compromise, i wanted to back it. we will see whether that happens. but as you say, challenging, certainly, the moment. but that does not been ages all over yet. this first campaign, we are hearing suggestions you might be prepared to have a televised debate, head—to—head with jeremy
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prepared to have a televised debate, head—to—head withjeremy corbyn. —— she might be prepared. this is an intriguing suggestion in a newspaper today, that she would relish the chance to go head—to—head with jeremy corbyn. now, some of course will be sniggering at that given that during the general election, there was a lot of fuss about her not wanting to do that. i suppose the attraction for downing street would be again, a prime—time audience, getting that message directly out to viewers. i think she would prefer to be on the detail of the agreement because she knows it better than anybody and it is clear from hearing her in the house of commons, she had spent hours and hours defending what she has got and taking questions from mps, it think she's used to doing. i think the problem is, though, to have the debate on those terms, the narrow terms, if you like, of what is in the text, would not suitjeremy corbyn as much, it would be hard to it like that. if you did it and we are told by labour that you would like to, he would want to broaden it much more, to talk about other policies, i think, so i don't think
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that would be so appealing to the prime minister. so at the moment no plans to do that. and remember those debates for the general election, it ta kes debates for the general election, it takes months and months to sort them out. it would be tricky, i think, to do that in time. but also the idea that it was justjeremy corbyn and the prime minister, some would say that in their manifestos, they both backed brexit, how could you have a debate when you didn't have other people with other views involved. so i think we are a bit away from it at the moment. thank you. i'm joined now by catherine haddon, a fellow at the indepenent think tank the institute for government — a group which aims to improve government effectiveness. thanks for being with us. do you agree that the maths stack up against the prime minister? it's a hopeless task for her? or do think she's got a chance of getting this through parliament on december 12? it's really ha rd through parliament on december 12? it's really hard to tell at the moment. everyone is trying to manage expectations, some groups trying to raise expectations, we know this deal is splitting both the parties like no other. there's been a lot of
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talk about those mps who know which way they're going to vote, what they will there are still a lot of of mps she will be trying to work on the moment. and that is why she's doing this big sell around the country, new media, trying to convince voters who she hopes will then convince their mps. we've seen throughout this process theresa may playing a long game, effectively, and she's trying to do that again, trying to use the period between now and the vote to try to sell it to the country, to get people on her site to help bring mps on board to do it. but it's a hard sell that she's got to do. what you think will happen, she does not get it through, what will happen? the eu said over the weekend, that's it, no possibility of any real negotiation. is that a bluff, do you think? difficult to tell. we know she is trying to manage expectations. there is talk sometimes about what will happen the second time that they try to take it through and some talk from sources
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about when that vote might be, while they try to push it through a second time before christmas or away to tell the new year? try to push it through a second time because you got a different deal because you think mps will change their minds? gas, with an archie comes back and says, no, it's this one thing, i don't know. —— whether or not she comes back and says. so far she's been saying, i will see this out, but whether or not she starts to push them to the limit and say, this oi’ push them to the limit and say, this or no deal, that's it, we don't know. the chances of a no-deal brexit, how do see that? it seems to be rising higher. when we saw the deal was coming, there was a lot of noise from the government that they we re noise from the government that they were close to a deal, they were confident we'll get it, but again we are back to talking about no deal and what it would look like. the problem is there's not a lot of time between now and the end of march to do all the work involved to try to mitigate the effects of a no deal. the next couple of weeks ago to be... we use the word historic but this is potentially a turning point
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in the history of this nation. huge turning point. this is the biggest vote many of these mps will ever have faced in their life, if not all of them. a big decision they've got to make further constituencies, their own conscience, for what they think is the best future for the government. so the, yes, this is historic. thank you very much. and at 2.30 this afternoon, we'll be trying to get answers to some of your questions about the latest brexit developments, with a panel of experts. if you have a question, get in touch. much more from me later — but for now, back to you rachel. ukraine's president has described the seizure by russia of three ukrainian navy vessels yesterday as an act of aggression. russian special forces opened fire and took control of two gunboats and a tug boat as they tried to pass through the kerch strait
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off the coast of crimea. both nato and the eu have called for restraint, and for ukraine's access to the waters to be restored. this is the moment one russian naval ship rammed a smaller ukrainian tug boat. the un security council will meet later today in an emergency session to discuss the matter. lebo diseko reports. russian fighter jets in the kerch straits. this stretch of water is the only way in and out of the sea of azov, which ukraine and russia share. russia says three ukrainian vessels illegally entered its waters. first it blockaded them, then it fired at them. ukraine says six of its sailors were hurt, while the russian security service says only three were wounded and were getting medical care. in kiev, ukraine's president, petro poroshenko, described the russian actions as unprovoked and crazy. mps there will vote on whether to introduce martial law on monday.
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translation: martial law would be introduced to strengthen ukraine's defensive capabilities amid increasing aggression and according to international law. it does not mean oui’ to international law. it does not mean our refusal to resolve the issue by somatic beans. —— diplomatic means. ukraine's key ports are in the sea of azov, but since russia annexed crimea four years ago, it is able to block access in and out of the kerch straits. overnight in kiev, there were protests outside russia's embassy, these events like salt in wounds that have not healed. both sides have asked for an emergency meeting of the un security council, which will be held on monday morning, the hope being that this crisis doesn't escalate any further. lebo diseko, bbc news.
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the bbc‘s zhanna bezpyatchuk is in kiev. this seems to be a major escalation of tension. yes, actually, the current incident that happened yesterday in the black sea, actually, it happened in the black sea, are seen as the escalation of the tension between to countries and many people here in kiev see it as an aggression of the russian federation. what is important understand that is that both ukraine and russia have a treaty that gives them equal rights and freedom of sees in the azarov see —— the sea of
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azov and in the kerch strait, and the incident itself happened in the black sea in waters that russia claims to be its territorial waters, well according to the international and ukrainian legislation, these waters around the crimean peninsula remain ukraine territorial waters as long as the annexation of the crimean peninsula in 2014 was illegal, that is recognised by the international community and not just ukraine itself or stop has admitted it is about ukraine's parliament is now considering bringing in martial law? —— how significant is it? now considering bringing in martial law? -- how significant is it? it could be very significant. because we have to remember that the current conflict in the east of ukraine has broken out in 2014 but since then,
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it has never been declared, martial law. if it happens, it will be the first time since the brick of the conflict. and of course, now, many ukrainians are seriously concerned by the imprecations of the declaration of martial law. what would it mean for their everyday life? -- would it mean for their everyday life? —— the implications. ever think a change, especially in the south and east of the country. it means that the presidential elections, that's a very important point, that are scheduled for march 2019 next year, they have to be suspended. and people are really worried by these developments. and clearly, the international community is concerned by what is going on in that area. we go the un security council is meeting this morning to discuss this. exactly. the
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international community has become concerned by the situation in the azov seat some time ago, it is not the first time they are concerned but it is the first outright military attack, the real stand—off between the two countries in this sphere area —— see every, and it there are many reasons for this concerns. russia and ukraine according to international legislation have equal rights for the navigation in the azov sea and in the kerch strait, and there is no state what they're between russia and ukraine, it has never been regulated or established there. so what we have is a situation where russia claims it has a border in the black sea, that it is linked to the annexation of the crimean peninsula, the water was changed by the annexation of crimea. and it claims
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it has learned that should be considered as state water in the kerch strait that doesn't correspond with international sea floor. so there are real concerns for the international community because it is about international law. —— it does not correspond with sea law. let's recap now on the story of matthew hedges, the british student sentenced to life in prison in the uae for spying. he's been releaseed and pardoned this morning. feras kilani is bbc arabic‘s special correspondent and joins us now from abu dhabi. tell us what more we know about mr hedges‘ whereabouts? tell us what more we know about mr hedges' whereabouts? he was released one hour ago and now we have learned he will be on a flight to london at ten local time, london time. so he will arrive to london at 5pm, let‘s
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say. we don‘t know which sites you will take but we can confirm now that he will be heading to the uk at ten london time tonight. —— we don‘t know which flight he will take. and of course he has been released but it has been made clear by the burr government there that he still guilty of spying in their eyes and this is a pardon, an act of clemency. —— made clear by the government there. they showed a video, showing him in different sessions, admitting he worked as a captain with mi6, collecting info not related to job. this is the record. and then that official on camera statement, they said that dot—macro said a lot about what he
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admitted and the timing of things, all that stuff, and then they said that this pardon which was declared yesterday is not about him because the pardon... it will include something like 700 prisoners here in the uae. given the intervention of the uae. given the intervention of the british foreign secretary and the british foreign secretary and the discussions that have had to happen, what you think if anything will be the ongoing impact between, on the relationship between britain and the uae? lots has happened in the ten day since he was sentenced for life. we heard a lot from the uk, from the foreign office and state m e nts uk, from the foreign office and statements from here. the official person who today read the statement, he said that... on another note, we
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know there are sensitive issues regarding the uk policy towards the gulf conflict. and the uae don‘t like how the uk deal with this especially regarding the muslim... their relationship with them, they‘d support them, the muslim brotherhood issueis support them, the muslim brotherhood issue is the main issue. and there issue is the main issue. and there isa issue is the main issue. and there is a lot of political motivation, i cannot say, because i met a lot of officials, i keep hearing that the muslim brotherhood and the policy of the cave towards them is the key thing, the problem behind all of this... —— the policy of the uk. let me say, the problem between them,
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the relationship between the uk and uae. thanks very much. now the weather. we have had some easterly winds in recent days and that has meant it was chilly. we will see those winds switch around to a south westerly. that makes all the difference. it will turn milder. there will be spells at heavy rain and potentially disruptive winds. showers in eastern england, the south—east of scotland. the further west you are, drier and brighter. maximum temperatures this afternoon getting up to five to nine celsius. tonight, showers in the east. patchy mist and fog developing in central and southern parts. a few brea ks in central and southern parts. a few breaks in the cloud. temperatures generally staying above freezing. late in the night we will see this area brain moving its way in. that
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rain will move its way north and east on tuesday. strengthening winds associated with that. the best of the dry and bright weather in northern and eastern part of the uk, max and temperatures seven to nine celsius. hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: the bbc has learned that matthew hedges, the british academicjailed for spying in the united arab emirates, has been released from detention after he was given a presidential pardon. we have made it very clearfor a number of months now that we see no basis in these allegations. i have reflected on that and taking the action they can, which means matthew hedges will be reunited with his family. theresa may meets her cabinet ministers as she begins a campaign to sell her brexit deal to parliament. but a difficult task awaits, as politicians on all sides say
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they won‘t support it. tensions escalate in waters off the crimean peninsula as russia seizes three ukrainian ships — these pictures appear to show a russian ship ramming a ukrainian naval vessel during the incident. plenty more on all of those stories. first, the sport. good morning. england have completed only their third series whitewash away from home, beating sri lanka by 42 runs in the third test in colombo. the home side had been frustrating england, and were dreaming of an unlikely victory until a brilliant run out from jack leach broke sri lanka‘s resolve. then the wickets started to fall regularly, with keatonjennings pulling off another stunning catch. he‘s been doing that all series, as has moeen ali. the all rounder removed roshen silva after a review to leave sri lanka nine down and take his tally to 18 for the series.
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it was just the slightest of touches on the pad, but it put sri lanka on the brink. and when leachjoined moeen on 18 wickets with the final one of the game, it was the 100th to fall to spin in the series. it‘s the first time england have swept an away series involving three or more tests since 1963. ireland coach joe schmidt will step down after next year‘s world cup, and he‘ll be replaced by andy farrell. schmidt‘s taken the team up to second in the world rankings, and they‘re one of the favourites for the tournament in japan. farrell has been ireland‘s defence coach under schmidt, after holding the same position with england up until the 2015 world cup. it‘ll be his first head coach role, taking overfrom the new zealander who has acomplished plenty with ireland. two championships, one grand slam, a
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winning series in south africa, beat the all blacks twice. i think the fantastic thing about joe the all blacks twice. i think the fantastic thing aboutjoe is he is leaving irish rugby in a much better place. he will commit to making sure there is a contingency plan, that he is breeding new coaches who come in and ensure this irish team is going on to continue to try to be competitive at the very top level. kearney talking after ireland‘s success was recognised with a clean sweep at the world rugby awards. johnny sexton was named player of the year — he‘s the first irishman since keith wood 17 years ago to win the coveted prize. they also won team of the year, and schmidt was named best coach. arsenal manager unai emery says he still expects more from his team, even though they‘ve extended their unbeaten run to 17 games. they went ahead against bournemouth with a really unfortunate own—goal from jefferson lerma — great volley, wrong end. and the home side equalised before pierre emerick aubameyang put away the winner. that win came after three draws in a row, though — and that‘s what emery wants
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to put right. huddersfield are off the bottom of the table, thanks to their first away win of the season — aaron mooy scored both goals as they beat wovles 2—0. that acutally shot huddersfield up to 14th place. arsenal‘s women have maintained their 100% start to the season, beating brighton 4—1. they‘re now six points clear of manchester city, who beat yeovil. lewis hamilton has welcomed all challenges to his formula one title next year. the mercedes driver dominated the field in 2018 to win his fifth world championship. but he expects his main rivals to be contesting a little more when they get back to racing. i really welcome the competition. we welcome the competition as a team. we hope they are there because it will just we hope they are there because it willjust add to the spectacle if there was a six way battle between
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there was a six way battle between the ferraris, red bull and mercedes. that would be much closer than it has been. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. more now on the news that the united arab emirates has granted a presidential pardon to the british academic, matthew hedges. the durham university phd student was jailed for life last week for spying. his wife, daniela tejada, said she couldn‘t wait for him to return home. here‘s how the uae government made the announcement earlier this morning. i think there is a certain amount of rebuilding to be done. quite a lot of academic institutions have been reviewing their policies with regard to the uae, quite sensibly in my view. the british government is also very worried. i had a quick conversation with alistair burt as to why the uae simply refused to accept their assurances that matt was an academic and nothing more. i think there will be added an inquest into how this was allowed to happen
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01’ into how this was allowed to happen or could happen. isuspect into how this was allowed to happen or could happen. i suspect there will be quite a lot of rebuilding work to reassure people that the uae isa work to reassure people that the uae is a place where we can do business. is it too dangerous for academics to go there now? i'm not sure i'm best qualified to answer that question. i know that a number of universities have been reviewing their ties in the light of matthew‘s treatment and incarceration. but clearly, they have to balance the benefits of having academic exchanges in release —— and relationships with a country like this, and the principle of academic freedom, which is a very valuable freedom in our western democracy. that was ben bradshaw. matthew hedges‘ constituency mp. let‘s return to brexit and rejoin ben at westminster. thank you very much indeed. the cabinet is meeting now to talk about
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the brexit bill and the prime minister is preparing to address mps this afternoon. she will give a statement on that bill. county get it through parliament on december the 12th? joining me now is the tory backbencher, simon hoare. thank you forjoining us. pleasure. the maths do not stack up in the prime minister‘s favour, do there? the maths do not stack up in the prime minister's favour, do there?” think she has and she will get the bill through. there will be a huge number of people looking at the bill. they will be listening to what the prime minister has to say. hearing the response of cabinet later on this morning. i actually think there is everything to play for. i happen to think this is a deal that deserves support. i hope my colleagues in all quarters of the house will support it, because i think it‘s right that we go out on a cross— party think it‘s right that we go out on a cross—party basis with all of us agreeing to the broad terms of the
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exit strategy. you will definitely vote for the deal? i definitely will be voting for it. what about those who say we become a vassal state, a colonial i don‘t to the european union? —— adjunct. colonial i don‘t to the european union? -- adjunct. ithink is colonial i don‘t to the european union? -- adjunct. i think is time we stopped trying to poetry —— portray the eu as the great bogeyman of politics. this deal delivers on the referendum and is a good deal for british people, while not damaging britishjobs for british people, while not damaging british jobs and for british people, while not damaging britishjobs and british prospects. it is a deal with support on both sides of the negotiating table. is it perfect? of course not. try to find be anything where you have a negotiated settlement. some people say you vote against the deal and then go back to brussels and get and then go back to brussels and get a better deal. this has taken two yea rs. a better deal. this has taken two years. the strategy is far more high risk. i am confident, and years. the strategy is far more high risk. iam confident, and i have
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been persuaded having listened to what the prime minister has had to say, that she has strained every single scene you to get the best dealfor britain. when single scene you to get the best deal for britain. when she says she is negotiating and has negotiated in the british interest, in the national interest, those are not just words. she absolutely minted, body, heart and soul. i‘m not convinced there is an 11 hour rabbits to be pulled out of the hat. i‘m not exactly sure what that rabbit would be. i think it is a good deal and i think we should stop now messing the british people about with this sort of delay. it is almost like the dance of the seven veils, waiting for the exciting bits to happen and nothing ever goes. we have to get on with it. that is what my constituents and the country as a whole want to see. britain out of the european union, the economy doing well, jobs protected. the unity of the united kingdom safeguarded. theresa may's strategy appears to be to go out campaigning
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to sell this. around the country, not just to mps. to sell this. around the country, notjust to mps. but to sell this. around the country, not just to mps. but surely to sell this. around the country, notjust to mps. but surely it is mps in westminster that she needs to really persuade, not the british people? well, it's an interesting question. i think it is both. it is thejob of question. i think it is both. it is the job of parliament to decide on the job of parliament to decide on the deal and to sculpt it as best we can. but don‘t forget, we are in this tantalising situation because of the people‘s vote in a referendum. i think it absolutely right and the country should expect the pm to say, this was the decision of the country, we said we would abide by the decision, we are implementing it. this is where we are at, this is the situation we have come to. what do you think? we think this is a good deal. we want the people behind it and support it. that is the right strategy the prime minister has about that. go out and convince the country, all of our constituents, that this is the right thing. you think she will get through on december the 12th?”
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thing. you think she will get through on december the 12th? i am really hopeful that she will. if you look at when the country went into the european union in the 1970s it was cross—party. if you look at the legislation that enacted the referendum for 2016, that was all done cross—party. i think it‘s perfectly acceptable to build a coalition of women and men of goodwill who have the national interest at heart, who want to see jobs and the economy preserved and protected. we can argue on all sorts of other issues, health, policing, education, but i think on this great national endeavour there is a legitimate expectation from people up legitimate expectation from people up and down the country that on this issue we put down the party political cudgels and we deal with it in the national interest on a cross— party it in the national interest on a cross—party basis. thank you so much for being with us. that is the latest from westminster. much more from me later. live coverage this afternoon of the
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prime minister‘s statement on the brexit deal. that will be sometime after 3:30pm. but for now, back to you, rachel. well, let‘s stay with brexit, because in the next hour the official group calling for a second referendum — the people‘s vote campaign — will publish an independent impact study into the prime minister‘s brexit deal. it‘s been written by the national institute of economic and social research. our business editor, simonjack, is here with more details. we‘re looking at the economic future. what can a picture does it pained? what it is looking at, it is comparing whether we were to stay in the european union with the deal that theresa may has sketched out. the country will be £100 billion worse off by 2030, it says. that tra nslates worse off by 2030, it says. that translates around £1100 per household worse off than we would have been under the eu. this has been funded, this research, by the people‘s vote campaign. they would
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like to have another crack at this. but a credible new chip outfit. these findings are broadly in line with this study they did a few months ago which was not funded by any particular party. i think it is any particular party. i think it is a credible look at what is good to happen. the big impact they found is that it would be less attractive to sell services from the uk. at the moment an american bank, a japanese bank, but an office here and they can sell across europe with the uk—based headquarters. that will be much more difficult. bear in mind services make up 80% of the uk economy. the additional frictions we are likely to get on the sale of services will be the lion‘s share of this hit to the economy by 2030. this is the first of several forecasts ? this is the first of several forecasts? that's right. this is the first. we‘re expecting later in the week to get one from the bank of england and also across whitehall
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analysis. they did one of these which was leaked back injanuary. they said there would be a 4.8% hit to the uk economy if we had a kind of canada style deal, which is roughly what theresa may, what the declaration sketches out for the future. this one looks a bit better than the one we had back injanuary, simply because it is more ambition —— ambitions are common customs areas. the really important one will be the treasury one, across whitehall think published later this week. that would be interesting because philip hammond said he supports this deal. he will have to publish and stand behind the report. he is likely to say, actually, we will be a bit worse off. his answer to that is, it‘s not all about money. there are other considerations apply. this is a
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compromise. but by and large most of these reports will say the uk will be slightly worse off. will these forecasts work? they are serious bits of credible work by serious, credible people. a lot of people would say they don‘t take and work out what might happen, what people will do. we may get new trade deals around the world. what the report saysis around the world. what the report says is that even if we were to get those trade deals, it would not be enough to offset the impact of the fridge with our biggest and largest trading partner. thank you, simon. a spacecraft launched by nasa six months ago, will attempt to land on mars later today. the probe, called insight, carries a number of instruments to help explore the internal structure of the planet. from mission control in pasadena, here‘s our science correspondent, victoria gill. let‘s speak top sue horne, head of space exploration at the uk space agency, who joins me now from the uksa‘s swindon hq. what an exciting day? good morning.
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yes, it is very nervous and turns at the moment. i will be happier when it has safely landed. we will talk about how you get this probe on to mars. tell me about the key pieces of equipment travelling with it? the uk's of equipment travelling with it? the uk‘s building a short period seismometer, involving imperial couege seismometer, involving imperial college london, oxford university, sts uc... this is looking at quakes on mars and it will tell us about the interior of maras, what is its structure, how thick is the trust, is the core liquid or solid? the next question has to be, in the nicest possible way, why does it matter? why should we be excited about mars? it tells us about how rocky planets formed. we know about earth. how do the other rocky
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planets form ? this earth. how do the other rocky planets form? this will tell us about how the planets and other solar systems... rather more planets there are likely to have evolved that could sustain life? you mentioned it was nerve wrecking. people talk about this seven minutes of terror as it has to try to get on to mars. why is it so challenging to land a probe on mars? the atmosphere of mars is a lot cleaner than earth, so the parachutes, it is more challenging for them. the first problem, if the module enters too steeply it will burn up. too shallow and it will bounce of the atmosphere. then it has to slow down from supersonic speeds down to a more normal speed and use two parachutes for that. and of the last little bit, you detach the
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parachutes that use rockets.” little bit, you detach the parachutes that use rockets. i sense you and your team will be keeping everything crossed. let‘s hope it goes smoothly. thank you. bernardo bertolucci, the director of the last emperor, which won nine oscars at the 1988 academy awards, has died. his publicist confirmed the 77—year—old died of cancer. mr bertolucci also directed the controversial last tango in paris starring marlon brando. in a moment we‘ll have all the business news. but first, the headlines on bbc news. the bbc has learned that the british academic, matthew hedges, has been released from detention after the united arab emirates gave him a presidential pardon. theresa may meter cabinet ministers as she begins a meter cabinet ministers as she beginsa campaign meter cabinet ministers as she begins a campaign to sell her brexit deal to parliament. but a difficult task awaits as politicians on all sides say they will not support it. and as we have just been hearing, bernardo bertolucci, the
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oscar—winning director, has died of cancer, aged 77. hello, i‘m maryam moshiri. carlos ghosn has been sacked as chairman of mitsubishi motors, after his arrest injapan over misconduct claims. it follows a similar move by nissan last week, amid claims he falsely understated his salary and used company money for personal gain. mr ghosn, who headed an alliance of renault, nissan and mitsubishi, has denied the allegations, according to media reports injapan. rail passengers who are unhappy about how their complaints have been handled, will be able to appeal via the dispute resolution ombusdsman, a new independent service launched today, which is designed to hold companies to account. this follows widespread disruption on the railways this year, which has angered many passengers. and the government‘s brexit deal will leave the uk £100 billion worse off by 2030 and gdp 3.9% lower, the equivalent of losing the economic output of wales
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or the city of london. that‘s according to a national institute of economic and social research study out today — which was commissioned by the people‘s vote, a pro—brexit campaign group that wants a second referendum. i meant imeantan i meant an anti—brexit referendum group. rejecting the brexit deal will be risky and lead to "division and uncertainty", prime minister theresa may will say to mps who oppose her plan. her commons speech comes after the 27 other eu leaders approved the terms of the uk‘s exit at a summit on sunday. mrs may now has to persuade politicians in the uk parliament to back the deal. as the prime minister prepares for the hard selling of the brexit withdrawal agreement, what do businesses think about the ongoing drama and how are they preparing? joining us now is claire walker, co—executive director of policy and campaigns at the british chambers of commerce.
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good morning. a lot of people may be bored by brexit. businesses are anything but because this is crucial for them? businesses up and down the country have been dealing with uncertainty for a two and a half yea rs. uncertainty for a two and a half years. although the move yesterday was a welcome step forward, there is very little certainty today that has changed that businesses can take to the bank. so they are still going to be looking in the months and weeks ahead at the real detail, working out what it means for them. what are the main sticking points for business? what are they looking for and have they found it in this agreement? we are looking very closely at the agreement. there are a number of areas where there is still a lack of clarity. remember the political agreement is just the
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heads of terms for the future agreement. things like, can i hire people? how long can this day? what this means in terms of trading... these are areas where there is a lack of clarity. that is what business needs. what do business leaders want from parliament next week? one thing business leaders are united on is that we have to prevent a disorderly brexit. the lack of business preparedness from the government is really quite challenging. and so are a risk register shows that many of the questions business are asking is still not, we have not got the clarity we need. we will be asking parliamentarians to really consider what this means for france. what this means for families. what this means for france. what this means forfamilies. —— what this means for france. what this means for families. —— friends. thank you. let‘s look at the markets. i wanted to show you in
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particular what the pound is doing against the dollar. it hasn‘t changed that much. that tells us the pound has been a good barometer in the past few months about how the markets feel about the brexit negotiations. they feel —— if they feel there is certainty, the pound tends to strengthen. it hasn‘t really that much. despite the fact the 27 eu leaders agreed with the proposal, the markets are not sure about what is going to happen next. that is why we have seen very little movement in pounds sterling. the london market and german mark at both up. we may get some sort of backing down from the italian government in its budget negotiations with the european union. more business throughout the afternoon. back to you. thank you. i want to bring you up to speed in developments in those tensions between russia and the ukraine concerning the capture of russia ——
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by russia of three ukrainian naval vessels. nato now saying they will hold an emergency meeting with the ukrainian officials at the alliance headquarters in brussels today over that naval stand—off. we already knew that the un security council we re knew that the un security council were holding emergency session later. also taking emergency steps to address this. the russian foreign ministry have issued a statement on the ukraine incident, saying they will respond harshly to any attempts to undermine their sovereignty and their security. clearly, this is an unfolding situation with tension running pretty high and the international to which it taking an extreme interest in developers. now the weather. good morning. we have had some sunshine this morning. a chilly start. over the last week, the easterly wind has brought the chilly weather. that will switch around to
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a south—westerly in the next 24—hours. it will bring not only milder conditions but wet and windy weather as well. for the rest of the afternoon we will continue with some showers affecting eastern england. the south and east of scotland. the further west you are, dry and bright. decent spelt of sunshine. maximum temperature is between six and 9 degrees. showers in the east this evening. missed and fog developing tonight across the midlands, central and southern areas of england. a few breaks in the cloud giving pockets of frost into tuesday. otherwise, temperatures just staying above freezing. rain visiting —— win quickly tomorrow morning through south—west england, wales and northern ireland. as it moves east, it will start to eat away at the sunshine across northern and eastern part of england into the afternoon. temperatures generally seven to 9 degrees. in the south west those temperatures creeping up
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to 12 celsius. you‘re watching bbc newsroom live — these are today‘s main stories at midday. matthew hedges, the british academicjailed for spying in the united arab emirates, has been released from detention after being given a presidential pardon. we‘ve made very clear for a number of months now that we see no basis in these allegations. they reflected on that and they‘ve taken the action that they can, which means the matthew hedges is going to be reunited which means that matthew hedges is going to be reunited with his family. daniela tejada described her husband‘s release as the best news which had ‘brought her back to life‘. theresa may meets her cabinet ministers as she begins a campaign to sell her brexit deal — warning of division and uncertainty if mps oppose it. the prime minister‘s secured the deal, a very good deal for the united kingdom, and it‘s now the job of all of us in the cabinet to make the case. but an uphill struggle awaits her as the democratic unionist party, dozens of tory backbenchers and all opposition parties say they won‘t vote for it in parliament. i do not accept that this
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is the best deal, it is a bad deal. and i‘m not... you would say, "well, you‘re the opposition, you would say that." but look what‘s happening. mps from all parties are saying, this is not a good deal. and i‘m ben brown, will be reporting live from westminster where the prime minister will make a statement to mps on her brexit deal this afternoon. in other news — tensions escalate in waters off the crimean peninsula as russia seizes three ukrainian ships. bernardo bertolucci — the oscar—winning director of last tango in paris and the last emperor, has died of cancer aged seventy—seven mission to mars — after a 90 million milejourney, nasa hopes to land a robotic probe on the red planet today. and england‘s cricketers beat sri lanka by 42 runs in the third test in colombo to seal a three—nil series whitewash. good morning.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. the british academic, matthew hedges has been released from prison in the united arab emirates after being granted a presidential pardon. the durham university phd student was jailed for life last week for spying. his wife, daniela tejada, said she couldn‘t wait for him to return home — he‘s expected to fly back to the uk tonight. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt said he was grateful to the uae government for resolving the issue speedily. well speaking at news conference a little earlier a uae government spokesman said matthew hedges was being granted clemency along with hundreds of other prisoners to mark a national day and he insisted that mr hedges had been spying for the uk. in response to a letter
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from the family of mr hedges requesting clemency, and in consideration of the historical relationship and close ties between the united arab emirates and the united kingdom, his highness has decided to include mr matthew hedges among the 785 prisoners released. mr hedges will be permitted to leave the country once all the formalities are complete. matthew hedges‘ wife daniela tejada tweeted her reaction just over an hour ago. she said... she‘s also spoken to the today programme on bbc radio 4. to be honest, i wasn‘t expecting it. it took me by surprise. i am just so happy and so relieved
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and really incredulous that this is all happening, finally. it has been an absolute nightmare this six, seven months. i cannot wait to have him back. do you know when you will see him? i don‘t know yet. the news has just been announced and we‘re trying to coordinate the details. i‘m trying to see if i can go and pick him up. we‘re absolutely elated at the news. what was the last time you saw matthew and what did you think? i saw him on the day of his hearing, and sadly the last time i saw him we were both walking out of the court room. we were not able to say goodbye. so i am glad that it will not be long till we say hello again. a huge relief, as you can imagine,
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for the family. the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt says the british govenrment are still ‘deeply perplexed‘ by the case, but has today thanked the uae for pardoning mr hedges. we‘ve seen no evidence to support these accusations against mr hedges, but today we want to thank them for the fact they have they have reflected on the strong representations we have made. we‘ve made it clearfor a number of months now that we see no basis for these allegations, they have reflected on that and take the action they can which means matthew hedges will be reunited with his family. earlier i spoke to our correspondent feras kilani who is in abu dhabi. we can confirm that he was freed one hour ago. now we hear that he will be on hour ago. now we hear that he will beona hour ago. now we hear that he will be on a flight to london at ten local time, london time. be on a flight to london at ten localtime, london time. so be on a flight to london at ten local time, london time. so he might be arriving in london at five, let‘s
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say. we don‘t know which flight he will take, but we can confirm now that he will be heading to the uk at ten london time tonight. and of course, he has been released but it has been made very clear by the government there that he is still guilty in their eyes of spying and this has been a pardon, an act of clemency? exactly. today, when they had this press conference, they started a private session, they showed seven minutes of video. it had no context. showing him in different sessions, admitting that he worked as a captain in m16, collecting information not related to hisjob. this is off the record. and then when they started the official, on camera statement, they said that... said a lot about what
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happened, what he admitted, and the timing of things, love that stuff, then they said that this pardon was declared yesterday, is not about him, the pardon i think is... it will include about 700 and something prisoners here in the uae. given the intervention of the british foreign secretary and the discussions that have had to happen, what do you think, if anything, will be the ongoing impact between, on the relationship between britain and the uae? orra lot relationship between britain and the uae? orr a lot has happened over the last ten days. said he was sentenced to life, we have heard a lot from the uk foreign office and statements from here. i interviewed the official person who today read the statement and up tell you he said that nothing is wrong. but on
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another note, we know there is a sensitive issue regarding uk policy towards the conflict, the gulf conflict, if you like. professor clivejones is chair of regional security for the middle of regional security for the middle east at durham university and matthew hedges phd supervisor and has thanked everyone involved in campaigning for his release. we are overjoyed, we really are. it's we are overjoyed, we really are. it‘s wonderful news. i would like to ta ke it‘s wonderful news. i would like to take the opportunity to thank my collea g u es take the opportunity to thank my colleagues here at durham and also more broadly to the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, for his effo rts secretary, jeremy hunt, for his efforts in bringing about this resolution, and equally to praise danny, his wife, for her effort of the last six months. she has been absolutely incredible. the foreign secretary praised her work in this. she has been unstinting, from the very, very beginning, in trying to explore all avenues, reaching out to
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the emirati ‘s, reaching out to people she thinks she can help. and she has done this, much of the time, in her own. she is an incredible woman and that should be very proud of her. how does it feel today for staff at the university? yet been so closely working with the family. as i say, we are overwhelmed. i know it comes across as a bit of a cliche, but hearing the news this morning, derek say, it‘s the best ever christmas present any of us could have. —— dare i say. christmas present any of us could have. -- dare i say. the timing is a bit late, do you know anything? we still don‘t know, whether you will be put on a plane straightaway, whether there will be a period where paperwork has to be gone through to get him out, we do not know when he will be back in the uk. you praised his wife, yet then in close contact for the last few days, however she been? i think many people will have heard her interview this morning on the bbc and of course, for her, it means everything. as i say, she has campaigned so hard and so
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relentlessly and she is true, true champion of justice in relentlessly and she is true, true champion ofjustice in this case. let‘s return to brexit, a busy day, possibly a busy week, possibly a busy two weeks, at westminster! lets join ben brown. theresa may has been chairing a meeting of her cabinet this morning, and then she will be here at parliament to address mps and make a statement on her brexit deal to members of parliament and try to rally support for her deal, really. either excel, as it has been called, try to get mps behind her. —— the big sell. or, she says, going back to square one, that is her argument of what will happen if they go against this deal. mps will vote on december 12. theresa may is having an cabinet meeting ahead of that statement. speaking to bbc news this morning, brexit secretary stephen
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barclay acknowledged that getting the deal through parliament will be a challenge but still said it will be the right course for the country. opposition parties, the dup and many of her own backbenchers have already said they will oppose the plan. here‘s our political correspondent. theresa may arrived home yesterday, with the ink fresh on the deal that will take us out of the eu. in brussels, she got the backing of eu leaders. now she must sell it to sceptical mps and the public. there were those who said that reaching a brexit agreement that worked for both sides was an impossible task. from the start, i rejected that counsel of despair and set about negotiating a deal that worked for the uk and the eu, one that delivered on the result of the referendum and set us on course for a prosperous future. there‘s two parts to this deal. the withdrawal agreement deals with our exit. there will be a transition period after we leave in march when not much changes until december 2020 so new arrangements can be worked out.
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it settles the divorce bill and guarantees the rights of eu and uk citizens living abroad and it contains that controversial backstop plan to avoid a hard irish border if there is no trade deal. then there is a political declaration which talks about an ambitious future partnership in trade, free movement will end, but the details have not been agreed and this document isn‘t legally binding. the prime minister and other eu leaders say this deal is the best it gets but back home, many disagree. what she has created is something that satisfies very, very few people. so, the chances of getting through, this deal through parliament i think is effectively nil. here, all the opposition parties and many conservative mps have said they will not support this deal. so, the challenge for the prime minister is to try to win them round before a crucial vote in a few weeks. theresa may‘s new brexit secretary,
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stephen barclay, has been speaking to the bbc this morning. he acknowledged that getting the deal through will be a challenge — but said it was the right course for the country. the fact is, this is the only deal on the table. it has taken two years of tough negotiation to get to this point. this deal delivers on the referendum and, ithink, the biggest democratic vote in our history. it would be highly damaging to our democracy not to deliver on that vote, but we need to move forward in a way that maintains our security cooperation with europe and protects jobs, protects the supply line, which is so important to manufacturing and other industries. the breakfast that sector is currently in downing street for that cabinet meeting. we will say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. you‘re watching bbc news. —— the brexit
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secretary currently in downing street. meanwhile shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, criticised the prime minister‘s deal. this is a bad deal, a lot better than this could have been negotiated if the prime minister had started in a different place and i do not accept that this is the best deal. it is a bad deal. and i'm not... you would say, "well, you're the opposition, you would say that," but look what's happening. mp5 from all parties are saying this is not a good deal and we cannot pretend that it is and that's why it's almost certainly not going to get through. i‘m joined now by the labour mp seema malhotra. who is on the brexit committee, if we can college, the select committee for leaving the european union. first of all, how do you see this boat going on december 12? first of all, how do you see this boat going on december12? etc first of all, how do you see this boat going on december 12? etc does not look like it will be good news for theresa may and it is obvious she started this process not taking
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parliament with her, not taking the country with her and now she‘s embarking on a deal that is set to make her constituents worse off, my constituents were soft, and really, i have to take my hat off to her. she‘s achieved something which i did not think was possible, united those who voted leaf and those who voted remain against a deal that clearly is not in the interests of this country. you talk about making people worse off, one day be even worse off with no deal, which is what you would be risking by voting against the steel? adoboli we would be risking that but i think parliament does need to take steps to make sure we would not default to no deal in the absence of an alternative. the eu is order starting to factor this end. extending article 50 and offering the option of a referendum remain and perform should also be options. but we have an alternative, as well, we should think deeply about whether we should think deeply about whether we stay within the wider orbit of
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the eu, sunbeam based on the ba and a customs union, that is a position that has had support and recommendations from our select committee as well. —— based on the european economic area. i think this isa european economic area. i think this is a deal that is set to make our country worse off, we could be £100 billion worse off by 2030. theresa may has not yet brought forward her own comic impact assessment, she should come clean with the british people that this is a big risk for us people that this is a big risk for us today. you think that if you reject the steel you can be negotiated a better deal? the eu has said there not reopening this negotiation. think we have got to try because clearly this is not a deal that commands the support of parliament and it would be important as well to test it with the support of the people. but if the eu says no more negotiations, are you saying they are just bluffing? adoboli they are bluffing, do think they understand this is a very serious point for britain. —— i don‘t think
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there are blotting. parliament has not been in dialogue. it got asked the question, why did eu 27 sign this agreement in one day? they brought along this process, they set out at the beginning giving the european commission their negotiating objectives, theresa may chose not to do that. she chose to sideline parliament, that is catching up with her. how she sidelining parliament of parliament has been wrote on december 12? she is all the way through sideline parliament. the vote was not something she agree to, i is tabled the first amendment... but you have a vote... but also there is a process to go through where parliament can talk about alternatives, extending article 50 may need to be one of those alternatives. if people‘s note on whether we remain maybe another. —— a people‘svote. but if we are to leave at some point, then what is the destination we reach and is it something that will be in the
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interests of rural economy with the least damage to british businesses and our families household least damage to british businesses and ourfamilies household incomes? thank you for being with us. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at downing street. i think this is really going to be all about how they sell this deal now. it‘s interesting because some of those on the cabinet table are not totally sold themselves and what is being put before them but for now they are sticking with it. but i think the plan will be to get out beyond westminster, to get beyond those 650 mps in the house of commons to try to make the case to the people, to constituents, to say that this was the best deal theresa may could get. it was a compromise, it would never be perfect for everybody but it does and freedom of movement, it stops large payments to the eu and she would say that trade continues in a way that helps the
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car industry and others as well. —— it does end freedom of movement. that is the plan. a media blitz, it will run the country for the prime minister, or to cry around —— all to try and sell this deal for that vote in december. whether that works is another matter. the numbers do not look great at the moment but a lot can change over that time, especially if mps come under pressure from constituents to say they back this idea and want to deliver brexit and move on. we will have to see whether that does resonate. the prime minister embarking, as you say, on this big sell. but of course during the election she was criticised for her style of campaigning, people said it was clunky, too stiff, did not really work connect with voters. and thatis really work connect with voters. and that is what she has got to do, or try to do, connect with voters and also mps to try to get those who are against it to change their minds. also mps to try to get those who are against it to change their mindsm is interesting, she has awarded on a radio phone in on the bbc last week.
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—— already done a radio phone in. obviously she feels this is the way to get that message across but as you say, there is an issue there, isn‘t there? there are many people, maybe, you look at her and think she‘s stuck with it, against the odds has pursued this deal and managed to get there in the end, while others have walked away from the table. some will praise for doing that, thinking if someone in the end has the sort this out, you cannot or will go away from the cabinet. but i think there is a distinction between that and some respect for her doing that and the deal itself. there are still many people who don‘t think this is worth it, that staying in the eu would be better or leaving with a clear break a more distant relationship from the eu is the way forward. so there are definitely risks for her in going ahead with this and also speculation about some kind of debate, head—to—head debate withjeremy corbyn, the labour leader. speculation that she wants to do that based on the deal that she has
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got. labour—saving will relish the opportunity to do so. it seems difficult to sort it out in time, it took months to sort out the one for the general election, something why just those two, shouldn‘t there be other people involved with different views on brexit? —— and people saying why just views on brexit? —— and people saying whyjust goes to the bacuna? it will be hard to get that up and running any time soon. i‘m joined now byjohn springford — deputy director for the pro—eu think tank the centre for european reform. do you think, if this is voted down, the eu would renegotiate this deal? no, i don‘t think they would bring negotiate the withdrawal agreement. they might do some tinkering around the edges on the political declaration accompanying the agreement. but in terms of agricultural nation that would help theresa may to get it through parliament a second time, that is unlikely. —— in terms of a transformation. how do you see it going? many saying she cannot get it
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through the commons, odds stacked against her. you agree?” through the commons, odds stacked against her. you agree? i do. she's obviously trying to get as many people on board as possible. the problem as i see it is that downing street has let the cat out of the bag, they might try another road if they lose this one. and in the sense that gives a kind of blank slate for mps to have a protest vote against this deal. and if there is huge numbers who do vote against it then it might be difficult actually for theresa may to turn it around, have another road and get it over the line that way. coupled with the fact that the eu is unlikely to change the withdrawal agreement very much, i don‘t think we should be super confident she will get through a second time. then what happens? a no—deal brexit, an election, maybe another referendum ? no—deal brexit, an election, maybe another referendum?” no—deal brexit, an election, maybe another referendum? i think there officer going to be cute chaos politically. —— there‘s obviously going to be. my sense is that it
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would be hard to do, is that if nothing happens by march 29 there will be no deal. but parliament doesn‘t want no deal, the eu doesn‘t really wa nt doesn‘t want no deal, the eu doesn‘t really want to no deal... use say parliament doesn‘t want no deal and yet at the same time, we are saying most mps are preparing to vote against the deal? there are. and has to do something. what can they do? they could vote for it a second time or they could say, we demand that you go back and re—negotiate. that might buya you go back and re—negotiate. that might buy a bit of time... you go back and re—negotiate. that might buy a bit of time. .. the year said they want to do that expect the eu have said no. and an apartment vote against it a second time then obviously a second referendum might be back on the table, theresa may‘s job might be injeopardy. —— if parliament voted against it a second time. so locked and on the table. we could end up with a second referendum. even if the deal is passed in parliament we‘re been hearing from the french, for example, that when negotiating the longer term trade mission ship with britain, they might want to talk
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about fishing rights before lifting the backstop, the irish border question, a lot of people are word about the future relationship with europe. and also the spanish on gibraltar and so on. you‘re starting to see signs that individual eu countries might flex their muscles. that is right. it has been an interesting few days, with the french particularly, social rights, implement rights, environment or law, and the spanish on gibraltar. so what will happen in the future is that we will enter into a trade negotiation and what usually happens with the eu‘s trade negotiations is all the countries want a little bit for their special sectors which means it‘s a very difficultjob to corral them all together into an individual line. good to talk to you, thank you for being with us. and at 2.30 this afternoon we‘ll be trying to get answers to some of your questions about the latest brexit developments, with a panel of experts. if you have a question — get in touch.
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that statement, we think, from the prime minister at 3:30pm this afternoon so much more from us dragged the day. but for now, back to you, rachel. the ukrainian parliament, the un security council and nato ambassadors are all holding emergency meetings today in response to russia‘s seizure of three ukrainian navy vessels in the kerch strait. ukraine‘s president has described the seizure as an act of aggression. russian special forces opened fire and took control of two gunboats and a tug boat as they tried to pass through the kerch strait off the coast of crimea. both nato and the eu have called for restraint, and for ukraine‘s access to the waters to be restored. this is the moment one
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russian naval ship appeared to ram a smaller ukrainian tug boat. steve rosenberg has sent in this report. off the coast of crimea, russian border guards on collision course with the ukrainian navy. here they target the tug boat. the hints less than subtle, get out of these waters. more drama to come. later, russian forces shot at and seized the target and two other ukrainian vessels. this appears to be an sos from one of the ukrainian sailors as the russians stalled his boat. if russia replies... —— a martian replies. the vessels were told to
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russian controlled crimea. more than 20 ukrainian servicemen were detained. the incident took place near the crimean peninsula by the kerch strait. russia sake ukraine‘s navy illegally entered russia‘s waters. ukraine denies it. this was the reaction in kiev. death to russia, he shouts. proteas ampara technics outside the russian embassy. —— protests and pyrotechnics. ukraine‘s presidents denounced what he called russian aggression. he will ask parliament to approve martial law to defend ukraine against russia. moscow is refusing to take the blame. russia‘s foreign minister accused kiev provocation. he said ukraine‘s leaders were trying to score political points ahead of elections. and with a show of force yesterday at sea and in the sky over the kerch strait, russia has sent a clear
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message to ukraine, don‘t mess with russia. ijust want i just want to bring you ijust want to bring you an update on the story we have been covering through the morning concerning the case of matthew hedges. we have been hearing that he had been pardoned, of course, of this spying charges and we‘re been told he had already been released. just to clarify, there seems to be some confusion about this because matthew hedges‘s family are saying he is not yet been released, we believe the pardon is still intact but in terms of his actual whereabouts, it‘s not quite clear whether he has been formally released from prison. a spokesman for his wife, daniela tejada, said he has not yet been released. so we tried to get more information about that. there is no suggestion at this stage that this is anything more than a hold—up in logistics butjust wa nted than a hold—up in logistics butjust
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wanted to clarify that actually, the suggestion he is already out of prison may not be correct. we will keep you updated on that. in its first major update on climate change in almost ten years, the met office has warned of significant temperature rises in the decades ahead. the uk climate projections 2018 study is the most up to date assessment of how the uk will change over this century. it says that under the highest emissions scenario, summer temperatures could be 5.4c hotter by 2070. a little earlier the environment secretary michael gove warned that urgent action is needed to tackle climate change and prepare for future extreme weather. let‘s have a listen to some of what he had to say. scientific knowledge is always good. there can never be too much information. the more we know the greater our ability to shape events for the better. but also, the heavier the responsibility to act. when it comes to climate change,
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thanks to the effort of uk scientists, we know more than ever before the urgency of acting, which is why notjust i but future generations are so much in the debt of the scientists who work for a better future. michael gove. of the scientists who work for a betterfuture. michael gove. now the weather. we are still into very cool air at the moment. we are going to see some changes to the weather in the next few days. it turns wetter, windier and much milder. for the time being showers in eastern coastal areas of scotla nd showers in eastern coastal areas of scotland and england, with not a great deal of wind to push those showers in. that is where they will stay for the rest of the day. away from the coastal areas, a lot of dry weather. temperatures between six and 8 degrees from most. showers could turn her in eastern scotland
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for a time. snow on the hills. thing turned slippery. otherwise, a chilly night. temperatures in the low single figures. there is the potential of getting some patches of frost. changes offered towards the south—west. rain working in for tuesday. that will spread to wales and northern ireland. the winds moving into a south—westerly direction, joining in some milder air. temperatures tomorrow afternoon of to 12 degrees in plymouth. it will feel similar to today, a few showers in the north—east of scotland. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: matthew hedges, the british academicjailed for spying in the united arab emirates, has been given a presidential pardon. we have made it very clear for a number of months now that we see no basis in these allegations. i have reflected on that and taking the action they can, which means matthew hedges will be
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reunited with his family. theresa may meets her cabinet ministers as she begins a campaign to sell her brexit deal to parliament. but a difficult task awaits, as politicians on all sides say they won‘t support it nato and the un are to hold emergency meetings as tensions escalate between russia and ukraine, after russia seized three ukrainian ships in the azov sea. bernardo bertolucci — the oscar—winning director of last tango in paris and the last emperor — has died of cancer aged 77. let‘s return to brexit and rejoin ben at westminster. thank you. theresa may has been chairing a meeting of her cabinet to talk about how to sell her brexit
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deal ahead of the vote in parliament on the deal expected on december the 12th. this afternoon she will make a statement to mps. i‘m joined now by katy balls from the spectator, and jack blanchard from politico. thank you for being with us. how do you see it going on december the 12th? is their any way she can get this deal through? the 12th? is their any way she can get this dealthrough? the unlikely option is she gets this through. right now the numbers don‘t add up. the big problem for number 10 is because it looks like to reason is going to lose this vote quite substantially, those mps who could be convinced to get her over the line think, what is the point of attaching myself to a very unpopular policy if it‘s not pretty pass anyway? that is the problem. the mood is not good when it comes to changing opinion. are there some mps who are a waivers? we haven't heard from many if there are. time is running out. just under two weeks away. katie says there seems to be
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some critical mass in parliament moving towards voting down the deal. what number 10 would have hoped was that when the deal was done yesterday, that was supposed to be a catalyst when mps start moving towards it. there is a momentum towards it. there is a momentum towards getting the deal done. we haven't had a sense of that at all. there isn't very long for theresa may to that. they seems to be thought they will vote down the deal and then maybe have another vote on the deal at a later stage. explain how that might work? we're looking at at least two votes. the first time it is voted down, number 10 are accounting for that to happen. panic may set in. the markets may go. there is a calculation that some mps good thing, this time around i will vote for this. it is not a foolproof strategy. what makes it worse is that if the margin is quite large in this deal being voted down, it makes it harderfor this deal being voted down, it makes
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it harder for theresa may to make the argument that if you printed a second time to the house it might happen. this only works if it is a small number. so far, that suggests it will be the case. the very day after the big vote on the 12th, there is another eu council summit in brussels. theresa may will be off to brussels the next day, winner might lose. if i was her i would be saying, if we do lose, maybe we need to talk a bit more about this deal and try to tweak it a little bit. the eu is saying no, that is it. i suspect they may have a look at that. do you think they are bluffing? i wouldn't go that far. you could maybe tweak around the edges a little bit. it is not a binding document. it is not as conjugated as the treaty. you could probably make some cosmetic changes. say, this is different. give mps a bit of cover to vote differently a second time. she is starting on this
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big sell, this campaign to sell the deal, not only to mps but to the public. is that the right strategy? i think she thinks if she can persuade members of the public to back it, they will try to persuade theirmps? back it, they will try to persuade their mps? it feels a bit like a general election campaign the way number 10 general election campaign the way number10 are general election campaign the way number 10 are going about this. mps are getting actually very hard to change the minds of. the slight flaw to the strategy is number 10 seem to be saying that everybody is so bored of brexit, just bowled this through. yet theresa may is trying to tell people who are bored of brexit to be enthusiastic about her deal to the point where they lobby her —— their mps. that does not add up. also some speculation today about a head—to—head debate between theresa may and jeremy corbyn. do you see that happening? you could see why number10 want to that happening? you could see why number 10 want to do it. they need something to change the dynamic of this, to change the conversation. that would be a big tv moment the sunday night before this big vote,
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watching them go head—to—head. we hardly ever see the leaders do that. theresa may wasn't keen to do that during the election campaign. it is a sign of how desperate they are in downing street. jeremy corbyn as well up for it. it is possible but well up for it. it is possible but we have not had any confirmation. everything you say suggests we are moving to was the tiff edge. is that how you see it? we are heading towards uncertainty and then all bets are off. then it looks like a general election, in norway arrangement, all looks likely. the problem with a debate is this not a party issue. it‘s a cross party. u nless party issue. it‘s a cross party. unless theresa may wants to debate borisjohnson, unless theresa may wants to debate boris johnson, chuka umunna unless theresa may wants to debate borisjohnson, chuka umunna etc, i don‘t see what that debate will result. there are many times in politics when the experts and the public really have no idea how things are going to turn out. we could have an election, we could have another referendum, we could
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have another referendum, we could have another referendum, we could have a no—deal brexit bottle ——. everywhere you go in westminster, everybody is having the same conversation, trying to gauge what is going to happen if and when this vote is lost. nobody has an answer. everybody has an idea. none of them seem like easy options at if anyone tells you in the next few days they know what is going to happen, they are lying to you. what is your best guess? my instinct has always been that when parliament is this deadlocked we have a general election at some point. the problem is parliament cannot agree anything. none of the options are acceptable toa none of the options are acceptable to a majority of mps. none of the options are acceptable to a majority of mp5. you need a general election. we now have a fixed—term parliaments act. that makes it quite complicated. but in the end that is what has to happen. i think what is interesting, speaking to brexiteers in recent days, is the second referendum is looking more appealing. labour are
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divided, the conservatives are divided. a referendum is something that i think some brexiteers think, this is the only way we will get a proper brexit, garlic —— by going back on winning the vote again. thank you both. much more from me later on. we will have the statement from the prime minister later. back to the studio. lets return to the news that matthew hedges — the british academic who was jailed for life on spying charges in the uae — has been given a presidential pardon. some uncertainty as to whether he has been released yet. here‘s how the uae government made the announcement earlier this morning. all countries react strongly to the act of spying , as they should. we reserve the right to protect our country from any external threat. the sentence that was handed down to mr hedges is fair considering the crime he committed. having said that, in the world
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of mounting threats, we recognise just how important it is for like—minded countries to work with rather than against one another. this belief in working together was embedded by our founding father. and we still follow the path today. continuing our traditions, established by his highness and as part of our national day of celebration, the president of the uae, may god bless him, yesterday has granted precious clemency to 785 prisoners across the uae to mark the 47th anniversary of this great nation. in response to a letter from the family of mr hedges requesting clemency, and in consideration
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of the historical relationship and close ties between the united arab emirates and the united kingdom, his highness has decided to include mr matthew hedges among the 785 prisoners released. mr hedges will be permitted to leave the country once all the formalities are complete. that statement from a spokesperson for the uae government. we are trying to establish the whereabouts of mr hedges. some breaking news from the old bailey concerning the case of the labour mp for peterborough, fiona onasa nya. case of the labour mp for peterborough, fiona onasanya. we are hearing that the jury has failed to reach a verdict in the case against her. she faces one charge of perverting the course ofjustice, accused of lying over a speeding ticket. she denies that charge. we are hearing because thejury ticket. she denies that charge. we are hearing because the jury has failed to reach a verdict, despite
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last week being told they could come toa last week being told they could come to a majority verdict, the judge saying he would accept a verdict from 11juras, no saying he would accept a verdict from 11 juras, no verdict has been released. fiona onasa nya from 11 juras, no verdict has been released. fiona onasanya were now face a retrial. that coming into us from the old bailey concerning the labourmpfor from the old bailey concerning the labour mp for peterborough, fiona onasanya. the royal college of surgeons is calling for compulsory registration of every medical device or implant put into a patient in the uk. the proposal comes after an investigation by media organisations around the world found evidence of inadequate testing and faulty equipment. the devices include heart pacemakers, rods to correct spines, and artificial knees and hips. you can see more on the investigation in tonight‘s panorama, at 8.30pm on bbc one, and afterwards on iplayer. the sister of a teenage boy stabbed to death in coventry, has said he was targeted because he lived in the wrong postcode.
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16—year—old jaydon james, known as jj, was attacked in deedmore road, in wood end, about four miles north of the city centre, 20 minutes to midnight on saturday, and died later in hospital. writing on facebook, his sisterjayda james described her brother as the "funniest, most kind—hearted boy". she added: "jaydon was stabbed to death because of his postcode, because he was a woodend boy." jaydon‘s friends were also injured in the attack, and taken to hospital. no arrests have been made. mexico says it will deport a group of migrants who attempted to force their way across the border into the united states. mexican officials say around 500 ran towards the fence that separates the two countries at the busiest crossing on the border, near the city of tijuana. us security forces have now reopened the border crossing after closing it for several hours. a spacecraft launched by nasa six months ago, will attempt to land on mars later today. the probe, called insight, carries a number of instruments to help explore the internal
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structure of the planet. from mission control in pasadena — here‘s our science correspondent, victoria gill. they call it seven minutes of terror. at this last stage of its journey to mars, nasa‘s insight lander will need to slow itself down from more than 12,000 miles an hour to a safe landing speed. so, this is the full—size model? this is the full—size, life—size model of the insight lander. these are our beautiful solar arrays that are gorgeous. they will power everything on the lander. insight is doing amazing science on the surface of mars. we like to say we are giving mars its first checkup in four billion years. before any martian science can begin, though, the pressure of a safe touchdown will trigger a beacon to be sent back to earth — insight‘s first call home. once we land, we‘ll get a message back from the spacecraft that says it thinks it‘s safe and then we have to obviously check up
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on our spacecraft as well and make sure that it really is in a safe state but, man, when we get that first indication our hearts are just going to explode! it will be really exciting. back at mission control, the team will plan where to carefully place a seismometer to listen for martian earthquakes, or "marsquakes". this will be the first robot to drill deeper into the surface of mars to understand the structure of the planet. it is like a meditative spacecraft. we have to sit and listen for mars quakes. all these other instruments have set the stage. but now we are going beneath the surface. we have only scratched the surface. we have only scratched the surface. we have only scratched the surface recently. these measurements will allow scientists to step back in time and work out exactly how rocky bodies like earth, mars and the moon actually formed 4.5 billion years ago. something of
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a tradition here, whenever there is an attempt to land on another planet, the whole team ate peanuts, apparently. they had six failures at the first attempt to land on the moon. then the chief engineer shared peanuts with the entire team. first, though, the craft will have to land on its feet on a planet more than 90 million miles away. victoria gill, bbc news, at nasa‘s jet propulsion laboratory, california. the headlines on bbc news: the bbc has learned that british academic matthew hedges has been released from detention, after the united arab emirates gave him a presidential pardon. theresa may meets her cabinet ministers as she begins a campaign to sell her brexit deal to parliament — but a difficult task awaits, as politicians on all sides say they won‘t nato and the un are to hold emergency meetings as tensions
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escalate between russia and ukraine — after russia seized three ukrainian ships in the azov sea. a study has that under theresa may‘s brexit agreement the british economy would grow more slowly than if the uk remained in the eu, but faster than in the case of a no—deal brexit. —— a study has looked at theresa may‘s brexit agreement. the national institute of economic and social research said, with the deal, the annual loss of growth would reach almost four percent by 2030. without an agreement the drop would be 5.5%. the leader of the liberal democrats, sir vince cable, spoke at a people‘s vote press conference. he spoke about what brexit means for ordinary people, and its impact on the economy. we need as far as possible to have a clear picture about what brexit means in terms of people‘sliving standards, expenditure and trade and so on. and now we have a clear definition
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about what brexit means in terms of the government‘s objective, in terms of how you turn this into numbers as far as possible. this is what the national institute has done and its independence is beyond question. and its conclusions all the more valuable. i think one point i would make is that we already know quite a lot about the way in which brexit works out because of the last two years, and one of the most striking documents was the government‘s budget which quite explicitly acknowledged the damage that has been done over the last two years. and it has described a growth rate of 1.5%, well below potential, well below what it should be. and it attributed it in the budget itself, this is the government, to a fall in investment caused by lack of certainty and to a loss of productivity. sir vince cable.
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bernardo bertolucci, the director of the last emperor, which won nine oscars at the 1988 academy awards, has died. his publicist confirmed the 77—year—old died of cancer. mr bertolucci also directed the controversial last tango in paris starring marlon brando. our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba, spoke to ben brown earlier this morning about mr bertolucci‘s legacy. he won best director and it won best picture and was also seen as an incredibly important film because it was the first film about china that was actually filmed there in china. they went into the forbidden city with the cooperation of the chinese government. that was the first time a film about china with western filmmakers coming in had been allowed for something like 30, 40 years. and of course, the result was an epic that swept the oscars, took the cinematic world‘s breath away with some of the imagery it portrayed there, portraying, of course, the biographical story of china‘s last emperor.
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so really, seen as one of the cinematic great movies. of course, on the other side you have something like the last tango in paris, possibly one of the most controversial movies, if people think about it in those terms, were starring marlon brando. and the way he explored sexuality, sexual politics through his imagery, through his filming style, is something that film—makers, critics, audiences still talk about today. what was his cinematic style and what is his cinematic legacy, if you like? the way he moved the camera, his colourful imagery. he first came to prominence with a film called the conformist around 1969, 1970. he wrote the screenplay. it was an adaptation of a story set in the fascist era of italy. but really, even at that young age his style was seen as breathtaking by many.
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and film—makers ranging from martin scorsese to coppola stephen spielberg have said in particular that was a film that influenced them. and this was a period when they were very young directors, just forging their own style so when you look at the careers of how they have progressed, they possibly would not have made the same kind of films in quite the same way if it were not for what they had absorbed from the work of bertolucci way back in the 1970s, late 1960s. but yeah, he will be seen as one of the cinematic greats, particularly the last emperor, ithink, you know, one of the few films that has... when it was at the oscars, it actually swept the board. it won every single category it was nominated for. that happens to so few films and that is the thing i think will really stand the test of time for him, the fact that he produced such a sweeping epic under what can‘t have been the most easiy of circumstances, and something that was rewarded at the most important awards ceremony in the film world,
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and was of course embraced by audiences as a completely enthralling epic, as well. lizo mzimba reflecting on the life of bernardo bertolucci. in a moment the weather. but first, let‘s look at some of the most striking images of the day. up to 145 pilot whales have died after becoming stranded on a remote beach near the southern tip of new zealand. officials said half of the mammals had already died by the time they were found and then they decided to euthanise the rest due to their deteriorating condition. hundreds of people in australia have been evacuated from their homes because of bushfires caused by unseasonably warm weather. authorities in queensland say that about 40 fires are burning across the state and several homes have been damaged or destroyed. thousands of travellers in the us have had a miserable end to thanksgiving weekend, with hundreds of flights cancelled because of a blizzard across the midwest. more than 12 inches of snow was recorded in some areas. the worst affected airports
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were in chicago, with more than 900 flights cancelled. and finally, in a warmer part of the united states, dogs have been surfing the waves in florida as part of an event to help pets in need. there was a huge turnout atjupiter beach in florida the crowds watched dogs of all different sizes and breeds surf with their owners. now he‘s one of britain‘s most successful rock and roll stars, who‘s career has spanned 60 years and 250—million record sales worldwide. now sir cliff richard has released his 104th album, his first collection of original material in 14 years. sir cliff has been speaking to bbc breakfast about what his new album, called ‘rise up‘, means for him and what impact his privacy case against the bbc over its coverage of a police raid on his home has had on him.
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for me to actually get in the studio and say, they‘re never going to break me down, it was fantastic and i could feel... not venom, exactly, but i felt triumphant to think that i‘d actually survived it all. what have those last four years been like? has it been the toughest part of your career...? yes, i would say it‘s the worst part. it‘s something i could never have expected. you know, when you spend your whole life... you know, i‘ve been called a christian goody two shoes and stuff like that. and i‘m thinking, i tried to live as honourabe and as honest a life as one could live, so when this thing came at me, ithought, oh, my... this could ruin everything i‘ve tried to do. anyway, it didn‘t work and i‘m fine! how important have friends and really close friends been throughout that time? oh, vital. absolutely vital. when that accusation first came through i was in portugal, and i had friends, about six or seven friends were coming to stay. and they all e—mailed me and said, look, this is horrible news, you probably want to be on your own. and i e—mailed back, saying, please, no, i do not want to be on my own. they came, we laughed a lot,
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we played tennis, we had... we dined a lot. but the thing is, of course, what can‘t be taken away is the fact that one should go to bed and close your eyes, you‘re on your own. but i never was. i was never on my own because i still have a spirituality. and in fact, it‘s grown since all this happened to me. and actually, because of what happened to you, you know think there should be a change in the law, don‘t you? well, it‘s a fight that we have to make. i didn‘t realise, now i know there is an army of us who‘ve been falsely accused. and being named as ridiculous. i couldn‘t believe it, ijust discovered, you know, magna carta, king john said, all of us are innocent until and unless proven guilty in a court of law. we are saying is, don‘t name anybody until the police think they have enough evidence to prosecute, they charge you, it then may take two years anyway. a lot of people say, well, we need to get more people coming forward. well, they have two years to come forward. but in the meantime, they smeared my name around the planet. i mean, i believe it takes seconds only to go to australia,
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new zealand, southeast asia, hong kong, singapore, kuala lumpur, bangkok, everywhere i‘ve ever been. that‘s what really shook me up and that‘s what... it didn‘t make me feel suicidal but i felt i‘d wasted my whole life trying to be different. sir cliff richard on bbc breakfast. in a moment it‘s time for the one o‘clock news with ben brown in westminster and clive myrie in the studio but first hello there. a big change in the weather in the next couple of days. we lose the relatively cold air and replace it with something milder and wetter and windy. today has been quite a cloudy day for most part of the united kingdom. you can see a number of areas of low pressure aligning up and waiting to swing into the uk, bringing the change in the weather. a quiet day today. a number of showers in eastern england, eastern scotland. not
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moving far inland from those eastern coasts. because there is no wind to push those showers along. that is where the showers will continue to be this evening. temperatures falling away. a chilly evening. overnight the potential to see some winter ina overnight the potential to see some winter in a sense of these showers in eastern scotland. snow over the hills. i see for a time. a change coming into part of the southwest as the cloud thickens later. rain approaching south—west england. otherwise, a cool night. we will see some patches of trustworthy cloud breaks. tuesday sees the band of rain coming into northern ireland, wales and south—west england. turning soggy. to the east of our weatherford we still have the cold air. a big temperature contrast from west to east. 12 degrees in plymouth. nine in london ahead of the weather fronts. the plymouth. nine in london ahead of the weatherfronts. the rain eventually get into parts of north—west england. cold air of
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scotla nd north—west england. cold air of scotland and north—west england. —— north—east england. looking at the weather picture towards the middle of the week, low pressure firmly in charge. a change in the weather. tightly packed isoba rs. charge. a change in the weather. tightly packed isobars. a zone of stronger winds working up the western side of the country. 60 to 70 mph winds. strong enough to bring down tree branches. maybe some trees. the risk of transport disruption. some heavy rain could also cause some issues as well. however, the winds in the south—west. look at those temperatures surging. a big jump in temperatures surging. a big jump in temperatures from tuesday to wednesday. 15 degrees in london and also belfast. we keep the milder weather over the coming few days through the weekend. even into part of next weekend —— week. windy and western scotland through thursday. the prime minister warns of division and uncertainty if mps oppose her brexit deal. theresa may chairs a meeting of the cabinet as she begins a campaign to sell the deal, insisting it‘s the best one available.
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i‘ll have all the latest from here at westminster where the prime minister will make a statement to the house this afternoon. also this lunchtime... matthew hedges, the academic jailed on spying charges in the united arab emirates, has been pardoned, and could be home tomorrow. nato calls an emergency meeting after russia seizes three ukrainian navy vessels off the coast of crimea. scientists are hoping to land a spacecraft on mars, the first to explore what the planet‘s made of.
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