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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 27, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. theresa may begins a tour of the country to sell her brexit agreement, but, as it's attacked by allies at home and abroad, critics say she's on the road to nowhere. i think the disappointing thing for me is that the prime minister has given up and saying this is where we are and we have to accept that, she may have given up on further negotiations and trying to find a better deal but i haven't. i believe ina better deal but i haven't. i believe in a better way forward and that we must find it. a bus company is fined more than £2 million for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed 2 people. none of us at company will ever forget the terrible events of october three, 2015, we are deeply sorry for the heartache of everyone affected, particularly the families. home at last: the british academic, released from jail in the united arab emirates, thanks his wife for helping win his freedom. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. good afternoon, we are talking about
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sam burgess, seen as the scapegoat for england rugby world cup in 2015 and it seems he's fed up of the criticism, winning instead he and selfishness from his team—mates. more on that later. and chris fawkes has all the weather. as the weather turns milder over the next couple of days we get some very strong winds that will take a closer look at where the worst of it is going, but also casting an eye further afield into norway and asking, who turned out the lights? also coming up — a picture of health, new images from mars that show nasa's latest mission has got off to the best of starts. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. the prime minister has hit
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the road today to try to muster support for her brexit plan, with many critics saying her campaign has already stalled. she's in northern ireland as she starts a uk—wide push, as she insists that the uk will be able to strike trade deals around the world after brexit. that comes after president donald trump suggested the withdrawal agreement sounded like a "great deal for the eu" and might hamper a future trade deal between the us and the uk. in another blow for mrs may the former defence secretary sir michael fallon, warned her brexit deal is ‘doomed'. our political correspondent chris mason reports. the big brexit vote is a fortnight away, so it feels like the general election campaign with one candidate, the prime minister, and one policy, the brexit deal. i am here today at the winter fair at the royal welsh hearing from farmers and manufacturers the importance of the certainty that the deal brings, the importance of the free trade
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area, and the ability to continue to export well with the european union in the future that we seen that bitter political declaration for our future relationship on trade with the european union. but her critics are everywhere. this man, glass of water in hand, used walk into this radio studio all the time to defend the government. take a listen to him now. my fear is this deal actuallyjust gives us the worst of all worlds. no guarantee of smooth trade in the future and no ability to reduce the tariffs that we need to conclude trade deals with the rest of the world. so unless the commons, i think, can be persuaded somehow that those things are possible, yes, then i think the deal is doomed. with friends like that, the prime minister could do without what you are about to hearfrom the president of the united states. who does he think is the winner in the negotiation between the uk and european union? sounds like a great deal for the eu and i think we have to do this... i think we have to take a look seriously at whether or not the uk is allowed to train because,
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you know, right now if you look at the deal, they may not be able to train with us. downing street insists an independent trade policy is possible under its plan, but with criticism raining down on the prime minister, people on all sides of this debate are now marshalling their arguments, hoping that their plan and replace hers if, when, it is defeated. some passionate brexiteers say leaving the eu with no deal is fine and they reckon the vision of mrs may is the worst in history and they are not surprised by the intervention of president trump. he is not only pro—british, pro—brexit, believing that nation states should make deals together, but from day one of being elected, he saw a big all—encompassing trade deal with the uk as being a very important thing for our two countries. and for him to say, i am not protectionist, i believe in free trade when it is between countries
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that are equivalent. from those arguing for no deal to those arguing for no brexit, some young campaigners gathered in westminster this morning to make their case. if you get the feeling anything could happen in the next few months, you mightjust be onto something. and the scottish political editor for the bbc has said that the scottish government has calculated the pre—minister's brexit deal could shrink the scottish economy by £9 billion. that is equal to £1600 per person. he said the first minister said the damage was so substantial that no one in her position could accept it. in a moment, we'll speak to our ireland correspondent, emma vardy, but first, let's speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young at westminster. it is not going as she would hope it is so far, is it?
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i think downing street would have wa nted i think downing street would have wanted after sunday that moment to bea wanted after sunday that moment to be a moment of national unity, if you like, that it would swing the momentum behind theresa may. certainly there was no sign of that yesterday, and that lengthy statement in the house of commons we re statement in the house of commons were yesterday was some support from oui’ were yesterday was some support from our own side but overwhelmingly across the house of commons there was a lot of criticism and that intervention by sir michael fallon, i think, is important because he was seen as i think, is important because he was seen as a i think, is important because he was seen as a loyalist and he does not feel that it is a good deal and there will be lots of others who agree with him. i think what they need to do is try and stop is becoming a debate, an argument about how much theresa may is going to lose that vote by because at the moment that is what people are talking about, they are talking about if she was as it by 50 or more than a hundred, i think they need to try and get this by contract by what exactly she is doing, going out to different parts of the uk, trying to
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illustrate to a wider audience why deal works, she thinks why she has ended up with that and speak to people who have to deal with the repercussions of it all. that is what she's going to plough on with, getting her message as she goes out there but clearly not being helped by interventions by sir michael fallon or donald trump. a sense of deja vu because a lot of talk about some sort of television debate. yes, theresa may wants to have a debate, but head—to—head withjeremy corbyn, the leader of the opposition of course. now he says he would relish the opportunity, i think there are lots of issues about that, not least if you remember he spent a lot of time debating the debate in the run—up to the last election and you could see how difficult it was to get it sorted. it is notjust a matter of putting those two people on the tv at sometime in the next two weeks, people will be looking at all sorts of issues about balance.
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we have or are they had from mps say hang on, that does not truly reflect the whole views and what everyone is talking about in the house of commons because we have theresa may, jeremy corbyn coming from different sides of the argument, but both to went into the last election ma nifesto went into the last election manifesto saying that they wanted leave the eu. there are others in the house of commons are saying that is not the way forward, there are options that another referendum in things been covered by mps and all parties which is a different scenario of the uk may bejoining the european economic area or the fta and adding on a customs union so there are so many ideas knocking around about the way forward that there are some mps are fitted with a reflection of the debate that has been hacked to have theresa may againstjeremy corbyn. so we have to see where it will end up but i think it is quite a tricky prospect. emma vardy is our ireland correspondent and joins us from belfast. not much of a welcome, arlene foster
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the dup leader says the trip is a waste of time. that's right, there will not be many warm words for the prime minister here from the dup but that should be no surprise to her because the dup again and again have made their opposition to this deal very clear, their problem with it as they see it is that this deal would hive of northern ireland and put it into a different kind of regime from the rest of the uk if the backstop scenario where to be needed. but theresa may what we need meeting the dup first of all, she will begin at queens university meeting students and academics, where she is probably likely to get a warm reception, but as you say from the democratic unionist party completely different, none of theresa may's effort to reassu ra nces none of theresa may's effort to reassurances at the moment are bringing them onside. just having listened to the dup leader arlene foster speaking to her political editor laura ginsburg this morning, saying that theresa may had
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effectively caved in to the eu. the disappointing thing for me is that the prime minister has given up and saying this is where we are we have to accept it, she may have given up on further negotiations and try to find a better deal but i haven't given up, i believe in a better way forward and i believe we must find it. and the focus very much whilst the uk leaves one union, the fate of the other, the united kingdom. that is exactly right because the backstop scenario was needed, the measures within the deal, this legally binding deal as it sits at the moment are that northern ireland would have to continue to obey certain rules of the single market. that is of course to keep it harmonise with the republic of ireland that trade can flow freely from both north and south of the silent. but that would in effect mean that there would be some regulatory difference between northern ireland and great britain. that bordered on the irish sea and that big red line for the dup. and
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they have been pretty consistent throughout their stay in their opposition is very clear, and they are absolutely not going to budge one little bit on that. and we will treat a's strategy is to go over the head of politicians, appeal to you, appealed to the public, very directly, but of course it is all about the arithmetic in the house of commons. so the dup have provided those ten key votes from the ten mps which gave her a majority, without them she does not have a parliamentary majority, but of course now the numbers are looking like she has also lost the votes of many of her parliamentary colleagues in the conservative party as well. thank you. a bus company has been fined more than £2 million after it ignored warnings about a driver who crashed into a supermarket, killing two people. the midland red bus careered into the sainsbury‘s store in coventry three years ago, killing a 7—year—old boy and a pensioner. the trial heard the driver, who was 77 at the time, had mistaken the accelerator for the brake. kathryn stancheshun reports. the moment kailash chander lost
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control of his double—decker bus failing to break, pressing hard on the accelerator instead. seconds later, it smashed into a supermarket, killing seven—year—old rowan fitzgerald, sitting at the front of the top deck. 76—year—old dora hancox, who had been crossing the road that afternoon, was also killed. the court heard it was looking more people were not injured. kailash chander was 77 at the time of the accident and was diagnosed afterwards with dementia, his driving had become increasingly erratic. mr chander had had several previous crashes with repeated complaints by customers, and six months prior to the crash, he had been assessed in house. bosses were told fatigue was affecting his driving. on the day of the accident, kailash chander had already worked a 75 hour week. he was deemed unfit to stand trial at a previous hearing. the bus company, pleading guilty to two helton said the offences, admitted that they later act had
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tragic consequences. or own detailed policies were not followed closely as they should have been. there were failures at an operational level with supervision and we deeply regret the opportunities that were missed to act decisively on warning signs. in a statement, the fitzgerald family said their lives have been changed forever. we will always feel anger over the cruel and unnecessary way rowan died. anger and not only the driver, kailash chander, but also a bus company which we feel did not do enough to stop the driver being a danger to us. midland red says it has made key changes and now has a much more robust safety measure in place, but the judge said the £2.3 million buying reflects the fact the public was put at risk notjust on that day, but four months beforehand. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines theresa may is on the road
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trying to rally support for her brexit deal — as she insists trade deals will still be possible. bus company midland red south is fined 2.3 million pounds for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed two people in a crash in 2015. eighteen migrants are rescued from two small boats in the english channel — it's believed one was carrying an 18—month—old child. and in sport, the former england by and in sport, the former england rugby union international sam burgess has blamed what he called the individual egos and selfish players for their early exit from the 2015 rugby world cup. jose mourinho said his manchester united tea m mourinho said his manchester united team can watch their champions league match on telly tied to the dog fancy the pressure of playing in front of their own fans at old trafford. and jonny bairstow has signed a short—term deal with keller nights to play dt ten league fresh from his mathematical performance in colombo. he is flying —— the england test
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side ‘s fight to the uae where the test is taking place. two boats carrying a total of 18 migrants, including an 18 month old child, have been stopped in the channel. they're the latest of more than 100 people who've been picked up trying to cross to the uk. simonjones reports from dover. nine migrants on a fishing boat found this morning by the french authorities, another nine rescued from this small —— despite repeated warnings of both is the talent people are putting their lives at risk kind across the busiest shipping lane in the world this is continuing. well, it's unprecedented what is happening at the moment, and it's like crossing the m25 on foot during the rush hour. it is the busiest thoroughfare for shipping in the world, there's over 400 commercial shipping movements a day, they do not have lighting, they do not have experience, they've got an inadequate boat. they're very, very lucky to be alive. the french authorities rescued another nine migrants in the early hours.
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the dover lifeboat was involved in one of this morning's rescue operations, and down there beside it, you can seejust how small the boat on which nine migrants were found is, risking their lives in the cold and the dark. over the past month, more than 100 migrants have succeeded in getting across the channel in small boats. most have claimed to be from iran. it's thought many have flown into serbia after the country began offering visa—free access to iranians to boost tourism and trade, then heading to northern france, with the goal of getting to the south coast. we need to see the home office and the french authorities working together to find these people traffickers who are behind this and stop them in their tracks, before there is a tragedy in the middle of the english channel. the home office says borderforce patrols have been stepped up, but some are warning that if this continues, the rescue operations could turn into the recovery of bodies. simonjones, bbc news, dover. our correspondent simonjones is in doverfor us now.
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simon, given the risks, and they we re simon, given the risks, and they were laid out very graphically, the lucky to be alive, these people. very lucky to be alive, but despite the warnings we are getting both from the british and the french authorities people are still making the perilous journey. authorities people are still making the perilousjourney. this morning as we have heard two simultaneous rescues , as we have heard two simultaneous rescues, one boat around six miles off dover, the nine people on board brought back to dover and we have had details of who exactly was on board. we were told there was to separate families there was a mother, a father and three of their children, then another family, mother, a father and three of their children, then anotherfamily, a mother, father and their child, plus another man. we are told they are all claiming to be from iraq. but seeing the bought up close that they use, it is very small, it was very much packed full of people and you
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get a sense, really in the cold and dark of how dangerous this is. we seem to be talking about these tense border more, almost one a day at the moment and warrant more from iran. why do we think that is? most of the migrants have managed to get over here on small boats have claimed to be from iran. there are two main reasons for this, we understand, the first is that people from iran are now allowed to travel visa free to serbia, the idea was that to increase tourism and trade between the two countries so the idea is potentially people are getting to serbia then using that to getting to serbia then using that to get another france and then getting an boats to try and get across the channel. the other reason we are told by experts is that people from iran who managed to get over here and claim asylum are not currently being forcibly deported back to iran, it is not considered to be safe, so if people get over here and
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are considered to have a legitimate reason to the main then they will not be deported back to iran. thank you. the british academic freed from jail in the united arab emirates yesterday has arrived back in britain. matthew hedges was welcomed home by his wife and members of his family. the durham university phd student was pardoned yesterday after being sentenced to life in prison for spying. and this afternoon his wife daniela tejada has tweeted a picture of the couple reunited after his return. she said, "thanks for collectively helping me to bring back my husband. we've been through hell and back and would really appreciate having some space to catch up on much—needed rest. " a police watchdog says a ‘crisis' in mental health services is putting an ‘intolerable burden' on police in england and wales. the inspectorate of constabulary claims officers are being forced to respond to tens of thousands of incidents every year which should be handled by mental health specialists. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, reports. he was a talented musician, but for many years sean rigg
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suffered from severe mental health problems, paranoid schizophrenia. in august 2008, he was arrested and restrained by police after reports he'd attacked people. the ao—year—old was taken to a police station, but he collapsed and died in hospital. an inquestjury said police had used an unnecessary and unsuitable level of force. what you need is care. when somebody is being restrained, somebody is vulnerable, the excessive force that's being used, that shouldn't happen. we are where we are, police are involved in this. the watchdog that monitors police in england and wales says they should be far less involved in cases like this. in a report it says officers are picking up the pieces because the mental health system is broken. the report says when mental health patients need help, 50% of the trips to hospital or a safe place are made by police, not ambulance. it takes about three hours for police to deal
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with someone who is mentally unwell. in london, five people with mental health problems called police 8600 times last year, more than anyone else. the police are called to stepping out of hours when other services go home, so we see the volume of calls to police peaking at around four or five o'clock in the evening weekdays when other practitioners are going home. and we see that as other mental health services pushing the risk and demand on to the police just because they are a 24/7 service. police leaders have welcomed the inspection report. they say the health service must stop passing the buck. this report must now put a full stop to everything that we've said before. there is a crisis, it needs to be dealt with and there needs to be some action. so i completely support what's being said. the government says it's planning to spend an extra £2 billion a year on mental health services in england and has already reduced the use of police
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custody for those in need. danny shaw, bbc news. a 10—year—old boy who had a rare blood disorder has been reunited with the man who helped save his life. rupert cross was diagnosed four years ago and spent months in a specialist unit at great ormond street on a course of chemotherapy. but his life was changed when a man whojoined the bone marrow register because he saw a woman he liked in the queue for donors, turned out to be a match. the chance encounter transformed both their lives, as look east's robbie west reports. so, all of these i've got to have? yeah. 0h! that's why you have a drip. iwould be sick, like, everywhere. rupert spent more than 80 days in a specialist treatment unit, diagnosed with a rare blood disorder. the six—year—old's immune system was failing right in front of his parents‘ eyes. i remember the time when his hair was falling out, and i was in with a nurse and i wasjust stroking his hair, and it wasjust coming out in clumps.
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i would have done anything to have swapped places with him. it's... it's such... it's such a horrific experience. his only option was to find a willing bone marrow donor who was a close enough genetic match. unknown to rupert, in basildon, someone was about to join the register who had the potential to save his life. billy higgins works in a bank. a charity had set up outside and was signing up bone marrow donors. he's the first to admit his initial reason forjoining the register wasn't all about helping others. yeah, ended upon the register because the girl i liked was in the queue. due to the complexities of rupert's condition, billy had to have an operation
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to remove some of his bone marrow. rupert has gone on to make a full recovery. billy went to hemel hempstead to meet rupert and his family. he was joined by the girl that he was flirting with in the queue to become a donor. she had to come along, really, seeing as now she's his wife. hi. pleased to meet you. nice to meet you! hi. how you doing, rupert? good, thank you. you all right? yeah. i feel... i feel very lucky. i can't believe, like, that someone has... i don't know, i can't put it into words. he's a superman. i'll take that one! rupert needed a hero, and in billy he got one. and you can see more on that story, on tonight's look east, that's on bbc one in the east at 6.30, and of course later
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across the uk on the bbc iplayer. don't forget — you can let us know what you think, tweet us using the hashtag #afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. time for a look at the weather. people complaining it is miserable and dark in the mornings, but if you think about the time of day that we have this time of year, of course the days are getting shorter all the time here in the uk, at its peak in the middle of october we was about five minutes of daylight each day, which is pretty incredible, but we're going to take a look up north if you like to northern norway to a place in the arctic circle and yesterday the daylight was one hour ten minutes. the difference between yesterday and today is they have lost 42 minutes of daylight.
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upsetting would that be? if you drive a solar powered anything it is bad news! so they get an hour, a day? today the day length is 20 minutes. and this is it. after today the sun won't come up again until the middle of january. so it is 48 days of street darkness in a row and what a drop off, it isjust street darkness in a row and what a drop off, it is just incredible, going from one hour and ten to 29th of daylight, to nothing. it will be like that for the next 48 days. that is why we're such cheerful bunch here. i better get on with this! it is running in with us already. there are some other unpleasant stuff coming? yes, they changed the milder weather, so temperatures struggle a bit, six or 7 degrees, tomorrow up to 15 or so but as we look at the weather picture today we have this band of rain coming in and it is behind this band of rain that we see the milder wet air spread in, so
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ultimately over the next few hours temperatures will push back into double figures across south—west england and also southern parts of wales, as the wet weather pushes eastwards, sting chilly from time but then overnight as the first band of rain clears to we have another one following from the west. temperatures 6—8d, the more mild—mannered computer recently, double figures compare to parts of the south—west of the changes under way. as we look at the weather picture for tomorrow we have this big area of low pressure working in, tightly packed as a barrister at —— targeting the western part of the uk but it'll be a wet day as well with heavy rain particularly affecting northern ireland and scotland where we can see some localised surface water flooding in we can see some localised surface waterflooding in the north we can see some localised surface water flooding in the north later in the day. windy, gusts could reach 60 maybe 70 mph, strong enough to bring down some tree branches so we could get localised transport disruption and potentially 12 power supply problems as well. temperature wise, iis problems as well. temperature wise, i is between 12 and a0 degrees, maybe 15 to some of the cold air
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hanging on in the northern isles. it will get more mild period we head into thursday. thursday the will pressure still on the scene, another little one heading into the uk. some uncertainty about just her strongest area of low pressure is going to be on thursday. ask a scenario is we could get gusts of wind of 70—80 mph around the western side of the uk but that is quite uncertain. what we are more certain about is yes it'll bea are more certain about is yes it'll be a blustery kind of day with rain at times, sunny spells and between and mild, temperatures between ten and 1a degrees. that is thirsty‘s weather, we now look ahead to friday and the weekend and i'm afraid although we have lost the cold air and replaced it with mild air across many areas of the uk we have also replaced that with rain and it will be quite a lot of that in northern ireland, and england and wales over the next few days. in scotland at times it will be a little bit cooler with a mixture here of sunny spells and passengers. iwill and passengers. i will see you later. —— passing showers. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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the prime minister begins a tour to sell her brexit agreement but, as it's attacked by president trump and allies at home, she insists trade deals will be possible. we have already been talking to the united states about the agreements we could have in the future. a bus company is fined 2.3 million pounds for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed two people in a crash in 2015. eighteen migrants are rescued from two small boats in the english channel — it's believed one was carrying an 18—month—old child. matthew hedges — the british academic released from jail in the united arab emirates — thanks his wife for helping win his freedom. and a postcard from mars — nasa's latest probe sends back its first picture of the red planet. sport now on afternoon live with hugh.
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a brief spell in rugby and yet sam burgess is stirring it all up. yes, league star. it was controversial at the time, but supported particularly by the england coach at the time, stuart lancaster, in the 2015 world cup in mind. but when things went badly at that tournament, they were the first host nation not to qualify from the group stage of the rugby world cup. sam burgess was made a scapegoat, given how he had been brought into the england team so quickly. the experience made him go back to rugby league after the tournament but he's still getting criticised. he seems to have had enough, particularly this morning when he responded on twitter, saying this... he insists he's enjoying watching the current england team. he wants them to do well at the next
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world cup, which is next year. it's a big week for english teams in the champions league. both manchester clubs can make it through to the last 16 of the champions league tonight — city are away to lyon and united take on young boys. it's been suggested that the united team feels more pressure playing at old trafford, where they haven't won in europe so far this season. but managerjose mourinho has no time for that. if you feel pressure to stay at home but when i say home, i don't say stadium home, isay but when i say home, i don't say stadium home, i say home home and watch on television. if you feel pressure to play matches at home where people come to support, come on. i neverfelt pressured where people come to support, come on. i never felt pressured to
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where people come to support, come on. i neverfelt pressured to play at home. manchester city need just a point to make the knockout stage but face the only team that have beaten them so far this season. they're in france to play lyon. i want to qualify, that is the first target. in that period, when you start the season until now, the most important issue is qualification for the champions league. for the premier league it is important to be there of course. if you make one or two mistakes, you can be out, and it is so dangerous competition in this one, so is so dangerous competition in this one, so dangerous. the man responsible for the attack on the borussia dortmund team bus has sentenced to 1a years in prison in germany. the defendant, identified in court only as sergei w, was convicted on 28 counts of attempted murder. dortmund defender marc ba rtra and a police officer were injured when three explosions hit the bus as it left for a champions league game last year. sol campbell has been appointed manager of the league's bottom side
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macclesfield town after agreeing an 18 month contract. it's the former england defender‘s firstjob in charge of a team, having previously complained that his managerial career in england has been hampered by a lack of opportunity for black coaches. macclesfield are five points adrift at the foot of league two. johnny bairstow has become the latest england cricketer to try his hand at the shortest form of the game. after returning to the test side and winning man of the match in colombo, he's signed a short—term deal with kerala knights in the t10 league, which is being played in the uae. the team is captained by england one—day skipper eoin morgan. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much for that. judges at the european court ofjustice are considering whether the uk could halt brexit and remain in the european union without permission from the other member states. a cross—party group of british politicians has brought the case, arguing that parliament could stop brexit if mps vote down the prime minister's deal.
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ministers say the case is only hypothetical, as the government has no plans to remain in the eu. our brussels reporter adam fleming explained what's behind this legal challenge. there were three sides making their case here in luxembourg, first of all it was the mps, msp ‘s and meps who want to know if article 50 can be revoked unilaterally. they say you have got to create a situation where a country could change its mind about leaving the eu and mps need to know that answer to the question when they are voting. this is all hypothetical because theresa may has no intention whatsoever of taking back that letter she wrote to the eu triggering brexit in march last year. the eu are worried about other countries using article 50 in a tactical way, putting in your notification, withdrawing it,
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changing your mind again, all to squeeze a better deal out of the eu. the hearing today was four hours long, it got complicated in places, and we don't know whether the judges he will make a final ruling. it could be months away. and there is a debate about a debate, whether theresa may could have a televised debate withjeremy corbyn. borisjohnson has tweeted, saying rather than widening discourse this debate is narrowing it by offering a false choice between the fake deal and the
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proposals, neither of which is brexit. we will have more on brexit later. a health think—tank is warning that thousands of cancer patients are dying unnecessarily each year because nhs england has failed to improve care quickly enough. a study by the health foundation found england had failed to close the gap with countries that perform better, such as canada. our health correspondent, nick triggle, reports. over the last 20 years, there have been four national cancer strategies. each has promised the best care for england. but the health foundation said, while there had been progress, the nhs was still lagging behind. its analysis shows that only on breast cancer have the health service managed to actually close the gap with the best performing systems. the report warns the lack of progress is costing lives. each year, 135,000 people die from cancer. but 10,000 of those could be prevented if care was as good as in other nations. the key problem is one of late diagnosis. people who are diagnosed late have a much less good chance of surviving five years than those
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who were diagnosed early. and so we have got to make it easier for patients to access their gp, for gps to investigate and refer on and for diagnostic services to be there so that people can be diagnosed in a rapid way. the think tank wants to see better access to tests and scans to speed up diagnosis, but it said services were being undermined by a lack of staff and equipment, which is delaying how quickly patients are seen. the government has already said it aims to tackle this. last month, the prime minister promised the number of cancers being diagnosed early would increase from one in two to three in four over the next ten years, thanks to the extra funding being provided to the health service. the department of health and social care said more details would be unveiled in the long—term plan for the nhs, which is expected to be published soon. nick triggle, bbc news. a study of graduate pay shows women with degrees gain more financially
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in their first few years of work than men do. the institute for fiscal studies found that by the end of their twenties, female graduates earn 28% more than other women. for men, the difference is only 8%. lauren moss reports. choosing to go to university can be an expensive decision. the average student leaves with £50,000 of debt. for the first time, a report has examined whether graduates later make that back. it appears women are getting a better return on their investment. on average, by the age of 29, a female graduate earns £6,700 a year more than a woman who did not go to university. a man with a degree earns £2,700 a year more than a man without. the subjects studied makes a big difference, with maths, science and medicine likely to lead to better wages than the creative arts, english, and philosophy. we see lots of men studying at institutions with zero or negative
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returns by 29. this return is likely to grow through men's 30s as graduate men tend to earn at a faster rate through their 30s than non—graduate men. for women, we see a large average return of around 26%, that varies but it is pretty consistently positive. these figures are only a snapshot of average earnings at 29. they don't look into what may happen next in life and how that could impact, such as how if a woman has children, it could affect her income, and how male graduates tend to add more later. some students think the findings might affect what people choose to study. there are quite a lot of degrees that are not as employable. i think it should impact people's choices, if many drives you. choices, if money drives you. maybe people are discouraged from studying art or literature,
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but i feel like it is something to think about. the government is to review university tuition fees. the focus will turn to which institutions offer the best value for money. a good degree will be worth the investment. i want to see universities competing to offer the best quality value for money degrees to young people. as students prepared to send off their ucas applications early next year, questions continue about how well—prepared they will be for life after university. scientists at nasa say they're beginning to gather data from mars, after successfully landing a probe on the surface of the planet yesterday. the insight spacecraft has already begun to send its first images back. our science reporter, victoria gill, sent this report from mission control in pasadena in california. touchdown confirmed! relief and joy at mission control.
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after plunging through the martian atmosphere at six times the speed of a bullet, nasa's insight spacecraft safely planted its feet on the surface of mars. now the science begins. it's going to be a really busy two or three months for us. i am really hoping that the energy and the feeling today is going to carry me through those next few months, because it is going to be needed. when we get our first marsquake we will get a bunch of images over the next few days. and it is incredible to be on this mission and say, "tomorrow when i come onto my shift i will see an image of mars that nobody has seen before." it's already sending snapshots back to earth. insight‘s cameras will examine its surroundings in detail, so scientists can select exactly where to place its scientific equipment. it will listen for martian earthquakes and drill deep into the planet to study its inner structure. as the insight lander studies the deep interior of mars robotically, it will be sending its data back here, to mission control nasa
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in california, and people will work out exactly how rocky worlds like earth, mars and the moon actually formed a.5 billion years ago. they lovingly call this the centre of the universe. the two—year mission is now under way to build a picture of the hidden depths of the red planet. victoria gill, bbc news at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory, california. back on earth, maryam is here. ina in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. theresa may tours the nations trying to rally public support for her brexit deal — as it's criticised by
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allies at home and abroad. a bus company is fined more than two million pounds for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed 2 people. 18 migrants — including a toddler — are rescued from two small boats in the english channel. here's your business headlines on afternoon live... donald trump has suggested theresa may's brexit agreement could threaten a us—uk trade deal. the us president told reporters the withdrawal agreement "sounds like a great deal for the eu" and meant the uk might not be able to trade with the us. more on that shortly. uk and dutch regulators have fined ride—sharing service uber for a breach that exposed the details of 57 million customers and drivers. the information commissioner's office fined the company £385,000 while the dutch data protection authority imposed a fine of 600,000 euros. thomas cook has warned that annual profits are set to come in £30 million lower than expected, blamed on the summer heatwave. it's the second profit warning the firm has issued in two months. earnings were £88 million lower
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in the year to september, as people delayed booking holidays because of the prolonged heatwave at home. not that he's used to causing controversy... president trump has been giving his opinion on a post brexit trade deal between the us and uk. remember when resident obama said that britain would join the back of the queue when it came to a trade deal, donald trump is saying what trade deal, because we will be connected to the european union so there won't be any way to do a deal with the us. he said that it wouldn't be a good thing if the uk could not do a trade deal with the us. all of this is unhelpfulfor the prime minister. she has been denying it. yes, and saying things will work
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out fine and we will be able to trade but there are no details on that within the withdrawal agreement, so what do the us make of it? please don't steal my line! what does america make of it? what does the us make of it? what does samira make of it. who does it better?|j the us make of it? what does samira make of it. who does it better? i am on yourteam! make of it. who does it better? i am on your team! this is another controversial thing for the president of the us to say and it doesn't help theresa may in the slightest, what is he thinking? this doesn't, the best time to the prime minister. remember, these are comments that have come from the president as he was boarding to go and depart and do an event in another part of the united states. reporters are throwing a lot of
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questions at him during this time though there's not a lot of time to get into very much detail when asking about this question, but he did say that he doesn't think it is a very good deal and he did have some doubt on whether the us and the uk will be able to come up with some trade deal. but remember, this is a president that has often criticised the eu for being a very difficult trading partner and has expressed some hope that when the uk will be out of the eu, there could be some better trading relationships happening between the us and the uk. it is hard to gauge exactly what he's thinking because we have times where he will talk about the special relationship, and other times he seems to forget it quite quickly. what do americans make of this? right, and rememberthis is coming ata time right, and rememberthis is coming at a time in which we are seeing a lot of discussion about a trade agreement between or rather trade
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relations between the united states and china. we are going into the 620 meeting at the end of the week and that's when the president of the united states will be meeting with counterparts and many people want to see an end to the tariffs. the president talks big when it comes to trade so i think you are seeing some of that also at play here with regards to these comments about this brexit agreement. 0k, samira in new york... sounds way you have a bit of a cold. indeed. go home, have a lemsip and put your feet up. other remedies are available! probably cheaper as well. the markets are really reacting to president trump, what he was saying
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about china. he has been threatening china with even higher tariffs and we are in the midst of the big trade war between china and the us so hopefully a resolution. those have been dashed ahead of him meeting president xi at the weekend. thank you very much. see you later. you are watching afternoon live. tributes have been paid to the conservative peer, lady trumpington, who has died at the age of 96. she worked as a code breaker during the second world war and spent nearly four decades in the house of lords. colleagues describe her as ‘one of a kind' and an ‘utterjoy‘. our parliamentary correspondent, sean curran, looks back at her life. a pillar of the establishment with a rebellious streak, jean barker, better known as lady trumpington, packed a lot into a long life. she was a land girl on lloyd george's farm. and a code—breaker
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at bletchley park. churchill visited us. he said, "you are the birds that laid the golden eggs but never cackled." and that was the important thing, was that we never talked. she was appointed to the house of lords in 1980 and served as a minister under bothjohn major and margaret thatcher. we were really good friends, but if i didn't agree with her about something, i said so. and that was very good for her because it gave her a chance to know what the opposition might say to her. in 2011, she famously gave a two—fingered salute to a colleague who had referred to her age during a debate. her v—sign lead to more on—screen opportunities, including an appearance on have i got news for you. i would like to know why, at the age of 90, i've had to sign a piece of paper in order to be
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on the show to say i wasn't pregnant. laughter. the prime minister led tributes, saying she was a formidable figure in british politics whose kindness and humour would be sorely missed. the chairman of the foreign affairs committee recalled meeting her and praised her amazing life of service, and the conservative mp tracey crouch called her mystery this, charming and supremely intelligent and warned those at the pearly gates they have no idea what was about to hit them. in 201a, she published her bestselling memoirs, coming up trumps, although she told one interviewer she had neither written nor read the book. tributes to lady trumpington, who's died aged 96. you may not have heard of deke duncan but he's been
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the voice of radio 77 for more than a0 years. the station doesn't have a licence, so can only be beamed through a speaker from his shed into his living room to an audience of one, his wife. that could all be about to change as he's now been offered a one—hour special radio show. jayne mccubbin went to meet him. let me take you back, right back, to a shed in 1970s stevenage. here to try and put a grin around your chin, a special hello, how are you going out right now to mrs teresa duncan, 57 donald crescent in stevenage. fast forward 50 years and 170 miles to stockport... looking after your ears, me dears. a special high, hello going out to pamela duncan. how in the world are you feeling, my darling? deke duncan is still broadcasting to his audience of one, though it's a different mrs duncan and it's not a shed. what do you think of the workshop? right. it is a workshop. yes.
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you're about to enter wonderland! oh, my days! it's radio 77, 2018. hit me with it, deke! i just love this, this is my world, my life, radio. fabulous! i bet you're never off duty, are you, even in the supermarket? no, in my head. if you're listening in the car right now, thanks for the ride. taking your ears through the years. looking after your ears, me dears. 77 coming at you today with a mountain of music guaranteed with deke duncan right here in the air chair. this is true love, love so pure even the missus approves. i think it's wonderful, you know! he believes it, he lives it, he does it, and, as he has said to me many times, it'sjust between me and the mic. this priceless nationwide film gave deke five minutes
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of fame five decades ago. i'm going to the shop, right, deke? 0k. my ambition would be to broadcast to the rest of stevenage, i'd like to share it with them. but the realjob in radio never materialised until this was shared once again. hey, deke, it's laura moss, the station editor at three counties radio. i want to offer you a one—hour special over christmas. wow! so, deke, yourdream is going to be a reality. you'd better pass the tissues! yeah, you've got that right, baby! in fact, in the media storm that followed, deke's had more than the offer of a one—off show. i believe there's been a job offer? there has been. from africa? from africa. i think it's probably a small station where theyjust put records on and they don't have a dj at the moment. there's an opening.
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i know. it's very difficult, i've got africa or bbc three counties. we're going to stick to stevenage and stockport. i think so. i'd miss it! holy, moly, rock and rolly! deke duncan's leason to us all — never give up on your dreams. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes. the chilly weather we have seen will be edging away as the weather turns significantly milder but also wet and windy. a couple of areas of low pressure waiting to swing to our shores and the temperatures will be boosted significantly. we look at today's temperatures, for some highs
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of7 today's temperatures, for some highs of 7 degrees but south—westerly dragging the milder air in and some will see temperatures as high as 15 celsius. that change to milder weather starts to take place this afternoon as this band of rain pushes through. we will start to see the winds turn south—westerly dragging in the mild air late in the day. the first band of rain pushes eastwards as we go through this evening and overnight, it will be replaced by another area of rain moving in from the west later on. rain at times probably best sums up the weather, temperatures mildest in south—west england overnight. for wednesday, it is the strength of the winds we are most concerned about, an area of low pressure with tightly packed isobars will bring strong winds, particularly on irish sea coast and western hills. the winds could reach up to 70 mph, strong enough to bring localised disruption at times. as well as that, there
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will be some heavy rain, the heaviest of which will be going across northern ireland and on into scotland. we talked about the rain and the strong winds, it will be turning milder with temperatures across the board pretty much into double figures, the exception the northern isles holding onto chilly air. on thursday we have another weather system targeting the uk. it might be another squeeze in the isobars that could bring a swathe of even stronger winds across western areas, potentially with gusts up to 80 mph but that is still uncertain. thursday will be another wet and windy day with rain easing into sunshine and showers later on, but staying on the mild side with temperatures between ten and 13 degrees. keeping the mild airfor the next few days with temperatures i3 the next few days with temperatures 13 or 1a degrees often in the next few days over london.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 3. the prime minister begins a tour of the nations to sell her brexit agreement — but, as it's attacked by president trump and allies at home, she insists trade deals will be possible. we will be able to do trade deals, to negotiate trade deals with countries around the rest of the world, and that regards to the united states we have already been talking to them about the sort of agreement that we could have in the future. a bus company is fined more than £2 million for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed 2 people home at last: matthew hedges — the british academic released from jail in the united arab emirates — thanks his wife for helping win his freedom. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — hugh ferris. good afternoon, having been made a scapegoat by some for england's rubber world cup failure in 2015 sam burgess has hit out at those he thinks are actually responsible. we
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will tell you how and who later. as the weather turns milder over the next few days it will also become wendy, so we will take a look at where the strongest winds are going over the next 2a hours, johnny later. also coming up, global greenhouse gas emissions reached a record high in 2017, the un says nations must radically improve policies to avoid dangerous climate change. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. the prime minister has hit the road today to try to muster support for her brexit plan — with many critics saying her campaign has already stalled. she's in northern ireland for a uk—wide push — as she insists that the uk will be able to strike trade deals around the world after brexit.
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that comes after president donald trump suggested the withdrawal agreement sounded like a "great deal for the eu" and might hamper a future trade deal between the us and the uk. in another blow for mrs may the former defence secretary sir michael fallon — warned her brexit deal is ‘doomed'. our political correspondent chris mason reports. the big brexit boat is a fortnight away. suddenly, it feels like a general election campaign with one candidate, the prime minister, and one policy, her brexit deal. the stop today, mid wales. i am here today at the winter fair at the royal welsh hearing from farmers and manufacturers the importance of the certainty that the deal brings, the importance of the free trade area, and the ability to continue to export well with the european union in the future that we seen that bitter political declaration for our future relationship on trade with the european union. but her critics are everywhere. this man, glass of water in hand, used walk into this radio studio all the time to defend the government.
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take a listen to him now. my fear is this deal actuallyjust gives us the worst of all worlds. no guarantee of smooth trade in the future and no ability to reduce the tariffs that we need to conclude trade deals with the rest of the world. so unless the commons, i think, can be persuaded somehow that those things are possible, yes, then i think the deal is doomed. the disappointing thing for me is the prime minister has given up on this is where we are we have to acce pt this is where we are we have to accept that. she may have given up on further negotiations, but i have not, i believe in a better way forward and we must find with friends like that, the prime minister could do without what you are about to hearfrom the president of the united states. who does he think is the winner in the negotiation between the uk and european union? sounds like a great deal for the eu and i think we have to do this...
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i think we have to take a look seriously at whether or not the uk is allowed to trade because, you know, right now if you look at the deal, they may not be able to trade with us. downing street insists an independent trade policy is possible under its plan, but with criticism raining down on the prime minister, people on all sides of this debate are now marshalling their arguments, hoping that their plan and replace hers if, when, it is defeated. some passionate brexiteers say leaving the eu with no deal is fine and they reckon the vision of mrs may is the worst in history and they are not surprised by the intervention of president trump. he is not only pro—british, pro—brexit, believing that nation states should make deals together, but from day one of being elected, he saw a big all—encompassing trade deal with the uk as being a very important thing for our two countries. and for him to say, i am not protectionist, i believe in free trade
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when it is between countries that are equivalent. from those arguing for no deal to those arguing for no brexit, some young campaigners gathered in westminster this morning to make their case. if you get the feeling anything could happen in the next few months, you mightjust be onto something. emma vardy is our ireland correspondent and joins us from belfast. what reception has theresa may had? not a warm welcome from the dup leader. now, at the moment she is meeting students and religious leaders and academics and they expect the welcome from them will be somewhat warmer than it has been from the dup. we know here in northern ireland are broadly across the business community there is a lot of support for theresa may's deal, that is because businesses say
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that it prevents the need for a hard border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland and it prevents the republic of ireland and it p reve nts a ny the republic of ireland and it prevents any immediate disruption to trade and business here in northern ireland. so there is some support for theresa may from that business community, and she will take some relief from that but at the same time as you say, a very, very different stance coming from northern ireland and the dup. they are not butting an inch in their opposition to this deal at all theresa may's efforts and reassu ra nces theresa may's efforts and reassurances are failing to bring them onside. so what trade deals could britain strike with other countries, under the terms of theresa may's brexit deal? our reality check correspondent, chris morris, is here. does trump have a point? the political declaration on the future relationship approved by eu leaders on sunday to say very clearly that the uk can develop an independent trade policy, but
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obviously trade is a two—way street so obviously trade is a two—way street so that is no such thing as complete independence. you have to make choices and one of the initial choices and one of the initial choices is that we can make those trade deals to begin with, we certainly can't comment them, so during the transition period we negotiate. we start to negotiate with a lot of countries, how well are they go to negotiate until they now what our future relationship with the eu is going to be? that is one of many questions. until they know what our relationship with the rest of the eu is going to be, will it be frictionless trade? that'll make a difference to other countries. so during the transition period we will not be able to implement those trade deals on goods with other countries, so cutting tariffs and stuff. and if they were to bea tariffs and stuff. and if they were to be a single customs territory, this temporary customs union set out in the backstop plan which nobody says they would want but if that we re says they would want but if that were to be put in place of choosing that period as well also because of the customers relationship we would not be able to negotiate those trade deals on goods. but there is a longer—term issue which is
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regulations. the rules and regulations. the rules and regulations and standards involved in the single market and the unknown and trade top as nontariff barriers. they are really important because if you look around the world that are big regular tory superpowers, the united states is one, you tend to align your regulations to the us. the eu is clearly another, certainly not the military or political superpower but in terms of regulations it is in the uk is part of that at the moment. there is another choice there, do you stick closely to the rules and regulations of the eu had quite a lot of businesses want because it is right on their doorstep, or do you say we we re on their doorstep, or do you say we were to move much closer into an american system? not entirely an either or choice but you must clean mogyorod another. that might be what donald trump meant when he said this isa donald trump meant when he said this is a good dealfor the eu. he and his officials have look at some of the detail of what this suggests the uk will stay fairly close to the eu orbit and he may have been hoping
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there would be a much cleaner break and the uk could move closer to the us orbit. if you have an looking at some of the numbers. some of the numbers for the trade we are talking about, these are the numbers last year for goods and services, uk goods and services exports to the us and imports. so big numbers but let's compare it to oui’ big numbers but let's compare it to our exports and imports of goods and services last year to the rest of the eu. they are much better. much better. if you take individual countries then the us is our biggest single trading partner but eu is a block so france, germany, italy, spain, poland, big economies and if you put them together are still far and away our largest trading partner and away our largest trading partner and will be still have to brexit. a lot of present supporters say that other parts of the world are growing more rapidly, it is true, there are, but for example we do more trade with ireland than they do with china, so yes there are countries
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that accelerating rapidly and sure there will be ways perhaps in which there will be ways perhaps in which the uk can do more trade with them, but at the moment the eu is absolutely key to our economic well—being and a lot of other people point out, well, yes, we want to do more trade with china, but germany already does far more trade than we do with china and it is in the eu and the eurozone and it is another thing, so it is notjust about the freedom to set your own policy it is the is structured as well. thank you. nice colour microphone by the way. it is yellow. i take the view that if you can match, clash. thank you. that is a reality check there wasn't expecting. a bus company has been fined more than £2 million after it ignored warnings about a driver who crashed into a supermarket, killing two people. the midland red bus careered into the sainsbury‘s store in coventry three years ago, killing a 7—year—old boy and a pensioner. the trial heard the driver, who was 77 at the time, had mistaken the accelerator for the brake. kathryn stancheshun reports.
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the moment kailash chander lost control of his double—decker bus failing to brake, pressing hard on the accelerator instead. seconds later, it smashed into a supermarket, killing seven—year—old rowan fitzgerald, who'd been sitting at the front of the top deck. 76—year—old dora hancox, who had been crossing the road that afternoon, was also killed. the court heard it was lucky more people were not injured. kailash chander was 77 at the time of the accident and was diagnosed afterwards with dementia, his driving had become increasingly erratic. mr chander had had several previous crashes, there had been repeated complaints by customers, and six months prior to the crash, he had been assessed in house. bosses were told fatigue was affecting his driving. on the day of the accident, kailash chander had already worked a 75 hour week. he was deemed unfit to stand trial at a previous hearing. the bus company, pleading guilty to twohealth and safety offences, admitted that they later act had tragic consequences.
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or own detailed policies were not followed as closely as they should have been. there were failures at an operational level with driver supervision and we deeply regret the opportunities that were missed to act decisively on warning signs. in a statement, the fitzgerald family said their lives have been changed forever. we will always feel anger over the cruel and unnecessary way rowan died. anger at not only the driver, kailash chander, but also a bus company which we feel did not do enough to stop the driver being a danger to others. midland red says it has made key changes and now has a much more robust safety measures in place, but thejudge said the £2.3 million fine reflects the fact the public was put at risk notjust on that day, but for months beforehand. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news, birmingham. the british academic freed from jail in the united arab
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emirates yesterday has arrived back in britain. matthew hedges was welcomed home by his wife and members of his family. the durham university phd student was pardoned yesterday after being sentenced to life in prison for spying. and this afternoon his wife daniela tehada has tweeted a picture of the couple, reunited after his return. she said "thanks for collectively helping me to bring back my husband. "we've been through hell and back and would really appreciate having "some space to catch up on much—needed rest.‘ a police watchdog says a "crisis" in mental health services is putting an "intolerable burden" on police in england and wales. the inspectorate of constabulary claims officers are being forced to respond to tens of thousands of incidents every year, which should be handled by mental health specialists. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, reports. he was a talented musician, but for many years sean rigg suffered from severe mental health problems, paranoid schizophrenia. in august 2008, he was arrested and restrained
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by police after reports he'd attacked people. the ao—year—old was taken to a police station, but he collapsed and died in hospital. an inquestjury said police had used an unnecessary and unsuitable level of force. what you need is care. when somebody is being restrained, somebody is vulnerable, the excessive force that's being used, that shouldn't happen. we are where we are, police are involved in this. the watchdog that monitors police in england and wales says they should be far less involved in cases like this. in a report it says officers are picking up the pieces because the mental health system is broken. the report says when mental health patients need help, 50% of the trips to hospital or a safe place are made by police, not ambulance. it takes about three hours for police to deal with someone who is mentally unwell. in london, five people with mental health problems called police 8600 times last year, more than anyone else. the police are called to step
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in out of hours when other services go home, so we see the volume of calls to police peaking at around four or five o'clock in the evening weekdays when other practitioners are going home. and we see that as other mental health services pushing the risk and demand on to the police just because they are a 2a/7 service. police leaders have welcomed the inspection report. they say the health service must stop passing the buck. this report must now put a full stop to everything that we've said before. there is a crisis, it needs to be dealt with and there needs to be some action. so i completely support what's being said. the government says it's planning to spend an extra £2 billion a year on mental health services in england and has already reduced the use of police custody for those in need. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. theresa may to as a nation is trying
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to rally public support for her brexit deal, as it is criticised by allies at home and abroad. a bus companies find more than £2 million from ignoring warnings about a driver who killed two people. 18 migrants including a toddler rescued from two small boats in the english channel. and in sport the former england rugby union international sam burgess has blamed what he called individual egos and selfish players for their early exit from the 2015 world cup. jose mourinho said his manchester united team can watch their champions league match on tv tonight if they don't fancy the pressure of playing in front of their own fans at old trafford. and their own fans at old trafford. and the former england defender sol campbell has his first managerjob, he has taken over at macclesfield town. more london storiesjust he has taken over at macclesfield town. more london stories just after half past. a study of graduate pay shows women with degrees gain more financially in their first few years of work than men do.
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the institute for fiscal studies found that by the end of their 20s, female graduates earn 28% more than other women. for men, the difference is only 8%. lauren moss reports. choosing to go to university can be an expensive decision. the average student leaves with £50,000 of debt. for the first time, a report has examined whether graduates later make that money back. it appears women are getting a better return on their investment. on average, by the age of 29, a female graduate earns £6,700 a year more than a woman who did not go to university. in comparison, a man with a degree earns £2700 a year more than a man without. the subject studied makes a big difference, with maths, science and medicine likely to lead to better wages than the creative arts, english or philosophy. we see lots of men studying
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at institutions with zero or negative returns by 29. but it is important to bear in mind this return is likely to grow through men's 30s as graduate men tend to earn at a faster rate through their 30s than non—graduate men. for women, we see a large average return of around 26%, that varies but it is a pretty consistently positive story for women. these figures are only a snapshot of average earnings at the age 29. they don't look into how what may happen next in life could have an impact, such as how if a woman has children it could affect her income and how male graduates tend to earn more later. some students think the findings might affect what people choose to study. there are quite a lot of degrees that are not as employable. i think it should impact people's choices, if money is something that drives you. maybe people are discouraged to studying art or literature, but i feel like it is something to think about. the government is to review university tuition fees.
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the focus will turn to which institutions offer the best value for money. a good degree will be worth the investment. i want to see universities competing to offer the best quality and value for money degrees to young people. as students prepared to send off their ucas applications early next year, questions continue to be asked about how well—prepared they will be for life after university. lauren moss, bbc news. nations must triple efforts to keep global warming below 2 celsius, that's according to an annual review of global emissions by the united nations environment programme. joining me now is dr yuri rogel, an expert in climate change the grantham institute at imperial college london, who was a scientific advisor to the un environment report. thank you for coming in. this makes
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grim reading. the message being we have to do even more than we thought if we're going to prevent this. is correct, it has been nine years in a i’ow correct, it has been nine years in a row that the un environment programme has put out this report that every year we show that there isa gap that every year we show that there is a gap between what countries are putting on the table and where emissions should be going to limit warming to below 1.5 degrees and this year the cap is even larger, down on what we assessed in previous yea rs. down on what we assessed in previous years. give me some idea, if we are going to avoid 2 degrees in rising temperatures, how much more do we need to do to avoid that? what countries have put on the table right now would bring down emissions from where they would go if we were doing absolutely nothing. however three times more in terms of emission reduction should be done for emissions to be put in line with 2 degrees. and even five times more for them to be in line with limiting
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warming to 1.5 degrees. five times more? five times what is promised, not what we're doing. the report clearly shows that policies, the measures that countries have put in place are not on track to meet their promises. what is the scenario if we don't? what are we facing? with each year that passes, we emit more carbon dioxide and dusty carbon dioxide accumulated in the atmosphere commits us to further warming and further impact, which originally irreversible. at the same time that means that we will be committed to more stringent emission reductions afterwards or by exposing the world to dangerous levels of climate change. we here in this country have had a summer that people will say once—in—a—lifetime, you always say that is going to be much more regular. it will indeed become much more regular, just yesterday if i'm not mistaken the uk
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met office launched another report showing specific projections for the uk in such a case. so it is true that what is now a very rare occurrence might become much more common in the future. we have been hearing a lot from president trump, hearing a lot from president trump, he said he does not believe the figures in terms of the costs to deal with this. but on a much wider basis, has science now got the credibility that a few years ago there were a lot of climate sceptics, but now it seems to be accepted that the science is scientifically right, if you like. the site has all lot been very clear on this topic and it has already been clear on this topic for the last couple of decades, it is true that only the last couple of years warrant for impacts are being felt because of the lack of climate action, and the general public now also slowly starts to better understand what it would imply to have a unchecked climate change. because we are going through it, because we have at some of that we
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have just had and winter ‘s .mac exactly, right now we are around, we have around 1 degrees of global warming. if we continue our emissions as they are going on now it will be at one and have degrees and 20a0, so that is another 20 yea rs. and 20a0, so that is another 20 years. so the impact that are projected out there now, and more impacts will come really soon. briefly, finally, what is the worst—case scenario? because its average rise of that level changes many, average rise of that level changes any average rise of that level changes many, many things, doesn't it? in terms of human life, what are we looking at? the worst-case scenario is that we don't manage at all to limit climate change in any sense whatsoever, however, the same time, one can see that climate action is happening at different levels. it is insufficient at this moment but there are also very positive
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developments, for example in renewable energy, in increased awareness in the public and so on, so awareness in the public and so on, so there are definitely positive developments, but at this point we do not measure up to the challenge that we have ahead to limit warming to safe levels. thank you. you don't have an added to brexit, have you? now. does the thought. two boats carrying a total of 18 migrants, including an 18 month old child, have been stopped in the channel. they're the latest of more than 100 people who've been picked up trying to cross to the uk. simonjones reports from dover. nine migrants on a fishing boat found this morning by the french authorities, another nine rescued from this small boat and brought back to dover. despite repeated warnings on both sides of the channel that people are putting their lives at risk trying to cross the busiest shipping lane in the world, it's continuing. well, it's unprecedented what is happening at the moment, and it's like crossing the m25 on foot during the rush hour.
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it is the busiest thoroughfare for shipping in the world, there's over a00 commercial shipping movements a day, they do not have lighting, they do not have experience, they've got an inadequate boat. they're very, very lucky to be alive. the french authorities rescued another nine migrants in the early hours. the dover lifeboat was involved in one of this morning's rescue operations, and down there beside it, you can seejust how small the boat on which nine migrants were found is, risking their lives in the cold and the dark. over the past month, more than 100 migrants have succeeded in getting across the channel in small boats. most have claimed to be from iran. it's thought many have flown into serbia after the country began offering visa—free access to iranians to boost tourism and trade, then heading to northern france, with the goal of getting to the south coast. we need to see the home office and the french authorities working together to find these people traffickers who are behind this and stop them in their
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tracks, before there is a tragedy in the middle of the english channel. the home office says borderforce patrols have been stepped up, but some are warning that if this continues, the rescue operations could turn into the recovery of bodies. simonjones, bbc news, dover. our correspondent simonjones is in doverfor us now. it does seem like we are seeing an awful lot more number of attempts to do this, why is that? there has certainly been a spike this month when coastguards are talking about unprecedented numbers, we have counted so far 13 boats that had managed to get across the channel with migrants on board this month alone, carrying more than a hundred migrants. there are potentially two possible reasons, it is about wet and blow you read over this afternoon but overall conditions happen fairly mild during the month of november. that has meant that
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people have had the right weather conditions to make the attempt. also what may well be part of this, that word again, brexit. because we understand that people smugglers overin understand that people smugglers over in northern france are killing migrants that come next march potentially there will be increased checks at borders into britain. therefore the message to the migrant is if you want to get across the need to do it before brexit, and you need to do it before brexit, and you need to do it before brexit, and you need to do it now. before winter truly sets in. one of the aspects i not the coastguard and others are looking at is the increased number of people who say they are a rainy and coming over, what is behind that? at the moment practically eve ryo ne that? at the moment practically everyone who's arriving in getting here are claiming to be from iran. the thought behind that is now it is easierfor the thought behind that is now it is easier for iranians to travel to serbia and get their visa free and increased tourism and trade them from serbia it is thought the
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migrants are travelling through europe to northern france and then getting on board is to try and get across the channel. the other issue is at the moment britain is not returning genuine migrants from iran back to the country, so if the last year and if they can prove they are from iran that they will not be returned to iran. having said that we understand the double rescue that took place this morning, one of the boards brought back here to dover, the nine people on board said they we re the nine people on board said they were from iraq but to give you an idea of the risk that they were taking, we understand there were two families on board the boat, a mother and father and three children and another mother and father and one child plus another man, so these are people crossing the busiest shipping lane in the world in the dark with their children, it gives you a sign of someone, how much desperation there is to ultimately end up in the uk. looking behind you can be a very bleak scene, counted ? uk. looking behind you can be a very bleak scene, counted? what will the
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borderfirst be bleak scene, counted? what will the border first be doing to try and counter this? the uk border force have told us that in recent weeks they have stepped up patrol boats along the south—east coast, looking for these potential migrant boats, but the local mp here and over charlie elphick said it simply is not enough and in many ways often they are searching for a needle in a haystack. he is calling on better cooperation between britain and france to try and deal with this issue and certainly in recent days we have seen issue and certainly in recent days we have seen more issue and certainly in recent days we have seen more migrant boats being picked up, closer to france. it is certainly surveillance has been stepped up over in france and patrol boats have been lodged over in france. but ultimately, there is a determination amongst many of the migrants in northern france to try and get over here, the channel is a big place, it is a dangerous place and people are determined that they will potentially large boats, and there also is another theory that some of the boat when they reach of
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the short of dover deputy be so overloaded that the coastguard and potentially have not managed to get the way on the ornstein is a larger boats in bringing the smaller boats closer to the course of dover, maybe a couple of miles out, dropping them there, they can then for the emergency services, the people on board, they then get rescued and brought back here. and for many, the minute they touch wood on british soilfor them that is minute they touch wood on british soil for them that is mission accomplished. thank you. now it is time for the forecast. we have some wet and windy weather to come today, particularly across western pa rt of come today, particularly across western part of the uk. that is where the rain has been heaviest so far. that band of rain will continue its journey eastwards as we go into the evening time. it will be a wet end to the day for eastern part of scotla nd end to the day for eastern part of scotland with the rain easing for a time further west. however there is more on the way as we go through
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this evening and overnight. you can see that next batch of rain steaming in. the wind is coming in from the south—west so it will feel different overnight. lows of 10 degrees in plymouth. still quite chilly across the north of the uk but that will change as we head into wednesday. it will be wet and windy and we could see gusts of wind of around 70 mph around exposed coast sandhills. there is the potential for around exposed coast sandhills. there is the potentialfor some disruption from no strong winds and heavy rain will swing from northern ireland into scotland. that could also cause one or two problems. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines: the prime minister begins a tour to sell her brexit agreement, but as it's attacked by president trump and allies at home, she insists trade deals will be possible. we will be able to do we will be able to do trade we will be able to do trade deals, we will be able to do trade deals, to negotiate trade deals, with countries around the rest of the world and as regards the united states, we have already been talking to them about the sort of agreement we could have in the future. a bus company is fined £2.3 million for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed two people in a crash in 2015. 18 migrants, including a toddler, are rescued from two small boats in the english channel. matthew hedges, the british academic released from jail in the united arab emirates, returns home and thanks his wife for helping win his freedom. a bus company is fined £2.3 million for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed two people in a crash in 2015.
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global greenhouse gas emissions reached a record high in 2017, the un says nations must radically improve policies to avoid dangerous climate change. sport now on afternoon live with hugh, and some controversial comments from sam burgess about his brief spell in rugby union. yes, you give a thank you taketh away in the first few seconds of that, simon. sam burgess switched codes with the 2015 rugby world cup in mind. it was a controversial move up in mind. it was a controversial move up the mind and very much supported by the then england coach stuart lancaster. he wanted him in the squad, playing in the tournament. it was controversial particularly because of the way he was fast tracked into that england team and then when things went very badly, england failing to get out of the group stage, sam burgess was very
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much made by some a scapegoat. an experience that made him go back to by experience that made him go back to rugby league straight after the tournament. even three years later, you're still getting criticism. overnight, the straw that seemed to break the camel ‘s back. he responded on twitter with this, essentially, throwing stones in the direction of others. by by whom of course he means stuart lancaster. at that point, it is fair to say he probably realised he had said enough and immediately decided to wish england well at the next world cup.
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quarter past midnight, the time. england well at the next world cup. quarter past midnight, the timelj will let you make your own decision about when is bestjudicious the manchester clubs today can both make it through to the last 16 of the champions league. manchester united takes on young boys of switzerland. it has been suggested they feel more pressure playing at old trafford but jose they feel more pressure playing at old trafford butjose mourinho will not entertain the notion. if you feel pressure, stay out of. watch it on tv. if you feel pressure to play matches when people come to support, come on, i neverfelt matches when people come to support, come on, i never felt pressured to play at all. manchester city need just a point to make the knockout stage but faced the only team to
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have beaten them this season, they face lyon. i want to qualify, that is the target. when you start the season, the most important issue is qualification for the champions league. if you make one or two mistakes, you can be out and it is so mistakes, you can be out and it is so dangerous, this competition. sol campbell has been appointed manager of macclesfield town after agreeing an 18 month contract today. he has previously complained his managerial career in england has been hampered by a block of opportunity for black cultures. —— lack of opportunity. jonny bairstow has become the latest england cricketer to try his hand at the very shortest form of the game. he has signed a short—term deal in
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the t10 league. it is being played at the moment in the uae. that is all your sport from now. thank you very much for that. as we've been hearing, two boats carrying 18 migrants, including a toddler, have been stopped in the english channel. the vast majority of those migrants who have been picked up in the last few weeks have claimed to have come from iran. with me is dr sanam vakil, she leads the iran forum project at chatham house. thank you for coming in. no doubt in your mind that these are iranians and there is a reason that they are trying to get here. if they say they are iranians, we should take them at face value because there has been a past trend of iranian migration that lasts —— the last round was in 2009 after the green movement protests that went on for many months. we are
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sort of predicting there is going to be increased waves of migration out of iran because of the reimposition of iran because of the reimposition of us sanctions and the massive economic pressure within the economy. people are going to be fleeing more. we are talking about we re fleeing more. we are talking about were relatively well off iranians who can afford to make this perilous journey. relativity. people who are able to sell or save and invest in the journey, which is able to sell or save and invest in thejourney, which is harrowing, an 18—month—old coming across the english channel might speak to the level of desperation people are feeling at the level of anxiety. they are willing to make this risk. for every family that makes it a briton, there are many others still somewhere in europe. there is these free travel to turkey, for example. people in the past have said they wa nted people in the past have said they wanted to claim refugee status and go through the process. all risk
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illegal transit routes. it is suspected that these iranians that came through came in before the close of period in october and then waited for the right time to cross over. what sort of desperation that is what are you trying to flee that you are prepared to put an 18—month—old across the english channel...? 18—month—old across the english channel. . . ? iranians writ large inside the country are feeling quite vulnerable economically and there is a lot of uncertainty about as to how long this sanction stand—off with united states is going to last. this is increasing prices, a drop in employment and youth in particular also feel that the impact of repression inside the country, political repression, human rights violations, and if you take up
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together, there is not a lot of hope for the future. definitely not in the short. people might looking to sort of migration as sort of a transition and something else. sort of migration as sort of a transition and something elselj sort of migration as sort of a transition and something else. i was going to ask you this is good to stop any time soon but no is the a nswer to stop any time soon but no is the answer to that? the iranian government is also suggesting they expect more to leave the country, as they have in past economic conditions, even during the war in the 1980s. they are using that to pressure european governments and sort of form that iran has a special role to play in security and prevent migratory patterns from taking place as well. what happens to these families when they get here? what is the hard part to really understand. not everyone makes it through but there is an understanding that if you do get in, to the uk, you will
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not be sent back. but it is a very ha rd process to not be sent back. but it is a very hard process to become legal. a process that can take years and a process that can take years and a process that can take years and a process that is not necessarily allow you legal employment and legal rights in this country. do they know what then —— that when they leave?|j what then —— that when they leave?” think so but they think it is worth the risk because there are opportunities that do not exist back home. there is a sense of hope for something new. thank you very much. a health think—tank is warning that thousands of cancer patients are dying unnecessarily each year because nhs england has failed to improve care quickly enough. a study by the health foundation found england had failed to close the gap with countries that perform better, such as canada. our health correspondent, nick triggle, reports. over the last 20 years, there have been four national cancer strategies. each has promised the best care for england. but the health foundation said, while there had been progress, the nhs was still lagging behind. its analysis shows that only on breast cancer
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have the health service managed to actually close the gap with the best performing systems. the report warns the lack of progress is costing lives. each year, 135,000 people die from cancer. but 10,000 of those could be prevented if care was as good as in other nations. the key problem is one of late diagnosis. people who are diagnosed late have a much less good chance of surviving five years than those who were diagnosed early. and so we have got to make it easier for patients to access their gp, for gps to investigate and refer on and for diagnostic services to be there so that people can be diagnosed in a rapid way. the think tank wants to see better access to tests and scans to speed up diagnosis, but it said services were being undermined by a lack of staff and equipment, which is delaying how quickly patients are seen. the government has already said it aims to tackle this.
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last month, the prime minister promised the number of cancers being diagnosed early would increase from one in two to three in four over the next ten years, thanks to the extra funding being provided to the health service. the department of health and social care said more details would be unveiled in the long—term plan for the nhs, which is expected to be published soon. nick triggle, bbc news. scientists at nasa say they're beginning to gather data from mars, after successfully landing a probe on the surface of the planet yesterday. the ‘insight‘ spacecraft has already begun to send its first images back. our science reporter, victoria gill, sent this report from mission control in pasadena in california. touchdown confirmed! relief and joy at mission control. after plunging through the martian atmosphere at six times the speed of a bullet, nasa's insight spacecraft safely planted its feet
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on the surface of mars. now the science begins. it's going to be a really busy two or three months for us. i am really hoping that the energy and the feeling today is going to carry me through those next few months, because it is going to be needed. when we get our first marsquake we will get a bunch of images over the next few days. and it is incredible to be on this mission and say, "tomorrow when i come onto my shift i will see an image of mars that nobody has seen before." it's already sending snapshots back to earth. insight‘s cameras will examine its surroundings in detail, so scientists can select exactly where to place its scientific equipment. it will listen for martian earthquakes and drill deep into the planet to study its inner structure. as the insight lander studies the deep interior of mars robotically, it will be sending its data back here, to mission control nasa in california, and people will work out exactly how rocky worlds like earth, mars
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and the moon actually formed a.5 billion years ago. they lovingly call this the centre of the universe. the two—year mission is now under way to build a picture of the hidden depths of the red planet. victoria gill, bbc news at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory, california. maryam moshiri is here. in a moment, she will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: theresa may tours the nations trying to rally public support for her brexit deal, as it's criticised by allies at home and abroad a bus company is fined more than two million pounds for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed 2 people. and eighteen migrants — including a toddler — are rescued from two small boats in the english channel. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. donald trump has suggested theresa may's brexit agreement
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could threaten a us—uk trade deal. the us president told reporters the withdrawal agreement "sounds like a great deal for the eu" and meant the uk might not be able to trade with the us. more on that shortly. uk and dutch regulators have fined ride—sharing service uber for a breach that exposed the details of 57 million customers and drivers. the information commissioner's office fined the company £385,000 while the dutch data protection authority imposed a fine of 600,000 euros. thomas cook has warned that annual profits are set to come in £30m lower than expected, blamed on the summer heatwave. it's the second profit warning the firm has issued in two months. earnings were £88m lower in the year to september, as people delayed booking holidays because of the prolonged heatwave at home. someone else getting a bit of heat
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is facebook, getting a bit of a grilling. yes, it is an international committee made up of nine countries and all they want is to basically clamp down hard on fake news and disinformation and they have been over the past two months trying to get mark zuckerberg from facebook to come to london to sit in front of this committee and to talk about face looks disinformation allegations. there is an empty chair with his name on it and they also tweeted, the committee tweeting saying, nine countries, 2a official representatives, millions, but where is mark zuckerberg? someone did turn up. his name is richard allen. he is the vice president for the policy for europe africa and asia. policy solutions.
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as pa rt of africa and asia. policy solutions. as part of the questioning, they said to him, does it look good that mark zuckerberg has not come to see us? he admitted it did not look good. one thing we are expecting from this committee previously was to do with certain internal facebook documents that were seized. the head of the committee, damian collins, said a sergeant in arms... it is a great story. a sergeant in arms was sent by this parliamentary committee. he went to a hotel and the us businessman there, who apparently had a whole load of internal facebook documents to do with privacy and all sorts of interesting things. they forced him to give these documents. they put him ina to give these documents. they put him in a car and drove him to parliament. it is like mission
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impossible, except no one dies. thank goodness. anyway, damian collins threatened to expose the contents collins threatened to expose the co nte nts of collins threatened to expose the contents of these documents to facebook. however, disappointingly for us, he did not, but there was a little titbit that we got. the contents little titbit that we got. the co nte nts of little titbit that we got. the contents of the document will not expose but at one point they asked richard allen about an internal e—mail sent by a facebook engineer in which he talked about some kind of russian activity within the website and whether or not they should look into it and they asked richard allen, we have seen this e—mail, did you look into it and he said no. i don't know. it is still ongoing. facebook is getting a grilling. mark zuckerberg is not. it is a big thing for that he has not turned up. richard allen is getting it in the neck because of that.
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we are talking about fashion now. another committee, mps are very busy right now. there is nothing else for them to be discussing. the key question was posed today to primark, represented at this committee, as well as marks & spencer, burberry and primark was asked, how do you defend selling a t—shirt for £2? it basically said, it is down to our business model. mps though are investigating the impact of fast fashion on the environment, which many people are saying is quite frankly devastating. let's talk to hannah carter. what do you make of primark saying a £2 t—shirt is part of our business model? it is hard to
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comment on primark 's setup. what we are trying to do is talk more to consumers than to brands and we feel that if we can change the behaviour of the people buying those t—shirts then maybe brands will feel more pressure to actually do something about supply chain and the problem of fa st about supply chain and the problem of fast fashion and the environment. you are saying you need to hit the consumer and make sure they understand the impact of what they are buying. we are talking to young people and giving them solutions. we are saying, firstly, from our point of view, clothes are being wasted and thrown into household bins when they could be worn again or reuse. what we are trying to say is don't ever throw clothes in the bin. and also think about second—hand instead of new. there is great quality second—hand of new. there is great quality second— hand clothes out of new. there is great quality second—hand clothes out there. if people start to do those things,
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brands will see a change in behaviour. took me through the impact of fast fashion on the environment. currently, there are 300,000 tonnes of coal is going to landfill in the uk every year. —— clothes. that does not need to happen. young people or anybody can just stop that by not throwing clothes in the bin and looking for clothes in the bin and looking for clothes banks or charity shops. thank you very much indeed. very briefly, let's look at the markets. not a bit bloody good day. they are worried about the trade relationship between china and the us. —— nota —— not a particularly good day. the markets are worried.
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that's all the business news. his life was changed when the man whojoined his life was changed when the man who joined the bone his life was changed when the man whojoined the bone marrow his life was changed when the man who joined the bone marrow register because he saw a woman he liked in the queue for donors turned out to bea the queue for donors turned out to be a perfect match. so, all of these i've got to have? yeah. 0h! that's why you have a drip. iwould be sick, like, everywhere. rupert spent more than 80 days in a specialist treatment unit, diagnosed with a rare blood disorder. the six—year—old's immune system was failing right in front of his parents‘ eyes.
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i remember the time when his hair was falling out, and i was in with a nurse and i was just stroking his hair, and it wasjust coming out in clumps. i would have done anything to have swapped places with him. it's... it's such... it's such a horrific experience. his only option was to find a willing bone marrow donor who was a close enough genetic match. unknown to rupert, in basildon, someone was about to join the register who had the potential to save his life. billy higgins works in a bank. a charity had set up outside and was signing up bone marrow donors. he's the first to admit his initial reason forjoining the register wasn't all about helping others. yeah, ended up on the register because the girl i liked was in the queue. due to the complexities
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of rupert's condition, billy had to have an operation to remove some of his bone marrow. rupert has gone on to make a full recovery. billy went to hemel hempstead to meet rupert and his family. he was joined by the girl that he was flirting with in the queue to become a donor. she had to come along, really, seeing as now she's his wife. hi. pleased to meet you. nice to meet you! hi. how you doing, rupert? good, thank you. you all right? yeah. i feel... i feel very lucky. i can't believe, like, that someone has... i don't know, i can't put it into words. he's a superman. i'll take that one! rupert needed a hero, and in billy he got one. that is such a great story. that
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story is available later on the bbc iplayer. let's have a look at the weather forecast. the chilly weather we have seen over recent days will be urging away over the next couple of days, as the weather turns significantly milder but it is also going to turn wet and windy. a couple of areas of low pressure waiting in the atlantic. temperatures are going to be boosted quite significantly. if we look at today, we're looking at highs of around 7 degrees but by tomorrow, much milder air, some of us will see temperatures as high as 15 celsius. the change starts to take place this afternoon, as this band of rain sta rts afternoon, as this band of rain starts to push through. that will
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drag in the milder air across western areas late in the day. it will be replaced by another area of rain moving in from the west later on. rain at times, probably best sums up the weather. wednesday, it is the strength of the winds that we remain concerned about. we will have some very strong remain concerned about. we will have some very strong winds coming up through western hills. gusts could reach 70 mph. that is strong enough to bring some localised disruption at times. there will be some heavy rain. the heaviest of which will be going across northern ireland and on into scotland. we talked about the rain and strong winds. it is going to be turning much milder. temperatures pretty much into double figures. wednesday, another
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low— pressure figures. wednesday, another low—pressure system. that is targeting the uk. a little squeeze in the isobars and that could bring a swathe of even stronger winds up through some of our western areas. potentially gusts of up to 80 mph. that is still uncertain. but what is not uncertain, thursday will be wet and windy with rain easing to sunshine and showers later. staying on the mild side. we're going to keep this mild air with as for the next few days. temperatures around 13 or 1a often in london over the next two days. —— next few days. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at a. theresa may begins a tour of the nations to sell her brexit agreement — but, as it's attacked by president trump and allies at home, she insists trade deals will be possible. we will be able to do trade details,
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negotiate trade deals with countries around the rest of the world. regarding the united states, we have already been talking to them about the sort of agreement we could have in the future. a bus company is fined more than two million pounds for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed 2 people. home at last: matthew hedges — the british academic released from jail in the united arab emirates — thanks his wife for helping win his freedom. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — hugh ferris. good afternoon. both manchester clu bs ca n good afternoon. both manchester clubs can qualify for the champions league last 16 tonight. city have the easier target while united can go through with a win, if they get there on time. more on that later. more on that later. thanks. chris fawkes has all the weather. thank you very much. we will cast an eye over to norway for the weather
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where it has just turned dark and it will stay that way for a long time. weather turns milder here in the uk and we will be looking at the strong winds targeting the west of the country tomorrow. we will look at where the strongest weather is heading. thanks chris. also coming up — nasa's probe on mars sends back its first image of the red planet. you will see pictures later. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. the prime minister has hit the road today to try to muster support for her brexit plan — with many critics saying her campaign has already stalled. but as she begins her uk—wide push, there's been damming condemnation at home and abroad of her brexit deal. she's currently in northern ireland — a visit the leader of the dup, arlene foster, described as a waste of time, accusing the pm of ‘giving up' on getting a better deal.
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on a visit to wales earlier today, mrs may rejected president trump's suggestion that her deal might hamper a future trade deal between the us and the uk. in another blow for the prime minister, the former defence secretary, sir michael fallon, warned her brexit deal is ‘doomed.’ and in the last hour, the scottish first minister, nicola sturgeon, said the deal would reduce scotland's national income by 9 billion pounds a year by 2030. our political correspondent chris mason reports. the vote is a fortnight away. suddenly, it feels like a general election campaign with one candidate, the prime minister, and one policy, her brexit deal. first stop today, mid wales. i am here today at the winter fair at the royal welsh hearing from farmers and manufacturers the importance of the certainty that the deal brings, the importance of the free trade area, and the ability to continue to export well with the european union
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in the future that we see in that political declaration for our future relationship on trade with the european union. but her critics are everywhere. this man, glass of water in hand, used walk into this radio studio all the time to defend the government. take a listen to him now. my fear is this deal actuallyjust gives us the worst of all worlds. no guarantee of smooth trade in the future and no ability to reduce the tariffs that we need to conclude trade deals with the rest of the world. so unless the commons, i think, can be persuaded somehow that those things are possible, yes, then i think the deal is doomed. i think the disappointing thing for me is that the prime minister has given up, and she's saying, this is where we are and we just have to accept that.
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but she may have given up on further negotiations and trying to find a better deal, but i haven't given up. i believe in a better way forward, i believe we must find that. with friends like that, the prime minister could do without what you are about to hearfrom the president of the united states. who does he think is the winner in the negotiation between the uk and european union? sounds like a great deal for the eu and i think we have to do this... i think we have to take a look seriously at whether or not the uk is allowed to trade because, you know, right now if you look at the deal, they may not be able to train with us. downing street insists an independent trade policy is possible under its plan, but with criticism raining down on the prime minister, people on all sides of this debate are now marshalling their arguments, hoping that their plan can replace hers if, when, it is defeated. some passionate brexiteers say leaving the eu with no deal is fine and they reckon the vision of mrs may is the worst in history and they are not surprised by the intervention of president trump. he is not only pro—british, pro—brexit, believing that nation states should make deals together,
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but from day one of being elected, he saw a big all—encompassing trade deal with the uk as being a very important thing for our two countries. and for him to say, i am not protectionist, i believe in free trade when it is between countries that are equivalent. from those arguing for no deal to those arguing for no brexit, some young campaigners gathered in westminster this morning to make their case. if you get the feeling anything could happen in the next few months, you mightjust be onto something. well, whilst theresa may was speaking to those she met at queen's university we got a rare insight in to her frustration at not being able to keep everyone happy with her brexit deal... idid i did express a slight frustration yesterday about those comments. i have been through this 18 month
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negotiation process, they said you will not get a deal, you will not achieve this or that or the final deal. i got a final deal. i got a final deal. our chief political correspondent, vicki young is in westminster. it isa it is a hard sell. she will be even more irritated because in the next two weeks a lot of people will be saying she cannot get her deal through parliament. the numbers do not look strong. she is continuing to go round the country and sell the deal to the public. i presume, hoping that businesses and others will put pressure on their mps to get behind her so i think that is the strategy. whether it will work or not, some mps are already seeing her going out and selling their conservative message during the last
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election did not work. they are not that confident it will work this time round. powerpoint is she will keep going because she feels she has the only deal. —— her point is. it involves compromise. the idea you canjust involves compromise. the idea you can just start again and go back to the eu for a better deal is simply not realistic in her view. let us talk about president trump and sir michael fallon, these criticisms that will hurt. yes, michael fallon got up in the commons yesterday and made it clear he was not happy. he said the uk was effectively handing over £39 billion with no assurances there would be frictionless trade or we would get anything in return. he followed that up today by going on to radio four and not being supportive when it whispered to him that theresa may would have to resign if she loses the vote on the 11th of december. clearly that is
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not then president trump suggested an ambitious trade deal between america and the uk would not be possible because of this brexit compromise she has come up with, that has not helped either. the uk, under the terms of the withdrawal agreement, once we have left the transition period, they would be able to sign their own trade deals but the future —— the question about our future relationship. but the future —— the question about ourfuture relationship. the one theresa may envisages is one where we are closely aligned to the eu. so you have to make a choice, if you're close to the eu, there are rules and regulations will limit what you can offer america to make an attractive trade offer. these are trade—offs that you have when you're trying to negotiate this kind of deal. there are plenty of people in house of commons who feel this is not the way to do it. the best idea would be to
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break away more cleanly which would give you more independence. that is two weeks to go until that vote. theresa may will continue to make her case. regardless of the opposition. that is what i wanted to pick up on, it is a tough week, she had that mauling in the commons yesterday and prime minister questions tomorrow. she's also going to argentina this week. yes, she has a 620 summit in argentina. lots of people have been talking about the resilience of the prime minister. others say that his/herjob. but admiration from some about her resilience, carrying on despite setbacks and never seems to be downhearted, that is a personal recognition of her strengths. others will see that dog and determination has had a problem because they think she has boxed herself in during negotiations. she has made up her
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mind about what brexit is about, especially regarding freedom of movement and immigration. they feel thatis movement and immigration. they feel that is limited her somewhat in the deal she has been allowed to get. i am not sure that personal admiration for the work ethic will translate into overwhelming support for the deal she has god. thank you very much. —— she has got. —— she has got. a bus company has been fined more than two million pounds after it ignored warnings about a driver who crashed into a supermarket, killing two people. the midland red bus careered into the sainsbury‘s store in coventry three years ago, killing a 7—year—old boy and a pensioner. the trial heard the driver — who was 77 at the time — had mistaken the accelerator for the brake. kathryn stancheshun reports. the moment kailash chander lost control of his double—decker bus failing to brake, pressing hard on the accelerator instead. seconds later, it smashed into a supermarket, killing seven—year—old rowan fitzgerald, who'd been sitting at the front of the top deck. 76—year—old dora hancox, who had been crossing the road that afternoon,
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was also killed. the court heard it was lucky more people were not injured. kailash chander was 77 at the time of the accident and was diagnosed afterwards with dementia, his driving had become increasingly erratic. mr chander had had several previous crashes, there had been repeated complaints by customers, and six months prior to the crash, he had been assessed in house. bosses were told fatigue was affecting his driving. on the day of the accident, kailash chander had already worked a 75 hour week. he was deemed unfit to stand trial at a previous hearing. the bus company, pleading guilty to two health and safety offences, admitted that the failure to act had tragic consequences. or own detailed policies were not followed as closely as they should have been. there were failures at an operational level with driver supervision and we deeply regret the opportunities that were missed to act decisively on warning signs.
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in a statement, the fitzgerald family said their lives have been changed forever. we will always feel anger over the cruel and unnecessary way rowan died. anger at not only the driver, kailash chander, but also a bus company which we feel did not do enough to stop the driver being a danger to others. midland red says it has made key changes and now has a much more robust safety measures in place, but thejudge said the £2.3 million fine reflects the fact the public was put at risk notjust on that day, but for months beforehand. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news, birmingham. the british academic — freed from jail in the united arab emirates yesterday — has arrived back in britain. matthew hedges was welcomed home by his wife and members of his family. the durham university phd student was pardoned yesterday after being sentenced to life in prison for spying. and this afternoon his wife daniela tejada has tweeted a picture of the couple — reunited after his return.
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she said — "thanks for collectively helping me to bring back my husband. we've been through hell and back and would really appreciate having some space to catch up on much—needed rest. " a police watchdog says a ‘crisis' in mental health services is putting an ‘intolerable burden' on police in england and wales. the inspectorate of constabulary claims officers are being forced to respond to tens of thousands of incidents every year, which should be handled by mental health specialists. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, reports. he was a talented musician, but for many years sean rigg suffered from severe mental health problems, paranoid schizophrenia. in august 2008, he was arrested and restrained by police after reports he'd attacked people. the ao—year—old was taken to a police station, but he collapsed and died in hospital. an inquestjury said police had used an unnecessary and unsuitable level of force. what you need is care. when somebody is being restrained, somebody is vulnerable, the excessive force that's being used, that shouldn't happen. we are where we are,
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police are involved in this. the watchdog that monitors police in england and wales says they should be far less involved in cases like this. in a report it says officers are picking up the pieces because the mental health system is broken. the report says when mental health patients need help, 50% of the trips to hospital or a safe place are made by police, not ambulance. it takes about three hours for police to deal with someone who is mentally unwell. in london, five people with mental health problems called police 8600 times last year, more than anyone else. the police are called to step in out of hours when other services go home, so we see the volume of calls to police peaking at around four or five o'clock in the evening weekdays when other practitioners are going home. and we see that as other mental health services pushing the risk and demand on to the police just because they
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are a 2a/7 service. police leaders have welcomed the inspection report. they say the health service must stop passing the buck. this report must now put a full stop to everything that we've said before. there is a crisis, it needs to be dealt with and there needs to be some action. so i completely support what's being said. the government says it's planning to spend an extra £2 billion a year on mental health services in england and has already reduced the use of police custody for those in need. danny shaw, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. theresa may tours the nations trying to rally public support allies at home and abroad. a bus company is fined more than two million pounds for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed 2 people. and eighteen migrants — including a toddler — are rescued from two small boats in the english channel. jose mourinho promises he will walk
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to old trafford for the match. they have been delayed because of traffic problems. win tonight and they could be through. the second leg of the copperfinal be through. the second leg of the copper final will be through. the second leg of the copperfinal will not be be through. the second leg of the copper final will not be held be through. the second leg of the copperfinal will not be held in argentina. but it will be held on april nine of december at a venue to be announced. sol campbell has his first manager'sjob. be announced. sol campbell has his first manager's job. he takes over at macclesfield town. more on the street just after half at macclesfield town. more on the streetjust after half past at macclesfield town. more on the street just after half past four. at macclesfield town. more on the streetjust after half past four. —— more on those stories. scientists at nasa say they're beginning to gather data from mars, after successfully landing a probe on the surface of the planet yesterday. the ‘insight‘ spacecraft has already begun to send its first images back. our science reporter, victoria gill, sent this report from mission control in california. touchdown confirmed! relief and joy at mission control. after plunging through the martian
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atmosphere at six times the speed of a bullet, nasa's insight spacecraft safely planted its feet on the surface of mars. now the science begins. it's going to be a really busy two or three months for us. i am really hoping that the energy and the feeling today is going to carry me through those next few months, because it is going to be needed. when we get our first marsquake we will get a bunch of images over the next few days. and it is incredible to be on this mission and say, "tomorrow when i come onto my shift i will see an image of mars that nobody has seen before." it's already sending snapshots back to earth. insight‘s cameras will examine its surroundings in detail, so scientists can select exactly where to place its scientific equipment. it will listen for martian earthquakes and drill deep into the planet to study its inner structure. as the insight lander studies the deep interior of mars robotically, it will be sending its data back here, to mission control nasa in california, and people will work out exactly how rocky
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worlds like earth, mars and the moon actually formed a.5 billion years ago. they lovingly call this the centre of the universe. the two—year mission is now under way to build a picture of the hidden depths of the red planet. victoria gill, bbc news at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory, california. joining me now is dr rain irshad, a researcher at the science and technology facilities council who worked on the nasa mars insight mission. i was watching you as we played that report, the relief on the faces in mission control when it landed, you must have shared that because you have been working on this for ten yea rs have been working on this for ten years as well? that is right. it was incredibly exciting. there was a momentjust before incredibly exciting. there was a moment just before landing incredibly exciting. there was a momentjust before landing when a pause went onjust momentjust before landing when a pause went on just a little bit longer than we anticipated. it is a worry that perhaps it did not make
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it, but it did and there was so much excitement. people were punching the air. we have had the first images and they look amazing. they are absolutely fabulous. the first one is the immediate snapshot with wide—angle lens. it still had the dust cap on the cover but it lets you know that it has got there and it is safe. the second one is so crisp. it is incredibly clear and it lets you see that you are absolutely on another world. they are amazing. nasa was tweeting them out earlier. we have been showing them the subject then. let us talk about what you want to happen next. —— showing them this afternoon. you are going to look inside the planet because you think there may be earthquakes going on? that is right. i was part ofa uk going on? that is right. i was part of a uk team. the going on? that is right. i was part ofa uk team. the uk going on? that is right. i was part of a uk team. the uk instrument is
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done miniature instrument which is incredibly sensitive. they will detect where to place that on the surface. once it is there, we will be getting the first vibrations that anyone has ever felt on the surface of another planet. we hope to send maters quake and impacts of meteorites as well. those vibrations might be coming from shifting tectonic plates or more likely in stress and concessions in the crust, the top surface of the planet. we will feel vibrations coming from meteor impacts all over the planet. each one lights up the inside of the planet for us so it is like when you walk into a dark room and turn on the light bulb. light from that boat travels through the room, hitch your eyes and allows you to see everything which is happening inside it. with each vibration hits the planet, the vibration travels through the planet to our sensors
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and allows us for the first time to see just what is going on and allows us for the first time to seejust what is going on inside maters. you must always be concerned that the equipment does not deal. —— inside more are. what you do to ensure these things stay working? that is why takes us so long to prepare for the mission. it has to survive the length of the journey and also we know we cannot go on to put it. it also has to survive conditions of launch and landing. the increased radiation during the journey and on the planet. gravity isa journey and on the planet. gravity is a lot less than on errors as well. we test each of those to within an inch of their lives. —— less tha n within an inch of their lives. —— less than on earth. it has its own back—up. if something fails, there will be another component which gets
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into takeover. if nasa called and said we have space in the next mission, we are sending men to mars, would you want to be on it? absolutely, i would not hesitate. what are the things you want answered, the questions you have? there are vast range of questions about the universe. the one everyone needs to know is, is there a life outside of the earth? we suspect thatis outside of the earth? we suspect that is not life on the surface of mars but we might find at the low mars but we might find at the low mars had a magnetic field which would've been the result of movement in our molten iron core on errors and we want to measure that. that magnetic field holds a rappers who are in place so it allows that atmosphere to keep us warm. it protects us from radiation from the
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sun. “— protects us from radiation from the sun. —— hold our gravity in place. at some point mars lost its atmosphere and its magnetic field and the solar wind allowed it to drift away which means temperatures on the surface became bombarded with radiation and that is why we think we have not found life on the surface. it is still the perfect —— the possibility there could be life below the surface and that is one of the questions we will be looking at. do usa the questions we will be looking at. do us a favour and do not go because we need you back on earth. great to talk to you, thank you very much for joining us this afternoon. thank you. two boats carrying a total of 18 migrants, including an 18 month old child, have been stopped in the channel. they're the latest of more than 100 people who've been picked up trying to cross to the uk. simonjones reports from dover. despite repeated warnings on both
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sides of the channel that people are putting their lives at risk trying to cross the busiest shipping lane in the world, it's continuing. nine migrants on a fishing boat found this morning by the french authorities, another nine rescued from this small boat and brought back to dover. well, it's unprecedented what is happening at the moment, and it's like crossing the m25 on foot during the rush hour. it is the busiest thoroughfare for shipping in the world, there's over a00 commercial shipping movements a day, they do not have lighting, they do not have experience, they've got an inadequate boat. they're very, very lucky to be alive. the french authorities rescued another nine migrants in the early hours. the dover lifeboat was involved in one of this morning's rescue operations, and down there beside it, you can seejust how small the boat on which nine migrants were found is, risking their lives in the cold and the dark. over the past month, more than 100 migrants have succeeded in getting across the channel in small boats. most have claimed to be from iran. it's thought many have flown into serbia after the country began
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offering visa—free access to iranians to boost tourism and trade, then heading to northern france, with the goal of getting to the south coast. we need to see the home office and the french authorities working together to find these people traffickers who are behind this and stop them in their tracks, before there is a tragedy in the middle of the english channel. the home office says borderforce patrols have been stepped up, but some are warning that if this continues, the rescue operations could turn into the recovery of bodies. simonjones, bbc news, dover. time for a look at the weather... we will talk about what is happening here in the moment but in certain parts of europe, it is quite miserable and gloomy all the time. yes. but looking at the length of the day, looking out of the window, it is already dark in london. we are
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losing two hours 15 minutes each day are thereabouts. but imagine what it is like in norway were yesterday, the length of the day was one hour and ten minutes. today they had just 28 minutes of daylight. that was today? yes, this was 15 minutes before the sun went down. quite a greedy with snow around. the sun is below the horizon. —— quite as greek league. it will get darker and darker. it has a very surreal feel to it, almost yellow rather than black. yes. it gets an evening twilight and morning twilight where the sun dips below the horizon. it still throws a little bit of white
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into the horizon but if you go further north, to the north pole, it is completely dark. thankfully we do not get that. it does feel quite dark outside. and we're in for a change? yes. quite chilly weather but the weather is on the turn. we have been —— we've seen these systems have been —— we've seen these syste ms m ove over have been —— we've seen these systems move over the atlantic. temperatures have been hovering around six or seven celsius but as we get the south—westerly winds blowing across the country, temperatures will rise. for some, 15 or16 temperatures will rise. for some, 15 or 16 celsius tomorrow. a completely different day. that change has been taking place through the day—to—day with this band of rain pushing in, as it cleared across wales and south england, that is where the milder air is. this evening, wet weather for eastern england and eastern
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scotland. driver time with the risk of mist and fog patches. overnight, not as cold as has been, quite mild in the south—west, temperatures no low in intent in plymouth. for tomorrow, we have this area of low pressure, tightly packed isobars targeting the uk with strong winds running up the western side of england and wales. gusts could reach 60 or 70 miles an hour. then the second batch of strong winds close to northern ireland and scotland towards evening. local gusts of 60 or 70 miles towards evening. local gusts of 60 or70 miles an towards evening. local gusts of 60 or 70 miles an hour. they will bring some disruption. branches down of trees or perhaps power cuts and transport problems. the rain as well, we will all get that but he at least in northern ireland and north—west scotland. they settled for thursday, low pressure remains with us. still some uncertainty
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about how strong that low pressure will be. worst case scenario, even stronger winds, perhaps 70 or 80 miles and are running up the west of england and wales. that is open to uncertainty. we are sure it will be a windy day, 1516 degrees probably more typical values. this run of mild weather is set to continue towards the end of the week on the weekend. —— 15 and 16 degrees. sometimes the rain will be quite persistent. temperatures remain in double figures for most of us but in the north of scotland, temperatures will be closer to average for this time of year. feeling cool as we head towards the weekend. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: theresa may tours the nations, trying to rally public support for her brexit deal as it's criticised by
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allies at home and abroad. a bus company is fined £2.3 million for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed two people in a crash in 2015. 18 migrants, including a toddler, are rescued from two small boats in the english channel. matthew hedges, the british academic released from jail in the united arab emirates, returns home and thanks his wife for helping win his freedom. and nasa's probe on mars sends back its first image of the red planet. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. we are talking champions league. both manchester clubs in action. yes, that is right. they could both be through to the last 16 by the end of the evening. manchester united ‘s biggest task might be to get there
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on time. both of their games so far this season have been delayed due to traffic problems. they have changed their routine for this one. instead of coming from the city centre, they will meet at the cricket ground, which is very much more nearby to old trafford. there is less chance of getting in a jam. jose mourinho has been forced to walk to the ground before so he can get there on time. the funny thing is, they did not win either of those two matches in the champions league at home so far. it has been suggested the team feels more pressure playing at old trafford. if you feel pressure, stay at home but when i say home, i don't say stadium home, i say home and watch on tv. if you feel pressure to play matches at home where people come to support, come on, i never felt pressured to play at home.
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win against young boys could send them through. manchester city need just a point to make the knockout stage but they faced the only side that have beaten them this season. they are playing lyon.” that have beaten them this season. they are playing lyon. ijust want to qualify, that is the first target. in that period can when you are starting the season until now, the most important issue is qualification for the champions league. with the premier league, it is important to be there but you have more time. if you make one or two mistakes, you can be out. and it is so dangerous, a competition, this one. uefa have a role to make sure if you are playing in a foreign country that you arrive a day before, in case there are traffic problems. what about in south america, the cobol abut adorers. cobol abut
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yes, the final was suspended twice at the weekend because of violence in buenos aires. the river plate fa ns in buenos aires. the river plate fans attacked the boca juniors team bus. some players were injured. the second game will now not be played in argentina. we don't know exactly where it will be played. but it will definitely take place on the eighth or 9th of december. the events of the weekend shamed argentina, according to one former player. rachel pochettino has described the violence as a cultural problem, one that might never be solved. for me, it is culture. we we re it is culture. we were going to change, i don't know to help that. it is so difficult ——
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know to help that. it is so difficult — — how know to help that. it is so difficult —— how are we going to change that? i don't know. but i think it is cultural. and to work, we need to do a very tough and i don't think it's going to change. sol campbell has been appointed manager of macclesfield town. he has previously complained his managerial career in england has been hampered bya career in england has been hampered by a lack of opportunities afforded for black coaches. macclesfield are five points adrift at the foot of league 2. jonny bairstow has become the latest england cricketer to try his hand at the shortest form of the game. he has signed a short—term deal in the t10 league, which is being played in the uae at the moment. that is all your support from now.
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—— sport. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide, and see what's happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to peter levy in hull, where look north has been looking at the introduction of groundbreaking 3—d printing technology being used to reconstruct patients' skulls, with lifechanging results. and susie fowler in our norwich studio. there, look east has been following the heartwarming story of a local bone marrow donor, and the young boy who's life he saved. whose life he saved. hospital scientists are using the latest technology. it is a 3—d printer that can help people born with complex facial deformities, cancer patients or after a serious
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facial injury and is seen as a huge breakthrough. the patient has a ct scan, creating a image which is overlaid by mirror images to look at the extent of the damage from inside and outside of the skull. this makes it quickerfor them to and outside of the skull. this makes it quicker for them to work out what sort of implants are required to rebuild the patient ‘s face. it is better for the patient and save the nhs money. it is amazing work. and it really does change lives. the main thing is speed is important to the patients. this model can be made in hours, costing just £10 for each model and they can do it there and then. the 3—d model is 100% accurate. the east yorkshire hospitals trust is one of the first in the country to use 3d printing in this way. often these things, as you can well understand, can be
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disfiguring and distressing for the patient. this means they endure less psychological damage and they can return to work on their lives more quickly at what is a very difficult and anxious time for them. robin broke every bone in his face, if you can believe that, in a cycling accident. his injuries were so horrific, he was not allowed to look ina mirroruntil horrific, he was not allowed to look in a mirror until after his surgery. there were plates involved. my eyes, nose, mouth. and i think about my functions today, i can eat, speak, i can see. i can breathe. itjust brings it all home. it is extraordinary. a good news story in every way. and we have more on that at 6:30pm.
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another heart—warming story, you need a box of tissues for this one, tell us about rupert and his condition first of all. rupert was just five when he was diagnosed with a rare blood disorder. it affected his immune system and he became very ill. he spent months having chemotherapy. doctors said it would develop into leukaemia. what he needed was a stem cell transplant but that depended on finding a bone marrow donor that was a match for him. it is worth noting that around 2000 people in the uk need a stem cell transplant from a stranger every year but only 2% of the population are on the register. you can imagine it was agony for his family to see him suffering and not be able to help. that first week, he
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had headlines to have the chemotherapy through. it is horrible to see i remember when chemotherapy through. it is horrible to see i rememberwhen his chemotherapy through. it is horrible to see i remember when his hair was falling out and i was in with a nurse and i wasjust falling out and i was in with a nurse and i was just stroking falling out and i was in with a nurse and i wasjust stroking his hairand it was nurse and i wasjust stroking his hair and it was just nurse and i wasjust stroking his hair and it wasjust coming out in clumps. it was not until later on that day and he saw his reflection in the bath, and the tap, he could see his reflection, he said, my hair has gone. i would have done anything to swap places with him. it is such... it is such... it is such a horrific experience. it is such... it is such a horrific experiencem you have a lump in your throat at home, you're not alone, let me tell you. the amazing bit of this, little did they know, there was a young man in basalt and who was about to
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become a life—saver. in basalt and who was about to become a life-saver. yes, billy higgins, he works in a bank and one day, there was an opportunity to be tested to go on the bone marrow register. that just tested to go on the bone marrow register. thatjust involves a mouth swab. by his own admission, he joined the queue as there was a girl he liked in it. he was tested and shortly afterwards, he was told he was a match for someone. it all went according to plan. rupert was given his stem cells and has made a full recovery and four years on, billy was able to meet the family for the first time. it was very emotional. rupert himself describes billy as his superman. there was not a dry eye in the newsroom when this story was run today. one man's act of kindness making such a huge difference. and it all turned out for well for billy. he ended up
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marrying that girl he fancied in the queue. i cry every time. i have seen it many times now. you are not alone. it isa many times now. you are not alone. it is a fabulous story and plenty more on your programme at 6:30pm. peter, also some positive news. thank you both very much. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. a health think—tank is warning that thousands of cancer patients are dying unnecessarily each year because nhs england has failed to improve care quickly enough. a study by the health foundation found england had failed to close the gap with countries that perform better — such as canada. our health correspondent, nick triggle, reports. over the last 20 years, there have been four
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national cancer strategies. each has promised the best care for england. but the health foundation said, while there had been progress, the nhs was still lagging behind. its analysis shows that only on breast cancer have the health service managed to actually close the gap with the best performing systems. the report warns the lack of progress is costing lives. each year, 135,000 people die from cancer. but 10,000 of those could be prevented if care was as good as in other nations. the key problem is one of late diagnosis. people who are diagnosed late have a much less good chance of surviving five years than those who were diagnosed early. and so we have got to make it easier for patients to access their gp, for gps to investigate and refer on and for diagnostic services to be there so that people can be diagnosed in a rapid way. the think tank wants to see better access to tests and scans to speed up diagnosis, but it said services were being undermined by a lack
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of staff and equipment, which is delaying how quickly patients are seen. the government has already said it aims to tackle this. last month, the prime minister promised the number of cancers being diagnosed early would increase from one in two to three in four over the next ten years, thanks to the extra funding being provided to the health service. the department of health and social care said more details would be unveiled in the long—term plan for the nhs, which is expected to be published soon. nick triggle, bbc news. maryam moshiri is here. in a moment, she will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. theresa may tours the nations trying to rally public support for her brexit deal, as it's criticised by allies at home and abroad a bus company is fined more than £2 million for ignoring warnings about a driver who killed two people. 18 migrants, including a toddler, are rescued from two small boats
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in the english channel. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. donald trump has suggested theresa may's brexit agreement could threaten a us—uk trade deal. the us president told reporters the withdrawal agreement "sounds like a great deal for the eu" and meant the uk might not be able to trade with the us. uk and dutch regulators have fined ride—sharing service uber for a breach that exposed the details of 57 million customers and drivers. the information commissioner's office fined the company £385,000 while the dutch data protection authority imposed a fine of 600,000 euros. thomas cook has warned that annual profits are set to come in £30m lower than expected, blamed on the summer heatwave. it's the second profit warning the firm has issued in two months. earnings were £88m lower in the year to september, as people delayed booking holidays because of the prolonged heatwave at home. maryam, what's going
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on on the markets today? it is not looking good today. first of all we are worried about china and the us. the two leaders are due to meet at the g20 meeting at the weekend but ahead of that, president trump has been talking tough about trade with china, talking about raising tariffs if some sort of resolution is not found and that has worried investors, particularly in london. big mining companies falling in value. metal prices are dropping because we are worried about demand from china if this trade will continue. also in the news, theresa may, we had donald trump talking tough to her as well about the trade, potential trade agreement with the us and the uk and saying this withdrawal agreement does not give an ysgol for the uk to then
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make a trade deal with the us and he was saying that and the pound went sailing down —— give enough scope. pounds sterling a barometer of how the marketing about brexit. absolutely. sterling is reflecting every twist and turn in the negotiations. as theresa may faces the daunting task of getting her deal through parliament, expectations are the pound will be very sensitive to that. the vote is on the 11th of december and if she does manage to get the deal through parliament, it should react quite positively. equally, if she fails to do that, we could see the pound fall even further. the pound has fallen quite significantly since its highs in april. let's talk about president trump once again. he has been
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talking tough about china and investors had been hoping that the meeting between the president might lead to some sort of talks this weekend. has that hope now diminished? his talks around trade related to both britain and china black route china. the expectation was that in three days' time, when donald trump and president xi me, there would be more of a conservatory tone —— met. but the tweets and messages from donald trump seems to indicate otherwise. that is making markets nervous and making investors nervous. let's talk about thomas cup before we go. the travel company has issued a warning about profits. the problem was the hot weather in the uk. we were not bothered about booking holidays abroad. exactly. if you are a
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company and booking holidays overseas, the last thing you need is a very tricky clay. most people booked their summer holidays in january but there is something known as the lates, where people put their summer as the lates, where people put their summer holiday slightly later in the year and because we had that astronomical heatwave, there was a significant drop in holiday bookings overseas. people also changed where they book. there is a places 1—macro preference for places that are more competitively priced. people are looking at thomas cook and saying, it needs to manage its capacity, needs to bring its cost base down. the shares were down 30% on the profit warning. it is not looking very good. what time of the year do
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you to book your holiday, simon?‘ good ten years ahead. the markets, you can see they have improved ever so you can see they have improved ever so slightly. the computer has broken in france. it has ended at the same level as it started the day. but it is unlikely. trade and china and donald trump are the three things. cani donald trump are the three things. can i go home now, i am really tired. yes, but hurry back. labour mp ian austin says the party has dropped an investigation into him, after a complaint was made about his alleged behaviour during a row about the party's anti—semitism code. he had been told he faced an internal labour party investigation into allegations
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of abusive conduct, following claims which he denied that he had screamed abuse at the party's then chairman ian lavery about the party's handling of anti—semitism. mr austin has today released a statement saying "i make no apologies for being upset about anti—semitism'. a study of graduate pay shows women with degrees gain more financially in their first few years of work than men do. the institute for fiscal studies found that by the end of their twenties, female graduates earn 28% more than other women. for men, the difference is only 8 per cent. lauren moss reports. choosing to go to university can be an expensive decision. the average student leaves with £50,000 of debt. for the first time, a report has examined whether graduates later make that back. it appears women are getting a better return on their investment. on average, by the age of 29, a female graduate earns £6,700 a year more than a woman who did not go to university. a man with a degree earns £2,700 a year more than a man without. the subjects studied makes a big difference, with maths, science and medicine likely
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to lead to better wages than the creative arts, english, and philosophy. we see lots of men studying at institutions with zero or negative returns by 29. this return is likely to grow through men's 30s as graduate men tend to earn at a faster rate through their 30s than non—graduate men. for women, we see a large average return of around 26%, that varies but it is pretty consistently positive. these figures are only a snapshot of average earnings at 29. they don't look into what may happen next in life and how that could impact, such as how if a woman has children, it could affect her income, and how male graduates tend to add more later. some students think the findings might affect what people choose to study. there are quite a lot of degrees that are not as employable. i think it should impact people's choices, if many drives you.
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maybe people are discouraged from studying art or literature, but i feel like it is something to think about. the government is to review university tuition fees. the focus will turn to which institutions offer the best value for money. a good degree will be worth the investment. i want to see universities competing to offer the best quality value for money degrees to young people. as a student is prepared to send off their ucas applications early next year, questions continue about how well—prepared they will be for life after university. you may not have heard of deke duncan, but he's been the voice of radio 77 for more than a0 years. the station doesn't have a licence, so can only be beamed through a speaker from his shed into his living room, to an audience of one, his wife.
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that could all be about to change though, as he's now been offered a one hour special radio show. jayne mccubbin went to meet him. let me take you back, right back, to a shed in 1970s stevenage. here to try and put a grin around your chin, a special hello, how are you going out right now to mrs teresa duncan, 57 donald crescent in stevenage. fast forward 50 years and 170 miles to stockport... looking after your ears, me dears. a special high, hello going out to pamela duncan. how in the world are you feeling, my darling? deke duncan is still broadcasting to his audience of one, though it's a different mrs duncan and it's not a shed. what do you think of the workshop? right. it is a workshop. yes. you're about to enter wonderland! oh, my days! it's radio 77 2018. hit me with it, deke! i just love this, this is my world, my life, radio. fabulous! i bet you're never off duty,
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are you, even in the supermarket? no, in my head. if you're listening in the car right now, thanks for the ride. taking your ears through the years. looking after your ears, me dears. 77 coming at you today with a mountain of music guaranteed with deke duncan right here in the air chair. this is true love, love so pure even the missus approves. i think it's wonderful, you know! he believes it, he lives it, he does it, and, as he has said to me many times, it'sjust between me and the mic. this priceless nationwide film gave deke five minutes of fame five decades ago. i'm going to the shop, right, deke? 0k. my ambition would be to broadcast to the rest of stevenage, i'd like to share it with them. but the realjob in radio never
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materialised until this was shared once again. hey, deke, it's laura moss, the station editor at three counties radio. i want to offer you a one—hour special over christmas. wow! so, deke, yourdream is going to be a reality. you'd better pass the tissues! yeah, you've got that right, baby! in fact, in the media storm that followed, deke's had more than the offer of a one—off show. i believe there's been a job offer? there has been. from africa? from africa. i think it's probably a small station where theyjust put records on and they don't have a dj at the moment. there's an opening. i know. it's very difficult, i've got africa or bbc three counties. we're going to stick to stevenage and stockport. i think so.
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i'd miss it! holy, moly, rock and rolly! deke duncan's leason to us all — never give up on your dreams. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. that's it from your afternoon live team for today. next, the bbc news at five. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes. the chilly weather we have seen over recent days will be edging away over the next couple of days, as the weather turned significantly milder but it will also turn wet and windy. a couple of areas of low pressure waiting to swing over our shores. temperatures are going to be boosted quite significantly. today, we're looking at highs of 7 degrees but tomorrow, some of us will see temperatures as high as 15 celsius. quite a big temperatures as high as 15 celsius. quitea bigjump temperatures as high as 15 celsius. quite a big jump in temperatures on the way. that change starts to take
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place this afternoon, as this band of rain pushes through and we will start to see wind turned to a south—westerly direction. that first band of rain pushes eastwards as we go through this evening and overnight. it will be replaced by another area of rain moving in from the west later on. rain at times best sums up the weather. notice the temperatures at their mildest toward south—west england overnight. lows of around 10 degrees in plymouth. for wednesday, it is the strength of the winds that we remain concerned about. tightly packed isobars will bring some very strong winds along the irish sea coasts and western hills. gusts reaching 70 mph. strong enough to bring some localised description at times. as well as that, some heavy rain. the heaviest of which will be across northern ireland and on into scotland. but nowhere is immune from seeing this wet and windy weather. we talked
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about the rain and strong winds. it will turn much milder. temperatures pretty much across the board into double figures. wednesday, another low pressure system. wednesday night and into thursday, targeting the uk. there might be a little squeeze in the isobars that could bring a swathe of even stronger winds up through some of our western areas, potentially with gusts of a swathe of even stronger winds up through some of our western areas, potentially with gusts of 80 mph. but that is still very uncertain. what is not uncertain is thursday will be wet and windy with rain easing to sunshine and showers later on but it will stay on the mild side with temperatures between ten and 13 degrees. we will keep this mild air for the next few days. temperatures around 13 or 1a degrees often over the next few days in london. today at 5pm, theresa may
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starts her tour of the uk to sell the controversial brexit deal, widely criticised by mps. the prime minister insists the plans are in the national interest, and denies claims that it will make trade deals difficult to negotiate. we will be able to do trade details, negotiate trade deals with countries around the rest of the world. regarding the united states, we have already been talking to them about the sort of agreement we could have in the future. but as mrs may visited wales and northern ireland, she was aware of highly critical remarks from one of her political allies. this deal actuallyjust gives us the worst of all worlds. no guarantee of smooth trade in the future, and no ability to reduce the tariffs that we need to conclude trade deals with the rest of the world.
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we'll have the latest on mrs may's tour, and we'll be speaking to the dup, the prime minister's
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