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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 26, 2018 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. touchdown confirmed! news from the red planet. a robotic lender has touched down on mars — a succcessful landing after travelling almost 150 million kilometres from earth. iam i am live at nasa mission control where the celebrations are just starting to subside so the real martian science can begin. the us describes russia's seizure of three ukrainian navy ships as an outrageous violation of sovereign territory. ukraine responds by imposing martial law. theresa may says she will take the debate over her brexit agreement around the country insisting it is the best and only deal on offer. we can back this deal, deliver on the vote of the referendum, and move on to building a brighterfuture of opportunity and prosperity for all oui’ opportunity and prosperity for all our people. or this house can choose to reject this deal and go back to
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donald trump has been critical of the deal saying it seems to favour the deal saying it seems to favour the european union. we will get more in the coming minutes. nasa has successfully landed a robotic probe on mars. here's the tweet. the insight — as it's called — is going to study the planet's core to learn more about how it's formed and why it's so different from earth. this was inside the nasa control room when it happened. touchdown confirmed. so lots
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celebration, hug, you name it, the insight lander had been en route for six months you can imagine the relief, we also have a first picture that has come back from mars, just in the last few minutes, here is the rover. i expect more to come in in the next few weeks and month. it landed on an area targeted by agencies is seeking to land on mars, and they called the entry descent and they called the entry descent and landing, the seven minutes of terror, this is why, the probe enters the martian atmosphere at hyper sonic speed. round 20,000
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kilometres an hour. the angle has to be 12 degreef it is not it risk bounces off into deep space where it could burst into flames. next the parachute is deployed — and it will slow it to almost zero. insight will then fire 12 of what are called the retro thrusters — these help to cushion its landing. this video shows us how this played out. you get the moment where it is closer to the surface and then at the last moment, the parachute comes out and it rests gently down. only 40 out and it rests gently down. only a0 percent of the attempts to land on mars have been successful. and nasa is the only space agency to manage it. insight‘s mission is to help scientists understand how mars is constructed — from its core, to its crust. it'll dig deeper than ever before — burrowing 5m into the ground. there it will take temperature readings. it'll also try and measure so—called "marsquakes".
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and this is the technology that's being used. hi—tech seismometres are placed on the surface. the vibrations that are measured provide information about the rock layers below the surface — and what those rock layers are made up of. the solar panels — which are the parts that look like umbrellas — are vital as generate power for the lander as a whole. the third experiment will use radio transmissions to determine how much mars wobbles on its axis. and whether the planet's core is liquid, orsolid — and how big the core is. for all these reasons and many more — a lot is riding on this mission. many missions have tried to reach mars. this is an area of mars targeted by the missions. the last attempt was a joint european and russia team in 2016.
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that one was reduced to dust when it smashed into the surface. that is where it landed and disintegrated. one of the first messages of congratulations for this mission came from mike pence. and canadian astronaut chris hadfied. lets us speak to victoria gill in pasadena, help us understand what we mean when we talk about deep interior. well, exactly that, the inside of mars, we are going beneath
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the surface for the very first time and nasa, as an agency knows so much about the surface of mars, they have rovers, oi’ about the surface of mars, they have rovers, or beth bit per, vehicles there looking that the surface, and even drill add tiny bit into it to study what it is made of at the outer crust. now they are going deep, probing deeper, three to five metres they will drill using this vehicle. this is a full size model, you can probably about see the robotic arm, that is what it will use to deploy its self burrowing drill. when they they go inside that mean that literally and what they can gauge and listening to how the planet vibrates and measures how it wobbles on the axis will help them figure out what it is made from. mars and earth have been on very different journeys since they mars and earth have been on very differentjourneys since they formed out of the same stuff four—and—a—half billion years ago, so four—and—a—half billion years ago, so going to mars which hasn't been recycled at its crust like the earth
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has been tectonic plates we have on earth shows us a glimpse of the birth of the solar system, how rocky planets were form, how we came to be and what was the start of that journey to make earth so unique. and what was the start of that journey to make earth so uniquelj mentioned nasa wants to understand if it wobbles, mars wobbles on its axis, tell us about that please. yes, this is very interesting, and this is a very clever use of some of the equipment on that spacecraft. it is using its communication antenna to work out the wobble of mars, one of the scientists explains that this lander six, deliberately, they didn't forget the wheels here, this sits still and listens to mars but it also by signalling its exact position with those antennae it means when they move, that is mars moving, that is not the vehicle moving, that is not the vehicle moving, that is not the lander, the lander sits very very still and because they can measure that wobble, and the movement is affected by what the core of mars is made
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from, whether that is liquid or solid or in what consistency and ratio, they will use that to again, work out what mars is like at its very deepest interior. work out what mars is like at its very deepest interiorlj work out what mars is like at its very deepest interior. i mentioned the importance of the solar panel, we can see behind you, when do we know if they are working as we need them to? as far as we know, the pictures that we have suggest that we have got power, so i don't know for certain if batteries are fully charged but since we have some operation, nasa didn't expect to get that first picture that you were showing as grainy and covered up as it is by that harrowing journey, nasa weren't expecting that so quickie, so things are looking good. everything will have to be checked. everything will have to be checked. every piece oaf quipment will have to be double checked from mission control from earth and it takes eight minutes to get a signal from this back to earth so there will be a while yet to check everything, look at the surroundings and make
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sure it is in perfect condition. all very exciting. thank you for talking us very exciting. thank you for talking us through it. if you have any questions or want more information about what this journey, this lander is doing you can get it through the bbc website or the nasa website has plenty too. in the last hour or so, ukraine's parliament has voted to impose martial law in several regions. this was president poroshenko on tv earlier proposing the measure. he asked parliament to support him — and they did. biv this is all to do with what happened off the coast of crimea yesterday. russian special forces seized three ukrainian naval vessels and 23 crew members in the kerch strait. we are waiting to see what russia
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will do with these people. let us hear further reaction, will do with these people. let us hearfurther reaction, because nato is paying a very close eye on this, we will hear from nato in a is paying a very close eye on this, we will hearfrom nato in a moment. irena taranyuk, bbc ukrainian. a day of huge drama, at the 11th hour, the ukrainian parliament has ratified presidential suggestion that martial law be declared in ukraine, in connection with yesterday's aggression, act of aggression of russian navy in kerr strait, and 276 ukrainian mps voted for a somewhat limited version of this martial law which will be only affecting ii ukrainian regions, bordering russia or bordering areas with, where russia has military
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dominance. in practicalterms what will that martial law mean for the 11 areas? in practical terms it would mean some limitations on citizens freedoms including the freedom of assembly, it would include a possibility that the government will limit the movement of people in and out but not ukrainian citizen, it will mean that any, it won't affect any, what people feared or critics of poroshenko that will it affect electoral campaigning, because it will be limited in time it will only be active for 30 days. this is being watched very closely — not least by nato's secretary general. we wall on russia to release the personnel and the ships and allow free access —— call, for ukrainian
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ships to the kerr for strait. this is playing out in the east of europe, many kilometres away in new york, the un security council has been meeting to discuss this, the uk in poland offered support to ukraine and this is the ambassador. this sunday's. .. is part and this is the ambassador. this sunday's... is part of a pattern of russian behaviour that includes the purported annexation of crimea and abuse against countless ukrainians as well as stoking conflict that has the headachen the lives of more than 10 thousand people in eastern ukraine. this is the russian response. translation: what is the idea of ill posing martial law? of course, they will extend it, we all understand this is about cancelling the elections, despite all of poroshenko's assurances to the contrary, over these past five years brainwashing and total anti—russian
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propaganda, hatred and animosity to russia have been fostered. you know the security council is limited with what it can do, of course because russia is a veto wilding member of council so although the council has met more than a dozen times, council members have to in this case sit back and just call for a desks lacing of the conflict. they are concerned about this spiralling into a wired conflict, but it is worth noting though that, the ukrainian ambassadorfor though that, the ukrainian ambassador for example did call for the international community, to adopt a new set of sanctions, particularly on the russian ports and while that is not through the un he did want unilateral sanctions
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through member states. in terms of what happened we are in the bizarre situations where the russians and ukrainian have different account, did they try to clear up who was in the right or wrong? first, we heard from rosemary decarlo who is the political affairs chief of the united nations, she made it clear at the top that the un has no kind of independent verification of who was responsible but western nations were very strongly on ukraine's side, in fa ct, very strongly on ukraine's side, in fact, most of them in their speeches, including an ambassador nikki haley majority lined why they thought ukraine's account of what happened was accurate and they accused russia of just happened was accurate and they accused russia ofjust trying to confuse and lie about the situation, so confuse and lie about the situation, so it was a very heated exchange in the council, and russia was fairly isolated, when russia tries to hold the meeting on the agenda of, you know, it being a sigh lacing of
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russia ‘s territory of ukrainian illegally entering their waters only three other countries supported russia, so there was a lot of support for ukraine snuck the council. we will talk soon, thank you for that. stay with us on outside source — still to come. thousands ofjobs going in the us and canada as general motors announces plans to halt production at five of its factories. questions are being asked about the future of england's worst performing mental health trust, norfolk and suffolk nhs foundation trust after growing concern about the number of patients dying unexpectedly, including suicides and neglect. it's the only mental health trust to have been placed in special measures and it's thought later this week it could fail an inspection for a third time. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson has been investigating. all the signs suggest that the trust
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has not improved, and that it is about to fail a further inspection report. if that has happened, and we can't say for sure, but then very serious questions will be asked about the future of this mental health trust and whether in fact it should be shut down. it has only happened twice before, viewers may remember the mid—staffordshire nhs trust, it is unprecedented for a mental health trust and to reassure patients services would continue, but they would be moved under the control of a different part of the nhs. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story. nasa has successfully landed a robotic probe on mars. it will study the planet's interior to learn more about how it's formed and why it's so different from earth. a human rights group says indian
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authorities should abandon efforts to retrieve the body of an american missionary believed killed by an endangered tribe in the andaman islands last week. survival international said any attempt would be "incredibly dangerous" for both the sentinelese tribesmen, and those sent to get john allen chau's body. bbc hindi. three chinese nationals have been charged with attempting to bribe investigators working on an alleged ticketing scam in a massive kenyan railway project. the three men reportedly offered officers a $5,000 bribe. the alleged ticket fraud involved triggering refunds and diverting the money elsewhere. bbc chinese. these pictures are of a sandstorm in northwest china at the weeked. visibility went dow to less than ten meters. the wall of sand reached as high as 100 metres. police had to help motorists when it struck. everyone has been queueing up to
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criticise theresa may. her own mps, the opposition mps, there was a lot of criticism in the house of commons, we will get into that but listen to what president trump has had to say about the deal. sounds like a great deal for the eu, had to say about the deal. sounds like a great dealfor the eu, and i think we have to do this, i think we have to take a look at seriously whether or not the uk is allowed to trade, because you know right now, if you look at the deal, they may not be able to trade with us, and that wouldn't be a good thing, i don't think they meant that, i don't think that the prime minister meant that and hopefully she will be able do something about that, but right now, as the deal stands, she may not, they may not be able to trade with the us, and i don't think they
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wa nt with the us, and i don't think they want that at all, that would be a very big negative for the deal. perhaps not the most interhelpful intervention from the prime minister ona intervention from the prime minister on a deal that is getting heavily criticised. we will get into that in more detail in ten minutes. the president has been talking about a story concerning general motors. general motors is slashing its workforce in north america. ia,000 jobs are going — that's15% of its entire workforce eight factories will be affected — five of them are in north america. why is it happening? afrnts big part has to do with customer preference, people are not buying these smaller cars, sedan, they are opting for bigger cars like suvs and trucks so thatis bigger cars like suvs and trucks so that is why you are seeing this big slash, we have to to mention the fa ct slash, we have to to mention the fact that tariffs have had some impact. steel has become more expensive domestically and that is a
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big component. stay with us please because president trump has been giving his reaction to this new, here it is. this country has done a lot for general motor, you better get back in there soon, that is ohio, so we have a lot of pressure on them, you have senator, a lot people, a lot of pressure, they say the chevy cruise is not selling well, i say get a car that is selling well and put it back in. so not an overly sympathetic message. absolutely not, he was certainly attacking gm's plan. this is all pa rt attacking gm's plan. this is all part of the restructuring to try and make them a more any more had been company and one that can deal with the change in customer preferences to really concentrate on autonomous ca i’s to really concentrate on autonomous cars and on electric car, that said the president of course is upset because this is someone who said i'm going to be bringing back car manufacturing job, i am going to bring backjobs that are important,
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the backbone to the american economy, and in the same sentence, you see that actually gm is piecing out out of a big part of american manufacturing. thank you very much indeed. not too often we cover camel trading. let's put that right. thousands of camels have converged on a tiny desert town called pushkar, in india's state of rajasthan. it's for an annual fair. and it's a major chance for local camel traders. but business isn't good. devina gupta reports. this caravan of camels is heading to india's largest cam. fair in the western city opushkar. tribals from india's community like this man walk for 15 days with the camels which they plan to sell. but for the past few years he has
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been struggling to get buyers. earlier we sold a camel for $700 which help to raise my family but now people don't even buy the. camel for $70. according to the officials last year almost a,000 camels came to the fair but only 20% were sold. one of the reasons that is hurting the business is the stringent state laws that prohibits camel breeders from selling them outside the state or even for slaughter. this group of men are bargaining to buy a baby camel and one of the buyers tells me he wants to take the camel out of the state and sell it again for camel out of the state and sell it againfora camel out of the state and sell it again for a better price. but there could be another solution. she is trying to pop rise camel milk at the fair we are turning over 40, 50 litres of milk a day and it is selling about $a per litre and a
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family can make about $250 per month from selling camel milk. it's a small step for now but she hopes in the coming year, the traditional camelfaircan be the coming year, the traditional camel fair can be reinvented into one that will provide sustainable business nor the community. iam i am outside my area of expertise, we are going to talk about the issue of the blue economy. the first sustainable blue economy conference for africa is taking place in nairobi. this is interesting if, like me, you'd not heard the phrase blue economy before. this is about the mangement and conservation of aquatic resources — seas, lakes, rivers and oceans. here's one example in this report from ferdinand omondi. in from ferdinand omondi. the thick forestjoseph an crew in the thick forestjoseph and his crew are taking measurements of the tree, they are here to monitor the
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forest and to protect it from destruction. they call themselves a pioneering initiative in which the community gets paid to preserve the forests that cleans the air we breathe, carbon trading. the major contributor of climate change is greenhouse gases and carbon dioxide is one of them, if we plant more trees we should be able to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide from the amount of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as they absorb it. we are conserving mangroves, so they are conserving mangroves, so they are now saving that. the forests we re are now saving that. the forests were threatened by human activity with cutting them down for fire wood. the forests are being replanted wood. the forests are being repla nted after wood. the forests are being replanted after a successful pilot project initiated by scientists yea rs project initiated by scientists years ago, this is ground zero where they did the initial test to see
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whether mangrove forest can be reclaimed, 25 years ago, all this forest had been destroyed by excess harvesting and the soil header roaded and this was nothing but sand. then they started planting and 25 years later this is the result. the forest is back to its former glory and so is this. the regenerated forest has many benefits. it a buffer between the land and sea, home to marine life and a breeding ground and refuge for fish which is the primary source of money and we will talk brexit in a couple of minutes' time. hello, the weather is making the news around the world, at the moment, we have got bush fires, dust
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storms and snow, we will start with the snow. this is north america, we have cloud, wet weather heading to the pacific coast, this area of cloud round an air yes of low pressure has been bringing the snow. this is time—lapse footage, an hour, in chicago at the end of the thanksgiving weekend. you can see how quickly the clouds have darkened and the snow has been building up and the snow has been building up and we have had major travel disruption at the airport. that snow will be moving obtuse away from chicago, up towards new england and quebec, there could be as much as 12 inch of snow. blizzards possible too. we have smoke in the rockies, wet weather heading to northern part of california. in the north of south america it is unusually wet forethis time of year, likely to stay wet in the amazon basin into peru and colombia where there was flooding over the weekend. in europe, this area of low pressure has been battering the azores, that will work to the uk and that will really
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change the weather type here across our shore, more on that later on on the news channel. still have the wedge of colder air, the block of high pressure in the north east of europe and that cold air meeting all the wet weather we have in the south—east. heavy rain and heavy snow fall, developing midweek, all the way from the balkans to bulgaria and romania. now the weather will be changing later on in the week, across northern parts of the middle east. they will fade away on wednesday but there is more to come later on, again could bring some flooding, that is one to watch, certainly this is worth watch, not necessarily worth being in, this is a dust storm that was raging in the north—west of china, a wall of sand about 100 metres high, and it really developed the visibility very quickly. not unusual to get dust storms across this part of china, most in china is dry under high
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pressure, the north—easterly monsoon, we have rain in indochina left over from all the downpours from the tropical storm that hit over the weekend. no sign of significant rain here just yet to the north of brisbane where we have the north of brisbane where we have the bush fires, combination of the dryness and all the heat, and further north we have had some record—breaking temperatures, in cairns in the north of queensland at the airport, it was close to a3 degrees, it remains very hot in this pa rt degrees, it remains very hot in this part of australia and it is getting hotter in western australia. there is cooler wetter weather moving into new south wales and that rain will be heavy enough to give localised flooding. it is mixed in new zealand with rain in the north. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. touchdown confirmed! those are the
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celebrations at nasa in pasadena as they got used their land had reached mars safely. it had travelled almost 150 million kilometres. theresa may says she will take the debate over her brexit agreement to the country, insisting it is the best and only deal on offer. we can back this deal, deliver on the third of the referendum and move on to coding a brighter future of opportunity and prosperity for all our people, all this house can choose to reject this deal and go back to square one. mexico says it will deport migrants who clashed with border guards in tijuana yesterday. president trump warns he may close the border again. get in touch about any of the stories we are covering tonight, the hashtag is #bbcos the uk has entered two of the most important weeks in its history.
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at the weekend, theresa may agreed the terms of brexit with the eu. a few minutes ago the us president said what he thinks of the deal ssource it sounds like a great deal for the eu, and i think we have to do this. i think we have to take a look at seriously whether or not the uk is allowed to trade, because right now if you look at the deal, they may not be able to trade with us, and that wouldn't be a good thing. i don't think they meant that, i don't think the prime minister meant that and hopefully she'll be up to do something about that,
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but right now, as the deal stands, she may not, they may not be able to trade with the us, and i don't think they want that at all, that would be a very big negative for the deal. not the most helpful comment from president trump, if you, like theresa may, support the deal. but there was not a great deal of support for the prime minister in the house of commons earlier. we will hear from the house of commons earlier. we will hearfrom some the house of commons earlier. we will hear from some of her critics, but first of all at is hear her making the case for the deal she's done. ican i can say to the house with absolute certainty there is not a better deal available, and my fellow leaders vertically with that yesterday. to debate it respectively, to listen to our constituent and decide what is in our national interest. we can back this deal, deliver on the vote of the referendum, and move on to building a brighter future
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of the referendum, and move on to building a brighterfuture of opportunity and prosperity for all our people, or this house can choose to reject this deal and go back to square to reject this deal and go back to square one, because no one to reject this deal and go back to square one, because no one knows what would happen if this deal doesn't pass. they would open the door to more division and more uncertainty, with all the risks that will entail. so the mps listened and the mps responded. i listened very carefully to what my right honourable friend said, and she said that the uk doesn't want it, that the eu doesn't want it, and we have the other day that ireland said that no matter what any agreement, they would never have any ha rd agreement, they would never have any hard border, so it makes you wonder why is it in the withdrawal agreement at all? will she agree that this agreement could cost a lot more than 39 billion, as there are no cash limits or figures in it and lots of liabilities, especially if the eu goes as low on the next phase of the next negotiations as the last lot, and drag us into permanent transition at enormous cost? 241 job
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losses at vauxhall motors ellesmere port, bringing the total to 900 job losses since the referendum. when this government went even do the basics to help automotive industries like ending the discrimination on business rates, how on earth, mr speaker, are my constituents opposed to trust this government's political wish list? i congratulate my right honourable friend on beginning her campaign to sell this deal to the country with a frank admission just now that it is unsatisfactory. i may say i think that is a bit of an understatement. it's as dead as a dodo. prime minister, i plead with you, the house of commons has never ever surrendered to anybody, and it won't start now. the vote looks certain to be in the week of ten december. here's the bbc website telling how the voting shakes down. the mathematical challenges facing
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the prime minister and her team. the prime minister and the conservatives have a working relationship with the dup of northern ireland but the dup says it doesn't like this deal and it won't support it. we also think there are 82 rebel brexiteers within there are 82 rebel brexiteers within the conservative party who say they won't support it either, so while theresa may needs 320 votes, she could easily lose 92 right there. we think around 50 opposition labour —— 15 opposition labour mps might vote with but the labour party as whole certainly won't. stuart wood is a labour party peer, he says every mp as they won't vote for the deal needs to be asked immediately, but will you vote against it? his point here is that if there are lots of abstentions, than the deal could potentially get through, but frankly that's looking like a long shot. let's bring injonathan blake, live with us from the lobby in parliament. if i drew up a list of the things i can imagine as theresa may's worst monday night event, i would think donald trump saying you
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may not be to do a deal with us would be right up there? yes, that was a real crushing blow from the president earlier on this evening and it has made a very difficult task for the prime minister apps even more difficult. one leading conservative brexiteer this evening agreeing with donald trump, and saying that under the terms of the deal theresa may has agreed a trade deal theresa may has agreed a trade deal with the us and any other country would be difficult if not impossible. downing street have responded to the president's comments, by saying that under the present political declaration it is very clear, it has been agreed between the uk and the eu that the uk will be able to draw up and sign trade deals with other countries around the world including the us, and they point out that the groundwork for that has been going on for some time, specifically to signa on for some time, specifically to sign a trade deal with the united states. but there are a lot of mps he would perhaps agree with what donald trump has had to say, and
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point out that as far as they are concerned, it is too restrictive this deal theresa may has reached with the eu to allow the uk in the future, if it remained in some sort ofa future, if it remained in some sort of a customs union, if the backstop was invoked, as part of the deal, eventually, if a trade deal wasn't put in place by the end of 2020 with the eu then the government's cans would be tired. i have to say, an effort by number ten to brief labour mps on the deal this evening here in parliament did not go down particularly well at all, only about 25 labour mps turned up to that briefing this evening, and they described it afterwards in various ways, but not particularly positive, i have to say. appalling, pointless, and a waste of time, were just a couple of times from labour mps leaving that room. so we have two big blocks of opponents, the brexiteers within her own party and then the labour party. if those two blocks vote against the deal, what do they want to happen after the deal has been voted down? well, that
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much less clear, different people wa nt much less clear, different people want different things. a lot of labour mps would, perhaps, certainly the labour leadership would favour a general election in that scenario, and jeremy corbyn has that time and time again, that that would be his preferred outcome. other mps would perhaps want the government to go back and renegotiate, although as far as theresa may is concerned, thatis far as theresa may is concerned, that is a nonstarter, it is this deal or nothing. there are some who would like or at least the content of the uk to leave the european union without a deal, and that is the default option, if the deal isn't voted for here in parliament. then there is a period of time when the government has to come back and give a statement of its intentions. if the deal is not voted through as to what will happen next. but there are various scenarios which people are various scenarios which people are talking about, in terms of what exactly could happen, but the fact is nobody really knows because it is com pletely is nobody really knows because it is completely uncharted constitutional territory, hence the very keen
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attempt by theresa may and her ministers to sell this deal and change their minds and vote for it. jonathan, thank you very much, live in westminster. now to the mexico us border. mexico says it will deport the group of migrants which attempted to force its way into the us. this is what happened yesterday — there were clashes, dozens of people arrested — and tear gas was used. it was at a crossing between tijuana in mexico and san diego in the us. here it is — it's called san ysidro. normally it's the busiest border crossing in the western hemisphere. more than 70,000 cars and 20,000 pedestrians cross from mexico each day — and of course most return too. well, it closed after the clashes — but has reopened since. president trump said "mexico should move the flag—waving migrants, many of whom are stone cold criminals, back to their countries. do it by plane, do it by bus, do it anyway you want,
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but they are not coming into the u:s.a." earlier, i spoke with our reporter ana gabriela rojas about what's being done from the mexican side. well, the mexican government as well have said they supported around 100 migrants yesterday just after this incident happened, and they are very much pressed to have stricter controls. the government is changing just this saturday, the new president is going to take into power, and the people he is already demanding him strict controls. especially because it has been said
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lately in the news that some of the migrants were in this violent incidents, although the majority of them were not. before we carry on, just want to pull up a tweet from a colleague in washington, saying if you are going to express outrage at the recent treatment at the border it is important knowledge that similar incidents happened under obama. and that's true, it isn't the first time we have seen clashes on the border between immigrants and the border between immigrants and the us authorities? well, at the us border it was very usual in the 905. there were these migrants cro55ing like in hundreds, you know, ma55ive groups of people trying to cross, and they actually sometimes made it in. but lately this has happened very rarely. it is the first time in a few yea r5 very rarely. it is the first time in a few years that we see the border police throwing tear gas to the mexican 5ide, police throwing tear gas to the mexican side, so this is quite 5hocking, a5 mexican side, so this is quite 5hocking, as well. this is quite new, and this is the highest tension
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point within the caravan that 5ta rted point within the caravan that 5tarted around one month5 point within the caravan that 5tarted around one months ago, so this is the highest point intention that we believe in the last weeks. this is the highest point intention that we believe in the last weekslj wa nt that we believe in the last weeks.” wa nt to that we believe in the last weeks.” want to show you a tweet from the wife of the british academic wa5 jailed for life last week in the uae. she 5hared she shared a picture of them in an embrace. matthew hedges had found guilty of spying — something he and the uk government denied. the bbc‘s paul adams spoke daniela tejada earlier. it has just it ha5ju5t come it has just come as a very sudden, very happy 5urprise, it has just come as a very sudden, very happy surprise, but it has just come as a very sudden, very happy 5urprise, butjust not something that i would have expected in such an immediate future. and do you have any idea how it's sort of happened in the end?” you have any idea how it's sort of happened in the end? i have no clue. i hope that, i mean, i canju5t say
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that probably the uae 5aw i hope that, i mean, i canju5t say that probably the uae saw it in their hearts to really have a compa55ion their hearts to really have a compassion for matt and his family. hopefully for me anyway, as i said, i'm just 27 years old, he's just 30, and we were just starting our lives, so and we were just starting our lives, 5oiam and we were just starting our lives, so i amjust and we were just starting our lives, so i am just thankful that this opportunity has been given back to u5. the pardon was announced minutes afterjournali5t5 were shown a video in which mr hedges apparently confessed to being a british spy. and this is some of the press conference that followed. during the investigation, it emerged that mr hedges has been using two different identities together information from his targets. in one, he was matthew hedges the ph.d. researcher. in another one coming was matthew hedges the businessman. he was part—time ph.d. researcher, part—time businessman, but he was
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hundred percent a full—time secret service operative. matthew hedges wa5 pardoned, along with nearly 800 other prisoners in the uae — that's a tradition ahead of the national day on sunday. and we think matthew hedges may arrive back in the uk on early tuesday morning. he's already spent six months in solitary confinement. let's hear the reaction of detained in dubai, which is an ngo that helps people in just that situation. in many of these cases, if the british government has intervened at an early stage, they could have actually prevented the conviction from happening in the first place. and the fact that he has been pardoned means it is a way for the uae to almost say he was guilty, we are partnering him and impress the uk. the foreign secretary has said there is absolutely no evidence
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against matthew hedges for the allegations, and now he has a criminal conviction, a life sentence, which can actually affect his ability to travel in the future. the russian ship between the uae and the uk as far as detainees has been concerned has worked on this exact manner in the past decade that i have been operating detained in dubai, and this pardon is insufficient, in my opinion, for the uk to continue these relations as they have been, because it is just going to happen again and again and again and again and again. we're not really going to see any changes, we are not seeing improvements to the judicial system in the uae to the burden of proof, their evidence requirements, and what i think we really need to see is the fco increasing their warnings to british citizens. i had a look at their website this morning, and there are so website this morning, and there are so many instances of british nationals being arrested for silly things, that we would consider silly, for example retweeting a news story ca n
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silly, for example retweeting a news story can the uae government. these sort of warnings have not been put on the website, and our nation is continuing to allow the uae to advertise and promote their country to tourists. in a few minutes we will turn to a strange story. about around 100 migrants, almost all men, almost all claiming they are from iran, being picked up in small dinghies in the english channel in the last three weeks. we will tell you what that is about. a liverpool fan who was viciously attacked before a match against roma in april still can't sit up and has problems speaking six months later. sean cox's wife says he will never make a full recovery. the 53—year—old from county meath in ireland was injured as he and his brother made their way to the stadium. our sports editor dan roan reports. they were the scenes that shamed football. crowd disturbances outside anfield in april. the violence which overshadowed liverpool's champions league semifinal against roma resulted
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in one man fighting for his life, sean cox, the victim of an attack which left the irish father of three with severe brain injuries. at her home just outside dublin, his wife martina told me just how tough the last seven months have been. sean went to a match in april, and he never came home. i miss sean, the children miss their dad, you know, everyday life has completely changed. it was horrific looking at him, absolutely horrific. your husband just sitting there, lying there, lifeless. it's all so senseless, you know? having been brought out of a medically—induced coma, sean is now being treated in a local rehab centre. he can't sit up on his own, he can't talk. there are certain words, and there are more words coming since he started to eat, that does help, but it is a very, very long, slow process. he's not going to make a full recovery. they say you don't get back the same person, and we know that. but the only way that he will reach
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his maximum potential is if he gets the therapies that he needs. liverpool's fans have led the fundraising efforts for sean's future medical care. roma have donated £130,000, with liverpool's manager, jurgen klopp, also making a contribution of his own. the attack on sean cox led to support across the game, support that he and his family still need as they continue to deal with its devastating impact. dan roan, bbc news, dunboyne. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is? nasa has successfully landed a robotic probe on mars. it will study the planet's interior to learn more about how it's formed and why it's so different from earth. a new story from the bbc‘s
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100 women season. new data from the united nations given to the bbc has revealed shocking figures on femicide — the killing of women. here's what the data showed. every day across the world, an average of 137 women are reported killed by partners or family members who stop that makes up more than half of all women who were reported killed in 2017. while men are more likely to be murdered, 80% of people killed by an intimate partner are women. the bbc picked one day at random in 2018, and looked through global news reports. we picked october one, 2018, and managed to find reports of a7 women who had died in gender related killings in
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21 countries. these are some of the stories of the women reported that is killed by those closest to them this day. judith was 22, from kenya. she had recently separated from her husband. he followed her to her parents's village, where he attacked her. local police say the husband has since been killed by villagers. in brazil, 39—year—old sandra was killed by her husband after they separated. he confessed to the crime, before killing himself. and on the same day in france, 36 terodde mary amelie was also killed by her husband. the couple had recently separated. he killed himself imprisoned shortly afterwards. this is what we could find onjust one afterwards. this is what we could find on just one day this year from publicly available information, but a lot of violence against women goes unreported, and there are likely many more cases we don't know about yet. the data and our research
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suggests that for many women, home is the most likely place for women to be killed. the final item on today's programme concerns what has been happening in the english channel. in the past three weeks more than 100 migrants, all claiming to be from iran, have been intercepted in small boats as they try to cross the english channel to enter the uk illegally. this is dangerous. it's roughly 31 km from dover to calais, and this is the busiest international seaway in the world. this is footage of one dinghy being intercepted by a uk border force boat on friday with eight men aboard. police say they were lucky to survive. the reason why it may be happening is to be found 1,900km away in the serbian capital of belgrade. last year, serbia began offering visa—free entry to iranians. since then, accroding to a refugee support centre in belgrade, over a0,000 people have come from iran — and not
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all have gone back. the bbc‘s william mclennan has more on this on our website — he came in earlier, and i asked what we knew about where they were from. so it is impossible to say for certain where they left from, because they are arriving on small rigid hold unbeatable boats known as zodiac ‘s, and they don't —— inflata ble zodiac ‘s, and they don't —— inflatable boats, they don't carry gps transponders so authorities are not able to track them from somewhere in northern france, and they are hiding somewhere in kent khamidova or folkestone, somewhere along those lines that of the boats are very along those lines that of the boats are very unsubsta ntial, along those lines that of the boats are very unsubstantial, they only have small outboard motors, and they are wearing hi—vis life jackets. we know in certain cases they have been bailing out water with empty plastic water bottles. ed woodward have been
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freezing as well? yes, temperatures reaching freezing, it is a 21 mile journey, choppy waters. where are they now? that we are not entirely certain of. they are taken away by the home office for interviews by immigration officials, and then they are kind of spread to the winds throughout the country, unless they are immediately deported. the children under the age of 18 will be put in local authority care in kent. and one thing i couldn't quite understand reading around the story was why this spike in the number of people doing this journey has happened in the last few weeks.” think the answer to that depends on who you ask. some bid will say it is brexit, and they say that people smugglers are using brexit as a marketing tool, saying it is now or never, get on this boat today or the border will close. we are not sure if that is true, if that will play out in time, but that is one of the theories. another theory is that us
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economic sanctions on iran are driving people out of the country, because for the poorest of the country things are getting more desperate. we will keep an eye on that story because it is continuing to develop. just to remind you what we saw a couple of hours ago now, the seven minutes of terror, as nasa described the entry of a probe into mars‘s atmosphere went well. the lander is down on the surface of mars, getting ready to go about its work. it is already tweeting, or at least the people and has a dean are tweeting on its behalf. feeling emotional. it also showed this picture, which is a little underwhelming, but it is from mars, so we will take it. thank you very much for watching, and i will see you tomorrow, goodbye. the quiet but chilly weather of the last few days is about to get blown away. a big change in weather type
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for the next few days will see heavy rain and gales, but with that something quite a bit milder. over recent days, the jet stream has something quite a bit milder. over recent days, thejet stream has not really been troubling us was it has been moving to the north, to the south, we have had high pressure in charge, so it been mostly settled. however, now the jet stream has charge, so it been mostly settled. however, now thejet stream has been racing high into the atlantic. a strong as 200 mph, and that is developing areas of low pressure, a few different lows in the atlantic, the jet stream driving them in our direction and we will see bouts of wind and rain. this is the first one, heavy bursts of rain, wind gusts in exposed coastal spots in the west. eastern areas having one last quiet and chilly day, but as we go through tuesday night, we will see this rain with temporarily some snow pushing north—eastwards,
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another batch of hefty downpours coming from the south—west by the end of the night, but it will be a little bit milder. seven to 10 degrees, because the winds will be coming from the south—west. but really strong winds on wednesday, but all the white lines, the isobars squeezing together on this chart. we are quite widely going to see gales forced up with those gales very heavy bursts of rain, particularly heavy bursts of rain, particularly heavy and persistent rain we suspect for some hills in south—eastern scotland. these are the sort of wind gusts we are expecting, 50, 60, maybe 70 mph in the most exposed spots, particularly in the west, but with those winds coming from the south—west, those temperatures much higher than they have been, 12 to 15 degrees and stop as we move out of wednesday into thursday, here comes another bout of wind and rain, another bout of wind and rain, another the floor area of low pressure starting to develop. it looks most likely we will see the strongest winds in the west but there's a bit of uncertainty about how potent that particular area of low pressure will be. once the first
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band of rain clears, we are left with sunshine and heavy blustery showers into thursday afternoon, and those temperatures may be starting to ease back just those temperatures may be starting to ease backjust a little bit. friday is a day of sunshine and showers, the showers most plentiful across northern areas, some heavy, some thundery, not as many further south. there will still be windy and those temperatures continuing to dip a little bit. nine to 11 degrees at best. notice, not as many white lines, isobars on the chart by the stage. so although we will still see some rain at times through the weekend, it is not going to be quite as windy. as we get into next week, it looks like things will continue to quieten down because the jet strea m to quieten down because the jet stream is going to leave us alone again by the looks of things. it looks most likely that the jet will head to the north of the uk, leaving us with quieter conditions, high pressure allowed to build back in from the south. low pressure will a lwa ys from the south. low pressure will always be close to northern areas,
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so always be close to northern areas, so there could be some rain here, and this sort of setup is or is likely to bring us a westerly wind. that means next week should be drier with lighter winds, the chance of rain in the north but with those westerly winds it will still be fairly mild. a return to something quieter but not necessarily much colder. tonight at ten — theresa may comes under relentless attack from mp5 over her controversial brexit deal. a day after meeting in brussels, the prime minister was in parliament to warn that rejection would cause more uncertainty and division. we can back this deal, deliver on the vote of the referendum and move on to building a brighter future of opportunity and prosperity for all our people. or this house can choose to reject this deal and go back to square one. but the prime minister's deal was widely criticised on both sides of the house. mr speaker, ploughing on is not stoic, it's an act of national self—harm. the prime minister and the whole house knows the mathematics.
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this will never get through. and this evening, president trump warned that mrs may's deal could make it harderfor britain to trade with america. also tonight... the british academic matthew hedges, convicted of spying
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