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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 27, 2018 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and mega munchetty. our headlines today: theresa may hits the road to sell her brexit deal and hits back at president trump over his comments on trade. free and on his way home. the british academic convicted of spying in the united arab emirates. it is the season for temporary workers. the number of applications for seasonal jobs workers. the number of applications for seasonaljobs is workers. the number of applications for seasonal jobs is not workers. the number of applications for seasonaljobs is not 10% this year. iam for seasonaljobs is not 10% this year. i am in a for seasonaljobs is not 10% this year. iam in a mince pie for seasonaljobs is not 10% this year. i am in a mince pie factory to find out how important christmas is to the business. touchdown confirmed! a cheer, a handshake and sheer relief as nasa scientists celebrate a perfect landing on mars. and the robot seems to have quickly settled into its new home. we hear exclusively from the wife of sean cox, the liverpool fan who was left in a coma after an attack before a match at anfield. he went to a match in april and he
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never came home, that is the reality of it. some dense fog in the morning commute, it is about gatwick and windier, i will have the details here on breakfast. —— it is about to get wet and windier. it's tuesday 27th november. our top story — downing street has insisted the brexit agreement with the eu allows the uk to sign trade deals with other countries, including the united states. last night, president trump described the plan as "a great deal for the eu" and told journalists that the withdrawal agreement could harm the uk's ability to trade with the us. i think we have to look at seriously whether or not the uk is allowed to trade because, you know, right now, if you look at the deal, they may not be able to trade with us and that wouldn't be a good thing. i don't think they meant that, i don't think that the prime minister meant that and hopefully she'll be able to do something about that, but right now, as the deal stands, she may not — we can speak now to our
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political correspondent ben wright, who joins us from westminster. theresa may is kickstarting a tour round the uk to convince people that her deal is the right one. how damning are president trump's comments? a torpedo from the other side of the atlantic, president trump seeming to demolish the agreement that she is try to sell around the country. deciphering what he meant isn't a lwa ys deciphering what he meant isn't always easy and in this case it isn't, during the transition phase that theresa may signed off on a mud that theresa may signed off on a mud that trade would be the same, downing street insists that the declaration apart of this deal, will allow the uk to pursue an independent trade policy and allow bilateral trade policies to be signed with countries like the us. it is an incredibly unhelpful
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remark, according to number ten, theresa may's critics have lined up, some of those who want her to stay in the eu, to point to donald trump and say he doesn't even think this deal is good. the prime minister is having a tough week on a question about that. chief at faced a wall of resista nce about that. chief at faced a wall of resistance in the house of commons yesterday. she is now going around other parts of the uk, selling this. the timetable is tight, the debate begins on december four and the the timetable is tight, the debate begins on decemberfour and the big vote would be on december 11. at the moment it is very hard to steal how she will get a deal through the house of common. —— house of commons. we were speculator in the programme. “— commons. we were speculator in the programme. —— we will speak to you later in the programme. meanwhile, the european court ofjustice will hear a legal challenge, on whether the uk can reverse article 50, without permission from the other eu member states. remain campaigners are hoping the case will give britain the option to stay in the eu in the event of another referendum.
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adam fleming is at the european court ofjustice in luxembourg for us this morning. good morning to you. it is another one of those developments. it feels like it could be incredibly significant. yes, it won't be significant. yes, it won't be significant today because this is just a hearing that will last for a couple of hours were all the different sides involved will make legal arguments and the judges will ta ke legal arguments and the judges will take those arguments are way, think about them for a couple of weeks, maybe is, before they give their verdict. you remember that were moment when theresa may wrote that letter last march, triggering article 50, believe process. this is all about whether that letter can be taken back without having to ask for consent of the other 27 eu countries to do that. the case has been brought forward by some mps, msp's and meps. the uk is opposed to this
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because they said you have to get the other countries involved in that process somehow the other countries involved in that process somehow and the government says this is all one big massive hypothetical question because the uk has got no intention of taking that article 50 letter back. for some people, this is just article 50 letter back. for some people, this isjust a really brainy legal argument, but for those campaigners is another powerful tool in theircampaignfor campaigners is another powerful tool in their campaign for another referendum that would see the uk staying in the eu and brexit being cancelled altogether. thank you very much for that moment. the time is five minutes past six. a british academic, sentenced last week to life in prison for spying in the united arab emirates, is reported to be on his way home. matthew hedges, received a presidential pardon, although officials in the uae insist he was working for mi6. his family has always denied the charges. our diplomatic correspondent paul adams reports. less tha n
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less than a week ago, matthew hedges is facing life in prison. now he is a free man, able to pursue his professional and personal life. your authorities in the uae continued to believe he was a spy. he was part—time phd researcher, part—time businessman, but he was 100% a full—time secret service operative. it is possible they would have released him months ago, if the british government admitted as much. that was never on the cards. jeremy hunt says there is simply no evidence for the allegations. we have made it clearfor a number of months now, that there are no basis in the allegations. they have taken the action that they can which means matthew hedges will be reunited with his family. my hopes have been shattered on so many occasions that ididn't shattered on so many occasions that i didn't actually know whether it i should raise them up again. it has come as a very sudden, very happy surprise. it now seems neither
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government wanted to risk a serious ru ptu re government wanted to risk a serious rupture in relations, something that seemed possible just a few days ago. butler says will perhaps need to be learned, it universities were to ask themselves if the gulf is a safe place for academics to undertake research into sensitive national sku subjects and the foreign office will have two see whether something could have two see whether something could have been done earlier on to secure matthew hedges' release. paul adams, bbc news. women with academic degrees are better—off financially in their first few years of work, than men. the institute for fiscal studies looked at graduate pay and found that by the age of 29, women with a degree earn 28% more than women who haven't been to university. for men, the difference is 8%. the study found that the type of university and subject, also had a significant influence on salary. experts are warning that thousands of cancer patients are dying unnecessarily each year because the health service in england has failed to make the improvements needed. the health foundation, which campaigns for better treatment, says more needs to be done to close the gap in survival rates between the uk
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and other countries. the government says improving cancer care is a priority for the extra funding already announced for the nhs. nasa scientists are beginning to gather data from mars, after successfully landing a probe on the surface of the red planet. the insight spacecraft‘s descent through the martian atmosphere, lasted just seven minutes, slowing down from a speed faster than a bullet to jogging pace. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. touchdown confirmed! relief and joy at mission control. after plunging through the martian atmosphere at six times the speed of atmosphere at six times the speed of a bullet, nasser‘s insight spacecraft played its feet safely on the surface of mars. now the work
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begins at. this is my first mission, i still feel nervous, like i don't know, the adrenaline is still going through me, but we're on mars, insight worked, we will get a bunch of images over the next few days and it is incredible to be on this mission and say tomorrow when i come onto my shift i will see an image of mars that nobody has seen before. it is already sending snapshots back to earth. insight‘s cameras will examine its surroundings in detail so that scientists can select that we we re so that scientists can select that we were to place its scientific equipment. it will listen or martian earthquakes and drilled deep into the planet to study its structure. as the insight land it studies the deep interior of mars, it will be sending it started back to here in mission control in california and people will work out exactly how rocky worlds like mars, the earth and the moon formed 4.5 billion yea rs and the moon formed 4.5 billion years ago. they lovingly call this the centre of the universe. the two—year mission is now under way to
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build a picture of the hidden debt of the red planet. victoria gill, bbc news at mass. the world war ii code—breaker and long—serving conservative peer, baroness trumpington, has died at the age of 96. she retired from the house of lords in 2017, after a 37—year tenure that included spells as a minister and a government whip. the international development secretary, penny mordaunt, described her as a "trailblazer, heroine and an utterjoy". our political correspondent, sean curran looks back at her life. a pillar of the establishment with a rebellious streak, jean barker, better known as lady trumpington, packed a lot into her life. she was a land gardener on george ‘s farm and a code breaker. churchill visited us, he said you are the birds that laid the golden eggs, but
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never tackled. and that was the important thing, was that we never talked. she was appointed to the house of lords in 1980 and served as a minister under both john house of lords in 1980 and served as a minister under bothjohn major and market thatcher. we were really good friends. —— margaret thatcher. if i didn't agree with her on something i said so. that was very good for her. it gave her a chance to know what the opposition might say to her. it gave her a chance to know what the opposition might say to henm 2011, she famously gave a two fingered salute to a colleague who had referred to her age during a debate. the sign led to more on—screen opportunities, including an appearance on a television show copy i would like to know why, at the age of 90, i decided his paper in order to be on the show to say i was not written. -- was not
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pregnant. in 2014, she published her bestselling memoirs, although she told one interviewer she had neither written, nor read the book. what a character. brilliant. the time is 12 minutes past six. matt has the weather for us, he says it is foggy. how many layers yesterday? five layers. is vice to be in yesterday? five layers. is vice to beina yesterday? five layers. is vice to be in a single shirt today. —— it is nice. we've been talking to the wife of sean cox, the liverpool fan who was left in a coma when he was attacked before a match at anfield in april. the attack lasted 17 seconds but it is 17 seconds that has changed his life altogether. it is a name i wish
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ididn't life altogether. it is a name i wish i didn't know, in many ways. his wife has been speaking to us for the first time, talking about her husband who was attacked before that match. she says her family's lives have been turned upside down. he was a keen runner, very fit and sporty. we will be hearing from her later in the programme, what she has to say about his condition at the moment. newcastle beat burnley in the premier league last night in what was a cracker of a game at turf moor. it was their third win in a row. jose mourinho says he'll walk to old trafford again if traffic stops the team bus getting to their champions league match on time. they were fined after a hold—up last month. both united and manchester city could qualify for the knockout stages tonight. and sophia florsch, the german teenager who fractured her spine in a formula 3 crash, is heading home. she's said she "can't wait to get back racing and realise her dream". notjust
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not just yet though. time for recovery. she is so lucky. remember that crash, we showed it when it happened, she flew through the air. the brakes went on her car, incredibly lucky, but has not knocked her determination to race. you said newcastle won for the first time ona you said newcastle won for the first time on a monday in yonks. we should use it more. everybody knows it is a one—time. if you break it down, you don't necessarily know. and non—specific period of time. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. it will be cold for yonks. isn't it? know, things are changing. it is cold out there this morning. cold this morning, widespread frost, things getting milder. another thing to contend with, if
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you're heading on the roads, pretty dense fog in parts of england and east wales. later we swapped that for some wet and very windy weather. several bouts of wet and windy weather gathering in the atlantic at the moment. noticed on the weather chart, very few isobars to begin with, that's why the fault has formed through the night. —— notice. this is where it is worse, on —— the fog ——: . the and that's bringing wet weather. a few showers in eastern scotland and eastern england. many staying dry. clearing from west wales and south—west england later but the breeze picks up, bringing milder air and a chilly day in eastern parts. let's focus on the rain for the school pickup and also towards the evening commute, turning particularly wet across the midlands through the afternoon and pushing
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towards south—east england by the evening rush—hour and east anglia. heavy rain in the pennines, across the pennines and down to the welsh hills and the southern uplands, some snow mixed in with the rank. this is on the tops of the hills, rain spreading into much of central and southern scotland —— with the rain. we've got a dry but windy spell coming in. the wind is temporarily fall like —— the winds. another speu fall like —— the winds. another spell of wet weather pushes in. —— all light. not as cold as recent night. —— fall like. —— recent nights. this is the big area of low pressure driving things —— fall like. this will bring outbreaks of rekik rain through the day on wednesday. the most persistent in northern ireland, north—west england and across scotland into the afternoon. brighter spells in the south but across the board, a windy
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day on wednesday leading to travel disruption. widespread severe gales in the west, winds could touch 60 mph and into the evening, 70 mph in the north of scotland. temperatures with the winds from the south of south—west, much milder than of late, into the teens. the mild night will follow, from wednesday night into thursday, more wet weather arrives and across parts of england we could see winds gusting in excess of 60 or maybe 70 mph. wet weather here, turning shower read later and a bit brighter by friday. temperatures dropping a bit but not as chilly as of late —— showery. a bit of wet and windy weather to come over the next few days. thanks very much. see you later. matt is with us throughout the morning but let's look at the front pages. sally is here but no victoria, she's at the largest mince pie factory in the whole of the uk.
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we will have a debate about when to eat one as well. i go august. one of us, i won't say who, doesn't allow them in the family home until the first of december. i wonder who that is. i wonder who that is! who likes regulations out here? —— around here. the times leads on a family court case which saw a council invite a jailed sex offender to play a part in the future of the child of a woman he raped. officials say they are investigating whether it was the result of an error by a social worker or systemic failings. the sun says theresa may wants a proposed debate on brexit withjeremy corbyn to take place on the ninth of december, two days before the vote, noting the showdown could take place on the day of the final of i'm a celebrity. the paper mocks up the two leaders as contestants on the tv reality show. would be interesting to see. rumble in the jungle! eating a spider, big
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finish! -- that would be interesting to see. donald trump's remarks are also the focus for the guardian's brexit story. the paper says the us president's criticism was unexpected. it leads with a story from a joint investigation into medical implants, reporting serious safety concerns about breast implants have been revealed. the daily mirror highlights predictions from a charity which runs hundreds of foodbanks that they will face record demand this christmas. the paper blames problems with delays to payments of universal credit, and describes the situation as shameful. 1.5 million meals will be handed out to poorfamilies 1.5 million meals will be handed out to poor families this christmas, including 590,002 children. to poor families this christmas, including 590,002 childrenlj neglected including 590,002 children.” neglected to tell you about the picture on the front page of that times —— 590,000 to children. amber heard, the star of aqua man, who wore this in london at the premiere last night. she's on the front page of many papers this morning.”
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last night. she's on the front page of many papers this morning. i like that had. is it meant to be like a swimming hat rosie white with the film being here is the dress. it is quite small. very flowery. what have you got, sally? england players celebrating their first full series whitewash in asia. jimmy anderson, back there in the corner, he said this is the best time he's had away with england on a cricket tuohy can remember. in every sense he has enjoyed the cricket, the team spirit and the journey —— cricket tour the can remember. they often complain about being away from home —— cricket tour he can remember. in the telegraph, an interview with deontay wilder, who fights tyson fury at the
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weekend. he already has seven children, is it seven, might be six, i think it is seven. he says one day he would like to carry his own child. he said if they ever invent a way for a man to carry his own baby i would like to experience that. kindergarten cop! no, what is the other one? arnold schwarzenegger. junior! junior! go through them all. predator! i read an interview with him yesterday, he said anyone who wa nts to him yesterday, he said anyone who wants to date his eldest daughter has to do three rounds sparring with him and only after that.” has to do three rounds sparring with him and only after that. i think his daughter will be having words. he's going for dad of the century. he fights tyson fury on saturday. have you seen fights tyson fury on saturday. have you seen nole edmonds at the age of 69? you're both watching i'm a celebrity, aren't you? —— noel
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edmonds. he is 70 this year. incredible nick. the biceps i am amazed by. immaculate barnett! thank you very much, sally! you're welcome. —— immaculate barnet. you may not have heard of deke duncan, but he's been the voice of radio 77 for more than 40 years. have you heard of him? only because we did a story on it recently. the station doesn't have a licence, so can only be beamed through a speaker from his shed into his living room to an audience of one — his wife. that could all be about to change, though, as he's now been offered a one—hour special radio show. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to meet him. let me take you back, right back to a shared in 19705 stevenage. let me take you back, right back to a shared in 1970s stevenage. here to try and put a grin around your chin, a special hello, how are you going
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out right now to mrs teresa duncan, 57 donald crescents in stevenage. fast forward 50 years and 170 miles to stockport. .. fast forward 50 years and 170 miles to stockport... looking fast forward 50 years and 170 miles to stockport. .. looking after your ears, me dears. a special high, hello to pamela duncan. how in the world a re hello to pamela duncan. how in the world are you feeling, my darling? deke duncan is still broadcasting to his audience of one, though it's a different mrs duncan and it's not a shared. what do you think of the workshop? right. it is a workshop. you're about to enter one. oh my god is! radio 772018 -- oh my days. hit me with it, deke! —— radio 77,20 18. i love this, this is my life, radio. fabulous! i bet you're never of duty, even in the supermarket?m my head. if you're listening in the
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car right now, thanks for the ride. looking after your ears, me dears. 77 coming at you today with a mountain of music guaranteed right here in the air chair. this is true love, love soap you're even the mrs approves. i think it's wonderful, you know! — — approves. i think it's wonderful, you know! —— soap you're. he believes it, he lives it, he does it, and as he is said to me many times, it'sjust it, and as he is said to me many times, it's just between it, and as he is said to me many times, it'sjust between me and the mike —— soap you're —— so pure. this priceless nationwide film gave deke 5 billion, minutes of fame five decades ago. i'm going to the shop, right, deke? my ambition would be to broadcast to the rest of stevenage, i'd like to share it with them. but the dream was never materialised until this was shared once again. it is laura moss, the station editor at three counties radio. i want to
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offer you a one—hour special over christmas. so, deke, your dream is going to be a reality. you'd better pass the tissues! yeah, you've got that right, baby! in fact, in the media storm that is followed, deke's had more than the offer of a 1—off show. i believe there's been a job offer a? there has been. from africa? from africa. ithink it's probably a small station where they don't put records on and they don't have a dj at the moment. there's an opening. i know. it's very difficult, i've got africa or bbc three counties. we're going to stick to steve na g e three counties. we're going to stick to stevenage and stockport.” three counties. we're going to stick to stevenage and stockport. i think so. to stevenage and stockport. i think so. i'd miss it! holy, moly, rock and roll the! deke duncan's message to us all, never give up on your dreams. he is so you're kind of dj!”
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he is so you're kind of dj! i love those lines, holy moly, rocky anderson rolly! just ask permission from his wife, —— and rolly. —— rocky and rolly. the world's largest mince pie factory in barnsley relies on seasonal workers to make 720 pies a minute at peak times. that's a lot of mince pies! victoria is there for us this morning, with some interesting news about a rise in demand for christmas jobs. if you're going to talk christmas jobs, where else would you talk about them ? good jobs, where else would you talk about them? good morning, victoria. good morning, naga, dan! smell that, smell of vision, i don't know if you can get that but you're right, 728 minute, 220 million a year. they need an extra 350 staff in order to do this production line. later i'm going to be talking mince pies facts and i'll be meeting the research and
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development technologist, the food taste, who comes up with the recipe. but first, the news, travel and weather where you are. —— the food taste. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. five people racked up over8,500 calls to the metropolitan police last year which ended up costing tens of thousands of pounds to answer. the five repeat callers all had mental health problems and the figure was released by the police forces watchdog to show how officers are forced to deal with mental health patients. her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary claims the broader mental health system is broken. the home office says its investing in mental health services. around a third of all newjobs created in the uk in the past decade have been created in london. the bbc has learned that although employment has been rising across the country, by far the strongest growth has been in the capital.
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london is also home to the highest percentage of skilled workers, like ny—ekee lambert. for her, moving herfashion business here was essential. i don't think my business would survive anywhere else but london. i've tried it in my old town and it didn't work. i think people just come straight here because they know that this is where, you know, you can make your money and there's opportunities here. a charity which turns excess apples from london's gardens and parks into cider and juice is fighting for funding to keep its community project afloat. the orchard project has uncovered dozen of hidden orchards in london and uses fruit that would otherwise go to waste. they've started crowdfunding as their main source of cash has ended. as a result, they hope to keep londoners making cider. let's take a look at the travel situation now. tfl rail has severe delays between paddington and heathrow airport due to a fire
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near the railway at southall. on the roads, in central london, piccadilly is closed between hyde park corner and the ritz hotel because of over—running roadworks. and in bermondsey, tower bridge road is closed northbound at the bricklayers arms roundabout because of a burst water main. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a chilly start out there this morning, temperatures down in low single figures celsius. there is quite a bit of low cloud around, some mist and murk, but later on turning breezy with some rain on the light. the wind is quite like first thing, but as it strengthens through the morning, it will help lift that mist and low cloud, into low cloud predominately and the rain arrives later. a blustery wind as well, temperatures between seven and nine celsius. the wind later on as the rain pushes brew could gust around 30—35 mph. overnight the rain clears away, postmidnight it will be dry but we
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hang on to the very gusty wind. the temperature overnight not as cold as it has been, the minimum between six and seven celsius. outbreaks of rain as we head into tuesday, but that wind will really start to strengthen, becoming quite strong and also the temperature, quite a lead, mild tomorrow with a maximum of 14 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. va nessa vanessa feltz has her breakfast show in halfan vanessa feltz has her breakfast show in half an hour until 10am. a packed programme this morning. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and naga munchetty. good morning, it is 6:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. the average uk woman's dress size is a 16, but in the fashion industry this would be described as ,, we'll speak to two curvy models, who are taking part in a documentary, which goes behind the scenes of a top london model agency.
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contemporary dancers with disabilities teamed up with strictly professionals at the weekend, to perform a special routine, choreographed by former judge arlene phillips. we'll catch up with some of them to hear about their experience. best known for directing the oscar—winning documentary, the white helmets, orlando von einsiedel will tell us why he decided to turn the camera on his own family and share the impact of losing a loved one. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. downing street has insisted the brexit agreement with the eu allows the uk to sign trade deals with other countries, including the united states. last night, president trump made an unexpected intervention in the debate, describing the plan as "a great dealfor the eu" and told journalists that the withdrawal agreement could harm the uk's ability to trade with the us. i think we have to look at seriously whether or not the uk is allowed to trade because, you know, right now, if you look at the deal,
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they may not be able to trade with us and that wouldn't be a good thing. i don't think they meant that, i don't think that the prime minister meant that and hopefully she'll be able to do something about that. meanwhile, the european court ofjustice will hear a legal challenge today, over whether the uk can reverse article 50, without permission from the other eu member states. remain campaigners are hoping the case will give britain the option to stay in the eu in the event of another referendum. the government argues the case is hypothetical as it has no plans to revoke britain's withdrawal from the eu. a british academic, sentenced last week to life in prison for spying in the united arab emirates, is reported to be on his way home. matthew hedges received a presidential pardon, although officials in the uae insist he was working for mi6. his family has always denied the charges. women with academic degrees are better—off financially, in their first few years of work, than men. the institute for fiscal studies looked
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at graduate pay and found that by the age of 29, women with a degree earn 28% more than women who haven't been to university. for men, the difference is 8%. the study found that the type of university and subject, also had a significant influence on salary. experts are warning that thousands of cancer patients are dying unnecessarily each year because the health service in england has failed to make the improvements needed. the health foundation, which campaigns for better treatment, says more needs to be done to close the gap in survival rates between the uk and other countries. the government says improving cancer care is a priority for the extra funding already announced for the nhs. nasa scientists are beginning to gather data from mars, after successfully landing a probe on the surface. touchdown confirmed! there were cheers at mission control in california as the probe, called insight, completed it's seven minute descent — slowing down from six times the speed of a bullet, tojogging pace.
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the robot has already sent home the first photograph from mars and will measure quakes and underground temperatures on the red planet. a 10—year—old boy, who was diagnosed with a rare blood disorder, has been reunited with the man who helped save his life. rupert spent 80 days in a specialist unit at great ormond street hospital, on a course of chemotherapy. during that time, billy higgins, joined the bone marrow register, after he saw a woman he liked in the queue. the story had a double happy ending as billy has now married the woman who inspired him tojoin the register and he discovered he was a match for rupert. i feel very lucky and i ifeel very lucky and i can't believe that someone would do this to me and i can't believe that someone. to me and i can't believe that someone. i don't know, i can't put it into words. he is a superman. it is one of those amazing sliding doors moment. imagine if he hadn't
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cornerback? or if he didn't have the guts to talk to the woman in the queue. that has properly lifted my cheeks. are truly amazing story. it is 6:35a.m., cheeks. are truly amazing story. it is 6:35 a.m., we have the weather coming up in about ten minutes. sally is here with us this morning, bit ofan sally is here with us this morning, bit of an exclusive interview to start in. —— start things off. the liverpool fan who was attacked outside enfield before liverpool's champions league match. the liverpool fan critically injured before the club's match against roma in april will never make a full recovery according to his wife. sean cox suffered serious brain injuries when he was assaulted by italian hooligans. martina cox says her family has been left completely devastated. he went to a match in april and he
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never came home. that is the reality of it. i miss sean, the children this their dad. everyday life has completely changed, it has literally turned everything upside down. but we are trying to muddle through it and do the best we can. there was a great match in the premier league last night, between two sides struggling to get their season's going and it ended in a 2—1victory for newcastle at burnley. joe lynskey was watching. sometimes football has two pause for more important matters. before this match started, the referee ‘s assessor collapsed in the tunnel. he was conscious when he was taken to hospital and kick—off was put back by half an hour. in the context of the season, it has been a slow start for burnley and newcastle, but the signs in black and white is that the
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toon have found momentum, the kind of strike that they have found momentum. at newcastle's second came from a more deliberate deflection. stretch of the neck angled ciaran clark's header into the corner. burnley haven't won in the lead since september, but thrust of their way into this match by the direct route. that header went to the edge of the box, a far easier place to score would be presented to matt ritchie. somehow, the newcastle missed from a yard out. a moment that would have haunted him or if they burn the equaliser was incoming. but as they rued missed chances, ritchie and his manager saw the brighter side. newcastle are on the brighter side. newcastle are on the rise and making up for their mistakes. it is massive because it gives you more confidence, you can see the table, we are in a better position. it is still a long—running race, so
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we have to carry on, but at least we are doing well and hopefully we can continue this month. both manchester clubs can seal a place in the last 16 of the champions league tonight. let's have a look at what they need to do. united will qualify if they beat young boys at old trafford and valencia fail to beatjuventus in the other group game. city are in france taking on lyon, and they only need a draw to go through, but they'll top their group with a win. now if you remember, manchester united were fined by uefa after their team team bus was caught in traffic around old trafford before last month's game against valencia. when it got sticky before their game againstjuventus, he got off the bus and walked to the ground and he says if he needs to, he'll do it again tonight. we are going to stay in a hoteljust a few metres away. the information i
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have from the club and the club contacts with the police is that things are going to be much better than the last time, but if it isn't better, i walk. i love that. that will be my motto for life. they have moved hotels and are staying closer to old trafford. the last time he walked he put his hood up and nobody recognised him. hang on, quite a lot of selfie is on social media saying it is posed a walking through the crowd. at a dinghy is as anonymous as he would like to. if anyone doesn't know the area, there are loads of great works —— roadworks in manchester. three lots of roadworks, the traffic is horrendous most of the time.“ lots of roadworks, the traffic is horrendous most of the time. if you would like to know your breakfast
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geography, behind us is the way behind us is the manchester ship canal and old trafford is about half a mile that way. and we are never late! we travel at stupid o'clock. i did walk here this morning, ten yards. congratulations. the former chelsea and watford manager gianluca vialli says he hid the fact that he had cancer due to a ‘sense of shame'. the italian had treatment for almost a year, but has only recently written about it in a book. he says he's now very well and back to having a beastly physique. i wonder if that is slightly lost in translation from the italian. great to hear. only a week ago, we brought you the news that sophia florsch, a 17—year—old racing driver, had an incredible escape from a high—speed crash. you may find the pictures coming up distressing. florsch crashed at around 170 miles an hour in the formula 3 grand prix in macau but after an 11—hour operation to repair her spine,
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she's on her way home to germany. this is her leaving hospital. it was my first ever dig crash and it took me some while to get over it but i am over at it now and i think now a new chapter starts. as i said, it was a bad crash but i am still here walking, everything is good and i will be back racing and chasing my dream. ireland coachjoe schmidt has led them through their most successful period in rugby, but he'll be stepping down after next year's world cup. he'll be replaced by andy farrell, ireland's defence coach under schmidt. they've won three six nations titles, beaten the all blacks twice, and risen to number two in the world. now, get ready to see more of this.
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we're reliving the fantastic moment when england's netballers winning gold at the commonwealth games in april. and it's been announced that the bbc will be showing every match of next yea r‘s netball world cup from day 4 onwards, live on tv and online. england play uganda tonight, and coach tracy neville says it'll be a big test for her side as they prepare for the world cup. this series will be about winning one game at a time. i am focused on uganda, they are in our group, so getting necessary intel on them and experience but also looking at which players xl against them and we found out at the commonwealth games that there were some players and some style of the way that the players play in our squad that works really well against, so that can't be ignored. and finally, have a look at this from the england dressing room after they completed a 3—0
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series victory over sri lanka. these are the celebrations, led by captainjoe root on the guitar. have a listen. i can't hear the guitar. is it a real guitar? it's he actually playing? it is not plugged in. someone else there seems to be playing something. jimmy anderson said it has been a great atmosphere. they have had a great time. it is 6:43 a.m.. you are watching brea kfast it is 6:43 a.m.. you are watching breakfast on the bbc. ukraine has declared martial law in part of the country after three of its naval ships were seized by russia. tensions flared when the vessels collided on sunday off the coast of crimea, which was annexed by moscow four years ago. ukraine's president described the move as an act of aggression and said the new measures will focus on tightening security. we'rejoined now from bristol
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by rainer—elk anders, a specialist in russian and ukrainian politics at bath spa university. thank you forjoining us. can you put into context the significance of this latest act of aggression, as it is being called, by the russians against the ukrainian fleet. yes, of course. russian is certain of opening anotherfront course. russian is certain of opening another front with this war with ukraine and what we have is a creeping annexation of the sea, which is a northern extension of the black sea. the move to attack the ukrainian vessels is reallyjust one move, but if we actually put everything together, then there is an aggregate of russia trying to strategically gained territory here and this will cause immense
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political and also economic problems forward ukraine. what are the implications of this, russia has been concerned that ukraine is west leaning, so to speak, what are the concerns they have about as political shift and what would be the impact there on the west that ukraine is leaning towards? yes, well, russia would like to have a government in ukraine that would be pro ocean and if russia cannot achieve this, then russia has obviously, for quite some time, been pursuing a policy where it would like to weaken ukraine politically and economically —— throw russian. the question for us is why is this releva nt — — the question for us is why is this relevant —— pro russian. it's releva nt relevant —— pro russian. it's relevant in many ways because russia for a long time has been trying to strategically explore and also exploit what it considers western vulnerabilities. what we have in the
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sea vulnerabilities. what we have in the sea of asov is a situation that could die luiten nato's capabilities. there are a few things that nato, but also the international community, could and should probably do in this case —— could die luiten. such as what? from a ukrainian perspective, it hasjust declared martial law —— die luiten. it shows the limitations ukraine has. it basically has no significant navy. is outnumbered militarily. from what nato can do, first of all it would bid to help the kerch strait open, the connection basically to the black sea and the sea asov, because it is against international maritime law to keep this locked —— sea of asov. nato should also go beyond expressing concern about the situation ——
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blocked. there should be a land lease programme from nato for military hardware to be sold to ukraine and, furthermore, also to maybe even think about a un mission to allow the kerch strait to remain open. for ukraine, it's of huge concern that this very important waterway is blocked, and raises obviously the threat that russia is going to annex what is really internal water between russia and ukraine. we will keep a close eye on it. thank you very much for talking to us and explaining the situation. thank you. the picture behind looked quite impressive in bristol. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. a slightly foggy picture? indeed. good morning. foggy and frosty this
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morning for the start of the day across the uk. the worst fault is in parts of england and wales, but worse later, the breeze picking up, outbreaks of rain spreading in and it will turn milder eventually —— worst fault. this is where the fog is at its worst in parts of the midlands, central and southern england —— worst fog. take it easy on the commute, the fog will last through the morning rush the breeze clears it. patchy rain in south—east england. most will be dry, those. the rain spreads this morning into south—east england, wales and northern ireland, quite persistent, and in too much of central and western england. temperatures to 11 or 12 by the afternoon with a bit of late sunshine in the south—west, but elsewhere, finishing the day on a 5°99y elsewhere, finishing the day on a soggy note. let's look at what happens for the school pickup and into the evening rush—hour. outbreaks of rain, some will be
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heavy, working across a good part of central and eastern england, reaching east anglia and parts of the north sea coast last of all. some parts of lancashire and greater manchester seeing rain but turning wetter in parts of south—east scotland, central areas and across the pennines and also the likes of the pennines and also the likes of the southern uplands and snowdonia. don't be surprised if you see snow for a time. tonight, the rain will spread across other areas and eventually clears. we could see mist and fog but the breeze picks up later in the night, rain returning to western and southern areas and that will keep temperatures higher than in recent days. the windiest weather into tomorrow is brought by this area of low pressure. named storm diane by the portuguese met office. they have reported storms to the west but it will have an affect on us the west but it will have an affect on us tomorrow, outbreaks countrywide through the day. persistent rain in the morning in northern ireland, afternoon across scotla nd northern ireland, afternoon across scotland and look at the wind gusts,
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widespread severe gales tomorrow with winds in excess of 60 mph in the west and we could get 70 mph in northern scotland later in the day. if anything it will be the mildest day of the week with temperatures into the teens. the rain easing from wednesday night into thursday, more wet weather for the start of the day and for this area in england and wales, again, severe gales with winds touching 60 or 70 mph before they ease and sunshine and showers for the rest of the week. that's how the weather is looking here. let me ta ke the weather is looking here. let me take you to the north of norway, tromso, a city in the northern parts, the arctic circle. this is the scene before sunrise yesterday and this is what happened as the sun came up, grey cloud, didn't see the sun and that is crucial because they only had one hour and ten minutes of daylight and today, 28 minutes. by the time it hits 11:30 p.m., the sunsets, and it isn't back until the 15th of january. there you go,
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sunsets, and it isn't back until the 15th ofjanuary. there you go, not bad here! you're taking us around the world.” have missed those numbers. 28 minutes of daylight today and when the sunsets at 11:30am this morning, it isn't back until the 15th ofjune you are a. 48 days without sunshine. -- 15th of you are a. 48 days without sunshine. —— 15th of january. you are a. 48 days without sunshine. -- 15th ofjanuary. they you are a. 48 days without sunshine. -- 15th of january. they get it back in time for christmas. yes, january. mind—boggling! in time for christmas. yes, january. mind-boggling! talking of christmas, mince pies! go on... the thing that staggered me about mince pies, you know you're meant to eat them according to an sd card expert with your left hand. —— an etiquette expert. so you can shake hands with your right. and get the next one! victoria is at a mince pie factory this morning, talking about seasonal working. good morning! good morning.
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that's right. not just working. good morning! good morning. that's right. notjust the elves have christmas jobs, there's that's right. notjust the elves have christmasjobs, there's plenty of temporary and seasonal workers. it isn't just making of temporary and seasonal workers. it isn'tjust making a list, checking it twice, there's things like manufacturing. all the mince pies coming off the factory. they couldn't make the 720 mince pies a minute here without seasonal workers. when it comes to seasonal and temporary work, the number of applications is up 11% this year and although demand is up, the number of candidates lurching for these roles have gone down. martin talbot is from totaljobs. why is there this mismatch between the number ofjobs and the number looking for them? things are changing with things for the whole year. the gig economy gives people access to work for the whole year. people who might do temporary work are doing things like uberand temporary work are doing things like uber and deliveroo. what about what's going on with brexit, the eu
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and all that stuff, we've seen a reversal of migration into the uk of eu workers. with eu workers in particular, we've found even through the summer where particular, we've found even through the summerwhere farming particular, we've found even through the summer where farming was affected, we are now heading into the christmas period were fewer of those migration workers are coming to the uk as they used to. interesting. thanks, martin. i know you will be doing some quality standards and taste testing later so i will see you later. we bought 220 million mince pies last year, and aman is set to rise yet again this year. we just love our pies, aman is set to rise yet again this year. wejust love our pies, don't we? —— and command. they had to take on an extra 350 staff as a result of opening these production lines —— and demand. what kind ofjobs are these temporary workers doing? we have a range ofjobs. we bring them in forjuly for six months doing technicaljobs, running in forjuly for six months doing technical jobs, running the
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machinery, then some of the team will be taking the quality of the product and then there will be manual packing jobs. quite a combination ofjobs. manual packing jobs. quite a combination of jobs. what do they do come december the 26th, where do they all go? some will stay with us into the new year, then at least, some will come back and some will go to the surrounding businesses —— at easter. then others will come back to us. around 80% of the seasonal workers here at this factory comeback year—on—year. one thing they might notice is the recipe keeps changing. the woman into a charge of the taste testing is research and development technologist emma. why do you keep changing the recipe? surely a pie is a pie isa changing the recipe? surely a pie is a pie is a pie? you would think so, the consumer would think so, but we test our pies with the consumer each year and get feedback from them. we wa nt year and get feedback from them. we want to make the nation's favourite
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mince pie, so we checked with them what they like, get feedback and change the recipe where we can. go on, how early do you start eating mince pies? ifi didn't eat on, how early do you start eating mince pies? if i didn't eat them all year anyway... i would mince pies? if i didn't eat them all year anyway... iwould probably start around the first of the sender, i love christmas, you have to get in the christmas spirit, so why not? and they are snowflakes this year instead of hollies and berries? we tested our pies with consumers and created a new design, we wanted to update it and modernise it because we've had the hollies and berries for many years. the s nowfla ke s berries for many years. the snowflakes tested well and so we thought we would go for what the people wanted a. give the people what they want! thanks, emma! for what they want! thanks, emma! for what they want! thanks, emma! for what the people want! —— for what the people want! we found a recipe from the 14th century when they were called tatts of flesh, would you believe, and you can find a leg of mutton in a mince pie. —— tatts.
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thanks very much, victoria. never too early for a mince pie in your world. the end of august i would go for a world. the end of august i would go fora mince pie! world. the end of august i would go for a mince pie! we've been reading about them, they didn't used to be round, some were rectangular, thought to be based onjesus's manger. only round in recent times. we will have loads of facts through the morning! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. five people racked up over8,500 calls to the metropolitan police last year which ended up costing tens of thousands of pounds to answer. the five repeat callers all had mental health problems and the figure was released by the police forces watchdog to show how officers are forced to deal with mental health patients. her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary claims the broader mental health system is broken. the home office says it's investing in mental health services.
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around a third of all newjobs created in the uk in the past decade have been created in london. the bbc has learned that although employment has been rising across the country, by far the strongest growth has been in the capital. london is also home to the highest percentage of skilled workers, like nyheke lambert. for her, moving herfashion business here was essential. i don't think my business would survive anywhere else but london. i've tried it in my home town, birmingham, and it didn't work. i think people just come straight here because they know that this is where, you know, you can make your money and there's opportunities here. a new short film that shares stories from the windrush generation gets its mini premiere today in west london. ruby fra nz‘s its mini premiere today in west london. ruby franz‘s nubian songs follows 85—yea r—old london. ruby franz‘s nubian songs follows 85—year—old ruby and those who use the nubian life centre in
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shepherds bush. the 12—year—old film shows the —— tfl rail has severe delays between paddington and heathrow airport due to a fire near the railway at southall. hasn't near the railway at southall. been fully cleared up. strand hasn't been fully cleared up. the strand has been closed for emergency repairs, expect delays over the bridge. and in bermondsey, tower bridge road is closed northbound at the bricklayers arms roundabout because of a burst water main. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a chilly start out there this morning, temperatures down in low single figures celsius. there is quite a bit of low cloud around, some mist and some murk, but later on turning breezy with some rain on the way. the winds quite light first thing, but as it strengthens through the morning, it's going to help lift that mist and low cloud into low cloud predominately,
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and then the rain arrives later. a gusty, blustery wind as well, temperatures between seven and nine celsius. the wind later on as that rain pushes through could gust gust around 30—35mph. overnight the rain clears away. post—midnight it will be drier, but we hang on to the very gusty wind. the temperature overnight not as cold as it has been, the minimum between six and seven celsius. outbreaks of rain as we head into tuesday, but that wind will really start to strengthen, becoming quite strong through the course of tomorrow, and the temperature, quite a leap, mild tomorrow with a maximum of 14 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. vanessa feltz has her breakfast show in half an hour until 10am. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and dan walker.
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our headlines today: theresa may hits the road to sell her brexit deal and hits back at president trump over his comments on trade. home a free man. it's understood the british academic convicted of spying in the united arab emirates has landed at heathrow. it's the season for temporary workers. the number of applications for seasonal jobs has workers. the number of applications for seasonaljobs has gone up 11% this year. i am at a mince pie factory in barnsley finding out how important christmas is to the business. touchdown confirmed! a cheer, a handshake and sheer relief as nasa scientists celebrate a perfect landing on mars. and the robot seems to have quickly settled into its new home. we hear exclusively from the wife of sean cox, the liverpool fan who was left in a coma after an attack before a match at anfield. sean went to a match in april and he never came home, that is the reality of it. it is cold out there in the moment
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with dense fog for the morning commute. it will get milder over the next couple of days, but to get there, wet and windy weather first. i will have the details on that, here on breakfast. it's tuesday 27th november. our top story: downing street has insisted the brexit agreement with the eu allows the uk to sign trade deals with other countries, including the united states. last night, president trump described the plan as "a great deal for the eu" and told journalists that the withdrawal agreement could harm the uk's ability to trade with the us. i think we have to look at seriously whether or not the uk is allowed to trade because, you know, right now, if you look at the deal, they may not be able to trade with us and that wouldn't be a good thing. i don't think they meant that, i don't think that the prime minister meant that and hopefully she'll be able to do something about that. we can speak now to our political correspondent ben wright, who joins
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us from westminster. on the day theresa may is kickstarting a tour round the uk to convince people that her deal is the right one. not the music she was hoping for this morning. iimagine i imagine exasperation in downing street when they heard donald trump had intervened. he is close to some of the brexiteer critics, people like nigel farage and borisjohnson and he has chosen to send a torpedo over the atlantic, aimed at theresa may's brexit deal, which is struggling to be sold in parliament. the exacerbation compounded by the fa ct the exacerbation compounded by the fact that they think the prime minister —— the president is wrong and that it does allow in the future for the uk to do bilateral trade deals with countries like the us, they just deals with countries like the us, theyjust think he is wrong with his intervention. it doesn't help at
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all, as you said, theresa may will be spending the next couple of weeks selling her brexit plan to the four nations of the united kingdom, she will be in wales today, northern ireland as well, but her real battle lies in parliament and she does not have long to persuade mps. let's review the timetable. a five—day debate beginning in the house of commons on the fourth of december, then the critical vote, one of the most important vote is we will ever see is on december 11 and the uk is due to leave the eu at the end of march next year. it was clear from her appearance in the house of commons yesterday that she faces deep opposition among her own party, opposition parties and it is not the at all whether she has the vote is to get this group injust at all whether she has the vote is to get this group in just two weeks time. —— vote is. —— votes. iam sure i am sure that something will cover across the days, weeks and months.”
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feel it is quite exciting. you said last week, i know we have talked about critical days, it feels that these next two weeks, last week was a big week as well, adam flemings, who was in brussels saying that there are big decisions made everyday. four minutes past seven is the time. in the last hour, it's understood, the plane carrying the british academic, sentenced to life in prison for spying in the united arab emirates, has landed at heathrow airport. the uae pardoned matthew hedges on monday after showing a video of him purportedly confessing to being a member of britain's mi6 intelligence agency. britain has denied he was a spy and welcomed his pardon. women with academic degrees are better—off financially in theirfirst few years of work than men. the institute for fiscal studies looked at graduate pay and found that by the age of 29, women with a degree earn 28% more than women who haven't been to university. for men, the difference is 8%. the study found that the type of university and subject, also had a significant influence on salary. this shines light on where good
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quality degrees are and what we want to do is cracked down on those courses that are not delivering value in those universities that are not doing so. is notjust about the price of a degree, a good degree will be worth the investment, what i wa nt to will be worth the investment, what i want to say is i want to see universities competing to offer the best quality value for money degrees to our young people. experts are warning that thousands of cancer patients are dying unnecessarily each year because the health service in england has failed to make the improvements needed. the health foundation, which campaigns for better treatment, says more needs to be done to close the gap in survival rates between the uk and other countries. the government says the extra funding already announced for the nhs will be spent on improving cancer care. nasa scientists are beginning to gather data from mars,
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after successfully landing a probe on the surface of the "red planet". the insight spacecraft‘s descent through the martian atmosphere, lasted just seven minutes, slowing down from six times the speed of a bullet, tojogging pace. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. touchdown confirmed! relief and joy at mission control. after plunging through the martian atmosphere at six times the speed of a bullet, nasa's insight spacecraft safely planted its feet on the surface of mars. now the science begins. it's going to be a really busy two or three months for us. i am really hoping that the energy and the feeling today is going to carry me through those next few months because it is going to be needed. when we get our first mars quakes we will get a bunch of images over the next few days and it is incredible to be on this mission and say tomorrow when i come onto my shift i will see an image of mars that nobody has seen before. it is already sending snapshots back to earth. insight‘s cameras will examine its surroundings in detail,
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so scientists can select exactly where to place its scientific equipment. it will listen for martian earthquakes and drill deep into the planet to study its inner structure. as the insight lander studies the deep interior of mars robotically, it will be sending its data back here, to mission control nasa in california and people will work out exactly how rocky worlds like mars, the earth and the moon actually formed 4.5 billion years ago. they lovingly call this the centre of the universe. the two—year mission is now underway to build a picture of the hidden depths of the red planet. victoria gill, bbc news at nasa'sjet propulsion laboratory, california. the world war ii code—breaker and long—serving, conservative peer, baroness trumpington, has died at the age of 96. she retired from the house of lords in 2017, after serving for 37—years. the international development secretary, penny mordaunt, described her as a "trailblazer, heroine and an utterjoy". our political correspondent, sean curran looks back at her life. a pillar of the establishment
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with a rebellious streak, jean barker, better known as lady trumpington, packed a lot into a long life. she was a land girl on lloyd george's farm and a code breaker at bletchley park. churchill visited us, he said "you are the birds that laid the golden eggs, but never cackled." and that was the important thing, that we never talked. she was appointed to the house of lords in 1980 and served as a minister under bothjohn major and margaret thatcher. we were really good friends, but if i didn't agree with her on something i said so. that was very good for her. it gave her a chance to know what the opposition might say to her. in 2011, she famously gave a two
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fingered salute to a colleague, who had referred to her age during a debate. her v—sign led to more on—screen opportunities, including an appearance on have i got news for you. i would like to know why, at the age of 90, i've had to sign a piece of paper in order to be on this show to say i wasn't pregnant. in 2014, she published her bestselling memoirs, coming up trumps, although she told one interviewer she had neither written, nor read the book. said exactly what she thought. amazing woman. fabulous. it is coming up to ten past seven. british academic matthew hedges returns home today after spending the last 6 months locked up in solitary confinement in the uae. his family say he suffered panic
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attacks and has been left "absolutely terrified" by his ordeal. our next guest, david haigh, the former managing director of leeds united, spent 22 months in a dubai prison following a fraud convinction in 2014. hejoins us now from penzance. thank you very much for coming on this morning and telling us about your own experience. we will speak about matthew hedges in a moment, ta ke about matthew hedges in a moment, take us back to 2014, what was the time you spent in jail take us back to 2014, what was the time you spent injail in dubai like a smack —— like? time you spent injail in dubai like a smack -- like? good morning. it was horror. i was managing director of leeds united and was tricked to come onto a plane to settle what i thought was a commercial dispute, in 15 hours i am literally lying on the floor of a dubai police jail being kicked and beaten and being forced to signa kicked and beaten and being forced to sign a false confession in arabic, much the same weight we are
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hearing that matthew was. matthew's wife said he was forced to sign the confession in a language he didn't understand. when you heard that, did it take you back to your time is spent injail in dubai? obviously matthew was in the united arab emirates, but a lot similar. from my own tyre —— on time and the work i due would now with expats. it is the standard of what you hear, false confessions, trials that last one or two minutes, not much help from a lawyer or embassy. it is the same over and over again. i lawyer or embassy. it is the same overand overagain. i rememberwhen i read the sentence for matthew last week, the first thing that came to my head was not again. because it happens again and again and again. you need to look at all of the britons that you see in the newspapers over the last few months, of ridiculous cases, young mothers
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on emirates getting arrested for having drink. it carries on and on and something needs to be learnt from this and with all of the focus, hopefully we need to address all of the people that are left there. hopefully we need to address all of the people that are left therem is interesting that he has been pardoned, but not acquitted, which will certainly affect any future travel plans he has. is a very strange system. in my case, i was held for 15 months, then found guilty, then pardoned nine days later and accused of twitter a abuse, held for five and then acquitted. a very strange system. you are right, in that case it is not an acquittal, he is a convicted spyr not an acquittal, he is a convicted spy, he will have issues in his life in terms of travel and going forward , in terms of travel and going forward, but also he was six months in solitary confinement, that will have a lasting effect. in my case, i spent six months in hospital when i came back repairing broken bones and
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a broken mind. there is a lot for him to go through. give us an indication into what it is like psychologically, preparing to come home from what he went through and what you went through. even in my case, my case on the twitter abuse charge, it was only when there was a bit of a media outcry, and human rights watchers called for charges to be dropped, when all of a sudden, after being there for 22 months, i am acquitted and shoved on a plane and on highway back. so fast that you do realise that. his case, if he was ina you do realise that. his case, if he was in a national securityjail, he wouldn't have access to understand what is happening. he is likely to have been told and stuck in something like eight police dog then ata something like eight police dog then at a cage at the back and put on a plane and sent back. it is almost too quick to understand what is happening. in my case i kept on looking over my shoulder thinking
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this cannot be real. until i actually landed in london and i finally felt a little bit safe. are you aware, when that is going on, you aware, when that is going on, you are desperate to be released but there is a much interest in your return, as matthew will experience, argue aware of what is going on and dramatically behind the scenes while thatis dramatically behind the scenes while that is happening in this ongoing relationship, in this case between britain and the united arab emirate i britain and the united arab emirate 's? in matthew's keskar has been a lot of effort from the foreign minister, in previous cases that really was not the case. —— in matthew's case there has. we have been told to go to the media, quiet diplomacy, it is only this case where you see at a change from the foreign office spending up and being tougher with foreign governments that wrongly jail hours tougher with foreign governments that wronglyjail hours it is an. —— our citizens. thank you for giving
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us our citizens. thank you for giving us your experience. as we understand it, matthew hedges has landed, no confirmation of that for certain. he is at heathrow, we think and we will continue to follow that one throughout the day for you across the bbc. it is exactly quarter past seven. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. i have cleaned my ears out, i made a mistake earlier, one of many, i'm sure! to talk about from zoe, only having 28 minutes of daylight left —— you talked about tromso. it stays dark until the 25th of january. —— you talked about tromso. it stays dark until the 25th ofjanuary. 48 days without sunshine! nobody wants that! at least we don't have that. we have less than four weeks until the days get longer. on the bad news, if you're heading out at the moment, especially england and wales, dense fog and frost quite widely across the country. we will swap land for rains and
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gails later. a day with everywhere the element in it. the worst of the fog is from the far east of wales, the midlands, central england. much of northern scotland and eastern england will be dry in the day but rain in the south—west, wet through the morning, as it will be in wales in the early afternoon and the same in northern ireland with the rain heavy at times and by the of the afternoon that will be in western parts of england. northern and eased in areas dry, temperatures in single figures, double figures in the west —— northern and eastern areas. not as strong at least to start with in parts of central and eastern england, but for the end of the afternoon into the evening rush—hour, outbreaks of rain, heavy on the tops of the pennines and on snowdonia earlier in the day and the southern uplands, we could see snow mixed in with the rain as the rain band pushes north and east. northern
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scotla nd band pushes north and east. northern scotland should stay fine through much of the day, one or two isolated showers. the rain will push northwards to affect those areas, not too much rain in northern scotla nd not too much rain in northern scotland tonight. more breeze tonight, read the limited risk of fog patches. later on, the wind picks up further after a brief lull as more rain spreads its way in —— only the limited risk of fog patches. this big area of low pressure rules the roost. storm diana. we will have some issues in the uk and ireland. outbreaks of rain spreading north and east through the morning, most prolonged in northern ireland and into the afternoon in scotland. brighter weather further south, but uk wide, these are the wind gusts through the day. widespread gales is not severe gales, 60 mph plus in the west and maybe 70 in northern scotland —— if not. we'll see temperatures widely
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into the teens are. a mild night to ta ke into the teens are. a mild night to take us into thursday morning, more rain spreads its way through first light -- rain spreads its way through first light —— widely into the teens. we will see the strongest of the winds here on thursday, touching 60—70 mph. that clears through the day for sunshine and showers on the rest of thursday, and the same story again on friday. a bit cooler on friday but not as chilly as it has been of late. good news, matt. thanks, we'll see you later. it's tuesday morning. it's 7:18am. the number of cancer patients unnecessarily losing their lives in england is the equivalent of a jumbo jet of people falling from the sky every two weeks, according to a former government cancer tsar. that's an image, isn't it? the astonishing claim comes from professor sir mike richards, who led a review of cancer care by the health foundation think—tank, which found if services were improved, 10,000 lives could be saved each year. joingin us now is dr becks fisher, who co—wrote the report. good morning. a start image anyway,
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winds to compare it to, and if you look at the report with these findings, it shows how much we lag behind other comparable countries, other countries we shouldn't be so far behind when it comes to cancer care. highs this? that's what's startling. it's clear from care. highs this? that's what's startling. it's clearfrom having written the report —— highs this? things have improved from 1995 significantly. —— highs this? it isa it is a good news story. which you would expect. yes. we've been successful bringing new technologies and treatments into... we fail to meet the successive ambition of government cancer plans over this time period, to narrow the survival gap we identified in the 19905 —— we failed to. where is the issue? is it
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that we aren't getting tested, we're not being diagnosed? do the gps need more support? where is the real problem? it is such a good question. one of the things that is clear is we're more able to answer that now than five years ago because we have better day and evidence that allows us better day and evidence that allows us to un—pick the problem. u nfortu nately us to un—pick the problem. unfortunately what taking the problem does is show how complicated it is, because all the things you just mentioned are going to be really important —— unfortunately undertaking. we need to pick up more cancers at an earlier stage. that is partly about public awareness, getting people to come and see us as gps and we need support for gps to make sure there referring patients into treatment and diagnosis early. importantly into treatment and diagnosis early. importa ntly we need into treatment and diagnosis early. importantly we need the capacity in the hospital sectors, the workforce, the hospital sectors, the workforce, the machines, to make sure we can get those patients diagnosed and treated in an appropriate time
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frame. the department of health has said we announced a package of cancer measures last month that will radically improve the system and ensure 55,000 more people survive cancerfor ensure 55,000 more people survive cancer for five years than the year 2028. big numbers, the year, 2028. you mentioned this country hasn't met the targets, have they been too ambitious? do they match the other countries' targets in the rest of europe? i would be tempted to turn that question a little and say is it ever too ambitious to say we should be saving more lives when we know we could be saving them? the reason i ask, we talk a lot about nhs budgets and the availability of specialist care, and also about awareness and people doing a lot to raise awareness, so that's why i ask if our targets have been too ambitious. i would really welcome the target theresa may setback in october of improving early diagnosis, because
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that's the way we're going to improve survival. the difficult thing is we're coming out of a period hopefully of really significant funding constraints on the nhs. we've been very clear at the nhs. we've been very clear at the health foundation of saying the nhs needs more muggy, we welcome what's been given but we thought it needed more to put it on a sustainable footing. can i ask as well, in terms of public awareness, i'm always aware... if people are watching this at home they think, what can i do, what do i need to think about, what should be public consciousness on an issue like this? what worries me is when patients come to see me and they say i thought about coming to see you six weeks ago but i couldn't get an appointment or i thought i shouldn't bother you. an important message is to say if you're worried about cancer, listen to that and come and see us cancer, listen to that and come and see us and never feel bad about bothering your doctor. you're not
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bothering your doctor. you're not bothering us. it is completely inappropriate use of gp time to see someone inappropriate use of gp time to see someone and say i'm worried, can you check me out. the job of the doctor is to say either i'm a little bit worried too, let's get you referred and make sure we're clear either way, or to make sure they come and see us way, or to make sure they come and see us if they're worried. so many people have spoken to ask about bill turnbull‘s recent diagnosis and treatment, go and see someone if you're concerned —— spoken to us. doctor becks fisher, thank you. it's the moment that got everyone talking on this week's strictly, when the professionals collaborated with a group of boundary—pushing artists. the candoco dance company is made up of both performers with disabilities and those without. we'll be joined by some of the team in a moment, but first let's remind ourselves of that moving performance. applause cheering
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such a huge response to that. dancer laura patay and artistic co—director ben wright from the candoco dance company join us now. it was so impressive. amazing to be pa rt it was so impressive. amazing to be part of my imagine and once you're dancing it, the reaction after, so many people got in touch to say it is eye opening and changed my perception of dance. how do you react to something like that? with glee i suppose, that would be the first thing. yeah, it's been
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really thrilling. we knew it was going to be quite an important collaboration, but, sort of, immediately after it haired, we went to see the twitter feed moving and m essa g es to see the twitter feed moving and messages started coming in. incredibly exciting, really exciting. laura, what does it mean to you? lots of people have posted pictures of their kids and it shows my child what is possible and it's fantastic. you didn't go out thinking you're going to inspire lots of people, ijust want to dance and have a good time, but it has made a difference? i think it is what we do at candoco dance company and for me as an artist, it is what i try to do when performing live. hopefully, yes, we speak to people and hopefully they want to see more. i hope it will be a great future for the company. how long did the rehearsals... how long was it all in
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the planning? the first e-mail came through from the bbc in late august. not long? no, no. it was last week we only had monday and tuesday with everybody in the room. they were in a couple of days before that with arlene. it all happened within one week essentially mostly. you're going to come back and we will talk about working with arlene, obviously one of the ex— judges on strictly and she knows the programme inside and she knows the programme inside and out. she knows all about that. we will speak to her in about an hour. and the other dancers. if you wa nt to hour. and the other dancers. if you want to let us know about what you think, you can find us an e—mail and social media and you will be back here at around 840 and. see you later. —— 8:40am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. five people racked up over 8,500 calls to the metropolitan police last year, which ended up costing tens of thousands of pounds to answer.
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the five repeat callers all had mental health problems, and the figure was released by the police forces watchdog to show how officers are forced to deal with mental health patients. her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary claims the broader mental health system is broken. the home office says it's investing in mental health services. around a third of all newjobs created in the uk in the past decade have been created in london. the bbc has learned that although employment has been rising across the country, by far the strongest growth has been in the capital. london is also home to the highest percentage of skilled workers, like nyheke lambert. for her, moving herfashion business here was essential. i don't think my business would survive anywhere else but london. i've tried it in my home town, birmingham, and it didn't work. i think people just come straight here because they know that this is where, you know, you can make your money and there's opportunities here. a new short film which shares stories from the windrush
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generation gets its mini premiere today in west london. ruby francis' nubian songs follows 85—year—old ruby and those who use the nubian life day centre in shepherd's bush. it cares for dozens of windrush elders, and the 12—minute film shows the racism and treatment that they faced when they arrived from jamaica right until the windrush scandal of this year. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's no service on tfl rail between hayes & harlington and heathrow airport, and there are severe delays between paddington and hayes & harlington due to the derailment of an empty train at west ealing. trains towards london are unable to serve hanwell, acton main line and west ealing. on the roads, in central london, the strand underpass is closed for emergency repairs.
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it's been closed since thursday afternoon. expect delays over the bridge. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a chilly start out there this morning, temperatures down in low single figures celsius. there is quite a bit of low cloud around, some mist and some murk, but later on turning breezy with some rain on the way. the winds quite light first thing, but as it strengthens through the morning, it's going to help lift that mist and low cloud into low cloud predominately, and then the rain arrives later. a gusty, blustery wind as well, temperatures between seven and nine celsius. the wind later on as that rain pushes through could gust around 30—35mph. overnight the rain clears away. post—midnight it will be drier, but we hang on to the very gusty wind. the temperature overnight not as cold as it has been, the minimum between six and seven celsius. outbreaks of rain as we head
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into tuesday, but that wind will really start to strengthen, becoming quite strong through the course of tomorrow, and the temperature, quite a leap, mild tomorrow with a maximum of 14 celsius. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and naga munchetty. it is 7:30am. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. it has been confirmed that matthew hedges has returned to the uk from the ukp more where he was sentenced to life in prison for spying. her husband says it will take time for recover. david haigh spent 22 months in a dubai prison following a fraud convinction in 2014. it is not an acquittal, he will have
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trouble in life going forward, but as we heard he was six months in solitary confinement, that will have a lasting, in my case i spent six months in hospital repairing broken bones and a broken mind. there is a lot for him to go through. we heard the comments from his wife, but matthew has also said, "i don't know where to begin, we thank people for supporting us. i haven't seen much of what has happened over the past few weeks, but my wife has colebee everybody is supporting. thank you to the home office for ensuring i arrived safely home". he goes on to say he couldn't do it within his wife basher without his wife, seeing her and my family after this ordeal is the best thing that could have happened. i thank you all once again, this is very surreal. when we get those comments on camera we will bring them to you through the rest of this morning. the time is 7:32
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a.m.. downing street has insisted the brexit agreement with the eu allows the uk to sign trade deals with other countries, including the united states. for the eu" and told journalists that the withdrawal agreement could harm the uk's ability to trade with the us. meanwhile, the european court ofjustice will hear a legal challenge today, over whether the uk can reverse article 50, without permission from the other eu member states. remain campaigners are hoping the case will give britain the option to stay in the eu in the event of another referendum. the government argues the case is hypothetical as it has no plans to revoke britain's withdrawal from the eu. women with academic degrees are better—off financially in theirfirst few years of work than men. the institute for fiscal studies looked at graduate pay and found that by the age of 29, women with a degree earn 28% more than women who haven't been to university. for men, the difference is 8%. the study found that the type of university and subject, also had a significant influence on salary. experts are warning that thousands of cancer patients
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are dying unnecessarily each year because the health service in england has failed to make the improvements needed. the health foundation, which campaigns for better treatment, says more needs to be done to close the gap in survival rates between the uk and other countries. the government says the extra funding already announced for the nhs will be spent on improving cancer care. nasa scientists are beginning to gather data from mars, after successfully landing a probe on the surface. touchdown confirmed. there were cheers at mission control in california as the probe, called insight, completed its seven minute descent — slowing down from six times the speed of a bullet, tojogging pace. the robot has already sent home the first photograph from mars and will measure quakes and underground temperatures on the red planet. the robot tweeted, it is a really,
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really clever robot. the bank of england has released a list of more than 800 scientists who have been nominated to feature on the new £50 note. to be on the it, the individual must be real, deceased and have contributed to the field of science in the uk. they include computing pioneer alan turing, the mathematician and writer ada lovelace, telephone inventor alexander graham bell and former prime minister margaret thatcher, who spent her early career as a research chemist. she is one of those on, i was going to say the short list, but the long list at the moment. the time is 7:34 a.m.. coming up on the programme, matt will have the weather, but first sally is here with the sport. you have loads going on. lots to catch up with, we have been hearing exclusively from the wife of sean cox, the liverpool fan injured before a match in april. his wife
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has been saying that he quite simply will never make a full recovery. sean cox suffered serious brain injuries when he was assaulted by italian hooligans. martina cox says her family has been left completely devastated. sean went to a match in april and he never came home. that is the reality of it. i miss sean, the children miss their dad. everyday life has completely changed, it has literally turned everything upside down. but we are just trying to muddle through it and do the best we can. there was a great match in the premier league last night, between two sides struggling to get their seasons going. after an own goal put newcastle in front at burnley, ciaran clark streched for a header to double their lead. burnley‘s sam volkes scored a brilliant header of his own to make it 2—1 but newcastle held on for their third straight win. it is massive because it gives
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you more confidence, you can see the table, ok, we are in a better position. it is still a long—running race, so we have to carry on, at least we are doing well and hopefully we can continue in this month. both manchester clubs can make it through to the last 16 of the champions league tonight. city are away to lyon and united take on young boys at old trafford. it's been suggested that the united players feel more pressure playing at home, but managerjose mourinho has some strong words to say about that. if you feel pressure, stay at home. when i stay at home, i do not say the stadium home, i stay at home home and watch on tv. if you feel pressure to play matches at home where the people bring support, come on, i neverfelt pressured where the people bring support, come on, i never felt pressured to where the people bring support, come on, i neverfelt pressured to play at home. only a week ago, we brought you the news that sophia florsch, a 17—year—old racing driver, had an incredible escape from a high—speed crash.
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you may find the pictures coming up distressing. florsch crashed at around 170 miles an hour in the formula 3 grand prix in macau, but after an 11—hour operation to repair her spine, she's on her way home to germany. it was my first ever big crash and it took me some while to get over it, but i am over at it now and i think now a new chapter starts. as i said, it was a bad crash, but i am still here walking, everything is good and i will be back racing and chasing my dream. ireland coachjoe schmidt has led them through their most successful period in rugby, but he'll be stepping down after next yea r‘s world cup. he'll be replaced by andy farrell, ireland's defence coach under schmidt. they've won three six nations titles, beaten the all blacks twice, and risen to number two in the world. that is what you call a great
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signing. interestingly that he has not been brought into the england fold, which is something that i know clive woodward would have quite liked to see. he will stay with ireland. after beating new zealand, they have a real chance of the world cup. i think theirfirst they have a real chance of the world cup. i think their first game they have a real chance of the world cup. i think theirfirst game is against ireland in the six nations. and we have heard eddiejones that england are desperate to beat ireland. he said after beating australia at the weekend, he said i wa nt to australia at the weekend, he said i want to play ireland tomorrow. maybe not! it is 22 minutes to eight. threats, humiliation and intimidation — are all patterns of behaviour known as coercive control, and three years they became punishable under a new law in england and wales. while it was hailed as a major step at the time, women's groups say reported cases remain low and many perpetrators are evading prosecution.
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breakfast‘s graham satchell has been looking at the conviction rates. domestic violence can be happening behind any front door. before it becomes physical, there can often be yea rs of becomes physical, there can often be years of aggressive, controlling behaviour. coercive control became a specific offence in england and wales three years ago, how successful has the law being? in 2017, 2018, police recorded over half a million cases of domestic abuse, only 960 lead to charges being brought. last year there were just 235 successful convictions for controlling coercive behaviour. scotla nd controlling coercive behaviour. scotland introduced legislation covering the same offence earlier this year, but there are no figures yet to show how effective it has been an in northern ireland, a planned law has not yet materialised because the assembly is not sitting.
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why is there such a small prosecution rate in england and wales ? prosecution rate in england and wales? charity say there is still a significant reduction, —— reluctance, a few to contact authorities. police have told us that even if people do report crime, gathering evidence is extremely difficult. we're joined now by natalie brunsden, whose husband was successfully convicted for coercive control, and also by katie ghose from women's aid. thank you so much for coming on this morning and talking about this. natalie, give us an idea of your own. at what point in your relationship did you think hold on, things are not quite right. from the very beginning there was red flags that i didn't necessarily think there was an issue until i was supported like the women's aid. lots of phone calls and people and friends have said to me he is always co nsta ntly friends have said to me he is always constantly calling you, is it an issue? that was from the very start. try to find out what you are up to.
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not necessarily in a horrible way, but generally what are you doing, what are you up to. but it was consistent calls. then we moved in together after about one year and a half on our own and that is when things really started change. i thought, how can i leave a relationship that i have just moved into a house, spent lots of time and money and effort and i wanted to be happy. there were some signs of intimidation right from the beginning but i thought i can deal with this and i will be ok, but actually, i just stayed with this and i will be ok, but actually, ijust stayed and over the yea rs actually, ijust stayed and over the years it just got actually, ijust stayed and over the years itjust got worse and worse. it was like a drip feed effect and then all of a sudden the tap was turned on at the end ofjune but the real turning point was when i started to, when he started to really try and change my thought process. they call it slighting. i
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thought i was going insane. i started to record stuff because i thought how will i prove what he is doing because he is quite subtle. the turning point was when he took my engagement ring and i thought thatis my engagement ring and i thought that is abuse, talking to people i found out that is a common in. how did you get to the point when you thought this is coercive behaviour andl thought this is coercive behaviour and i can act? —— common thing.” didn't call essex police about it, i fled my house and spoke to my friends and family and told them exactly what is going on. i didn't tell anyone of the recordings and text messaging, i didn't say that, i then spoke to the police and said i just need help, i don't want to be another statistic because i felt that if i didn't get out i would be in serious trouble. natalie had the
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strength of mind to recognise something was wrong and you often hear, he said that drip feed behaviour you here at conferences being shattered. how exact glee —— how easy is it, often you are isolated from family. how easy is it to be able to flag up coercive behaviour and it be understood?m isa behaviour and it be understood?m is a real challenge, which is why we wa nt is a real challenge, which is why we want to raise awareness. it is a subtle form of abuse and a lot of people might eat in an abusive relationship and might not see the signs. as we say, nobody should be frightened of their partner. if your partner is constantly chipping away at your self—esteem and monitoring your every move , at your self—esteem and monitoring your every move, including phone and social media, they are preventing you from seeing friends or family, these tactics of isolation and intimidation, it is a crime and is
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serious and if we look at women killed by partners, the patterns of coercive and controlling behaviour we re coercive and controlling behaviour were often there but were not spotted or acted upon.” were often there but were not spotted or acted upon. i can imagine the process you are going through. some people are naturallyjealous and are worried about their partner and are worried about their partner and who they are with and what they are doing, is there a definitive line or is it individual cases, people come to you and say this is what is happening and you say you are in trouble is at the —— in trouble. every relationship is different, but we know enough to know the warning signs. nobody should be frightened of their partner, or have a rule book and are punished if they do not abide. crucially, it is about patterns of behaviour, repeated patterns and continual control, rather than one of incident. it is hard to pin down.
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you are not in. is hard to sit down ina you are not in. is hard to sit down in a conversation and say they do this and do that, because little things do not seem to add up. because i started videoing things he was doing, but obviously he didn't know about that, and i always say this, i'm quite aware some people have their phones constantly monitored, so that worked for me and that was safe for me at the time and ultimately it paid dividends in i went to the police and show them these recordings. i started saving these recordings. i started saving these recordings. i started saving these recordings. i started writing my own diary. when i went to essex police, they asked if i had any record of anything. i didn't even remember when i looked at my phone, it is so much, it is hard to pinpoint what it is. that's one of the reasons why i wanted to do this and talk about coercive behaviour, it isn't acceptable to live in fear of your life and there is support
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and help available for everyone. how did yourfamily and help available for everyone. how did your family react when you told them? did it come out of the blue?” think over the last year of the relationship, before i left, they knew things weren't right. they didn't know exactly what, but they knew things wasn't right. they was asking me to go out. i popped to see my mum, and i'm really close with my family, and! my mum, and i'm really close with my family, and i would literally pop in and pop out and i'd say i'll is you ina and pop out and i'd say i'll is you in a little while and i never went. that's another form of control. —— i'll see you. it made it so difficult to go so i never went. but ifi difficult to go so i never went. but if i did go out, i would get 1000 phone calls and ended up going home. one quick one, we're probably running out of time, i'm fascinated by your storage. your husband is sentenced to two years in jail, is their complete freedom ? i sentenced to two years in jail, is their complete freedom? i see the smile breaking across your face. it's weird to say, you know,
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obviously someone sitting in prison -- is obviously someone sitting in prison —— is there complete freedom? i feel liberated and free and i can live my life, and that's the most important thing. i got an indefinite restraining order, something there to protect me. i've had the most amazing support from essex police and women's aid. i can't thank them enough. i'm still on myjourney, i don't know what the future holds and i want to live a happy life. we wish one to you as well and i had to made a difference to someone this morning. i hope so as well. if you've been affected by any of these issues... please visit the bbc action line on bbc.co.uk/actionline, or call 0800 888 809. as natalie said, talk to someone, someone as natalie said, talk to someone, someone will listen, and there is help available. thank you both of you. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather.
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a strange week, most of matt's pictures have involved fog and there's another one. is that the shard? it is. a picture from a few weeks ago, but it tells the story this morning. good morning. if you're commuting today, a bit of a top and tail day, not brilliant. later you will have wind and rain to contend with in many parts. this morning, cold, frosty and as you hinted at, quite foggy. the worst in the areas on this chart depicted by light, east midlands, wales, the midlands, central, southern england and it will shift as the breeze picks up. already wet weather weather will push across the country. a bit of snow on the tops of snowdonia. spreading its way into western england later. northern and eastern scotland, down through eastern england, dry in daylight hours save
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a few showers and. chilly here and mild in the west later, some afternoon sunshine and the winds will strengthen, maybe 50 mph around irish sea coast. let's look at the rain as we go into the evening, across the midlands, central, southern england, the south—east, not quite with you in norfolk and suffolk until the evening. easing away, receipt coasts in the north—west, but heavy rain on the pennines, —— easing away on irish sea coast. expect some snow mixed in. northern ireland, better end to the day than the start and dry for much of the day for many in northern scotland. a few showers here tonight, some rain in eastern england for a time. there could be a few mist and fog patches around, especially over the hills tonight, but certainly not as cold as last night thanks to the wind, the rain and the cloud. more rain returning to the west later. it links into this deep area of low pressure, named by the portuguese net service as storm diana. —— met. it will
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bring disruptive winds tomorrow. outbreaks of rain coming through the day. a bit of brightness in between the downpours in the south but for the downpours in the south but for the north, prolonged rain in the morning, afternoon for scotland and. widespread gales if not severe gales in southern and western areas. 60 mph or more possible, maybe 70 mph in the north of scotland later. one word of comfort, if you're not enjoying the cold, a milder day tomorrow. thanks, matt. looks very sparkly in that picture. looks very nice. i will give you some mince pie facts later. you were talking about someone who is strict about mince pies. is that you? there's someone around. is it matt? is this true, matthew, you don't allow mince pies anywhere near the house until when? the allow mince pies anywhere near the house untilwhen? the first allow mince pies anywhere near the house until when? the first of december, saturday. why are you so against them in the months building up against them in the months building up to christmas? it is a christmas
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being, no christmas things until december in our house. does that make me bad? i'm the other end of the scale, i start late august and continue right the way through.” think there should be no rules, none whatsoever! talking of mince pies... we are live this morning, victoria is, at the biggest mince pie producer in the entire united kingdom. talking about christmas jobs, they're one of those businesses that need to recruit people because this isa need to recruit people because this is a busy time of year for them? white this is peak pie in barnsley. you are libertarians when it comes to mince pies. be used to eat these at easter. they were kind of a celebration pie. we're talking about seasonal workers —— they used to. they wouldn't be able to make 720 per minute if they didn't take on more staff. you can see them going into each of the sleeves, six per
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pack and they are flying off the shelves. 220 million will be eaten in britain over the next few weeks. a lot of them here are going to be made in barnsley. they've had to ta ke made in barnsley. they've had to take on an extra 350 staff to run these three production lines for pies. one man who knows about recruitment is martin paul burt who works at totaljobs. seasonal workers, the numbers are up 11% on applications this year, but lots of people are in permanent roles —— martin talbot. at totaljobs we have found it is students and people who have had warehouse experience, particularly popular for seasonal activities. what kind of seasonal jobs are being advertised at the moment on the website? we've got a lot of seasonal work in hospitality, as christmas parties take off. a lot in operations and fulfilment, particularly where housing for the retail market, and retail stores
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themselves. how many christmas elves and sa ntas themselves. how many christmas elves and santas do you have on the website at the moment? 65 companies are looking for a santa and we have 240 people who would like to be christmas tree farmers. thanks, martin. 65 companies in need of santas, so martin. 65 companies in need of sa ntas, so if martin. 65 companies in need of santas, so if that's you then you know where to go. mou is in charge of developing the recipes for the ben spies —— emma is. how do you become the taste tester for the biggest manufacturer in britain? —— the mince pies. i did a degree in food science at the university of leeds a few years ago and a placement at premier foods at a different site and that led me here. how much can you play with the recipe from year to year? it has to have the same stuff in it, surely? it has regulations, it has to contain a it has regulations, it has to containa certain it has regulations, it has to contain a certain amount of sugar,
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fat and vine fruits, raisins and sultanas or fat and vine fruits, raisins and sulta nas or currents fat and vine fruits, raisins and sultanas or currents in the recipe in the mince meat to call it a mince pie. we can't change that too much and we know what is a thence by. we play with spice and orange oil to keep with the trends —— mince pie. do you have other mince pies, do you taste them to make sure yours is better? sometimes, we like to keep an eye on the market for our own knowledge to keep up to date with trends and what's going on. we taste a lot of mince pies. there's a debate going on the best way to eat it. go on, from the official taste tester, how do you eat your mince pie? they are best fresh out of the ove n pie? they are best fresh out of the oven here. i would put it in the microwave, take them out of the foil for ten seconds, nice and warm inside and chris, lovely warm pastry. there you go -- crisp. don't forget to take the foil off if
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you're going to put them in the microwave! we will talk more about what's going on in the factory. 220 million mince pies! we obviously absolutely million mince pies! we obviously a bsolutely love million mince pies! we obviously absolutely love them, they seem like an english tradition, but did you know they didn't actually come from britain in the first place at all? they actually come from the middle east. if you want some luck for your christmas mince pies, maybe you're making them at home, you're meant to stir the mince meat clockwise. another fact for you. mincemeat meat clockwise. and etiquette expert says you're meant to eat one with your left hand only because we generally eat finger food with the left hand so as eat finger food with the left hand so as to keep the right hand free, not for drinks, for shaking hands with people. good morning, good evening. or, as we said earlier,... in case you didn't figure that i out
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on your own. i can't believe we don't have mince pies as props today! sally would normally bake something, she has let the side down! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will have to have a word with sally about this! good morning, i'm asad ahmad. five people racked up over 8,500 calls to the metropolitan police last year, which ended up costing tens of thousands of pounds to answer. the five repeat callers all had mental health problems, and the figure was released by the police forces watchdog to show how officers are forced to deal with mental health patients. her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary claims the broader mental health system is broken. the home office says it's investing in mental health services. a new short film which shares stories from the windrush generation gets its mini premiere today in west london. ruby francis' nubian songs follows 85—year—old ruby and those who use the nubian life day centre in shepherd's bush. it cares for dozens of windrush elders, and the 12—minute film shows the racism and treatment that they faced when they arrived from jamaica right until
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the windrush scandal of this year. around a third of all newjobs created in the uk in the past decade have been created in london. the bbc has learned that although employment has been rising across the country, by far the strongest growth has been in the capital. london is also home to the highest percentage of skilled workers, like nyheke lambert. for her, moving herfashion business here was essential. i don't think my business would survive anywhere else but london. i've tried it in my home town, birmingham, and it didn't work. i think people just come straight here because they know that this is where, you know, you can make your money and there's opportunities here. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's no service on tfl rail between hayes & harlington and heathrow airport, and there are severe delays between paddington and hayes & harlington due to the derailment of an empty train at west ealing. trains towards london
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are unable to serve hanwell, acton main line and west ealing. the derailment is affecting trains in and out of paddington station. the overgrouind has no service between romford and upminster due to poor rail conditions. on the roads, it's very slow up towards the blackwall tunnel, made worse by an earlier broken down vehicle. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a chilly start out there this morning, temperatures down in low single figures celsius. there is quite a bit of low cloud around, some mist and some murk, but later on turning breezy with some rain on the way. the winds quite light first thing, but as it strengthens through the morning, it's going to help lift that mist and low cloud into low cloud predominately, and then the rain arrives later. quite a gusty, blustery wind as well, temperatures between seven and nine celsius. the wind later on as that rain pushes through could gust around 30—35mph. overnight the rain clears away. post—midnight it will be drier, but we're hanging onto the very gusty wind. the temperature overnight not as cold as it has been, the minimum between six and seven celsius.
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outbreaks of rain as we head into tuesday, but that wind will really start to strengthen, becoming quite strong through the course of tomorrow, and the temperature, quite a leap, mild tomorrow with a maximum of 14 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. you can get travel updates every 15 minutes on bbc radio london. the nasa felt as her breakfast show on bbc radio london until 10am. —— va nessa on bbc radio london until 10am. —— vanessa feltz. bye for now. good morning.
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welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and dan walker. our headlines today: theresa may hits the road to sell her brexit deal and hits back at president trump over his comments on trade. home a free man — the british academicjailed for spying by the united arab emirates arrives back in the uk. iamata i am at a mince pie factory in ba rnsley i am at a mince pie factory in barnsley to find out how important christmas is to the business. "touchdown confirmed". a cheer, a handshake and sheer relief, as nasa scientists celebrate a perfect landing on mars. and the robot seems to have quickly settled into its new home. we hear exclusively from the wife of sean cox, the liverpool fan
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who was left in a coma after an attack before a match at anfield. sean went to a match in april and he never came home. that's the reality of it. and in the weather, we have dense fog and frost for the morning commute, but very wet and very windy weather is on its way. the details on that here on breakfast. good morning. it's tuesday 27th november. our top story: downing street has insisted the brexit agreement with the eu allows the uk to sign trade deals with other countries — including the united states. last night, president trump described the plan as "a great deal for the eu" and told journalists that the withdrawal agreement could harm the uk's ability to trade with the us. i think we have to look at seriously whether or not the uk is allowed to trade because, you know, right now, if you look at the deal, they may not be able to trade with us and that wouldn't be a good thing. i don't think they meant that. i don't think that the prime
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minister meant that. and hopefully, she'll be able to do something about that. we can speak now to our political correspondent, ben wright, who joins us from westminster. this is terrible timing for the prime minister. she is kick—starting her tour around the uk and this torpedoes a lot of that. yes, it does. the prime minister is in wales today and then northern ireland selling her brexit to deal to the country well resistance in parliament is growing by the hour. just this morning, sir michael fallon, former defence secretary, said he thought the prime minister's deal was doomed. and critics of the plan from their brexiteers to people who think the uk should stay in the european union now will point to donald trump's remarks and say it proves that point. number 10 is
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exasperated by this intervention and they point out the deal agreed between the uk and the eu would allow immediately negotiations of trade deals and it would allow after the transition period the uk to sign trade agreements with countries like the united states so they disagree with what president trump is saying, but it is hugely unhelpful, no question. what is now the beginning ofa question. what is now the beginning of a very intense two—week period for the government. this is the timetable. a five—day debate will begin in the house of commons on december four. that will tee up a critical vote on december the 11th when mps decide whether to accept this deal or not and then of course the date of the uk's departure from the date of the uk's departure from the eu is set to be the end of march, march the 29th, 2019. that debate and that vote is absolutely critical. as we can see from the prime minister's appearance and has,
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just today come resistance and opposition to her deal seems to be growing on her own side and among the opposition parties as well. she faces a real challenge getting this through and if she does not, the question in westminster is, what happens then? what is plan b? nobody knows. much to think about this morning, thank you very much. we will talk to minister for the cabinet office david lidington in a few minutes, we will put questions to him. the british academic matthew hedges has praised his "brave and strong" wife, daniela, after arriving back in the uk, following his pardon by the uae. mr hedges was sentenced to life in prison for spying, which he denies. in a statement, he said: "this is very surreal" and "seeing my family after this ordeal is the best thing that could have happened". his wife, daniela, said: "it will take him time to heal and recover". david haigh spent 22 months in a dubai prison following a fraud convinction in 2014 and spoke to us earlier. it's not an acquittal,
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he is still a convicted spy, so he's going to have all sorts of issues for his life in terms of travel and going forward. but also, as we heard, he was six months in solitary confinement, so that's going to have a lasting, you know... i'm sure he saw many horrors. in my case, i spent six months in hospital when i came back, repairing broken bones and a broken mind. so there's a lot for him to go through. experts are warning that thousands of cancer patients are dying unnecessarily each year because the health service in england has failed to make the improvements needed. the health foundation, which campaigns for better treatment, says more needs to be done to close the gap in survival rates between the uk and other comparable countries. here's our health correspondent, nick triggle. over the last 20 years, there have been four national cancer strategies. each has promised the best care for england. but the health foundation has said, while there had been progress, the nhs was still lagging behind. its analysis shows that only on breast cancer has the health service managed to actually close the gap
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with the best performing systems. the report warns the lack of progress is costing lives. each year, 135,000 people die from cancer. but 10,000 of those could be prevented if care was as good as in other nations. the think tank wants to see better access to tests and scans to speed up diagnosis, but it said services were being undermined by a lack of staff and equipment, which is delaying how quickly patients are seen. the government has already said it aims to tackle this. last month, the prime minister promised the number of cancers being diagnosed early would increase from one in two to three in four over the next ten years, thanks to the extra funding being provided to the health service. the department of health and social care said more details would be unveiled in the long—term plan for the nhs, which is expected to be published soon. nick triggle, bbc news. nasa scientists are beginning to gather data from mars, after successfully landing a probe on the surface. touchdown confirmed!
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there were cheers at mission control in california as the probe, called "insight", completed its seven—minute descent. the robot has already sent home the first photograph from mars it will measure quakes and underground temperatures on the red planet. the landing, for some idea of the deceleration of who would know... travelling from the speed of six times the speed of a speeding bullet to resting. they measure the speed of bullets in beta per second and 1126 fps is the normal speed of a high velocity bullet. it is from 7,000 fps, to nothing, to
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a jogging it is from 7,000 fps, to nothing, to a jogging pace, it is from 7,000 fps, to nothing, to ajogging pace, in the it is from 7,000 fps, to nothing, to a jogging pace, in the space of seven a jogging pace, in the space of seven minutes. that is quite a deceleration! hopefully, that has given you a clearer picture of what happened on marches today when that probus landing. —— on mars. the world war two code—breaker and long—serving, conservative peer baroness trumpington has died at the age of 96. she retired from the house of lords in 2017, after serving for 37 years. the international development secretary, penny mordaunt, described her as a "trailblazer, heroine and an utterjoy". our political correspondent, sean curran, looks back at her life. a pillar of the establishment, with a rebellious streak, jean barker — better known as lady trumpington — packed a lot into a long life. she was a land girl on lloyd george's farm and a code breaker at bletchley park. churchill visited us. he said, "you are the birds that laid the golden eggs, but never cackled." and that was the important thing, that we never talked. she was appointed to the house
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of lords in 1980 and served as a minister under bothjohn major and margaret thatcher. we were really good friends, but if i didn't agree with her on something, i said so. and that was very good for her. it gave her a chance to know what the opposition might say to her. in 2011, she famously gave a two—fingered salute to a colleague, who had referred to her age during a debate. her v—sign led to more on—screen opportunities, including an appearance on have i got news for you. i would like to know why, at the age of 90, i've had to sign a piece of paper in order to be on this show to say i wasn't pregnant. applause. in 2014, she published her bestselling memoirs, coming up trumps, although she told
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one interviewer she had neither written, nor read, the book. amazing woman and extraordinary life. extraordinary, force of nature, she will be sadly missed. amazing story now. a ten—year—old boy, who was diagnosed with a rare blood disorder, has been reunited with the man who helped save his life. rupert spent 80 days in a specialist unit at great ormond street hospital, on a course of chemotherapy. during that time, billy higgins, joined the bone marrow register — after he saw a woman he liked in the queue. the story had a double happy ending as billy has now married the woman who inspired him tojoin the register and he discovered he was a match for rupert. i feel very lucky and i ifeel very lucky and i can't believe that someone would do this for me. and i can't believe that someone. . . for me. and i can't believe that someone... i don't know, i can't put
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it into words. he is a superman. what a lovely story! beautiful. you read it and it puts a smile on yourface. serendipity, if he had not seen his future wife in the queue and thought, i need to talk to her, he could not have saved a young boy's life. it is one of those sliding door things. we like it a lot. we like it a lot. we will talk to matt, officially known as the grinch because he does not allow mince pies. that's quite a bit of support for that because people say you should not let christmas extend into the rest of the year and keep it for december. some people very strict, the 12 days of christmas and that is it but traditionally, mince pies could have eaten at easter. went to the baubles come out in muirhouse? it depends how lazy i am feeling. christmas eve! ifi christmas eve! if i have been organised at all. i
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am sure many people sympathise. it is 12 minutes past eight. nasa's "insight" probe survived the so—called "seven minutes of terror", as it made the perilous descent through the red planet's atmosphere. touchdown confirmed. we have enjoyed the handshakes as well. elaborate handshakes! new ordinary handshake for that mission. we'rejoined now in the studio by planetary scientist katie joy and also from california by professor tom pike who was part of the science team behind the mission. give us a sense of the atmosphere in the room when it touched down. incredible. there is so much risk in coming down. there has only been 40%
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of the missions sent to mars have made it all the way. we have added to that number. and it is just now that we are going to go to bed, the rest the team already tucked up, and we know when we wake up in the morning, we have got instruments on mars ready to go and to take the first look inside another planet. that is an incredible feeling. give us an idea of why is it so hard to land things? you talk about how difficult it has been and the percentages of success, is it because we have been talking about the speed you have to slow things down from, too, to make that safe landing? yes, there are engineering challenges. you need to get to mars in the first place, you have to travel fast. and then you have to slow down very quickly, that is that seven slow down very quickly, that is that seven minutes of hell. and then when you get to the surface, not only have you got to have slowed down, but you have to have a little bit of
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good look right at the end, you have to make sure that you don't land on a great big rock. you cannot be sure. we did not know where we were going to land. it was just going to bea going to land. it was just going to be a matter of chance. and i shivered a little when the first high—resolution image came down and we saw a huge rockjust a few metres away. if we had landed on that, we would never have got that image, that would have been the end of the mission before it had even started. katie, how exciting is this in terms of what you can discover? you have brought a rock. is this real? this isa brought a rock. is this real? this is a terrestrial rock from the earth. missions like insight want to understand what the inside of mars is made of so we will use seismology and other techniques, heat flow measurements to understand what the inside of mars is made of. this is a couple of hundred kilometres from inside the earth, green minerals. ideally, we would like to tie in the
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seismic measurements with the types of rocks we expect inside mars and to do that in the future, we need some poor returns from mars to bring them back to earth and integrate them back to earth and integrate them with the knowledge of insight and other missions. what is the point of all the knowledge? we would like to know the differences and similarities between the planets, how they formed and geologically evolved, why we have differences in the chemistry of their interiors, their course, their crusts. the type of measure is the tea m crusts. the type of measure is the team will be doing over the next few yea rs a re team will be doing over the next few years are hugely exciting because they will address the similarities and differences between mars and the other planets. through that we can understand our own oranges. katie is talking about the length of the investigation, how long is the life span of insight and what will be the key thing is coming back over the next few months and years? we are scheduled to at least last for two
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years on the surface of mars. one big part of that is to have power for as long as possible. so it was a huge relief when the solar arrays we re huge relief when the solar arrays were collectively deployed. we know from the rovers that they can last notjust a from the rovers that they can last not just a couple from the rovers that they can last notjust a couple of from the rovers that they can last not just a couple of years, from the rovers that they can last notjust a couple of years, they have lasted over a decade, the mars rovers which nasa have previously landed on the surface. we could be in there for the long haul and that is critical in terms of the data we get back. what we are looking for, we don't quite know how many we are going to see. the longer we lessen the more data we will get, and the better picture will build up of this deep interior looking all the way down to the core. fascinating stuff, thanks so much. and katie i imagine even though you are not going to be there you will be following it with great interest? i think planetary
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scientists around the world were cheating along with california last night, every time we touch down it's a huge success and there are huge teams of people involved, it's a lot of work to get us to the surface and now we can look forward to what is coming next with the rover missions in 2020 and beyond. it's an exciting time to be doing planetary science. you just hope it works because it's a long way to go to fix it! thanks so a long way to go to fix it! thanks so much for coming in and bringing your rock. and thank you tom, best of luck with the rest of the mission. let's return to our top story. any sense of accomplishment that theresa may might have felt after her brexit plan was approved in brussels over the weekend must be fading pretty quickly this morning. the prime minister faced fierce criticism over her deal from all sides in the house of commons yesterday, and now president trump has confirmed some brexiteers' worst fears, that the withdrawal agreement could harm trade. minister for the cabinet office, david liddingtonjoins us now from westminster. thank you for your time this morning
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on breakfast, lots to get through i suppose this morning, a tough day at the office i think it's fair to say for the prime minister, how do you think she would react after quite a negative reaction, many political commentators are saying they've never seen commentators are saying they've never seen anything quite so hostile as this. i don't think they have been following the debates if that is the conclusion we came too! i have been hugely impressed, the last ten days the prime minister has done three separate statements, each about three hours in duration. i've not for the most part i have been sitting next to herfor much not for the most part i have been sitting next to her for much of that time, i have not heard people speak ina way time, i have not heard people speak inawayi time, i have not heard people speak in a way i would not have predicted knowing their previous views on european policy. what has struck me is when i have been travelling around the country, my own constituents in other parts i am getting a very strong push back from people whose estimation of theresa
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may has gone up and are saying to me and theirmps, for may has gone up and are saying to me and their mp5, for goodness' sake, this is a decent compromise on the table, let's get on and do this and a clear message from businesses around the united kingdom saying we have had decisions about investment and job creation on ice for too long because of the uncertainty, let's crack on and do this and then we can plan for the future. it's interesting you say the opinion of the prime minister has improved or been quite high because the dup, which the conservative government relies upon to keep a majority in government at the moment says she's not resilient but just government at the moment says she's not resilient butjust does not listen. it appears the opinion amongst those who count and will be voting for this deal or not is the case may be is falling.” voting for this deal or not is the case may be is falling. i think it's important that mps listen to the views expressed by their constituents and local businesses. the message which is coming through very powerfully now from businesses
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in northern ireland, in scotland, in wales and england, is that this is a good compromise. it brings us a closer economic partnership with our friends and closest neighbours and important trading partners in the european union then canada has got, or other advanced economies have got with the european union. at the same time it means that once we come through the temporary transition period we have a fully independent trade policy which is referred to in terms of the text of the deal. it means we can innovate our services to suit global markets without being constrained by future eu regulations. it means we have a strong police and security and anti crime and anti terrorism partnership with those agencies around europe. it's a compromise but what there is here i think offers some really good assets to the uk for future economic and security. what you make of the
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comments of trump, something he was concerned the uk would not be able to broker a deal with the united states because of the way this customs arrangement in the withdrawal agreement has been written, any hence perhaps he is on the side of brexit yet, we know he is friends with nigel farage. the deal with the eu refers to the united kingdom having an independent trade policy and the united states government has opened up a public consultation on a future us— uk trade deal. what's true is that in the temporary transitional period while we can negotiate trade deals with other countries there will be certain constraints over what we can implement in practical terms. but as the transitional arrangements drop away, trade policy becomes fully independent. let's be clear about this, the united states under
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president trump or any other leader will fight hard for american interests, put america first is what he has consistently said, just as theresa may will consistently put the united kingdom first and whoever we are negotiating with around the world we will be fighting to get the best possible deal for british consumers and british firms and producers but we know that the people we are talking to will be trying to get a good deal for people we are talking to will be trying to get a good dealfor their countries as well so we must be clear eyed and ha rd—headed. countries as well so we must be clear eyed and hard-headed. you see it's important theresa may sells this deal to constituents and voters, but she also needs to sell this deal to mp5, yesterday you're ata this deal to mp5, yesterday you're at a government meeting for mp5 on this deal, there have been reports, and please clarify this for me, that only around 20 people showed up, various mps described it as pointless and appalling saying there was no support from anyone in the room and it was badly organised, do you want to let us know what
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happened? there were a number of brief meetings we had with mp5 from all political parties to invite them to come and have a presentation from some of the officials who are closely involved in the negotiations and to ask any detailed questions they have. the atmosphere last night as other meetings was constructive, there were lots of questions being asked. i frankly think we should have more of this time of meeting because there are a lot of issues which can cut across party lines and which can cut across party lines and which can cut across party lines and which can be quite complex and it's good for mp5 ahead of the debate to have the opportunity to put questions and try to at least, if we're going to have an argument, to do sue on the basis of understood fa cts . do sue on the basis of understood facts. can you reassure people there isa facts. can you reassure people there is a plan b? because at the moment of the next two weeks while theresa may tries to convince constituents and travels around the country to
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sell her plan at the moment it looks like there will not be enough support in the house for this plant to be passed through. if the plan is not what is plan b and will you be there to support plan b? there is a bit of wishful thinking on the part of some people that a preference expressed by politicians in the uk will somehow lead to a different plan, an alternative being offered. the message which has come through very, very plainly from the 27 governments with which we were negotiating is that this has been a very difficult compromise for them, they have had to move, they have had to make concessions from their negotiating position. they are not going to reopen negotiations. there isa binary going to reopen negotiations. there is a binary choice for the house of commons to make, they can accept the deal that is on the table, that's a compromise, but i think is a good
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compromise, but i think is a good compromise for our national interest. or they can vote it down and the one thing that is certain is that there would be additional uncertainty at that point because the eu 27 is very clear, they are not going to reopen this package. you are literally seeing it as deal or no deal, those are the options? there would be huge uncertainty, some people would be pressing to go for leaving the eu with no deal, there will be other people in parliament who would be in the circumstances trying to press for a second referendum or staying in the eu altogether, stopping brexit from happening which i think would cause serious political problems given the scale of the turnout of the referendum two years ago. and for business, that would be really bad news. the thing business loads about all else is uncertainty about the
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future, if you are taking a decision about investing in a new factory, if you are taking a decision about hiring more people, you want to be able to plan with some certainty for some years ahead, not four days ahead, and a vote by mp polls which added uncertainty would be bad news forjobs and living standards in this country. thank you for talking to us, david lidington. we will catch up on the weather in 10—15 minutes' time, quite a bit of fog out there, i am sure most of you have opened the curtains but we have new travel and weather from wherever you are watching, the national headlines in a few minutes. it is mild, it is more mild. lovely. see you soon. good morning. plenty of weather is
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going on over the next 24 hours to keep us busy. we have fog around this morning which has been quite dense in central and southern parts of england which clears away and we're looking at rain and gale is developing. the rain is moving across many western areas at the moment. further east across scotland and eastern areas of england, a bit of brightness before the clouds increase later. maximum temperature is up to seven, 10 degrees. 12 celsius in the south—west. milder are starting to filter in. by the afternoon, some sunny spells across south—west england and wales, but strong and gusty winds developing around the irish sea coast. the rain moves further east into this evening. clearer spells across northern ireland around the irish sea, strong winds continuing. rain moves from scotland, hilson o'hear.
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the far north and east of scotland staying dry and bright into the afternoon with sour is. overnight tonight, the first rain clears away and we have another spell of rain into the west. the wind strengthening all the while. temperatures stay up at about five, eight celsius, nowhere near as cold as last night with patchy frost. into wednesday, a big area of low pressure, the isobars really quite squeezed together. strong winds for all of us throughout wednesday. heavy rain moving through, particularly for northern ireland and across scotland. as much as 50 millimetres of rain here which could cause issues. strong and gusty winds for all of us, they could be much higher than that across the north and west and exposure up to about 50,60, and west and exposure up to about 50, 60, perhaps 70 mph. temperatures on wednesday, nowhere near as low as previous days, 12 to 15 celsius.
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hello. this is business live from bbc news, with ben thompson and sally bundock. trading with trump. the us president warns britian's brexit deal might be a barrier to the uk reaching a deal with the united states. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 27th november. with mrs may still fighting to get her brexit deal through parliament, mr trump's intervention won't go down well, but is he right about the path ahead? also in the programme: upping the ante with china — president trump says he expects to slap more tariffs on goods from there now.
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