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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 29, 2018 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: the parliamentary battle over brexit. details begin to emerge of how five days of debate will play out. jeremy corbyn says he will call on parliament to prevent the uk crashing out of the eu without a deal. branded unsafe — the hospital trust being investigated over the death or injury of more than a0 babies is rated inadequate by inspectors. improving the road network for disabled users. why more needs to be done to improve signage, services and assistance for drivers with disabilities. in sport: it is down to the wire for spurs and liverpool in the champions league. and it is another very windy day, especially for parts of england, wales and southern scotland. gust of wind in excess of 70 mph, some travel disruption possible. i will have your full forecast on brea kfast. it is thursday 29 november.
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our top story: the battlelines for the parliamentary debate over theresa may's brexit deal are being drawn, ahead of five days of discussion starting next week. labour has confirmed its opposition to the plans, saying it will put forward an amendment to stop the uk leaving the eu with no deal. we now know the debate will begin on 4 december, next tuesday, and take place over five days. mps will be able to vote on changes to the agreement. 0n the final day of the debate, 11 december, they will vote on whether to accept or wholly reject the deal. we can talk now to our political correspondent iain watson. this is such a crucial time coming up this is such a crucial time coming up now and we have the structure of how it will work. that's right, five days of debate and at around seven o'clock, the so—called meaningful vote on whether theresa may will get a deal through parliament. they will
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be the opportunity for mps to have six potential options going forward, and as you mentioned, we know labour will put forward their amendment calling for a permanent customs union and the stronger deal to get access to the single market. as things stand, it is perfectly possible that both labour's amendment and theresa may fall, because there is still an awful lot of scepticism from mps on her own side. she has been touring the country, wales, northern ireland and scotland. she is off to a big summit, the g20 summit, in argentina. some people saying her place should be right here in westminster trying to convince some of the critics in her own party, and this morning, as soon as we are off air, almost, she will be talking to some of the most powerful mps in parliament, the chairs of committees which scrutinise ministers. again she will have another opportunity to put her case forward, under pretty tough questioning. individual mps will now be making decisions, won't
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they? and gradually, i imagine, we will be hearing more from each of them as to how they intend to vote. that's right, at the moment i think we are up that's right, at the moment i think we are up to about 86 conservative mps saying they were not intending to back the prime minister, some newspapers putting that figure over 90. it is a measure i think of how positive it can be for the prime minister, but also the scale of the desperation, if you like, because it is necessary for one member of her own cabinet, andrea leadsom, to come out and say she is actually supporting the policy of her own government. this actually makes front—page news, that a member of theresa may's cabinet actually supports theresa may. if you take a look at the statement, some of it is worded in an interesting way. she says she feels she must support the prime minister because this is the only deal on the table. that is certainly good news for theresa may, that she is not getting any further resignations, but a measure of how
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vulnerable she is that she needs that level of support, publicly declaring what once upon a time would have been given, that your own top team are right behind you. thank you for that. the security minister will be joining us later on, yesterday the emphasis was on the money as we had philip hammond, today we talk about some of the security implications. a hospital trust at the centre of a widening review into poor maternity care has been rated inadequate by inspectors. the care quality commission has deemed the a&e and maternity units at shrewsbury and telford nhs trust as unsafe, and raised questions about the leadership of the organisation. the trust said the report made uncomfortable reading, and has vowed to improve. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has the details. for 18 months, more and more families have come forward to raise questions about the maternity care they received at this trust over nearly two decades. so far, more
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than 200 families have contacted an independent review of maternity services. why did you let me try natural birth, when you knew that there was something wrong with his head? it could have been a com pletely head? it could have been a completely different story. throughout, the trust had insisted current care is safe, but today's report highlights a catalogue of failures. both maternity and accident and emergency are rated as inadequate for safety. staff say there was a culture of bullying and harassment. some of the executive tea m harassment. some of the executive team do not have the right skills and abilities to provide high quality, sustainable care. there is no doubt that leadership has not created the right culture at this organisation. staff told us they we re organisation. staff told us they were fea rful organisation. staff told us they were fearful about raising concerns. that is not acceptable. staff need to be free to raise concerns about safety for patients, and those concerns need to be acted upon. the trust is already in special
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measures, meaning it is closely monitored by regulators and is getting support from others in the nhs. given the extent of problems, there are growing calls for the chief executive to resign, but simon wright says he won't walk away. i've worked in the nhs phonetically five yea rs. worked in the nhs phonetically five years. my entire professional life has been part of that. i live in this community. my family live in this community. my family live in this community. my family live in this community. if i didn't think and believe that i was capable of leading this organisation, i would have already walked away. the trust insist the care will improve, and that there are pockets of good practice within their inadequately rated services. real concerns for the hospital there. we will be talking to the chief inspector of hospitals, professor ted baker, after 7:00am. a day after footage of a 15—year—old syrian refugee being allegedly assaulted was shared on social media, a video has emerged appearing to show his sister being attacked at the same school. a teenager is to be charged with assault after the incident at almondbury community school in huddersfield. judith moritz‘s report contains images you might find upsetting. this video was filmed on school
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playing fields last month. 0ne pupil approaches another student. he appears to head—butt him, grab him by the neck, and wrestle him to the ground. then he pours water over the pupil's face, whilst other students look on. after pulling himself up, the boy walks away. the video has now been shared and viewed online millions of times. the teenager who was assaulted is a syrian refugee. his father told me that his other child had also been targeted by different pupils. translation: i have my daughter in school. we are muslims. after one yearfrom being in the uk, she'd grown up and decided to put on a hijab, like her mother. we are surprised that in school, her friends beat her up and take hijab. this new footage is said to show that attack. the family have told us
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that the girl in the pink hijab is the sister of the boy in the first video. you came to the uk for sanctuary. do you feel safe here? translation: in the beginning, i thought that we are coming for sanctuary and safety. but, when i saw what happened to my children, i don't know what to say. the footage was filmed at almondbury community school in huddersfield. relating to the first video, the police say a 16—year—old boy will appear before a youth court for an offence of assault. the head teacher has written to parents to tell them that the school is working with the police, and taking the situation extremely seriously, that they don't tolerate any sort of unacceptable behaviour here, and that its business as usual, so that there is no disruption to pupils' education. donations have been pouring into a fundraising account for the family of the boy who was assaulted. the videos continue to be shared online. the family of the boy say that, despite their situation, they respect britain as the country which has given them refuge. judith moritz, bbc news, huddersfield.
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the un secretary—general, antonio guterres, has warned that the rise of nationalism around the world has reduced the political desire of some countries to tackle global warming. ahead of the g20 summit in argentina and a un climate change conference in poland next week, he urged all political leaders to make reducing climate change a priority. he spoke exclusively to our new york correspondent nick bryant. things are getting worse than predicted, but the political will today is unfortunately not as high as it should be. we have a very important, landmark agreement, the paris agreement. but countries are not doing what they committed to do in paris — or many countries are not doing, not all — what they committed to do in paris. and what was committed in paris is not enough. the channel island of sark could be plunged into darkness by the weekend, after the island's
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only electricity provider confirmed he would cut off supplies on friday. an independent commissioner has ordered sark electricity to lower its prices, but the company says it would make a loss as a result, and it had threatened to pull the plug. the island has some of the highest energy tariffs in the western world. it is time to catch up with the sport. matt will have the weather for us as well. we were talking about the big break that thing happening on 11th december. isn't there a football thing? there is a football thing happening. liverpool are playing napoli at anfield, and it isa are playing napoli at anfield, and it is a big night for them. differing results for liverpool and spurs in the champions league, but they both now need to get a result on the final matchday to stay in the competiton. tottenham needed to beat inter milan to stand any chance of getting to the last 16, and that is exactly what they did at wembley, christian eriksen coming off the bench to get the winner.
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barcelona next for spurs. liverpool were outplayed by paris st—germain and their expensively assembled team of stars, losing 2—1 in paris. liverpool now have to beat napoli in a couple of weeks or they are out. tyson fury and deontay wilder had a bit of a scrap at the news conference ahead of their heavyweight title fight. they go head—to—head in los angeles on saturday night for the wbc world title. isn't that the way of the... isn't that the way of the. .. lots of these things are staged, that one looked slightly less staged. i am being ridiculous. 0f looked slightly less staged. i am being ridiculous. of course it is staged. but it looks kind of quite genuine. they've got to have some aggression, haven't they? you don't believe me, do you? it hasjust become... it is a bit like pantomime, it is a ritual they go through. maybe that is what they
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need to do, because they were all friendly yesterday, making friends with the la county firefighters. do you think when they introduced the two protagonists in chess tournaments, it kicks off in a similar way? i have seen them having to be separated. no, i saw one of them asleep, that's what it was. sally! we have had this debate about chess, haven't we. i love it.|j sally! we have had this debate about chess, haven't we. i love it. ijust don't understand it, that is all. charlie is not thrilled by it. as this story continues, and the lack of things happening, there is a point at which that becomes interesting in itself. there has beena interesting in itself. there has been a result, hasn't there? can you believe it? and remember we told you about chess armageddon? after an entire month of play, we finally have a world champion. norway's magnus ca rlsen retained his world title after a play—off. a little handshake. just like that. are they going to fight each other?
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at the beginning, magnus, the norwegian guy, he has a pretty killer stare on him. can we show that, or not? right at the beginning, he was looking... he is not messing about, is he? anyway, there you go. was that at a crucial moment that he did that? you tell us, you are the one who understands it. we will talk to matt. we have to move on to the weather. big gusts of wind and cold. not quite as cold, still quite mild. good morning. winds set to strengthen. a slight lull overnight. they will strengthen across england, wales and southern scotland, in excess of 70 mph for some, travel disruption later and this morning heavy rain around as well. let's focus on the wind first
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of all through the day. we have seen them over 70 mph over the isles of scilly, we can see that a long southern and western coast, and by the end of the rush hour winds of 60 mph over central and southern england, then by the end of the morning into the afternoon northern england, southern scotland will bear the brunt, even higher than that in places, which could cause some problems. factor in we have the rain. let's see where it is raining at the moment. it has been pushing in from the south—west, some have it bursts as well, surface water and spray. the northern half of scotland is dry at the moment. it won't stay that way. the area of rain will work north and eastwards. heaviest in the west. 0n north and eastwards. heaviest in the west. on this tale in the rain we will see the strongest wind. you can see into a early afternoon across northern england and southern scotland. by the end of the day the heaviest rain limited to the north—east of scotland, we will albrighton up with some sunshine at times, a scattering of showers, some thundery pushing through is in the
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breeze, the breeze not a strong at the end of the afternoon but still gales in places, particular it around shetland, and temperatures holding up in double figures —— all brighten up. a bit fresher in the end of the afternoon. tonight, fresh by and large, showers most frequent and prolonged across the north—west of scotland. elsewhere showers come and go. some clear skies and temperatures will drop back into single figures tonight after the very mild weather last night. so a chilly start to friday, low pressure driving things. and where the isobars are tightly packed, this is where the strongest winds will be. scotland, northern ireland, it is your turn for widespread gales, one oi’ your turn for widespread gales, one or two spots in excess of 60 mph. it is in the north where we will see longer spells of rain, hilson at times, but basically tomorrow, one of the most writer days of the week -- hill of the most writer days of the week —— hill snow at times. —— brighter. many of you will avoid it, they will
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fall for only a small portion of the day and temperatures will have dropped a single figures across the northern half of the uk, 10— i2 dropped a single figures across the northern half of the uk, 10— 12 in the south. and then to get us into the south. and then to get us into the weekend, temperatures will take a lift to take us through friday into saturday as another wet and windy spell of weather pushes into england and wales. it is a morning feature more than anything else, thenit feature more than anything else, then it will clear through, sunny conditions developing and rain for a time in scotland and northern ireland. a cool day in the north, mild in the south, lots of cloud around on sunday. back to you both. thanks very much. we will check out who has the best stares later after the chess competition, so work on yours. 0k, the chess competition, so work on yours. ok, i will do. the chess competition, so work on yours. 0k, iwill do. is that it? i can't do it on camera. and i will keep working. i don't think he is going to win. ben hasjoined us as well to look at the papers in a moment. we will look at the front pages. the i focuses on the bank of england's warning that a no—deal brexit could herald the worst economic slump since world war two. it says that brexit supporters have
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accused the bank of reviving " project fea r". for the sun, the bank of england governor's warnings amounted to "carnage". little play on his name, mark carney, of course. it lists his warnings that house prices could crash by 30% and the value of sterling against the dollar could plunge. this is if there is no deal. the guardian says theresa may's campaign to sell her deal to the country ran into further difficulties after the bank of england and treasury concluded the uk would be better off staying in the eu. it also reports that the author margaret atwood will write a sequel to her book the handmaid's tale. iam i am excited about that. cheery all—around. i am excited about that. cheery all-around. it is a brilliant book. i look forward to the second one. and that attack on the 15—year—old syrian refugee boy at a school in huddersfield is the lead story for the metro. we had just been talking about that. reports are sister has been attacked as well.
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police say a 16—year—old boy is to be charged. ben, i was interested in the carnage headline. we have to be careful when we look at who is saying what about the economy. that it is about what would happen if there is no deal. the economy. that it is about what would happen if there is no dealm the worst case scenario. they are not saying this will happen. and when you look at the growth figures that have been coming out of the treasury yesterday they were still going to see growth in the economy. yes. the prediction is that there will be less growth. essentially the bank'sjob, this will be less growth. essentially the bank's job, this is will be less growth. essentially the bank'sjob, this is why i think some criticism about it being project fear is unfair is to make sure that the economy can cover that shock, that it will be ok in the economy, and that is why they do stress tests so the biggest banks, this is on the front of the business section of the telegraph, uk lenders can survive ha rd telegraph, uk lenders can survive hard brexit says the banks, so contrary to the headlines about the impact on the economy, what they make clear is banks are in a robust
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position to be able to withstand what they call the disorderly no—deal brexit, so the worse case scenario, these things could happen, but the bank is not saying that they will happen, they just but the bank is not saying that they will happen, theyjust say but the bank is not saying that they will happen, they just say that we have to keep an eye on the potential outcomes of the no—deal brexit. have to keep an eye on the potential outcomes of the no-deal brexit. what have you got, sal? in the times today we are meeting tyson fury's 26—year—old trainer at the training camp, really interesting, he is very young, ben davison took over from tyson fury's uncle peter, who had been training him, and this chap has helped him lose ten stone. they met in an unconventional way. i won't go into the details. he challenged him in spain. he said to him, we are going to walk up a mountain to see how fit you are. he started to walk up how fit you are. he started to walk up the mountain, then he started to run. ben said you can stop now. he carried on. sounds like something out of one of those movies. yes, a bit like one of those movies. he has
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lost ten stone, he is much fitter than he was, so we will see. that is a huge change, isn't it? yes, and he ran upa a huge change, isn't it? yes, and he ran up a mountain at 26 tone. more than a person. he has lost ricky hatton. laughter. that is a hard person to lose. he is ten stone. is that all? yes, he has lost ricky hatton. do i have time for one more? yes. i love this idea in the guardian, we could potentially see horseracing through our cities. there has been a trial of an held around aintree on the road around the racetrack with a special service on it with the idea that eventually we could see racing through big cities, apparently the target is the layout for this trial, which was modelled on constitution hill, from green park in london, basically the ambition is to have horseracing past the palace. they would lay a special
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track. yes, a special surface. do you want to look at food? yes, a couple of things. one i want to look at quickly is a proposal to cut the small print on tv ads, when they try to cram in all of the things on tv and radio ads and they speak really quickly with the terms and conditions. that has to stop because it is confusing. there is a minimum speed, a maximum speed for how quickly it has to go. it could make ads like american ads that go on for hours. the picture you can see, fields of sprout in west lothian harvested for christmas, 12 feeds covering 2000 acres. look at that. did you see sally's face? sorry. what are you doing?” did you see sally's face? sorry. what are you doing? i am not a massive fan. you only have to eat one. i love them. with butter and bake in. so you can't taste it -- bacon. you can only taste the bacon. i love them. i buy them throughout the year. no! yes! yes or no? i am
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co mforta ble. the year. no! yes! yes or no? i am comfortable. i am comfortable. that is my verdict on that. we will see you later on. something to add, ben? lam happy. you later on. something to add, ben? i am happy. 0k, we will move on. we've been talking about the potential economic impact of brexit this morning, well now leading pharmaceutical firms say stockpiling medicines won't be enough to guarantee the supply of vital drugs if the uk leaves the eu without a deal. industry leaders say the government needs to do more to prepare for any disruption at ports, but the health secretary matt hancock says supplies will continue, as long as everybody does what they need to do. 0ur health correspondent catherine burns explains. that was a good goal. shiv is seven and his big passion is football. now we are going to score. but he struggles to play. he has a rare
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condition of muscular dystrophy. boys with it came to be in a wheelchair before they are 12, lose the use of their arms in their teens and then in their 20s there hearts can stop working. it is life limiting and, yes, to be told that it felt like we had been given a death sentence. and then brexit comes along. that gives us even more sleepless nights. there is no cure for this condition. for now shiv ta kes for this condition. for now shiv takes steroids to try to keep his muscles stronger for as long as possible. but his parents are worried in case no—deal brexit would delay his drugs coming through. two thirds of our medication comes from oi’ thirds of our medication comes from or via the eu. if the pm's deal comes through the trade in medicine should continue seamlessly through a transition period but there are plans in place in case that doesn't happen. no deal scenario for the nhs will be difficult. but we are confident that if everybody does
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everything that they need to do, then we will have an unhindered supply of medicines. so the government has asked drug companies to store an extra six week supply. this is the start of one stockpile and the company says it has done everything possible to make sure patients get their medicines immediately after any no—deal brexit. but there is a longer term worry. do you think brexit will make the uk less of a priority when it comes to releasing new medication in the future? unfortunately, there is a high potential that that might be the case. so you prioritise, you know, america, europe, where the big populations are because you want to get more medicine, innovative medicine to the maximum number of patients possible. now, the concern would be that the uk might fall down theoretically, the kind of pecking order. countries with less
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purchasing power have to wait for new medication. switzerland tends to get them around five months later than the eu. the government says there is an awful lot of work to be done, but that it can happen so patients shouldn't worry about getting their medicines if we have a no—deal brexit. and also that we will still have access to the best new medicines in the future. some experts, though, are warning it by not be so straightforward. politicians must remember that these drugs save people's lives, they extend people's lives, they make sure that people don't end up in hospital, so it is really important to make sure they recognise and remember that as part of the negotiation. are you going to help? shiv‘s parents are optimistic about better treatments or even a cure but they need that to happen before he sta rts they need that to happen before he starts to decline. every minute counts, every day counts, and we just simply don't have that time to waste. catherine burn is, bbc news. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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we shall see you soon. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. the parents of a man killed in cyprus two years ago hope an inquest will answer questions about how he died. 22—year—old george low from dartford was stabbed to death in ayia napa in august 2016. his mother and father have flown out to the island for the hearing. no—one has ever been prosecuted. more than half of london's train stations can't be used by some disabled passengers. that's according to research by health and welfare charity leonard cheshire, which found 55% of stations in the capital don't have step—free access. the rail delivery group says it's working together with disability groups to improve accessibility and invest in projects that will enhance the service. he's become known in parts of north london as the friendliest bus driver in the capital. now ahmed serhani is the star of a short film,
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created by one of his passengers, which is set to be shown at the london transport museum. the driver of the number 214 bus says he always wants to make those on board happy. i always believe that person who is going to board your bus had an issue before boarding your bus, maybe they had a bad day or a bad start to the day, so let's make it a better day oi’ day, so let's make it a better day ora day, so let's make it a better day or a good day for that person. and the easiest way to do it is just to say hello. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning, we've got minor delays on the overground a good service on all other lines. moving the trains, we have delays and some cancellations on london north—eastern railway, grand central and hull from king's cross following electrical supply problems overnight. 0nto the roads, northbound traffic on the blackwall
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tunnel southern approach from the woolwich road flyover. meanwhile heading out of borough, the a2 is closed southbound at old kent road for emergency waterworks. now the weather with elizabeth rizinni. good morning. get set for a very blustery day of weather. it will be windier than yesterday with the strongest gusts through the morning and then easing slightly into the afternoon. we also have some early rain around as well and then that will clear to sunny spells and showers for the second half of the day. so this is this morning's rush hour. not free nice. gusts 50— 55 mph through the morning, easing into the afternoon but some of the gusts of wind disruptive possibly for the first half of the day. then we will see some brighter skies, sunny spells and a few showers to the west, some of those showers may be heavy and thundery. top temperatures on the mild side, 13— 11! degrees, you won't note is not because it will be so windy. and then rather blustery overnight. some showers around. lots of clear spells. it
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will be cooler than last night. temperatures down to mid single figures in places. now, tomorrow it is still quite windy. not as witty as today. the nicest looking gate of the week. dry with some good spells of sunshine and then more early rain on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: the summer heatwave might seem a long time ago, but there are concerns that they're becoming more frequent and could overwhelm health services. we'll find out why. thousands of young brits travel to australia every year to work as au pairs. but this morning, we hear how many are being poorly paid and treated badly by their host families. from westeros to the west end, kit harrington tells us why he has
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swapped game of thrones for the theatre. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: the battlelines for the parliamentary debate over theresa may's brexit deal are being drawn ahead of five days of discussion starting next week. it comes as security minister ben wallace issues a warning that britain will lose access to eu databases used to track terrorists and criminals in the event of no—deal. he says the uk will have a comprehensive security relationship with the eu under theresa may's agreement. but mps have accused the government of not being honest about the potential security risks. a hospital trust at the centre of a widening review into poor maternity care has been rated inadequate by inspectors. the care quality commission has deemed the a&e and maternity units at shrewsbury and telford nhs trust as unsafe, and raised questions about the leadership of the organisation. the trust said the report made uncomfortable reading,
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and has vowed to improve. this next story contains images you may find upsetting. a day after footage of a 15—year—old syrian refugee being allegedly assaulted was shared on social media, a video has emerged appearing to show his sister being attacked at the same school. a teenager will be charged with assault after the incident at almondbury community school in huddersfield. heatwaves linked to climate change increasingly threaten to overwhelm health services around the world, according to a new report. the number of people at risk because of extreme hot weather has risen steadily since 1990, according to research published in the medicaljournal the lancet. last year, 157 million more people were exposed to heatwaves than in 2000, and 153 billion hours of work were lost as a result. the channel island of sark could be plunged into darkness
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by the weekend, after the island's only electricity provider confirmed it would cut off supplies on friday. sark has some of the highest energy tariffs in the western world. an independent commissioner has ordered sark electricity to lower its prices, but the company says it would make a loss as a result, and it had threatened to pull the plug. islanders have been stockpiling water, candles, matches and firelighters. after an unprecedented contest lasting almost three weeks, the world's number one chess player, magnus ca rlsen, has retained his world championship title, beating the american fabiano caruana in a tie—breaker. in three dramatic time—limited games in london, the norwegian ended caruana's hopes of becoming the first american champion since bobby fischer in 1972. it was the culmination of a record—breaking streak of 12 drawn games of regular chess. we just attention to one of the
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moments during the chess tournament itself. and this is a look. and the arm fold. we have actually edited that down a little bit. by all accounts, i have not seen the full version, that looked just carries on. it is a proper look, isn't it? is that your look? no, i thought that was what you were doing me, i was quite scared. you can do the one eyebrow thing as well. and chess is no different to other sports in that there is a lot going on. they have been locked together for a month playing chess, they will hate each other, surely. it is a board game and the mayan game. talking of mind games, the champions league is all still to play for. differing results for spurs and
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liverpool in the champions league, but they have one thing in common. they both need a result on the final matchday to stay in the competiton. natalie pirks reports. at wembley, tottenham's job couldn't have been clearer. only a win would do. the londoners were throwing everything at survival. it's hit the bar. but in an all—or—nothing game, it looked like spurs would have to settle for the latter. he wouldn't be down for long, though. a driving run led to a deft flick from dele. all super—sub eriksen had to do was finish. into the back of the net! now that was what they came to see. it was by no means vintage, but spurs are hanging in there. now, there is just the small matter of barcelona to get past. over in paris, jurgen klopp told his liverpool team to be brave. a win against psg could be enough. but you can't always get what you want. and when liverpool made a hash of the clearance, juan bernat‘s shot deflected into an open net, to give psg an early lead. just how do you stop some of the most expensive,
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skilful footballers ever assembled ? well, that's one way. but you can't hold back an express train. mbappe, cavani, neymarto finish. it's neymar, and it's 2—0. the highest—scoring brazilian in champions league history had reason to dance, but his celebrations were short—lived, thanks to angel di maria's wayward limbs. the challenge was rash. james milner‘s penalty on the stroke of half—time was perfection. but it was 2—1, the final score, psg celebrating like they had won the thing. liverpool still have work to do. arsenal's europa league games against vorskla poltava will go ahead tonight, after the match was moved to the capital kiev. uefa moved the game after martial law was imposed in parts of ukraine. poltava initially said they may not be able to play, before later backtracking. cracking night in the championship. all kinds of things going on. we arejust going
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we are just going to show you plenty of goals. first off, derby's bradleyjohnson could be in trouble after appearing to bite stoke'sjoe allen. a little bit more affectionate than it needed to be. it all kicked off after a red card for stoke, but they won the game 2—1. and we've got a morning goal—fest for you. here is every goal from the 5—5 draw between aston villa and nottingham forest. four goals in there for villa's tammy abraham. there were two disallowed goals, as well. don't say we never give you anything. they just keep don't say we never give you anything. theyjust keep coming. two goals disallowed on the night. that is frustrating. not when it is 5-5, it is fine. the pre—fight news conference ahead of tyson fury's heavyweight title fight with deontay wilder went exactly the way you would expect. they fight in los angeles on saturday night. i don't really have to say anything, do i? the pictures do all the talking.
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many men have tried to take things from me in the past. but i never come across anybody, amateur, professional, sparring, anything — there ain't never been a man that could better me in a fight, ever. never — not a spar, not a boxing match, not a professional fight, not anything. i've never, ever been bettered, not one time. so, if deontay wilder is that man, then god bless him. it is all getting a bit feisty, isn't it? shall wejust it is all getting a bit feisty, isn't it? shall we just contrast that completely with something absolutely gorgeous? and finally, the england manager, gareth southgate, is used to getting a tough time at press conferences — but probably not quite like this. you tell young players to be fearless, but i'm a bit scared of spiders. are you afraid of anything?
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well, i'm a little bit afraid of heights. i am. are you? our pe teacher, mr smedley, is a football coach. can you give me any advice that i can tell them? is he a good football coach? no, he shouts at people. he does, sometimes. there you go, that is what you said, because he is nice to people. so i would say, mr smedley, keep doing what you are doing, because you are obviously doing a good job. i feel we should meet mr smedley. i feel we should meet mr smedleylj feel a bit sorry for him because i feel a bit sorry for him because i feel like the kids are letting it all out of the bag. that was gareth southgate talking about launching a new coaching manual. it may feel a world away now, looking out of the window, but we had an exceptionally warm summer this year. this morning, there is a warning
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that heatwaves linked to climate change pose an increasing danger that threatens to overwhelm health services around the world. the number of people who have become vulnerable to extreme hot weather has risen steadily all over the globe since 1990. in 2017, 157 million more people were exposed to heatwaves than in 2000, and 153 billion hours of labour were lost due to heat exposure. it also found that people living in europe are more at risk compared to those in africa, mainly due to more older people living in cities. 0ur guest is doctor nick watts, the executive director and report co—author. there is a lot of
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material here. can you try and convince it down? the link people are trying to make between weather and climate change, make the link for us and about the effect on people's health. absolutely, and there is a lot of information there. it isa there is a lot of information there. it is a very wide ranging report produced by 27 institutions from lots of different areas, the university of london, other universities. what the report makes clear is that climate change is impacting the health of people around the world today. it is not something we are talking about in 2050, by the end of the century. absolutely it is going to get worse and all of our projections suggest we are in for a rough ride, but we are seeing these health impacts today. so what are the health impacts, and who is affected? everyone is affected, no one is immune, none of the patients that anyone in the nhs would treat would be immune to the health impacts of climate change. they range from the extremes climate change. they range from the extre m es of climate change. they range from the
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extremes of heat that you have been talking about, the labour impacts that come from that, the kidney disease that comes from extremes of heat, the exacerbation of congestive heart failure. but on the other hand, as you have pointed out, it is actually a bit stormy outside. we expect to see stronger floods and stronger extremes of weather as a result of climate change as well, the spread of infectious disease. the health impacts really touch on all of the good foundations of public health. so knowing that is happening, which sections of society or which countries, types of countries, are the most vulnerable? sure, so specifically when we talk about heat, one of the things that this report highlights is that europe is one of the most vulnerable populations with respect to heat. 40% of the population over the age of 65 vulnerable to extreme heat. why is that? is because we are not used to certain levels of heat, or out infrastructure isn't coping with it, orfunding out infrastructure isn't coping with it, or funding for out of services? what is the issue? let me be clear,
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it is not to say that europe is uniquely or only affected, just that europe is the most vulnerable, and this is basically a factor of demographics. there is an ageing population, people ageing growing, migrating into the areas worst affected by climate change, and those people come with all sorts of pre—existing conditions. chronic kidney failure predisposes you, chronic pulmonary disorder. you also mentioned the labour capacity loss that we see in india, china, pakistan, all around the world, really. 153 billion hours in total. when we look at that in context it isl.4% when we look at that in context it isi.4% of when we look at that in context it is 1.4% of china's total labour capacity, 7% of india's total labour capacity. can ijust put the other side of this story, which i guess donald trump would be, one of the spokespeople for, which is that they are not convinced by the arguments about climate change. and what you are talking about is the vagaries of weather. i am not sure i am going to comment on what donald trump would or would not say, but... well, if
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you had presented the evidence you presented to him, i mean, it is... whether it is interesting or not, whether it is true or not, it is important, isn't it? it is absolutely important, and it is certainly true. we see 97% of climate scientists, around the world, incomplete consensus. we no longer talk about whether it is happening, we talk about how soon, the health impacts and how we can respond. i really don't want people to feel the end is nigh, so to speak. can we cope with it? so there are two things that we have to do to respond to climate change. first we have to make sure that our hospitals, doctors and nurses are prepared. we have to make sure that we are able to respond to these new extremes we are able to respond to these new extre m es of we are able to respond to these new extremes of heat, the floods, the extremes of heat, the floods, the extre m es of extremes of heat, the floods, the extremes of weather, and there are ways to prepare for that. but there
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are also limits to that prepare it must. there are limits to the adaptations we can put in place. so we also have to make sure that we are tackling climate change head—on, reducing greenhouse gas emissions. and the good news is that when you look at all the things that we need to do to respond to climate change, clea n to do to respond to climate change, clean up the air, encourage physical activity, encourage healthy diets, they are just common sense public health interventions. we have seen a letter going to the prime minister from many of the royal medical and nursing colleges calling for exactly these messages, for a rapid scaling up. doctor nick watt is co-author of that report. there is no heat wave in the uk today. it is mild but wet as well. yes, it is set to get much windier once again, we have seen a brief lull in the winds through the night, but they are set to strengthen over the coming hours. england, wales, southern scotland with the greatest chance of travel disruption, adding in heavy rain as well, it is unpleasant this morning, there is no way to gloss over it.
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let me show you the expected wind speeds. we will focus on that's first of all. winds of over 70 mph on the isles of scilly, we can see that on southern and western coast, though strong winds move south eastwards and then by the end of the morning, lunchtime, northern england and southern scotland, damaging winds potentially up to 70 mph, if not a little more in spots. as i said, rain to go with it as well. let's look at where it has been falling, pushing in from the south—west. it would be hard to avoid this morning. most favoured in northern scotland. the rain will be on its way. heavy burst of rain to the west. this is where the strongest winds will be tied in as it works northwards and eastwards. across northern ireland through the morning from southern areas, into sunshine and showers. northern england has the strongest winds, clearing in the afternoon. by the end of the day, the rain confined to north—east scotland. sunshine and
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showers through the afternoon. much brighter and today. showers in the west could be thundery. 0n the mild side. feeling fresher in the afternoon and this morning. the winds are not a strong. as you can see, touching gale force in places, particularly around shetland for a short time. tonight it will remain fairly blustery. a mixture of clear spells and showers. more clear spells and showers. more clear spells and showers further south. longer lasting showers to the north—west scotland, where the winds will strengthen into the morning. it will strengthen into the morning. it will be a fresher night, and a cool start to friday morning, temperatures in single figures. low pressure close by, showers on the cards, to the south of that, north of scotland, the strongest winds for tomorrow morning's commute. scotland, northern ireland, up to 50- 60 scotland, northern ireland, up to 50— 60 mph for one or two, wintry over high ground, and further south, showers in the west, very few further east, east wales, central
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and eastern england will be dry, if not all day, certainly for the bulk of it. tomorrow is fresher than today, down to single figures in the northern half of the country, 11 or 12 in the south. and a cool night to ta ke 12 in the south. and a cool night to take us into saturday and the start of the weekend. another area of low pressure, wet and windy spells. they morning, and it looks like england and were will have the wet and windy weather. snow on the ground in the grampians. it will all clear through. the afternoon looking a bit brighter, some sunny spells, the odd shallot, mild to the south, cold in the north and on sunday fairly cloudy for many —— shower. not as heavy as we have seen on saturday morning, but some stating dry. that's how it's looking. thank you very much. it does seem really mild. it is very mild. we have winds coming from the south. unfortunately the very strong winds that go with it isa the very strong winds that go with it is a little bit of a sting in the tale i suppose you could call it. at least it is mild. thank you.
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ben, we talk quite a lot about the road network. you have a different ta ke road network. you have a different take on that. yes, looking at changes to be made for people with disability. it is the things we might take for granted in terms of signage, getting out of the car, maybe to fill up at the petrol station, things are much more difficult with a disability. the road network is not set up for it. we know that being able to get out is so important for ease of movement and freedom for people with disability. easy to take lots of things for granted — not least jumping the car and getting from a to b. but if you've got a disability, all sorts of things can be a problem. that includes poor signage, a lack of breakdown services, poor toilet facilities and inaccessible petrol stations. the transport watchdog transport focus says more needs to be done to help drivers like alan. i use it for work, for social,
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domestic, i love driving. i could just drive all day. i think the system needs an overhaul. they haven't increased the spaces. you've got to know where they are and go around scanning which one and then hope you cant get one. also, they don't take vehicles like mine, where you have to get in and out at the back. you need to have a protected area at the back with the yellow lines. at the moment, most of them are on either side. david sidebottom is from transport focus. good morning to you. that is a taste of what alan faces every day. how typical is that? very typical. alan is one of 2 million people out there who use the network and who is disabled, and planning meticulously the journey to make sure that you have the right rest breaks is down to the detail. everything needs to be much better in our report today.
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let's talk about that detail. i touched on some of the changes you are looking for. there are a range of things that would make a journey, a simplejourney of things that would make a journey, a simple journey for many people, much more easy for people with disabilities. it is breaking them down, planning, the information, it might bea down, planning, the information, it might be a simple break to get a sausage roll or coffee. for people with a disability it is about making sure they planned their breaks, that they can look at fatigue, perhaps a medication break, making sure the parking bays are close to the doors, toilets close to the front of the facilities, little details that make a lot of difference. why has it not been done already and who is responsible for that? we target that at highways england, it falls within their gift, and nothing is so badly broken that things have to change tomorrow, we are talking about when investment goes in for service areas and more information, better information, that all road users can ta ke information, that all road users can take into account. let's talk about the changes you'd like to see
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immediately, and what struck me is they are applicable to people with and without disabilities, just generally having better toilet facilities on a long journey. maybe having a pump attendant at the petrol station if you can'tjump out to fill up. it was telling in the research, we spoke with 50 disabled rd users, in particular the issue about petrol pumps was fascinating, the need to make sure that the call button if you like to have assistant at the petrol pump is that someone is around to help you because physically getting out of the car at a petrol station is incredibly difficult and challenging and often disabled people will rely on fellow motorists to help. how realistic is it to expect these changes will be made soon? we are talking 2 million people using these facilities on the road network who are disabled and this is a call to help focus — there isa this is a call to help focus — there is a lot of investment into the road network and service areas and improving mobility for disabled road users. we want to make sure these
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are used to shape the future delivery of services for those important group of people. certainly focus minds. thank you. david sidebottom from transport focus. we will talk more later. thanks very much. after hanging up his winter cloak for the final time, game of thrones star kit harrington has made the journey all the way from westeros to london's west end. do you think we pronounced it correctly? i am not familiar with game of thrones. i am not familiar with the series. westerps -- westeros. the final series will be screened in the new year, but before that the actor's treading the boards in a production of the sam shepherd play true west. see? see the links we are making? he's been telling tim muffett about the glamour of the london stage. it is good to see you. we are on stage at the vaudeville see theatre. some serious action going on from the 70s. not least my moustache. the
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play is set in 1979. no one is going to go and see a film like that. play is set in 1979. no one is going to go and see a film like thatm isa to go and see a film like thatm is a movie. there is a big difference. they are two brothers in their mother's house outside of la, polar opposites as people. their mother's house outside of la, polar opposites as peoplelj their mother's house outside of la, polar opposites as people. i have just about had it with the insults. this story has a lot of violence. what has it been like to rehearse and perform? it is fun. i love a fight scene. you have done a few in your time. i have done a few, yeah. you have this thing where you get thrown across the stage, and he has a golf club which he stops at my face, which gets a nice reaction from the audience. you must have done something, threatened him or something. what did you do? how does it compare performing on stage in front of a live audience compared with making a massive tv show like game of thrones? people think that is the glamorous part. i find this
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the glamorous part. myjob is to come in and play to the west end audience every night. that for me is quite glamorous. whereas game of thrones was quite often outside in some foreign country a way from your mates in a muddy field. you have obviously filmed the last series of game of thrones going out in the new year. what was it like when they said "cut" for the last time in your final scene? i burst into tears, you know. it is a weird thing. i am not sad about it ending. i feeljoyous about it ending and having completed it. but it doesn't make any less emotional. and the first pilots of game of thrones was described by the producers as a disaster. what did you make of it when you first made it? i don't know what i was doing. i was like, this is fun. i am it? i don't know what i was doing. i was like, this is fun. iam in it? i don't know what i was doing. i was like, this is fun. i am in a tv show. i have no idea if it was going to bea show. i have no idea if it was going to be a big success or anything. a p pa re ntly to be a big success or anything.
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apparently it was a disaster. i still haven't seen it. they blackmail me every now and again with threatening that they will release parts on yutu because it was terrible and i had this awful wig. and the fact that it was such a global phenomenon. are there countries where you go to where you don't get recognised ? countries where you go to where you don't get recognised? not that i have found. although this is helping. you know, iam now... iam recognised a lot less now i have less hair and less fur on my face. kit harrington. from westeros, game of thrones. the play ‘true west‘ runs at london's vaudeville theatre until late february. it is possible... it is an enormous thing like game of thrones to happen and, for whatever reason, you don't get on board, it does happen. and, for whatever reason, you don't get on board, it does happenlj tried it. i couldn't do it. one and
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a half episodes. and then it is daunting because there is so much. and everyone is talking about it. and everyone is talking about it. and everyone is talking about it. and every once in awhile you say something and look like an idiot. is it friday? no, it is thursday. we can make it thursday feeling. we are going to have some mead in the studio to drink. it is a very old drink and it is having a resurgence in terms of popularity. filled with honey we are told and we will have a taste test later on. although it is quite alcoholic, so we have to be careful. mm. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. see you soon. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara 0rchard. the parents of a man killed in cyprus two years ago hope an inquest will answer questions about how he died. 22—year—old george low from dartford was stabbed to death in ayia napa in august 2016. his mother and father have flown out to the island for the hearing. no—one has ever been prosecuted. more than half of london's train stations can't be used
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by some disabled passengers. that's according to research by health and welfare charity leonard cheshire, which found 55% of stations in the capital don't have step—free access. the rail delivery group says it's working together with disability groups to improve accessibility and invest in projects that will enhance the service. he's become known in parts of north london as the friendliest bus driver in the capital. now ahmed serhani is the star of a short film, created by one of his passengers, which is set to be shown at the london transport museum. the driver of the number 214 bus says he always wants to make those on board happy. i always believe, you know that person who's going to board your bus? had an issue before boarding your bus, maybe they had a bad day or a bad start to the day, so let's make it a better day or a good day for that person. and the easiest way to do it is just to say hello. let's have a look at the travel
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situation this morning. 0n the tubes this morning, we've got minor delays on the overground. a good service on all other lines. 0n the trains, there are delays and some cancellations on london north—eastern. 0n the rail, grand central and hull trains to and from king's cross following electrical supply problems near peterborough. there's disruption for south western railway services via woking following a points failure, while southern and thameslink services to the south coast are running with speed restrictions and delays due to the expected high winds. 0n the roads, there's northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach from the woolwich rd flyover. there's traffic on the a13 building westbound, heading out of dagenham into barking. now, the weather with elizabeth rizinni. hello, good morning. get set for a very blustery day of weather. it will be windier than it was yesterday, with the strongest gusts of wind through the morning, and then easing slightly into the afternoon. we've also got some early rain around as well, and then that will clear to sunny spells and showers for the second half of the day. so this is this morning's rush hour.
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it's not very nice out there. gusts of wind of 50—55mph through the morning, easing into the afternoon, but some of those gusts of wind disruptive, possibly for the first half of the day. and then we will see some brighter skies, sunny spells and a possibly a few showers, particularly out to the west. some of those showers may be heavy and thundery. top temperatures on the mild side, 13—14 degrees, you won't notice it because it'll be so windy. and then staying rather blustery overnight. some showers around, lots of clear spells. it will be a cooler than it was last night. temperatures down to mid—single figures in places. now, tomorrow it's still quite windy. but not as windy as today. the nicest looking day of the week — dry with some good spells of sunshine, and then more early rain on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: the parliamentary battle over brexit. details begin to emerge of how five days of debate will play out.
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jeremy corbyn says he will call on parliament to prevent the uk crashing out of the eu without a deal. branded unsafe — the hospital trust being investigated over the death or injury of more than a0 babies is rated inadequate by inspectors. travel giant thomas cook has issued two profit warnings in two months, after the summer heatwave kept more of us at home. it has got another update within the next few minutes, amid a fall in bookings for next year, too. in sport: spurs get the win they need, but they and liverpool need to win their final matches to stay in the champions league. and, after a slight lull through the night, the winds are set to strengthen yet again, especially for england, wales and southern scotland, winds gusting up to 70 mph. throw in some heavy rain this morning and it is not looking great
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out there. join me for the forecast in15 out there. join me for the forecast in 15 minutes out there. join me for the forecast in15 minutes on out there. join me for the forecast in 15 minutes on breakfast. it is thursday 29 november. our top story: the battlelines for the parliamentary debate over theresa may's brexit deal are being drawn, ahead of five days of discussion starting next week. labour has confirmed its opposition to the plans, saying it will put forward an amendment to stop the uk leaving the eu with no deal. we now know the debate will begin on 4 december, next tuesday, and take place over five days. mps will be able to vote on changes to the agreement. 0n the final day of the debate, 11 december, they will vote on whether to accept or wholly reject the deal. we can talk now to our political correspondent iain watson. so the battle lines are being drawn. it is now all about how closely this fight is going to go. it will go down to the wire, i imagine. certainly there will be huge efforts i theresa may the make sure she can
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get a deal through, but as things stand there is an awful lot of scepticism amongst her own mps. she has been, of course, touring the country, wales, northern ireland and scotland, in the past few days. there have been some calls for her to return to westminster to try and convince sceptics in her own backbenchers to support the deal. just after we go affair she will be talking to some of the most important mps in westminster, those who chair a committee to scrutinise the government. they will be asking her lot of questions, and she will have the opportunity to put her case directly to them. the key thing this vote on 11 december, will it in a nyway vote on 11 december, will it in anyway change? labour are saying we should be permanently inside a customs union, but as things stand, i think it will be very difficult for labour to get their plan through, very difficult for theresa may to get her plan through, some people already discussing what happens next. the chancellor suggesting the government will take stock. labour has a little bit of a different emphasis between the party leader and the shadow chancellor on
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how quickly they might go for the option of another referendum. still an awful lot of uncertainty over the next couple of weeks, and five days of debate during that time, we will see if there is any shift in anybody‘s opinion. see if there is any shift in anybody's opinion. interesting, you pick out the differences or nuances in what is coming out in the labour party but no more than the splits we have seen or potential splits in the conservative party, in theresa may's own cabinet. that seems to be changing a little. it is changing a little, but it is still astonishing if you step back. in normal, pre— brexit times it would not be front—page news if a member of the prime minister's cabinet said that they supported the prime minister, ora they supported the prime minister, or a member of the government said that they supported government policy. but in these strange times we live in it is now apparently headline news that andrea leadsom, the leader of the house of commons, actually supports her own prime minister. she sent a letter to constituents which finds its way into one of the newspapers today,
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and she says that she will be backing the deal. she of course campaign to leave the european union, so in the current context it isa union, so in the current context it is a boost to theresa may that she is a boost to theresa may that she is not expecting any further resignations from that top team, but if you look at the detail of the letter, basically what andrea leadsom is arguing is that this is the only deal on the table and to guarantee that we live in march next year, but she also says that she didn't think a managed no deal scenario would be a disaster either. so there we go, a ringing endorsement. but certainly for the time being theresa may will take comfort in any support she gets. sometimes you are grateful for whatever support you get. we are hoping to talk to ben wallace, the security minister, a little later on, around 8:20am on this programme. a hospital trust at the centre of a widening review into poor maternity care has been rated inadequate by inspectors. the care quality commission deemed the a&e and maternity units at shrewsbury and telford nhs trust unsafe, and raised questions about the leadership of the organisation. the trust said the report made uncomfortable reading,
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and has vowed to improve. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has the details. for 18 months, more and more families have come forward to raise questions about the maternity care they received at this trust over nearly two decades. so far, more than 200 families have contacted an independent review of maternity services. why did you let me try natural birth, when you knew that there was something wrong with his head? it could have been a completely different story. throughout, the trust had insisted current care is safe, but today's report highlights a catalogue of failures. both maternity and accident and emergency are rated as inadequate for safety. staff say there was a culture of bullying and harassment. some of the executive team do not have the right skills and abilities to provide high—quality, sustainable care. there's no doubt that the leadership has not created the right culture
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at this organisation. staff told us they were fearful about raising concerns. that's not acceptable. staff need to be free to raise concerns about safety for patients, and those concerns need to be acted upon. the trust is already in special measures, meaning it is closely monitored by regulators and is getting support from others in the nhs. given the extensive problems, there are growing calls for the chief executive to resign, but simon wright says he won't walk away. i've worked in the nhs for nearly 25 years. my entire professional life has been part of that. i live in this community, my family live in this community. if i didn't think and believe that i was capable of leading this organisation, iwould have already walked away. the trust insist their care will improve, and that there are pockets of good practice within their inadequately rated services. in a few minutes we will be talking to the chief inspector of hospitals, professor ted baker. a day after footage of a 15—year—old
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syrian refugee being allegedly assaulted was shared on social media, a video has emerged appearing to show his sister being attacked at the same school. a teenager will be charged with assault after the incident at almondbury community school in huddersfield. judith moritz‘s report contains images you might find upsetting. this video was filmed on school playing fields last month. 0ne pupil approaches another student. he appears to head—butt him, grab him by the neck, and wrestle him to the ground. then he pours water over the pupil's face, whilst other students look on. after pulling himself up, the boy walks away. the video has now been shared and viewed online millions of times. the teenager who was assaulted is a syrian refugee. his father told me that his other child had also been targeted, by different pupils. translation: i have my daughter in school. we are muslims.
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after one yearfrom being in the uk, she'd grown up and decided to put hijab, like her mother. we are surprised that in school, her friends beat her up and take hijab. this new footage is said to show that attack. the family have told us that the girl in the pink hijab was the sister of the boy in the first video. you came to the uk for sanctuary. do you feel safe here? translation: in the beginning, i thought that we are coming for sanctuary and safety. but, when i saw what happened to my children, i don't know what to say. the footage was filmed at almondbury community school in huddersfield. relating to the first video, the police say a 16—year—old boy will appear before a youth court for an offence of assault. the head teacher has written to parents to tell them that the school is working with the police, and taking the situation extremely seriously, that they don't tolerate any sort of unacceptable behaviour here, and that its business as usual, so that there is no disruption to pupils' education.
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donations have been pouring into a fundraising account for the family of the boy who was assaulted. the videos continue to be shared online. the family of the boy say that, despite their situation, they respect britain as the country which has given them refuge. judith moritz, bbc news, huddersfield. in the last few minutes, the tour operator thomas cook has announced a drop in profits. ben is here with more. they are not good numbers, and we expected that they would not be pretty, because the travel firm has issued two profit warnings in two months, saying all that good weather in the summer meant that we put off booking summer holidays or going away, and the business, really made up away, and the business, really made up of the airline but also the travel agency business, has now gone into running its own hotels as well. if you look at it overall, profits fell so significantly they fell into a loss. they are reporting a loss of
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£163 million for year. the tour operator part, that is where we book a holidays, they saw the biggest fall, profit they're down by £88 million. they say that is because the good weather stopped us booking holidays. the airline itself not doing too badly. profits were up, the chief executives describing it asa the chief executives describing it as a really disappointing year. there is a lot of work they want to focus on, getting us booking, and january will be key for them, because that is when we begin to think about the summer holidays. because it is miserable. so you are backin because it is miserable. so you are back in the office and thinking ahead to the rest of the year, and where do you want to go? they are counting on january where do you want to go? they are counting onjanuary being a really good time for them. already they have told us booking is for the summer are down 3% on what they were last year. they have a lot of work to do to make us part with our cash to do to make us part with our cash to start looking. and that fall has really affected them, because the idea that you would wait until september or october, that didn't happen. so overall, thomas cook
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falling into a loss of £163 million. we will hear from the chief negative in about half an hour. ok, looking forward to that. thank you. the channel island of sark could be plunged into darkness by the weekend, after the island's only electricity provider confirmed it would cut off supplies on friday. sark has some of the highest energy tariffs in the western world. an independent commissioner has ordered sark electricity to lower its prices, but the company says it would make a loss as a result, and it had threatened to pull the plug. islanders have been stockpiling water, candles, matches and firelighters. those are the latest stories, to bring you up to date. inadequate, unsafe, and with a culture of bullying. that is how a new report by inspectors has described maternity and emergency care at the shrewsbury and telford nhs trust. the trust was already at the centre of a review into poor maternity care. it admits the report makes for uncomfortable reading, and has vowed to improve.
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joining us now from our central london studio is the chief inspector of hospitals, professor ted baker. thank you very much for your time this morning. i wonder if you could first of all outlined the number of cases that are now being looked at in connection with the maternity ca re in connection with the maternity care at this trust? good morning. the cases you are talking about are being reviewed by a review that was commissioned by the secretary of state and is being led by nhs improvement. that is not being undertaken by the cqc. i don't think i should be answering questions on that. that review will be very important because it will be looking at how well this trust has investigated adverse incidents affecting babies over the last considerable period. there will be important learning from that, i am sure. iam important learning from that, i am sure. i am not aware of what has come out of it as yet, i await the results with interest. it will be important that the trust loans, but
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it will also be important all maternity services learn from that. 0ne maternity services learn from that. one of the things that we have found in our inspection of maternity services across england is that they often do not learn effectively when things go wrong and implement change. and that is something we found that shrewsbury and telford, but we have found that in other services as well. i think it is important that all services take account of the learning that comes out of that review. well, let rate this down to what we really matter to people watching this programme. it may well be that someone who is about to have a baby or is thinking about to have a baby or is thinking about taking baby into this trust, shrewsbury and telford hospital nhs trust, i mean, is it safe? well, we inspected it in august and september, as you know, we found serious safety concerns and we took immediate action and told the trust it had to make immediate improvements. we have made sure it has made those immediate improvement and we monitored those things very carefully. so the immediate safety
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concerns have been dealt with. there isa concerns have been dealt with. there is a bigger issue here that you have referred to already about the culture in this organisation, which means how do they sustain safety and quality going forward? and they have to build the right culture that supports staff, allows staff to raise concerns, investigates when things go wrong, and learns lessons in next sure action is taken. that is the challenge for this organisation. it needs to turn around its safety culture so it is focused on the safety of patients in the maternity services as well as other services in the organisation, and it is learning to improve services all the time. we have seen other trusts in a similar position that have turned the quality of their care around quite significantly by focusing on culture and leadership of their staff. shrewsbury and telford need to do the same. can i be clear about this? are you saying that it is safe? can you categorically say that the care being offered in the maternity units there is safe? we have dealt with the immediate safety concerns, we will monitor
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that carefully and ensure everything is in place. if i could just that carefully and ensure everything is in place. if! couldjust ask that carefully and ensure everything is in place. if i could just ask you this in follow—up to my clear question, you haven't said yes, now i would take that, if i was going to have a baby and go into those units, i would take it the chief inspector of hospitals not saying it is safe isa of hospitals not saying it is safe is a real worry. what we have done is a real worry. what we have done is make sure that the service has dealt with the immediate safety concerns. that doesn't mean it doesn't need to do more. there is no absolute safety of any service. all services have risks. it is important to focus on those risks. the service is as safe as we can make it now. there is no reason why people should not use the service. that does not mean they should not do more to improve. on the issue of the long—term, you may reference —— made reference previously that this trust hasissues
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reference previously that this trust has issues over a long period of time. we have a statement from the hospital. i know you praised individual staff at the hospital. it is important to say that. we read another statement from the hospital today which says they are concerned about the report that they are acting upon it. people would be thinking they'd probably said that the last time someone raised concerns. they probably said that ten yea rs concerns. they probably said that ten years ago or five years ago or three years ago. i imagine we could find statements along those lines. why is nothing changing? because the leadership of this organisation hasn't dealt with the cultural issuesit hasn't dealt with the cultural issues it has to deal with. it is creating a culture you mentioned earlier on where staff feel bullied. they can't raise concerns. safety is on at the centre of everything they do. the challenge for leadership is recognising the problems in the organisation to change the culture. does the cqc ever recommend that leadership should be changed, and do you think that would help?m leadership should be changed, and do you think that would help? it is not
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our role to appoint new leadership to organisations. this leadership needs to rise to the challenge. if it can't, it needs to step aside and let others who can rise to the challenge step in. this is a test for leadership in place at the moment. they need to deal with the issues identified. if they can't, they need to step aside. thank you for your time this morning. the chief inspector of hospitals for the ca re chief inspector of hospitals for the care and quality commission. it is time to talk to matt to find out what is happening with the weather. it looks rather stormy behind you. is that what we should expect? yes, the scene in north—west wales, nagag, and the same today, the winds are picking up, and good morning, case of grab a brolly and keep hold of it this morning, not only heavy rain but the wind are strengthening across parts of england, wales pushing into southern scotland by the end of the morning, early afternoon, some travel problems
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likely as the wind picks up, let's focus on them today first of all. england, wales, southern scotland, strongest in southern and western areas, touching 70 mph. even inland as wind pushes north eastwards we could see wind in excess of 50— 60 mph, closed at 70 mph lunchtime at in northern england and southern scotland. at insult to injury to go with the strengthening wind, let's look at where the rain has been falling. hard to avoid at the moment, spreading north and east. heaviest across eastern northern ireland, north—west wales into southern scotland, working north eastwards into the rest of scotland, where you will start dry and bright with the worst of the wind, but they will pick up for eastern scotland in the afternoon. strong winds for the middle of the day along the central section, and more sunshine across the country with a scattering of showers especially in the west, some heavy and sundry and most persistent
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in the north—east scotland. mild enough day at 11— 15 degrees, feeling fresh later, and these are the winds towards the end of the day, dropping from this morning's levels, still touching gale force, soa levels, still touching gale force, so a very blusteryjourney home for most of you, and a blustery night to come, when speaking at an scotland, showers turning to spells of rain, gaps between the showers further south, and we are back to something fresher with temperatures dropping to single figures for all. so into tomorrow morning, low pressure to the north and it is closer to that across northern scotland, northern ireland where we will see the strongest winds for tomorrow morning. not as wrong as today. still a0 morning. not as wrong as today. still 40 to 60 mph possible, widespread gales. showers merging to longer spells of rain across the highlands and islands to begin with. further south, more sunshine around. some of you will have dry and sunny weather. some showers in the west, some heavy and thundery, and temperatures on the fresher side at
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around eight to 12 degrees. as for the weekend, we will see some rain to begin with on saturday, brightening up through saturday afternoon and sunday just brightening up through saturday afternoon and sundayjust fairly cloudy and damp. thanks very much. we have been talking about the impact of brexit this morning. now leading pharmaceutical firms say stockpiling medicines won't be enough to guarantee the supply of vital drugs if the uk leaves the eu without a deal. industry leaders say the government needs to do more to prepare for any disruption at ports, but the health secretary matt hancock says plans are in place to make sure supplies will continue. 0ur health correspondent catherine burns explains. that was a good goal. shiv is seven, and his big passion is football. now we're going to score. but he struggles to play. he has a rare condition called duchenne muscular dystrophy. boys with it tend to be in a wheelchair before they are 12, lose the use of their arms in their teens, and then, in their 20s, their hearts can stop working.
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it's life limiting and, yeah, to be told that, it felt like we'd been given a death sentence. and then brexit comes along. that, for us, gives us even more sleepless nights than what duchenne already does. there's no cure for this condition. for now, shiv takes steroids to try to keep his muscles stronger for as long as possible. but his parents are worried in case no—deal brexit would delay his drugs coming through. two thirds of our medication comes from or via the eu. if the prime minister's deal goes through, the trade in medicines should continue seamlessly through the transition period, but there are plans in place in case that doesn't happen. a no—deal scenario for the nhs will be difficult. but we are confident that, if everybody does everything that they need to do, then we will have an unhindered supply of medicines. so the government has asked drug companies to store an extra
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six weeks' supply. this is the start of one stockpile, and the company says it's done everything possible to make sure patients get their medicines immediately after any no—deal brexit. but there's a longer—term worry. do you think brexit will make the uk less of a priority when it comes to releasing new medication in the future? unfortunately, there's a high potential that that might be the case. so you prioritise, you know, america, europe, where the big populations are, because you want to get your medicine, your innovative medicine, to the maximum number of patients possible. now, the concern would be that the uk might fall down, theoretically, the kind of pecking order. countries with less purchasing power have to wait for new medication. switzerland tends to get them about five months later than the eu. the government says there's an awful lot of work to be done, but that it can happen,
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so patients shouldn't worry about getting their medicines if we have a no—deal brexit. and also that we'll still have access to the best new medicines in the future. some experts, though, are warning it might not be quite so straightforward. politicians must remember that these drugs save people's lives, they extend people's lives. they make sure that people don't end up in hospital, so, again, it's really important to make sure they recognise and remember that as part of the negotiation. 0k, are you going to help? shiv‘s parents are optimistic about better treatments or even a cure, but they need that to happen before he starts to decline. every minute counts, every day counts, and we just simply don't have that time to waste. catherine burns, bbc news. talking a lot about how to prepare for brexit, we have the security minister ben wallace at 8:20am to talk about security preparations on this programme. it is thought to be
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the world's oldest alcoholic drink. sales of mead has been growing for the past three years, especially with young drinkers. when was the last time you bought it?|j with young drinkers. when was the last time you bought it? i don't think i have. if i think about mead, i think about robin hood. friar tuck. would you like a glass of mead? yes, ajug of tuck. would you like a glass of mead? yes, a jug of mead. tuck. would you like a glass of mead? yes, ajug of mead. english heritage claims it sells a bottle every ten minutes and we asked salford locals if it tickles their tastebuds. i don't know what that is. horse medicine. it has got quite a strong taste. almost a bit... like ice cream. i've never had mead, but...
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that is sort of how i imagine it might taste, quite sugary, quite sweet. it tastes like a sweet. like an old boiled sweet. yes, it has really sweet. they are nice, yes. yes, it is good. it tastes like cough medicine. soi so i have heard nothing bad. nothing bad? iam so i have heard nothing bad. nothing bad? i am thinking the opposite. i am thinking! bad? i am thinking the opposite. i am thinking i don't like sweet drinks. ice cream. cough medicine. i like cough medicine. that is the whole idea of it. it makes you feel better. that is what you are getting for christmas this year. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will see you soon. good morning from bbc london news. the parents of a man killed in cyprus two years ago hope an inquest will answer questions about how he died. 22—year—old george low from dartford
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was stabbed to death in ayia napa in august 2016. his mother and father have flown out to the island for the hearing. no—one has ever been prosecuted. more than half of london's train stations can't be used by some disabled passengers. that's according to research by health and welfare charity leonard cheshire, which found 55% of stations in the capital don't have step—free access. the rail delivery group says it's working together with disability groups to improve accessibility and invest in projects that will enhance the service. he's become known in parts of north london as the friendliest bus driver in the capital. now ahmed serhani is the star of a short film, created by one of his passengers, which is set to be shown at the london transport museum. the driver of the number 214 bus says he always wants to make those on board happy. i always believe, you know that person who's going to board your bus? had an issue before boarding your bus, maybe they had a bad day or a bad start to the day, so let's make it a better day or a good day for that person.
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and the easiest way to do it is just to say hello. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning, we've got minor delays on the overground. a good service on all other lines. 0n the trains, there are delays and some cancellations on london north—eastern railway, grand central and hull trains to and from king's cross following electrical supply problems near peterborough. there's disruption for south—western railway services via woking following a points failure, while southern and thameslink services to the south coast are running with speed restrictions and delays due to the expected high winds. 0n the roads, there's northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach from the woolwich rd flyover. the m25 is slow clockwise following a breakdown with delays are back towards junction 5 and the a breakdown with delays are back towardsjunction 5 and the m26. there is westbound traffic on the
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highway. now, the weather with elizabeth rizinni. hello, good morning. get set for a very blustery day of weather. it will be windier than it was yesterday, with the strongest gusts of wind through the morning, and then easing slightly into the afternoon. we've also got some early rain around as well, and then that will clear to sunny spells and showers for the second half of the day. so this is this morning's rush hour. it's not very nice out there. gusts of wind of up to 50—55mph through the morning, easing into the afternoon, but some of those gusts of wind possibly quite disruptive for the first half of the day. and then we will see some brighter skies, sunny spells and a possibly a few showers, particularly out to the west. some of those showers may be heavy and thundery. top temperatures today, on the mild side, 13—14 degrees, you won't notice too much because it'll be so windy. and then staying rather blustery overnight, too. some showers around, lots of clear spells. it will be a cooler than it was last night. temperatures down to mid—single figures in places. now, tomorrow it's still quite windy. but not as windy as today. the nicest looking day of the week, dry with some good spells of sunshine, and then more
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early rain on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the battlelines for the parliamentary debate over theresa may's brexit deal are being drawn, ahead of five days of discussion starting next week. security minister ben wallace has issued a warning that britain will lose access to eu databases used to track terrorists and criminals in the event of no deal. he says the uk will have a comprehensive security relationship with the eu under theresa may's agreement. but mps have accused the government of not being honest about the potential security risks. a hospital trust at the centre of a widening review into poor maternity care has been rated inadequate by inspectors. the care quality commission has deemed the a&e and maternity units at shrewsbury and telford nhs trust as unsafe, and raised questions about the leadership
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of the organisation. the trust said the report made uncomfortable reading, and has vowed to improve. the leadership of this organisation has not dealt with the cultural issuesit has not dealt with the cultural issues it needs to deal with. it has created a culture where staff feel bullied. they can't raise concerns. safety is not at the centre of everything they do in the challenge for the leadership is to recognise the problems in their organisation and change the culture. this next story contains images you may find upsetting. a day after footage of a 15—year—old syrian refugee being allegedly assaulted was shared on social media, a video has emerged appearing to show his sister being attacked at the same school. a teenager will be charged with assault after the incident at almondbury community school in huddersfield. heatwaves linked to climate change increasingly threaten to overwhelm health services around the world, according to a new report. the number of people at risk because of extreme hot weather has risen steadily since 1990. research published in the medical
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journal the lancet showed that last year, 157 million more people were exposed to heatwaves than in the year 2000. after an unprecedented contest lasting almost three weeks, the world's number one chess player, magnus ca rlsen, has retained his world championship title, beating the american fabiano caruana in a tie—breaker. in three dramatic time—limited games in london, the norwegian ended caruana's hopes of becoming the first american champion since bobby fischer in 1972. it was the culmination of a record—breaking streak of 12 drawn games of regular chess. and one thing that we have all taken away is just how serious the game of chess is. it can be a pretty intense business, look at this. and the
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folded arms. did you see, it was kind of a bit wasted, because the opposition wasjust kind of a bit wasted, because the opposition was just looking down. like in all sport, it is true, just because it is chess, doesn't mean it is any less confrontational. that gives you a hint of the stuff that is going on. you know what they call him? the thor of the chess world. eu two haven't bought into this, have you? ironically, because of nothing happening, all these stalemates, i have become more interested. don't ask me to describe how he won it, thatis ask me to describe how he won it, that is all i would say. we are talking to a chess expert later, actually. i am glad they will explain it to you. it is a little bit like the champions league permutations for liverpool. they are not complicated at all, they are quite straightforward. they need to
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win next game. —— their next game. differing results for spurs and liverpool in the champions league, but they have one thing in common. they both need to win on the final matchday to stay in the competiton. natalie pirks reports. at wembley, tottenham's job couldn't have been clearer. only a win would do. the londoners were throwing everything at survival. it's hit the bar. but in an all—or—nothing game, it looked like spurs would have to settle for the latter. he wouldn't be down for long, though. a driving run led to a deft flick from dele. all super—sub eriksen had to do was finish. into the back of the net! now that was what they came to see. it was by no means vintage, but spurs are hanging in there. now, there is just the small matter of barcelona to get past. over in paris, jurgen klopp told his liverpool team to be brave. a win against psg could be enough. but you can't always get what you want. and when liverpool made a hash of the clearance, juan bernat‘s shot deflected into an open net, to give psg an early lead. just how do you stop some of the most expensive, skilful footballers ever assembled ?
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well, that's one way. but you can't hold back an express train. mbappe, cavani, neymarto finish. it's neymar, and it's 2—0. the highest—scoring brazilian in champions league history had reason to dance, but his celebrations were short—lived, thanks to angel di maria's wayward limbs. the challenge was rash. james milner‘s penalty on the stroke of half—time was perfection. but it was 2—1, the final score, psg celebrating like they had won the thing. liverpool still have work to do. europa league tonight, and arsena's match against vorskla poltava will go ahead after the match was moved to the capital, kiev. uefa moved the game after martial law was imposed in parts of ukraine. poltava initially said they may not be able to play, but they have since changed their mind. cracking night in the championship — all kinds of things going on. first off, derby's bradleyjohnson could be in trouble after appearing
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to bite stoke'sjoe allen. it all kicked off after a red card for stoke, but they won the game 2—1. is that subject to investigation of some kind? absolutely. it obviously really... an unappealing tussle. you can't see whether he definitely beat him but he looks very much like he did. —— bit him. and we've got a goal—fest for you. here is every goal from the 5—5 draw between aston villa and nottingham forest. four goals in there for villa's tammy abraham. there were two disallowed goals, as well. so you will have seen 12 in total. so you will have seen 12 in totallj
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like those matches. it is brilliant, and sometimes those gains in the championship are just the most exciting to watch. the pre—fight news conference ahead of tyson fury's heavyweight title fight with deontay wilder went exatly the way you would expect. some flash photography coming up. they fight in los angeles on saturday night. i don't really have to say anything, do i? the pictures do all the talking. time to take the top off. that's better. it could be made into a film, couldn't it? many men have tried to take things from me in the past. but i never come across anybody, amateur, professional, sparring, anything — there ain't never been a man that could better me in a fight, ever. never — not a spar, not a boxing match, not a professional fight, not anything. i've never, ever been bettered, not one time. so, if deontay wilder is that man, then god bless him. now, let's go to the other extreme
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of motivational speaking. shall we go from that to the power of positivity? the england manager, gareth southgate, is used to getting a tough time at press conferences — but probably not quite like this. you tell young players to be fearless, but i'm a bit scared of spiders. are you afraid of anything? well, i'm a little bit afraid of heights. iam too. are you? 0ur pe teacher, mr smedley, is a football coach. can you give me any advice that i can tell them? is he a good football coach? he never shouts at people. he does, sometimes. there you go, that's what you said, because he's nice to people. so i would say, mr smedley, keep doing what you're doing, because you're obviously doing a very good job. i like the way he didn't sell out mr smedley there. he was being
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positive, and he was at the launch ofa positive, and he was at the launch of a new coaching manual about teaching kids in a positive way. i really noticed it, i watch a lot of kids' football, you listen to the coaches, and it is all coming down from the fa, and they are talking about what happened in the game that was good rather than telling them what was out. is mr smedley a classic pe teacher's name? itjust feels like it is, mr smedley the pe teacher. good morning, mr smedley. cani teacher. good morning, mr smedley. can ijust teacher. good morning, mr smedley. can i just say, teacher. good morning, mr smedley. can ijust say, it is not a bad thing being told and you have done something wrong. i am with gareth. thousands of young people travel abroad every year to work as au pairs, and many of them go to australia. but most of those working down under are being exploited, according to a new study. many are earning way below the minimum wage, and end up being treated badly by their host families, as our sydney correspondent hywel griffiths reports. being an au pair means you've got
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your hands full. for this woman from eastbourne, living in australia has at times been overwhelming. she feels happy and included with her current family but says that others have treated her like a housemaid on the cheap, leaving her isolated, far from home. i feel like theyjust needed an extra pair of hands, not like they needed someone to come and live with us. we didn't communicate face—to—face, it was only overtaxed, and when they came home they would ta ke and when they came home they would take him and, like tomago. au pair system is meant to be a cultural exchange, looking after a family's children in return for experiencing a new country. australia's reputation for sun, sand and surf rings young people from around the world here looking for work, and in theory, being an au pair can be a really good deal. a roof over your head and regular income, leaving plenty of time to enjoy all of this.
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but in australia, au pairs faced the same problems as many other backpackers, with evidence of exploitation and underpayment. our findings show that most families we re findings show that most families were taking advantage of a large supply of working holidaymakers to get cheap housekeeping services as well. the lack of effective regulation has also caused starc power imbalances between families and au pairs. so for instance, of the au pairs who are asked to leave early, fully a third were only given one day's notice or less to leave the home when they were thrown out. australia doesn't have a specific visa for au pairs, which means less regulation and no way of knowing exactly how many there are. industry body say change is needed, but stressed most au pairs do have a good time. overwhelmingly, au pairs are happy with the experience. a family engages with an au pair, and shares their culture, that is
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cultural exchange. it is very hard to measure, but we know it happens in most cases. life in australia has not been what she had hoped for, a warning to others to do your research before you leave home. sandra landau is from the british au pairs agencies association, and joins us now. so there are some very worrying cases out there. how frequently are these cases popping up? thankfully i don't get to hear them so often because we are part of the international au pair association. any international agency, be it in the uk, australia or around the world, girls are taken care of properly. there is no exploitation, if it is done correct me. u nfortu nately, if it is done correct me. unfortunately, it is the young people who find the families themselves on the internet, there is no supervision —— done correctly.
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there is no guarantee that you are going to be put with a nice family, ora going to be put with a nice family, or a considerate family, regardless of whether you are booked for an agency or by yourself. there is still an element of potluck hummer isn't there? not really. the girls that we send abroad are given every opportunity. they choose the family themselves. from the information you are given. they do it iphone, skype, face time, they meet the children before they go, they feel they personally know that family before they ever get on the plane to go out to australia, the united states or wherever. equally when girls come to the uk it is done the same way if it is done through a proper, recognised agency that is part of the association. how many times have you removed an au pairfrom an engagement? thankfully, i have been in the business a long time, but it is very, very rare. have you ever done that? no, because i hear of odd
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cases. . . done that? no, because i hear of odd cases... on the face of it, that makes me think that maybe people are relu cta nt to makes me think that maybe people are reluctant to complain rather than their not being a problem. there obviously is a problem, because people go on the internet and find themselves a family and there is no after—ca re themselves a family and there is no after—care at all, nobody on the ground to look after them. if they go through a proper, recognised au pair agency which is part of either the australian association of au pair agencies or the british association, then there is always somebody on the ground to look after that young person. they do so much for them there. the after—care, meeting friends, they host events, they have outings, there is so much ca re they have outings, there is so much care taken of young people if they do it properly. i suppose, by saying you do it properly, what they also have to do, and this is what young people will be mindful of, because they are out to earn money, ultimately, is that an agency is taking a cut. no. well, an agency needs to earn its money. the agency and its money from the host family. and that will inevitably filter down to how much the au pair is paid. no
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one will say i will get an extra 10% and pay it. so that is why maybe some au pairs do go on the internet. if that is the case and they choose not to go through the agency, which they think about in terms of safety? again it is checking out the family before they start their position. i can only say that the agencies go to such lengths to make sure that their stay is good. on a practical note, if you are with the family and otherwise happy. and they say it stars to creep in, then they said, you know what, if you could just do the washing today, and then wednesday it is, if you could do the ironing, in practice, it gradually creeps in. it is all set out before any applicant start that position, there is a schedule of the expectations, the alice and payments, extra money for extra hours, it is so carefully done if it is done correctly. we will leave it there. thank you for your time. make
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sure you have a checklist. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. nota good morning. not a great morning. i have to be honest straight up. things are set to turn windy over the next few hours across england, wales and southern scotland yet again. we could see winds in excess of 60 or 70 mph. add again. we could see winds in excess of 60 or70 mph. add in again. we could see winds in excess of 60 or 70 mph. add in the heavy rain as well. let's focus on the winds, 60 to 70 mph along southern and western coasts. that will extend across the rest of england, wales, into southern scotland in the morning, with wind in excess of 60 mph at times. there is rain as well. the last two hours have seen that rain spread to all but the far north—east of scotland. heaviest across southern scotland, northern ireland, into north—western wales, the worst of the word whether pushing northwards, causing minor flooding as well as a strengthening wind across england and wales. ——
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worst weather. the rest of the wet weather will clear through this morning, the sunshine comes out and it will transfer northwards to all but the north—east scotland into the second half of the day, so here you start with sunshine and finish with rain. elsewhere sunshine and a scattering of showers, some of those heavy and thundery. quite mild at the moment, we will stay like that through the day, and the winds might ease into the evening rush hour, still touching gale force in many areas. into tonight, the winds are temporarily lulled and then they pick up again in the north—west of scotland. showers keep going through the night, longer spells of rain and hill snow in parts of northern and western scotland. fewer showers further south, some staying dry and it will turn cooler. so a fresh start to tomorrow morning. low pressure close by. that is where we cease shallow clouds go a lot. this is where you see the strongest winds tomorrow morning, 40 to 60 mph. and
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of course with more rain around at times, there could be some big puddles and minor flooding. times, there could be some big puddles and minorflooding. the rain will break up into showers through the day. showers elsewhere for western parts of the uk. the odd one into the air. many parts of central eastern england will be dry through the day and probably the sunniest of the day and probably the sunniest of the week even with the showers around. it will feel a little fresher with temperatures in single figures across the northern half of the country. we can split the country in two. the northern half is cooler. in the south, wet and windy weather. mainly a morning feature. if you have plans for saturday, the morning looking better in the afternoon. —— worst in the afternoon. —— worst in the afternoon. showers to take us through the second half of the day. notice the teens in the south, single figures in the north, the same thing on sunday. the rain is light and patchy and in some places it will be dry. that is how it is looking. thank you very much. it has been very wet lately.
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after hanging up his winter cloak for the final time game of thrones star kit harrington has made the journey all the way from westeros to london's west end. you say it like you know westeros. it is from the very popular game of thrones. neither of us have watched it. the final series will be screened in the new year, but before that the actor's treading the boards in a production of the sam shepherd play true west. he's been telling tim muffett about the glamour of the london stage. it's good to see you. we're on stage at the vaudeville theatre. some serious ‘70s action going on. not least my moustache. the play‘s set in 1979. no one's going to go and see a film like that. it's a movie. there's a big difference. they are two brothers in their mother's house outside of la, they're polar opposites as people. i've just about had
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it with the insults. this story has a lot of violence. what's it been like to rehearse and perform ? it's fun. i love a fight scene. you've done a few in your time. i have done a few, yeah. you have this thing where i get thrown across the stage, and he has a golf club which he stops at my face, which gets a nice reaction from the audience. you must have done something, threatened him or something. what did you do? i convinced him! how does it compare performing on stage in front of a live audience compared to making a massive tv show like game of thrones? people think that's the glamorous part. i find this the glamorous part. myjob is to come in and play to the west end audience every night. that for me is quite glamorous. whereas thrones was quite often outside, in some foreign country, away from your mates, in a muddy field. you've obviously filmed the last series of game of thrones,
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going out in the new year. what was it like when they said "cut" for the last time in yourfinal scene? i burst into tears, you know. it's a weird thing. i'm not sad about it ending. i feeljoyous about it ending, and having completed it. but it doesn't make any less emotional. and the first pilot of game of thrones was described by the producers as a disaster. what did you make of it when you first made it? i didn't know what i was doing. i was like, this is fun. i'm in a tv show. i had no idea if it was going to be a big success or anything. apparently it was a disaster. i still haven't seen it. they blackmail me every now and again with threatening that they'll release parts on youtube, because it was terrible and i had this awful wig. and the fact that it was such a global phenomenon,
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are there countries where you go to where you don't get recognised? not that i have found. although this is helping. you know, iam now... i am recognised a lot less now i have less hair and less fur on my face. he seems like a really nice guy. the play true west runs at london's vaudeville theatre until late february. we are tasting mead later on. something tells me that in game of thrones, maybe they drink mead. it was mediaeval. well, ben would know. no, he didn't. i have never watched it. it is popular in my house at home. mead and game of thrones. yes. the original alcoholic drink is what they were saying. you are here to talk to us about some of the events
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yesterday. yes, it is on the front of the newspapers. let's look at them first of all. it is inevitable that brexit will be on it. the i saying that brexit supporters have accused the bank of reviving project fear. yes. and the sun, the bank of england warnings, carnage, and a play on his name. let's go to the guardian as well. they were specifically looking at her campaign, selling the deal to the country in among those figures about the economy. quickly on the metro, taking a different line, looking at the 15—year—old boy, syrian refugee, who has been allegedly bullied and attacked at school. we understand a 16—year—old will appear before court on that as well and we have more on that later on. let's focus on the front pages which are debating whether or not mark carney at the
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bank of england is right to put the projections out with the language used. yes. he was accused of being pa rt used. yes. he was accused of being part of the project fear that we've talked about. about whether the worse case scenario outlined could come true. if we keep talking about it, whether it is self fulfilling. to look at some of them, the daily mirror says theresa may's deal will cost £100 billion and a real hit for the state of the economy. the front of the times has no—deal brexit would be the worst crash since the 19305. it is because they have highlighted three things. remember, these are the worst case scenarios. mark carney saving house prices could fall 30%. interest rates could rise over 5%. the economy could shrink 8%, the worst drop he says that after the 2008 financial crisis. the thing to talk about is the worst case scenario. they are pointing out that this is what could happen in the worst case. he doesn't expect it to happen. he doesn't
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necessarily think it will happen. but thejob of necessarily think it will happen. but the job of the governor of the bank of england is to make sure that the economy and we are prepared for what my —— might unfold. the economy and we are prepared for what my -- might unfold. that is talking about a disorderly brexit. that is the worst possible scenario. yes, that we have no arrangement when it comes to things like travel and trade, when it comes to cross—border interactions for financial services. the city of london is one of the biggest exports. all of those things need clarity. i travel around the country, meeting with businesses, and lack of clarity is a huge problem for them. what hasn't made the headlines is that regularly the bank of england pushes all of our retail banks through what we call stress tests to make sure that if these things happen, what could they sustain themselves with, can they hold themselves up, and the answer is yes. a lighter note on brexit, the fun of the telegraph, looking at
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project hysteria, michael sheen, the actor, he split up with his partner, sarah silverman, right after the brexit vote, and after donald trump was voted in in the us, because politics, they felt they had to focus more on politics. a proper brexit breakup. i would expect up and down the country it has happened elsewhere, because it is so divisive, we know how divisive it is, donald trump and brexit, it could strain a few relationships. we will see you later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the parents of a man killed in cyprus two years ago hope an inquest will answer questions about how he died. 22—year—old george low from dartford was stabbed to death in ayia napa in august 2016. his mother and father have flown out to the island for the hearing. no—one has ever been prosecuted.
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more than half of london's train stations can't be used by some disabled passengers. that's according to research by health and welfare charity leonard cheshire, which found 55% of stations in the capital don't have step—free access. the rail delivery group says it's working together with disability groups to improve accessibility and invest in projects that will enhance the service. he's become known in parts of north london as the friendliest bus driver in the capital. now ahmed serhani is the star of a short film, created by one of his passengers, which is set to be shown at the london transport museum. the driver of the number 214 bus says he always wants to make those on board happy. i always believe, you know that person who's going to board your bus? had an issue before boarding your bus, maybe they had a bad day or a bad start to the day, so let's make it a better day or a good day for that person. and the easiest way to do it is just to say hello. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning, we've got minor delays on the overground.
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a good service on all other lines. 0n the trains, there are delays and some cancellations on london north—eastern railway, grand central and hull trains to and from king's cross following electrical supply problems near peterborough. there's disruption for south—western railway services via woking following a points failure, while southern and thameslink services to the south coast are running with speed restrictions and delays due to the expected high winds. 0n the roads, the m25 is low clockwise following a breakdown with delays are back towards junction clockwise following a breakdown with delays are back towardsjunction 4. there is westbound traffic on the highway heading towards tallow hill. there is a lane closure on cromwell road for recovery vehicles involved in an earlier collision. now, the weather with elizabeth rizinni. hello, good morning. get set for a very blustery day of weather. it will be windier than it was yesterday, with the strongest gusts of wind through the morning, and then easing slightly into the afternoon. we've also got some early rain around as well, and then that will clear to sunny spells and showers for the second half of the day. so this is this morning's rush hour. it's not very nice out there. gusts of wind of 50—55mph
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through the morning, easing into the afternoon, but some of those gusts of wind disruptive, possibly for the first half of the day. and then we will see some brighter skies, sunny spells and a possibly a few showers, particularly out to the west. some of those showers may be heavy and thundery. top temperatures on the mild side, 13—14 degrees, you won't notice it because it'll be so windy. and then staying rather blustery overnight. some showers around, lots of clear spells. it will be a cooler than it was last night. temperatures down to mid—single figures in places. now, tomorrow it's still quite windy. but not as windy as today. the nicest looking day of the week — dry with some good spells of sunshine, and then more early rain on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today... the parliamentary battle over brexit — details begin to emerge of how five
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days of debate will play out. jeremy corbyn says he will call on parliament to prevent the uk crashing out of the eu without a deal. branded unsafe — the hospital trust being investigated over the death or injury of more than 40 babies, is rated inadequate by inspectors. good morning. travel giant thomas cook has been hit us enjoying the summer heatwave at home. annual profits melted into a big loss. i'll be speaking to the boss in a moment. in sport, spurs get the win they need, but they and liverpool need to win their final matches to stay in the champions league. it's a horrible morning out there at the moment, you could see wind gusting at 60—70 miles an hour. i'll have more details coming up. good
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morning. it's thursday, november 29th. our top story. the battle lines for the parliamentary debate over theresa may's brexit deal are being drawn, ahead of five days of discussion starting next week. labour has confirmed its opposition to the plans saying it will put forward an amendment to stop the uk leaving the eu with "no deal". we now know the debate will begin on december 4th, next tuesday, and take place over five days. mps will be able to vote on changes to the agreement. 0n the final day of the debate, december 11th, they will vote on whether to accept or wholly reject the deal. we can talk now to our political correspondent iain watson. how closely fought is this going to be? good morning. we have the timetable for the last couple of weeks. good morning, thank goodness something is certain, we know friend abel debated, how long they will debated, but we don't know the outcome, at this stage things don't look too
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good for theresa may, many of her mps very sceptical, she's been touring the country for the last few days trying to drum up support, trying to get the public to put pressure on politicians to back a deal, things looking tough for her. she is back in parliament today, talking to very important mps, committee chairs, she will be making her case, she is off to argentina then for an international summit, she will be losing some time people think could be precious and crucial for her to try and get some of her mps onside. labour will be putting forward alternative plan which includes britain staying in a customs union permanently. but at this stage i have to say it looks like the most likely outcome is that theresa may's the dos not get through parliament and the labour alternative dos not get through, then questions will be asked between then questions will be asked between then and christmas as to what we do next. on december the 11th, looking forward to that, between now and then, presumably a lot of mps will
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declare their hand. that's right. at the last count, 86 conservative mps said they would not support the deal, we do not know that means they will abstain, they will be absent, thatis will abstain, they will be absent, that is the difficult thing to work out. we probably expect the opposition to the deed to fall a little, it's an uphill task of the prime minister, she would be pleased to date to see andrea letson, leader of the house of commons, coming out in favour of a deal in a letter to her constituents published in the natural —— national newspaper, she says it's the only deal in town, guarantee is leading the european union on the 29th of march but i think it is astonishing it has come to this, its headline news that a member of theresa may's cabinet still agrees with theresa may. for the moment, thank you. a hospital trust at the centre of a widening review into poor maternity care, has been rated inadequate by inspectors. the care quality commission deemed the a&e and maternity units at shrewsbury and telford nhs trust unsafe, and raised questions
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about the leadership of the organisation. the trust said the report made "uncomfortable reading" and has vowed to improve. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has the details. for 18 months, more and more families have come forward to raise questions about the maternity care they received at this trust over nearly two decades. so far, more than 200 families have contacted an independent review of maternity services. why did you let me try natural birth, when you knew that there was something wrong with his head? it could have been a completely different story. throughout, the trust have insisted current care is safe, but today's report highlights a catalogue of failures. both maternity and accident and emergency are rated as inadequate for safety. staff say there was a culture of bullying and harassment. some of the executive team do not have the right skills and abilities to provide high—quality, sustainable care. staff sometimes feel bullied, the
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challenge is for them to recognise that culture an organisation and change it. the trust is already in special measures, meaning it is closely monitored by regulators and is getting support from others within the nhs. given the extensive problems, there are growing calls for the chief executive to resign, but simon wright says he won't walk away. i've worked in the nhs for nearly 25 years. my entire professional life has been part of that. i live in this community, my family live in this community. if i didn't think and believe that i was capable of leading this organisation, iwould have already walked away. the trust insist their care will improve, and that there are pockets of good practice within their inadequately rated services. this next story contains images you may find upsetting. a day after footage of a 15 year old syrian refugee being allegedly assaulted was shared on social
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media, a video's emerged appearing to show his sister being attacked at the same school. a teenager will be charged with assault after the incident at almondbury community school in huddersfield. heatwaves linked to climate—change increasingly threaten to overwhelm health services around the world, according to a new report. the number of people at risk because of extreme hot weather has risen steadily since 1990. research published in the medical journal, "the lancet" showed that last year, 157 million more people were exposed to heatwaves than in the year 2,000. the tour operator thomas cook has announced it's made a big loss in its latest results this morning. ben's talking to the boss.... the heatwave has really affected them. the firm had issued two profit warnings in two months — and today confirmation of why.
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the travel giant has reported a loss of £163m for the year — and it's blamed that on the better summer weather in the uk that meant more of us stayed at home, rather than jetting off somewhere warm.... let's speak to the boss. peter fankhauser is the chief executive of thomas cook, he's in our london newsroom. good morning, i'm looking through the statement you made this morning and usage priority is addressing the uk business are getting more of us to book and go on holiday. 0nline is important for you, i wonder for juicing of the future of europe high—street shops up and down the country. we closed shops in 2018, we had to rebrand the corner shops and they were sometimes very close to they were sometimes very close to the cup the thomas cook shops and there was no meaning to have to shops in almost the same street, we closed 100 shops, we are now adding additionaled additional services like thomas cook money into or shops, that they can have these
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services as well on the high street, we are as well enlarging our holidays and hotel offering, we are going to launch 20 new hotels in 2019, some of them are cooks clubs, it isa 2019, some of them are cooks clubs, it is a compelling holiday offering for customers in 2019. £163 million loss last year and i touched on why, because of the better weather, can you commit to not closing any more stories given that a gloss you have just reported? there is no plan for a big shop closure programme going forward , a big shop closure programme going forward, of course, we manage those shops according to the single profitability and there are maybe some shops we are going to close but we're not going to close shops as we close them in the numbers of what we had done in 2018. you can't open a newspaper this morning without hearing the word brexit and what it
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could mean for business, we heard the dire warnings from the bank of england, what difference doesn't make you come off changes are you making to your business to make sure you are ready for a potential no deal? we are very confident we can offer to our customers the holidays they wish, hard brexit or with a deal on brexit. but we see now, it is still early days at next summer, we see a shift of demand more into eastern mediterranean countries like turkey, as well tunisia in the south, out of the uk. but it's still very early tojudge south, out of the uk. but it's still very early to judge whether this is down to brexit fears of whether this is down to a better holiday price in those countries than for example in spain. mark carney warned yesterday he was surprised by terminate firms had not made preparations for brexit, what preparations have you made a thomas cook? we have all kinds of contingencies in place, we
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are confident as well this morning, we heard from chris grayling that the hinterland agreement with the us is going to be in place, we are very confident that there is an agreement or flying into european countries in place but we are having contingency plans in place for every eventuality so we plans in place for every eventuality so we feel very well prepared and we worked a lot on this brexit. peter, it's good to talk to you. thank you. bearing in mind shares in thomas cook down 30% so far this week, a lot of work for the firm to do. back to you. the time is 11 minutes has stayed. -- 11 the time is 11 minutes has stayed. —— 11 minutes past eight. england went to this summer's world cup with 11 black and ethnic minority players, the national team's most diverse squad ever. it's a far cry from 40 years ago today when viv anderson became the first black footballer to wear the three lions.
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throughout his career he suffered from racial abuse and he believes the game still has a lot of work to do to become more inclusive. viv has been taking a look back at his career with his three children — ruby, freddie and charlie. what was it like coming through as one of the only black players in the game? i was lucky being born and bred in not, they never thought of me being black. how would you do with people shouting stuff i chew in the crowd, anything like that come off work that young. i had a really good manager called brian clough, he said warmed up, i warmed up, i said they are throwing bananas and all they are throwing bananas and all the sort of thing, he said get back out and get the banana and an apple. afterwards, which was quite funny, i did laugh, afterwards he said you cannot let people like that dictate to you otherwise you're never going to you otherwise you're never going to make a career, everything was dismissed and i got on with playing football, you are here because you can play football, you have to show people what a good player you are, soi people what a good player you are, so i never ever doubted after that. why do you think you have not been
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offered an opportunity to start managing again? nothing has changed in 20 odd years, and must put something in place to give everybody as long as they are qualified, the opportunity to manage, something has to change because i think we have only got two or three black managers in the football league, there's not many. black, asian, whatever colour they are, as long as they have qualifications and think they should be given an opportunity. interesting thoughts prompted anderson and if you want to see more of that, it was on newsround and it is now available on newsround and it is now available on the eye player. joining us now is football pundit and former player dion dublin. welcome... he talked about bananas being thrown on the pitch, in some ways, he doesn't think much has changed. on the pitch, in some ways, he doesn't think much has changedm is not surprise me, i got racially abused when i started out, when i was 20—21, even to the age of 28—29 was 20—21, even to the age of 28—29
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was still there, not so bad... how long ago was that? i retired ten yea rs long ago was that? i retired ten years ago. even then. what kind of thing are you talking about? you know, opposing fans not happy that there is a black player at their ground, in their vicinity, they don't want it in and around them, even though they have black players within their aside, it's very blinkered, what it is, it's ignorance. that was happening, if you're talking as recently as ten yea rs you're talking as recently as ten years ago, that was happening at the time then all the campaigns we are so familiar with were up height, and... gathering pace, we thought all of this was working, i think what we've done is tried to shut it up what we've done is tried to shut it up but it's still there. we have not corrected it, there is ten, then i say non—white, for the sake of going through the holes will that nick and all that stuff, non—white coaches in first team positions in professional football. that's ten of 248. 12 out
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of 234 in the youth scheme within the professional football. that's 22 coaches. at nearly 500 people. when you started playing professional football, were there any non—managers? football, were there any non-managers? i don't think so. the problem, sol campbell has just been elected manager of a club. —— non—white. elected manager of a club. —— non-white. it's the same in any industry, if you don't see people at the top who look like you, i'm assuming, the assumption is for lots of people there is no place for you at the top so you are at a certain place, eg ever consider management i think, after my career, natural progression for me is management? no, i never wanted to go back into the game, i had 20 —— 22 years as a
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professional, iqbal had been great for me, i never wanted to get back in as for me, i never wanted to get back inasa for me, i never wanted to get back in as a culture manager, ever, and i know people who have tried and tried, they just keep know people who have tried and tried, theyjust keep getting knocked back, they have the same qualifications, let'sjust knocked back, they have the same qualifications, let's just say as a five person for now, they keep getting knocked back. just give us the same chance as everybody else. who knocks them back on 0fwat is knocking them back? sorry, the place has been filled, sorry, not this time, why don't you try in a couple of years, time, why don't you try in a couple of yea rs, we time, why don't you try in a couple of years, we will keep your name on the list. what body is at ofwat level is at that isn't either seeing different people or visualising different... looking people in the role. it has to be the people in charge at the football clubs that make the decision of yes or no and what coach they want. there's something very odd happening and maybe it's quite easy to identify in a way, those same people in those clu bs, a way, those same people in those clubs, the bosses for want of a
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better word, who are happy and keen to sign black players to play on the pitch to get the results or somehow making a completely different judgment about who they want coaching or managing the team. maybe... maybe it's a paraffin, could you hand that much power to someone you don't really want in your club? you don't want because... of your club? you don't want because... of their colour and race? it's that simple. we can't really, there's no point glossing it over. still there. there's no point glossing it. 0therwise there's no point glossing it. otherwise there would be a lot more coaches. sol campbell is at macclesfield. the bruce mclaren but who went in at another club, he had that problem with his heart. ——
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terrified to. if you say it's as simple as that, somebody in a boardroom is looking round making a decision, sometimes it has to be challenged. —— fabrice mwamba. and it is not being challenged. on the flip side, as a black player that has retired, i don't have any badges so we have got to remember not all black players are going for these jobs and not getting them, the ones that are qualified, who all the qualifications you need all the way to your professional license just seem to be not getting a fair crack at the foot and a strong, it has to change as soon as possible. when sol campbell said he struggled to nail down a coaching job, he said he would work for free, is that typical. no, i know him, that's not going to happen! he's getting paid now, but do you think, is that story
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different or is it, if you want to bea different or is it, if you want to be a coach regarding this off your colour or ethnicity you have to be able to offer that or do you think it's able to offer that or do you think its specific to him and the colour of his skin? i think it's him being desperate getting into a job he feels he is desperate to do, he can help the youth are younger players within the first team of a club and there are lots of players like that, i spoke to a fantastic coach at spurs, god rest his soul, few and far between. sol campbell has said that, he just a far between. sol campbell has said that, hejust a lonely in, it's far between. sol campbell has said that, he just a lonely in, it's like had to earn the right to earn the money, you know? if you get the opportunity to speak to a boss, as opposed to a coach of the major club, we would be happy to send a camera to u2 filmed that conversation. 0k, thank you. if there is a manager brave enough to engage in a conversation i think
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it's something we should try and do. i will be ready for that any time. excellent. lovely to talk to you. thank you. time to talk to matt taylor, eight 19 am, wet and windy but mild. gratefulfor you have got to take anything out of the forecast you can, 70 mile an hour gust in plymouth, southern scotla nd hour gust in plymouth, southern scotland feeling the brunt as well this morning. there could be travel problems, let's focus on the wind, touching 70 miles an hour across southern and western coasts, transferring inland, not quite as strong, still getting above 50—60 miles an hour in places, getting into northern england and southern scotla nd into northern england and southern scotland this afternoon as well. taking wind strength. lots of rain this morning, very few avoiding rain a pleasant —— present, the rain is on its way to stop pushing in across
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north—west england, currently across northern ireland. the south will see heavy downpours through the coming hours, things brightening up into the afternoon, more sunshine around during the second half of the day, sunny weather pushing northwards as we go into the afternoon. followed by heavy showers particularly across the west. temperatures on the mild side, not lifting hugely compared to what we have at the moment but it may feel pressured by the day and the wind not quite as strong as they are through this morning. still touching gale force the evening commute in a fairfew touching gale force the evening commute in a fair few spots. tonight it will stay blustery, lots of showers around. across the west, some pushing eastwards, merging into longer spells of rain, even hill snow across parts of scotland, the rumble of thunder as well. the temperatures tonight, back down into single figures, fresher than the past few nights, low pressure, as we go through into tomorrow morning, to the north of us, the closer to that,
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it will be wet and windy. the wind touching 40—60 miles an hour. not a grey start, the wind easing through the day, blustery day on friday, better chance of sunshine, almost uk wide but still some showers, most frequently in scotland and northern ireland, one or two to the west, some across central and eastern parts sustained write and temperatures down on the values today, 8—12d. back to you. thank you. it is 8:21am. more on our top story — after a series of dire economic warnings about the future of the uk in the event of a no—deal brexit yesterday, this morning the government's saying the country's security could also be under threat. a new report warns britain will lose access to eu databases used to track terrorists and criminals in the event of "no—deal" but mps have accused the government of not being honest about the potential security risks in theresa may's brexit plan —
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security minister ben wallace joins us now. we've been talking about about a range of issues but can you tell us what will be different about security after brexit? we will see no change for the next two years of how law enforcement and security services share information and develop investigations to combat serious and organised crime and counterterrorism. worst of all the well be no cliff edge and if there was, there was a crash out of the eu, in march, we would simply locked out some really important systems that are police need to exchange information, to follow—up investigations and share operations because the 21st—century they are often because the 21st—century they are ofte n a cross because the 21st—century they are often across borders all the time. we would be locked out of that. so you appear to have just jumped we would be locked out of that. so you appear to have justjumped to we would be locked out of that. so you appear to havejustjumped to no deal rather than the steel. we shouldn't forget, theresa may's deal is about the stroll agreement, the transition period which is another
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two years to december 2020, that is important for the world i'm responsible for, that is about day—to—day policing, there is no argument about the impact of being locked out of that, there's lots of rows about economic forecast, those are matters of opinion. this is for real, police officers sitting at their desks will not be able to get lifetime instant data that they use at the moment. that is part of the deal, withdrawal agreement is almost as important as the political declaration but after that, two things, first of all, there has been a recognition by the european union in the political declaration that security is a partnership, not a competition, trade is competition, i get that, but this is a partnership and the political declaration signed up and the political declaration signed up to the eu 27 members and the uk, there is quite a strong commitment around issues of sharing dna, vehicle registration, all of those things under the current system we
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are about to engage in here and some of the other passenger details of aeroplanes, 147 million passenger details coming in and out of this country every year on aeroplanes, will be able to continue with that under the deal and the plus side is, by getting the borders back, it means i is security minister can do more to keep people safe from people coming into this country. at the moment, i can exclude people from far—away, outside europe, based on intelligence who might pose a threat, as soon as they are in the eu or they marry, or they are a member, or they become an eu citizen, it is harderfor me member, or they become an eu citizen, it is harder for me to exclude people, intelligence might tell me they have been a foreign fighter but i need stronger evidence, that will change and that isa evidence, that will change and that is a good thing. ok, thank you for that, this week and over the next two weeks, what is your primary role, are you a politician trying to push through theresa may,'s deal or
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are you a security minister?” push through theresa may,'s deal or are you a security minister? i am your security minister, i would not be here if i didn't believe that the deal would deliver it for me, it's three important to me, personally, that the people i work but who are the professionals, who are on the front line, they have the tools to do theirjob, if they didn't, and i didn't believe europe was determined to come to a security agreement, i would not be sitting here, that is the reality. the reason i ask this is because i am trying to imagine what happens after march the 29th, if we don't have a date and at the moment, you say, you have used phrases like, we will be locked down, there are partnerships, we will be locked out of systems, 21st—century, you know, arrangements will be at risk. effectively, we will be at risk. effectively, we will be at risk. effectively, we will be in trouble. as security minister, you must have a great respect and a good relationship with the other security services in the
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eu,i the other security services in the eu, i cannot imagine that any country, whether it works for or against any country will allow criminals or information to not be exchanged when it comes to security risks, that's the implication you are putting forward, it feels like scaremongering? no, look, first of all, intelligence will always be shared between intelligence services but that's not evidence and investigation, that's intelligence, look, the eu has some very strict rules about their country participation and you see it around the world. it is simply the fact, the world. it is simply the fact, the eu has a number of data systems that by law, by law, the eu only allows members to access or in certain cases for they have special treaties, such as norway, iceland and the eu for example a certain treaties on extradition and surrendering subjects of interest,
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but by law you don't get access to that, that is their law. it means countries from further afield don't turn up and get onto the system. you are saying we will definitely be safer under this deal under —— after march 2019. for we are now is remaining a member of the eu, yes, we have timely and very easy access to eu and our own data shared in a way that allows us to have smooth, lifetime investigations... will we be safer under this deal from theresa may. we will be in parts of the element of security because we will be able to control our borders ina way will be able to control our borders in a way we can now and my point about exclusion, you know, sitting here are security minister, something that is really frustrating is the people who are dangerous to this country, i can keep them out of they coming direct from syria, turkey, if they come here and i had a case not so long ago they married
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a case not so long ago they married a european citizen, suddenly those are the people are harder, to be able to do that after brexit and thatis able to do that after brexit and that is a really important measure that is a really important measure that your viewers will find more reassuring. thank you very much for your time this morning. then wallace, security minister speaking to us from westminster. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. likely to give a spell of deals or severe gales to england and wales and southern scotland throughout this morning, disruption is likely from this, stay tuned to bbc local weather or head online to see the local warnings. into the afternoon the severe deals will eventually clear into the north sea, it will stay wendy, a bit of sunshine breaking through but also blustery showers, a mild day for england and wales, cooler across the north. into friday another area of low pressure sweeping off the atlantic, gales or
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severe gales to the northern part of the country particularly for scotland. some showers further south across western areas but a lot of sunshine to, cooler day for all, temperatures 9—11. into the weekend it remains unsettled, particularly england and wales where it's mild, cooler further north. this is business live from bbc news with victoria fritz and sally bundock. president xi promises a more open china for foreign firms — ahead of a g20 showdown with president trump. live from london, that's our top story on thursday the 29th of november. but can the leaders of the world's two biggest economies really
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resolve their differences and an end a trade war that's threatening to undermine global growth? also in the programme: us markets rise after the head of the central bank indicates
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