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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 29, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: our father killed our mother and sister — the two brothers calling for better understanding of psychological abuse. from the outside it looked like we were a close—knit family. we were always together, we had a nice—looking house. and i think we put on a face as well, we didn't want anyone to know what was going on, almost. but on the inside we were terrified, we were fighting every single day. confusion over a brexit tv debate between two party leaders — theresa may accepts the bbc‘s proposal, butjeremy corbyn prefers itv‘s. a damning report into shrewsbury and telford nhs trust, already in special measures, and now rated inadequate. with criticism particulalry of its maternity care. why did you let me try a natural birth when you knew that there was something wrong with his head? it could have been a completely different story. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. arsenal's europa league match with worskla poltava goes ahead after being moved to the ukrainian capital kiev.
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thanks, and helen willetts has all the weather. indeed it is very choppy out there at the moment. the winds will start to ease later and the rain, but georgia for the weekend. thanks, helen. also coming up, you'd think after that we'd all be pleased to remember our hot british summer, but not thomas cook, who've revealed losses of more than £160 million because holiday—makers stayed at home. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. for brothers luke and ryan hart it must be the hardest things to talk about, the issue of coercive behaviour, behaviour which led to their father killing their mother and sister.
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after years of psychologically abusing his family, lance hart shot his wife claire and 19—year—old daughter charlotte before turning the gun on himself. coercive control became a criminal offence three years ago, but the family were unaware of it. days before the murder, lance hart's sons luke and ryan moved their mother and sister out of the family home. our home affairs correspondentjune kelly has been speaking to them. claire and charlotte hart were a very close mother and daughter. and they were together when they were shot dead. just days before, they had finally escaped from the family home after years of psychological abuse. lance hart lay in wait for his wife and daughter with a gun outside a leisure centre. he knew they had gone there for a swim. after murdering claire and charlotte, he turned the gun on himself. throughout his marriage, lance hart had subjected his family to what is known as coercive control, extreme psychological and emotional abuse, but which stopped short of serious violence.
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charlotte's older brothers, luke and ryan, say that before the killing their father had never been violent, and they didn't realise his psychological bullying was domestic abuse. from the outside in, it looked like we were a close—knit family, always together, nice—looking house, on the inside, we were terrified, we were frightened every single day. we had never gone to school with a bruise, we had never encountered the police, never been to social services, we were top students, literally the top students. and then, our father killed our mother and sister. today's review by the safer lincoln partnership says that the murders were a tragedy that could not have been foreseen. the family were not on the radar of police and social services because they had never contacted the authorities about lance hart. do i think that the public need to be more aware of coercive control? absolutely, that is a job notjust for police and agencies but communities as a whole,
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and it's one of the key recommendations that this report makes, that our partnership will address. the coercive control which lance hart subjected his wife and children to became a criminal offence in england and wales at the end of 2015. that's seven months before the murders. our mum especially, he limited her life as much as he could, he didn't let her work more than part—time, so she had no financial independence. over time, shejust got more and more worn down. her friendship group closed off, her family were closed off, because our father kept moving us away, so we were physically distant from anyone who knew us. and he essentially turned our mother into a slave for him. she lived just to serve him. today's review talks about the need for gps to question patients about suspected domestic abuse and says there should be a national publicity campaign to raise
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awareness of what coercive control is, using this family's story to show how such abuse can end in tragedy. with me now is katie ghose, chief executive of women's aid, a national charity working to end domestic abuse against against women and children. the most striking part of that was listening to those very brave brothers talking about something most people would find very difficult to talk about. every time they talk about the horrific events and the loss of their mother and sister, they are raising awareness of chorus of control, a horrible form of emotional and psycho ball abuse that a partner has over other family members. they are doing so
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much because if we can raise awareness that abuse doesn't always involve physical violence and it is risky and completely unacceptable and decrying... and this is the point, isn't it? absolutely. it has been a crime for nearly three years now. we have seen under the 300 convictions over those years to stop it is amazing to see the courage of these brothers in talking about it. we need awareness and as they have been seeing, as is everyone from a gp to housing officer who may be able to have a conversation, to prompt somebody who is in trouble to know that there is support out there and they are not alone. somebody may not be aware that what they are going through constitutes criminal behaviour. they may think that this is almost normal. absolutely, and i was very struck to hear about one of the brothers going to the police station after the mother and sister had been killed in seeing a poster
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about domestic abuse, chorus of control and seeing it was against them. they had installed it and said that was the life they had been when living. the knowledge that this severe controlling behaviour, a pattern of behaviour, knowing it is a crime hopefully means we can change lives and save lives. one thing for the victims to know that, but what about the police? is there following is there as well? we have not yet seen that full awareness that coercive behaviour is at the heart of domestic abuse. there may bea heart of domestic abuse. there may be a tendency for some police officers to see a domestic abuse a lwa ys officers to see a domestic abuse always physical assault and this family's story is a terrible case of a campaign of terror, psychological abuse. the brothers say they are further didn't resort to physical violence because they lived in terror of him. that fear is one of the reasons i imagine most people
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don't report it, because the fear of reporting it and making the situation potentially much worse. you're absolutely right and in abusive partner will use these tactics of intimidation, perhaps even threats to kill and harm and will instil that fear, chip away at the victim's self—esteem. they will isolate them from friends and family and those are some of the things you can look out for and all of us can have that awareness so that we might be able to help a friend or family member who has any chorus of the controlling relationship. it is very good for you to come and talk about it, thank you. and if you are affected by any of the issues covered injune's report you can go to the bbc action line website. plans for a live televised debate on brexit between the prime minister and jeremy corbyn are up in the air, following a clash between the two over the format. theresa may has agreed to the bbc‘s proposal for a programme on the sunday before the crucial vote in parliament. but mr corbyn has said that he prefers the itv offer. 0ur political correspondent
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iain watson reports. she may have emerged from the back door of downing street this morning but theresa may signalled she would be willing to put her brexit plans under the spotlight in a bbc debate. labour hasn't yet to taken up the offer. but she was determined to get some practice in, anyway. she was on her way to a kind of political dragons' den to sell her deal to a panel of senior mps. my focus is on the vote that will take place on the 11th of december here in this house. but straight away, rather than asking about her deal, they seemed more interested in what would happen if mps voted it down on december 11th. the question i'm asking you is is there planning going on for a different approach if the deal is defeated? this is the deal that has been negotiated and this is the deal that we need to focus on. knowing you for 20 years, ijust don't believe that if your deal goes down you are the kind of person
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who would contemplate taking this country into a no—deal situation. am i wrong? it will be a decision for parliament as to whether they accept the deal. and they also wanted to know if the prime minister would be unveiling her long—anticipated plans for a new post—brexit immigration system before mps vote on her deal. can you just confirm that we will definitely have the immigration white paper published before the meaningful vote on the 11th of december? there is still discussion ongoing as to the timing. and there's another issue to be settled. it is still not clear that we'll see theresa may debating directly withjeremy corbyn on television. politicians can't seem to agree on anything these days. she seems to be willing to accept a bbc proposal that would involve audience participation while he wants a head—to—head clash on a rival channel. the itv offer seemed a sensible one.
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it reaches a wide audience and the timing looks good to me because it is not inconveniencing people who may wish to watch other things later in the evening. and on the substance of brexit, the labour leader told itv‘s this morning that parliament wouldn't allow the prime minister to leave without a deal. well, the alternative isn't no deal, nobody‘s going to allow no deal. how could we? we've seen the prime minister and the leader of the opposition argue their case in very different settings this morning. whether we see them clash head—to—head is still, well, a matter of debate. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster for us now. strictly are i'm a celebrity?
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perhaps neither. there is a slot in the afternoon. they will both come 0n the afternoon. they will both come on and debate. people will see that we can't see them debate every day at 12 o'clock during prime minister's questions. we don't know whether either of these events will happen. it does seem like a recently —— rieder has accepted a bbc offer and jeremy corbyn and itv, so it is difficult to see how that can be reconciled and what the audience appetite is for this kind of thing. people are very upset about it because they wouldn't be included in this. they are people who feel that there are other options. i think this comes down to the busy debate we are at now about all of this, where so many people are thinking that theresa may can't get her deal through parliament so they are looking at alternatives. people have very many different views. many want to be involved in a kind of debate as there is to be won but in the
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meantime, they are getting on with making their own plans. it's pretty intriguing, you go around parliament and talk to people and they are coming up with different ideas, some talking about the idea of as being any european economic area scenario, soa any european economic area scenario, so a much closer relationship with the eu. there are of course still brexiteers talking about the new deal. it is interesting today hearing from theresa may seeing that those preparations for the no deal will have to be massively increased if her deal does not go through parliament. then you have the others talking about another referendum. it is difficult to see the hurdles to get over to get to that. it would definitely require an extension of article 50, they wouldn't be able to be held in time for the end of march. that is making the case today we re march. that is making the case today were some conservative mps including justine greening, the former cabinet minister. she said it was perfectly possible and you would have to extend article 50 budget you could easily work that through over the
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next six months or so. we heard two from jojohnson. next six months or so. we heard two from jo johnson. he was next six months or so. we heard two from jojohnson. he was reflecting and articulating another thing i have heard from lots of conservative mps over the last few months, their worries about the wrong party. they look at this whole brexit scenario, they are very concerned that if it is not done properly, it could have very big ramifications for their own party. even if we could unite around to the prime minister's deal, implementing a botched bungled brexit but sees as seed control and makes every part of the country poorer than it would otherwise be would surely risk of doing serious damage to the conservative party. a worst of all words tory brexit—lite will will become an albatross around their necks for years to come. as colleagues in parliament have been warning on recent days, this deal, disliked by both leaders and remainers, players are so few people
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that it could end up leading to an electoral defeat on the scale of 1997 or worse. meanwhile, the prime minister is on her way to argentina for a g20 minister is on her way to argentina fora g20 summit minister is on her way to argentina for a g20 summit meeting of world leaders and there have been a few rumblings from tory mps here saying why she had been out on the road trying to sell this deal foot to the public and why would she want to do a television debate, which is appealing to the public when actually the votes that are going to matter to get her deal through parliament or the 650 mps in the house of commons. for now, thank you very much. the shrewsbury and telford nhs trust, which is already being investigated over claims of poor maternity care, has been rated inadequate by inspectors. the care quality commission said staffing levels were not high enough to keep patients safe. staff told inspectors there was a "culture of bullying and harassment" at its hospitals, and "defensiveness" from its leaders. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. for 18 months, more and more families have come forward to raise questions
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about the maternity care they received at this trust over two decades. so far, more than 200 families have contacted an independent review of emergency services. why did you let me try a natural birth when you knew that there was something wrong with his head ? it could have been a completely different story. throughout, the trust have insisted that current care is safe, but today's report highlights a catalogue of failures. both maternity and accident and emergency are rated as inadequate for safety. staff say there was a culture of bullying and harassment. some of the executive team do not have the right skills and ability to provide high quality sustainable care. there is no doubt that the leadership was not creating the right culture in the organisation. staff told us they were fearful about raising concerns. that's not acceptable. staff need to be feeling free to raise concerns about safety for patients, and those concerns need to be acted upon.
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the trust was put into special measures earlier this month, due not just to failings in maternity but also because of long—standing problems in the a&e unit. critically ill patients left waiting hours to see a doctor and then more hours to be admitted to a hospital bed, because this is a trust that just cuts and cuts and cuts the number of available beds. given the extent of the problems, there are growing calls for the chief executive to resign, but simon wright said he won't walk away. i've worked on the nhs for nearly 25 years. my entire professional life has been part of that. i live in this community, my family live in this community. if i didn't think and believe that i was capable of leading this organisation, iwould have already walked away. the trust insist that care will improve and there are pockets of good practices within their inadequately—rated services. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the family of a woman
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and daughter shot and killed by their abusive father call for a national campaign to focus on the impact of controlling behaviour in cases of domestic violence. the prime minister has agreed to debate brexit on a television debate on sunday 9th december, the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has yet to confirm he will take part. branded unsafe — the hospital trust being investigated over alleged failings in maternity care, is rated inadequate by inspectors. and in sport, arsenal are in the ever head of the europa league match. a match that has been moved 200 miles to the ukrainian capital because of instability in the country. manchester united have activated a one—year extension to goalkeeper david de gea ahead of any uncertainty ahead of the transfer window. sol campbell faces the media for the first time this afternoon since his appointment of manager as
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macclesfield town. he becomes only the eighth like manager to be working in the top four flights of english football. britain's funeral market is facing an investigation after the competition watchdog found prices have been soaring for well over a decade. the competition and markets authority says those on the lowest incomes are spending nearly 40% of their annual outgoings on organising a funeral, more than on food, clothing and energy combined. 0ur personal finance correspondent simon gompertz is here. these figures are quite staggering. why are the up so much? the authority blames some of the big chains for pushing up their prices but also funeral directors in generalfor taking but also funeral directors in general for taking advantage of the fa ct general for taking advantage of the fact that when we are in that situation, having to organise a funeral, they don't want to spend time on that and you simply want to be involved in the bereavement and sorting that out and so people tend to ta ke sorting that out and so people tend to take the first price that comes
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their way or use a firm that their family has used before. they take advantage of that. let's have a look at what has actually happened to some of the prices. the average price of a funeral in this country, which is £11271, and that's up 68% over ten years. prices have gone up over ten years. prices have gone up over that time but this is nearly three times the rate of inflation. and within that, the price of a cremation is £737, and that's a big one because that has gone up by 84% over that 10—year period we have had. people have been describing that today as shocking, unjustified. what can you do about it? there are independent undertakers. that is one thing the authority says is that you mightfind a thing the authority says is that you might find a local small operator who has a lower price. but of
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course, you have to be sure about the quality of what you are being offered as well. you could wait for the authorities to clamp down. they are doing a big investigation now. but to take advantage of some of the websites on the internet, price comparison sites that have cropped up, which give the opportunity for you to feeding your address or postcode and see what is on offer locally. that's another way of hitting it as this moment in getting something cheaper. but if you are going to knock on the door for someone saying they represent the corner‘s office and we have your family member's body, the last thing you want to do in the world is complicated which is already a horrific moment in your life. and historically, people haven't shopped around in this situation and that is the problem and is what they will need to do in future if they want to get these lower prices. you can save more than £1000 on a funeral by shopping around. the big operators, the co—op and dignity, they have
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national chains and said they will cooperate with this investigation. we have also said they have started to bring prices down this cheer. clearly not by enough as far as the authorities concerned. this will head their properties. dignity is on the stock market on their shares are down 16% today. thank you very much. a record number of citizens from european union countries left the uk last year. it brings the estimated net migration from the eu to the uk to its lowest level since 2012. but the figures from the office for national statistics also show that an increasing number of people from outside the eu are coming to live in britain. one of britain's biggest tour operators, thomas cook, has announced a £163 million loss for the past year. that compares with a £9 million profit in 2017. the firm said its uk business had been hit by the hot weather here over the summer, leading to less demand forforeign holidays. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. thomas cook specialises in taking people from cooler countries, like the uk,
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to regions where holiday sunshine is a bit more reliable. but this year there was a problem, britain basked in summer heat and foreign holidays lost their appeal. we had a very good start to the summer of 2018. and then the heatwave, all over europe, not only in the uk, in the nordic countries, and on the continent, had really an impact on customer behaviour. the company's earnings plummeted as it was forced to cut prices to fill planes and hotels. that hot summer does feel like a very long time ago, even so thomas cook is facing a number of other challenges. uncertainty over brexit, high debt levels, and how to keep the more traditional parts of its business when what consumers want is changing very rapidly. thomas cook is a large business. it has 21,000 staff, nearly half of them in the uk. it still operates nearly 600 high street stores,
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though hundreds have closed over the past two years. last year it had 22 million customers. some analysts believe its business model is outdated. thomas cook, obviously, is a well—established brand. it possibly has not kept up with the times. that brand is very traditional, but is it in pace with the new way of booking travel? thomas cook has invested heavily in online services, and new, trendy hotels. it might insist it is unchanging but the reality is, that faced with political uncertainty and a fast changing market, it may have little choice. time for a look at the weather. let's go to the united states. we are looking at an area which has suffered from these horrible fires over the last few weeks but now a big difference. coming with the proviso because we
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have obviously had devastating fires across california and we are now getting rain and snow across mammoth and heavenly, so good news for those wanting to ski but because the vegetation has disappeared, there is a warning forflash vegetation has disappeared, there is a warning for flash flooding and mudslides. that'll be the overriding concern for the next days. we have some welcome rainfall, probably starting to dry up by the end of friday, but coming down into the desert south—west states and california, you can see that ebbs away and we have a breeze coming in. any priest is not good news but hopefully with everything mostly concerned and miserable contains now and marine on the way, we are on the positive side. we have some very wet weather to come for the mississippi valley and southern states, causing potentially flash flooding. but obviously for california, particularly the drier parts, you
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don't see that much rain anyway so this will be welcome. closer to home, it has been a pretty grim morning for many people. for the third day running, pretty much. again, gusts of wind and heritage as a gust devon and cornwall. this is just heritage as a gust devon and cornwall. this isjust a spectacular, the waves over that pa rt spectacular, the waves over that part of the world. it is notjust across the south—west that we have seen this sort of weather, we have seen this sort of weather, we have seen lively winds quite far in life, 55 miles per year which will cause damage, bring down slates and branches, overturned lorries. so not good. let's have a look at what is coming up. it is easing. for the next few hours, if you're heading out, not great. we have had to these gusts of wind but as i say, it is starting to
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ease 110w wind but as i say, it is starting to ease now so we are seeing them not to burn by ten mph. that will continue. for scotland and the rain continues to pour down across fife and up towards inverness. to the west we are starting to see the rain easing but there are lots of showers coming in. the showers themselves could give good half—inch one inch of rain in a very short space of time. those are shah will keep coming thick and fast. the windsor easing in the south and west but it gets wetter for north—western scotla nd gets wetter for north—western scotland overnight whilst elsewhere we keep the showers around the coast. it has been really mild the last couple of nights and it will be frosted freezing night but chillier. the year is changing slightly for tomorrow. even the low pressures with us tomorrow and even though it will throw lots of showers are away, it doesn't look as turbulent as it has been today or yesterday. there will still be some strong winds. these are the gusts tomorrow across the north of scotland. but it is not
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exceptional, not for scotland in particular. but again a combination of heavy downpours and gusty winds picking for quite a lively conditions on the roads, fast roots in particular. fewer across central and eastern parts of east of scotla nd and eastern parts of east of scotland and northern ireland, but not exempt. temperatures will be 3-4d not exempt. temperatures will be 3—4d down on today, so the mouse buttons above average. a quieter end to the rebuttal doesn't last. this next area of low pressure rose and for saturday. more rain, possibly strong winds of that develops more. we mostly think across the southern half of the uk, england and wales, try but chillierfor half of the uk, england and wales, try but chillier for scotland and northern ireland but thejury try but chillier for scotland and northern ireland but the jury is out. there is uncertainty as to were these low pressure systems will sit. then another lot for sunday. we again have more showers to come for most of us. it is not looking like a wash—out this weekend, the windsor should not be quite a strong, but not great given that it is the weekend. there are warnings are still out for today's weather on the
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website but this turbulent weather is with us for the next four or five days. we will have more for you through the afternoon. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. two brothers, whose father killed their mother and sister, are calling for a better understanding of psychological abuse. coercive control became a criminal offence three years ago, but the family were unaware of it. confusion over a brexit tv debate between two party leaders — theresa may accepts the bbc‘s plan for a debate at 8pm on the ninth december, but jeremy corbyn prefers itv‘s proposal. a hospital trust, investigated over alleged failings that led to the deaths of dozens of babies, has been rated inadequate by inspectors. more than 200 families raised concerns about care at shrewsbury and telford nhs trust. and the hot summer is blamed as tour operator thomas cook reveals losses of more than £160 million. sport now on afternoon live withjohn and arsenal playing
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in ukraine in the europa league and their game has been moved. it looked at one stage as though it wouldn't go ahead — poltical instability in ukraine prompting uefa to move arsenal's europa league match 200 miles to kiev, despite protests from tonight's opponents vorskla poltava. travel plans for some of the 500 supporters who've made the tip, have been disrupted with fans already there, having to get a train to the capital where they will have to put up with temnperatures of around minus ten. a win will see arsenal top the group — they've already qualified as have chelsea, who are also in action. celtic need a win to keep them in contention.
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sol campbell, first managerial job, at macclesfield. sol campbell facing the media for the first time since being appointed manager of league two macclesfield town — he becomes just the eighth bame manager in the premier league and efl — eight among 92 clubs in the top four divisions, as black managers continue to be overlooked when it comes to managerial appointments. that press conference getting under way in around an hour. we will hopefully bring you a clip of what he has to it comes a0 years to the day that viv anderson became the first black player to play for england. he's been speaking about his experiences of the landmark and the difficulties he faced. clearly it was a big thing but for
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me it was all about playing the game and trying to do well, as didn't wa nt to and trying to do well, as didn't want to let me mam down, dad down, people that knew me so i was tunnel vision, playing the football. there aren't many black faces round all those years ago, it was tough but at the end of the day i wanted to be a footballer so i made an effort really early on, what anybody shouts or screams or throws at me i will dismiss and try and get on with playing manchester united have triggered the one year extension to goalkeeper david de gea's contract. the player's deal runs out at the end of the season, permitting him to speak to overseas clubs from the first of january. united want to keep hold of their keeper and hope it will avoid any uncertainty over the player's future heading into the january transfer window. new rules will allow overseas cricketers to play cricket for england earlier, after three years
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living in the country. and that means pace bowler jofra archer is now available for england. the 23—year—old was born in barbados but has an english father and a british passport. he's tweeted to say "it may or may not happen but i would love to debut in front of my family." england have a tour of the west indies starting in january ahead of the world cup starting next may. and we're going to finish with some cheating in china. almost 250 runners were caught taking short cut during the shenzen half marathon. they were actually spotted by traffic cameras, and cut around two or three kilometres off the full 21k distance. all of those who cheated now face bans. that is something you would never do simon? we haven't got time... i'm guilty. 0nce simon? we haven't got time... i'm guilty. once i did! 0nce? 0nly guilty. once i did! 0nce? only once. move onjohn. i have.
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leaving the european union without a deal would be bad for britain's security — that's according to the government. currently, the uk has access to european security and law enforcement databases. but speaking earlier, security minister ben wallace said the brexit deal agreed by the prime minister would establish a "broad, comprehensive and balanced" security partnership with the eu. balanced security partnership, which helps us tackle evolving threats including serious international crime, terrorism, cyber attacks and hybrid threats as well as the erosion of the rules based international order and the resurgence of state based threats. 0n law enforcement in particular, under lines orfuture 0n law enforcement in particular, under lines or future relationship will be comprehensive, close, balanced and reciprocal and seek to deliver strong operational capabilities. the text includes a commitment that
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our national security will remain the sole responsibility of the united kingdom that we will co nsulta nt united kingdom that we will consultant and cooperation on sanctions while pursuing independent joining me now from munich is professor malcolm chalmers, deputy director general at the defence and security think tank rusi. thank you forjoining u do you agree on what you understanding of the brexit proposals are? well, what i think is true is this deal if it goes through, will buy the uk time for coming up with proposals for data sharing that are acceptable to both sides but there has not been aan agreement on that, if we leave without a deal, then we will have significant problems straightaway in terms of our ability to share data with counterparts in europe. can i just pick you up on that, because what would those difficulties be? we are talking about people in coun one
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country, getting op line or picking up country, getting op line or picking up the phone, they all know each other, what stops? the reason is that when police exchange data on personal information, on criminal records, on people that have beener —— arrested or charged, passenger data in terms of regulating number of car, the. na data and so on, all that quite rightly has to be done under a strict legal framework, that legal framework currently if we talk about exchanging data, is done under the framework of usualure —— european union, the european course of justice, if we european union, the european course ofjustice, if we leave without a deal that framework will no longer apply and it is right that we can only share data when there is a legal framework to do so, what the negotiation also seek to do, after we leave, under this deal, is to
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establish a new legal framework, establish a new legal framework, establish a new way of agreed exxon rules for handling that data and also having a way ofjudging we are doing it correctly, right of appeal for citizen, we believe they are being unjustly treated and that is where the notty issues come up, because at present the european union is sinisting all that will require the uk —— insisting will require the uk —— insisting will require the uk to take new rules without having a say in formulating them and to be subject to the jurisprudence of the european court ofjustice. the jurisprudence of the european court of justice. the problems jurisprudence of the european court ofjustice. the problems i think are not in any way unsoluble, but they have not been solved, yet in these negotiations, being kicked into the future status negotiations which will start. there has been a suspicion with some, that actually security is something that theresa may has been able to use as
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something of a bargaining chip because things like gchq, security is something that the uk is very strong within the eu on? on? . you know i think our defence capability, our intelligence capability through gchq and other agencies is outside this process by and large, there are little bits that are affects its intense sharing relationship is more central to negotiations and any and i think there was a suggestion early none the negotiations, that the uk could somehow or other use its defence intelligence power o as a means of gaining concessions in the area of economic, but that has been largely discarded by the government, absolutely rightly because the implication is we would be prepared to compromise on our nato commitments, on our central security commitments, on our central security commitments, to our european neighbours if we didn't get what we
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wa nted neighbours if we didn't get what we wanted on the economic side, and that would be a counter productive argument, it would be a trump like argument, it would be a trump like argument if you like and one that the government has put to one side. what our government has to say if we don't have close cooperation on security, then both the uk and the eu, it is a negative, if we continue co—operate, and i think governments of europe are listening to that argument, i suspect, of europe are listening to that argument, isuspect, if of europe are listening to that argument, i suspect, if we go through this deal and get beyond march un9th there is a real possibility of finding a way to co—operate but it will require significant concessions from the uk in terms of sovereignty, we will have to be a rule taker and basically... in our own legislation fsomething like basically... in our own legislation f something like what we're have now, it is not possible to maintain
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the current level of both operational cooperation, and control, develop practises outside. professor, we will have to leave it there. most grateful for your time. thank you forjoining breaking news about donald trump's lawyer. what is going on. first a reminder of who michael cohen s he is donald trump's former personal law lawyer, he was regarded as being his mr fix it, the man who would sort out problems for him. you maybe remember he organised the payments to two women who claim they had affairs with donald trump, including the porn star stormy daniel, while michael cohen has made a surprise appearance in court in new york, there is a hearing that is taking place at the moment, and it seems
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that he is preparing to plead guilty to making false statements to congress, and this is in relation to the investigations going on to allegations of collusion between the trump campaign, and russia during the 2016 presidential election, of course things which donald trump very very strongly denies. it seems that it very very strongly denies. it seems thatitis very very strongly denies. it seems that it is a specific thing he is pleading guilty to, he is pleading guilty according to these report, and the hearing is still i don't know going but he is making false statement in relation to a real estate deal taking place between the trump organisation and taking place in moscow, what was sometimes referred to as the trump tower deal in moscow, and it seems that michael cohen says that he told congress lies about when he stopped being involved in talking about that deal. now what is important to say is that michael cohen has pleaded guilty to income tax fraud charge, charges
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brought by prosecutors in new york, this seems to be different r it seems to be in connection with special council investigation that robert mueller investigation, that president trump continues to call a witch hunt, and it does suggest that he is now fully co—operating with robert mueller and he is pleading guilty as part of whatever deal he has made. 0ne count of making false statement to congress. everybody‘s waiting with bated breath, is he going to dish the dirt? yes, the truth is, is they all suggestions are michael cohen, as donald trump's former personal lawyer knew huge amounts about the president's business. he was the man who the president went to whenever he wanted to get things done. it is why he got this mr fix it reputation and there was always this feeling that president trump was concerned when michael cohen was having conversations, at the moment of
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course we simply don't know how much he has told robert mueller or how much michael cohen actually knows, but, what will undoubtedly concern the white house, and will unkoutly concern president trump, is that this charge that he is pleading guilty to is something that is directly related to allegations of russia, connected to the truc organisation, all of that will fit into a organisation, all of that will fit intoa mix organisation, all of that will fit into a mix that undoubtedly will get a response from president soon. he is due to leave to argentina in a short amount to time to go g20 meeting. i suspect we will be watching his tweets carefully to see how he reacts to hang on, sorry about this because i am telling you stuff that is happening nearer to you than me, coen said he made the misstatement to be consistent with trump's political messaging and out of loyalty to trump. donald trump is going to be concerned to read that. yes, and that is the whole point of this, it is about the relationship
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between donald trump and michael cohen, and just emphasise, this court case is happening in new york, the hearing is taking place as i speak, iam the hearing is taking place as i speak, i am sitting in washington, so there will be details that are breaking as we speak about this, so don't be afraid to jump breaking as we speak about this, so don't be afraid tojump in and give me stuff that is happening. i am trying to keep a watch as best i can. the fundamental thing, is that this is all about relationships, it is all about what was known. the concern for donald trump has always been that michael cohen had intimate details the about his business relationship, personal relationship, he lied in the past about michael copenhagen's own relationship in terms of what he knew about money being paid to the porn star stormy daniels. that led to concerns about what president trump was saying and what president trump was saying and what he wasn't saying. michael cohen is now going forward and saying he gave a false statement to congressional committee, said he had
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stopped working on, talking about this real estate deal in russia while that deal was still going on, they were still having those conversation, as a result, donald trump will been sitting here and watching this very closely. but it won't just be donald watching this very closely. but it won'tjust be donald trump, it will also be everybody else in washington and of course all of this is connected to robert mule her‘s investigation into allegation of russian interference in the presidential election, claims that the trump campaign colluded with that and also claims of obstruction of justice. all of which that and also claims of obstruction ofjustice. all of which we dekeen on saying the president deny, lots of concern about when this report is going to drop. robert mueller muller less report has been talked ant. we are seeing from today's activity in new york, from this court hearing, is that robert mueller‘s investigation is ongoing and he is
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getting more information. thank you for that. we will talk late other that, we are a good team on this. talk to you later on. you can give me any information you can give me, that would be great. great. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live the family of a woman and daughter shot and killed by their abusive father call for a national campaign to focus on the impact of controlling behaviour in cases of domestic violence. the prime minister has said she'll take part in a brexit debate, televised live by the bbc on sunday ninth december, butjeremy corbyn has said he prefers itv. branded unsafe — the hospital trust being investigated over alleged failings in maternity care, is rated inadequate by inspectors. here's your business headlines on afternoon live.
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the frankfurt headquarters of deutsche bank have been raided by prosecutors in a money laundering investigation. 0ther deutsche offices in the city were searched in an operation involving about 170 police and officials. prosecutors are looking into whether deutsche bank staff helped clients set up offshore accounts to "transfer money from criminal activities". thomas cook swings to a loss as the heatwave hits sales. the travel firm reported a £163 million annual pre—tax loss compared to a £9 million profit last year. three online casino firms have been fined £14 million by the gambling commission uncovered failings in systems designed to prevent money—laundering and protect problem gamblers. maryam is here with some cheer from the markets? they have been raising interest
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rates. and saying there may be more. they have been criticised by president trump because he wants a booming economy, he wants the economy to be booming and he is blaming the federal reserve for what he said that the federal reserve has done more than anyone else to dampen the economic growth in the us, higher interest rates mean hiring borrowing cost and that can reduce output. the federal reserve has a different agenda. let us talk to samara hussein. what did mr powell have to say? what did mr powell have to sawm what did mr powell have to say? in a speech here in new york, jerome powell said that that interest rates right now are just above a neutral point point, where it is neither going to do any harm or any damage
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to the us economy. now investors here took that as news that we are not going to be seeing as many rises to the interest ratings as had been previously sort of telegraphed by the federal reserve, to be clear, there is a meeting next month in december, and there is going to be a rate rise at this meeting but what we are talking about, future rate rises in 2019. how is it different to what he said before? he sounds like he is talking the same talk?m is so slightly different. you have to remember things that come out of the federal reserve, it won't be telegraphed in really easy to understand language, it is going to be very subtle kind of language and the different here is thatjust last month we heard from the federal reserve from jerome powell and he said interest rates are way beyond a point at which they will have neutral impact on the economy, so in just one month, we have seen that we
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have gone from way beyond to just about there. the president has unsurprisingly been critical of the federal reserve and of mr powell, why is that, what has he been saying? mr powell was an pointed to the position by president trump, but the president has not been shy about voicing his concerns about the federal reserve and its role. look, as you rightly mentioned rising interest rates has an impacts in terms of borrowing costs and what that means for the us economy. donald trump has said that the federal reserve is the biggest risk to the us economy, and has called out mr powell directly, and so what some fed watchers are saying is look, perhaps this speech here in new york, by mr powell, is a sign that the federal reserve is sort of saying to the white house, look, we are listening, we hear some of your concerns. samara, i saw you looking at of your
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phone while you were waiting to talk to us, i am guessing, a few people interested in what president trump's lawyer may have to say. there is certainly something that is getting a lot of interest here, there are is a lot of interest here, there are is a lot of people round here, you can't see the televisions are everywhere, what you are see tong screen is people looking at what is happening in new york.|j screen is people looking at what is happening in new york. i can imagine. you are right in the hub of it samara. the markets are looking good. cheer has spread as it often does at this time of year. i will be back in an hour's time to talk about everything you love to talk about. to spread more cheer. thank you. four months today, the uk
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is set to leave the eu, and different sectors of the economy have been gearing up for the change. in the nhs, they're looking at key areas that could be affected: including staffing, the supply of vital medicines, and access to new treatments. the health secretary matt hancock has told mps that although a "no—deal" scenario is "unlikely" the government is preparing for all eventualities. our health correspondent catherine burns reports from milton keynes hospital. that was a good goal. shiv is seven, and his big passion is football. now we're going to score. but he struggles to play. he has a rare condition called duchenne muscular dystrophy. boys with it tend to be in a wheelchair before they are 12, lose the use of their arms in their teens, and then, in their 20s, their hearts can stop working. it's life—limiting and, yeah, to be told that, it felt like we'd been given a death sentence for us. and then brexit comes along. that, for us, gives us even more sleepless nights than what duchenne already does. they are optimistic about better treatment or even a cure and there are hopeful signs from researchers, but there is concern that leaving the eu might mean we get new drugs and later,
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something the government says won't happen. we can have a medicine and medical devices regulation system that can provide for access to the best new medicines. but some industry figures are not quite so optimistic. do you think brexit will make the uk less of a priority when it comes to releasing new medication in the future? unfortunately, there's a high potential that that might be the case. so you prioritise america, europe, where the big populations are because you want to get your medicine to the maximum number of patients possible. now, the concern would be that the uk might fall down, theoretically, the pecking order. the hope is that it won't come to that, though. the government's aim is for us to continue to work closely with the european drugs regulator.
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and authorities say they want to make sure that patients get new drugs at the same time as the rest of the eu. but it's all down to negotiation and if it comes to a no—deal brexit, such close cooperation could be off the table. politicians must remember that these drugs save people's lives, they extend people's lives. they make sure that people don't end up in hospital. so again, it's really important to make sure they recognise and remember that as part of the negotiation. countries with less purchasing power do have to wait for a new medications — switzerland tends to get them about five months later than the eu. but there is also a view that after brexit we might become faster at releasing some medicines, for example vaccines. as for shiv‘s parents, they feel that this is a race against the clock. every minute counts, every day counts, and we just simply don't have the time to waste. we'll be answering your questions about how brexit will affect the nhs
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including staffing and the supply of vital medicines at 5.30 today. we'll be joined by layla mccay, from the nhs confederation and danny mortimer, chief executive of nhs employers. you can text 611211, email hyperlink "mailto:askthis@bbc. co. uk"askthis@b— bc.co.uk or tweet using the hashtag bbcaskthis. the royal mail has written to a seven—year—old boy to let him know that they'd safely delivered a birthday card to his dad — in heaven. jase hyndman, from west lothian in scotland, wrote on the envelope "dear mr postman, can you take this to heaven for my dad's birthday". a manager at the royal mail wrote back to jase to say they succeeded despite "a difficult challenge avoiding stars and other galactic objects en route". a slight something in my throat...
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time for the weather. what a windy wet start to the day for many. that rain is riding out into the north sea and the winds will continue to ease as we go through this evening but for the next few hours certainly, there will be some rather strong gusts of wind. wind. and even with the showers following on from the main band it is a fairly gusty wind. taking the story through the evening, you can see we still have the rain across the north east of scotland, these are showers following in behind, into western area, southern coasts given the south—westerly wind, that is the direction we will see most of the shower, there will be something more organised so longer spells of rain in northern and western scotland. again, pretty mild for most of us, perhaps a little cooler than cent night but to real frost worry, tomorrow looks a little less mild thanit tomorrow looks a little less mild than it has been. there will be plenty of showers round and hail and
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thunder and snow over the hills. goodbye. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm: 0ur father killed our mother and sister — the two brothers calling for better understanding of psychological abuse. from the outside it looked like we were a close—knit family. we were always together, we had a nice—looking house. and i think we put on a face as well, we didn't want anyone to know what was going on, almost. but on the inside we were terrified, we were fighting every single day. confusion over a brexit tv debate between two party leaders — theresa may accepts the bbc‘s proposal, butjeremy corbyn prefers itv‘s. a damning report into shrewsbury and telford nhs trust — already in special measures — and now rated inadequate. with criticism particulalry of its maternity care. why did you let me try a natural birth when you knew that there was something wrong with his head ? it could have been a completely different story. donald trump's former lawyer pleads guilty of lying to congress during the inquiry in to russian involvement in the us elections.
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coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. arsenal live, all the sport. play ukrainian side in the europa arsenal play ukrainian side in the europa league later. the match moved to 200 miles to the capital kiev following political instability in the country. thanks, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after 15.30. helen has all the weather. still quite turbulent out there at the moment but hopefully once we've passed the evening rush, the worst will be over. then sunshine and showers but potentially more wind and rainforthe showers but potentially more wind and rain for the weekend. thanks. also today, the hot summer is blamed as tour operator thomas cook reveals losses of more than £150 million. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. for brothers luke and ryan hart it must be the hardest
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thing to talk about, the issue of coercive behaviour, behaviour which led to their father killing their mother and sister. after years of psychologically abusing his family, lance hart shot his wife claire and 19—year—old daughter charlotte before turning the gun on himself. coercive control became a criminal offence three years ago, but the family were unaware of it. days before the murder, lance hart's sons luke and ryan moved their mother and sister out of the family home. our home affairs correspondentjune kelly has been speaking to them. claire and charlotte hart were a very close mother and daughter. and they were together when they were shot dead. just days before, they had finally escaped from the family home after years of psychological abuse. lance hart lay in wait for his wife and daughter with a gun outside a leisure centre. he knew they had gone there for a swim. after murdering claire and charlotte, he turned the gun on himself.
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throughout his marriage, lance hart had subjected his family to what is known as coercive control extreme psychological and emotional abuse, but which stopped short of serious violence. charlotte's older brothers, luke and ryan, say that before the killing, theirfather had never been violent, and they didn't realise his psychological bullying was domestic abuse. from the outside in, it looked like we were a close—knit family, always together, nice—looking house, on the inside, we were terrified, we were frightened every single day. we had never gone to school with a bruise, we had never encountered the police, never been to social services, we were top students, literally the top students. and then, our father killed our mother and sister. today's review by the safer lincolnshire partnership says that the murders were a tragedy that could not have been foreseen. the family were not on the radar of police and social services, because they had never contacted the authorities about lance hart.
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do i think that the public need to be more aware of coercive control? absolutely, that is a job notjust for police and agencies but communities as a whole, and it's one of the key recommendations that this report makes, that our partnership will addres. the coercive control which lance hart subjected his wife and children to became a criminal offence in england and wales at the end of 2015. that's seven months before the murders. 0ur mum especially, he limited her life as much as he could, he didn't let her work more than part—time, so she had no financial independence. over time, shejust got more and more worn down. her friendship group closed off, her family were closed off, because herfather kept , our father kept moving us away, so we were physically distant from anyone who knew us. and he essentially turned our mother into a slave for him. she lived just to serve him.
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today's review talks about the need for gps to question patients about suspected domestic abuse and says there should be a national publicity campaign to raise awareness of what coercive control is, using this family's story to show how such abuse can end in tragedy. katie ghose is the ceo of women's aid, a national charity focussed on ending domestic abuse against women and children. earlier she told me how important it is for people like the hart brothers to tell their story. the hart brothers are so courageous, and every time they talk about the horrific events and the loss of their mum and sister they are raising awareness of coercive control, which is a horrible form of emotional abuse, psychological control that an abusive partner has over their partner and other family members. and they are doing so much, because if we can raise awareness that abuse that doesn't involve
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physical violence is dangerous, it is risky and it is completely unacceptable... and it's a crime. and this is the point, isn't it? absolutely, and coercive control has been a crime for nearly three years now. we've seen something like under 300 convictions over two years, so awareness is still low. and it's just amazing to see the courage of these brothers and this family in talking about it. we all need awareness and as they have been saying, it is the police, it is everybody from a gp to a housing officer who might be able to have a conversation, to prompt somebody who is in trouble to know that there is support out there and they're not alone. someone who you say is in trouble, but they may not be aware that what they are going through constitutes criminal behaviour. they may think that this is almost normal. absolutely, and i was very struck to hear one of the brothers talk about going to the police station after their mum and sister had been killed and seeing a poster about domestic abuse,
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about coercive of control and seeing it was against the law. they hadn't known that and they said that was the life that they'd been living. so awareness that this behaviour, this severe controlling behaviour, it's a pattern of behaviour, knowing that it's against the law, it is a crime, hopefully means we can change lives and save lives. so, one thing for the victims to know that, what about the police? is there a full awareness there as well? we've not yet seen that full awareness that coercive, controlling behaviour is at the heart of domestic abuse. and again, there may be a tendency for some police officers or call handlers to see domestic abuse as always physical assault, and this family's story is a terrible case of a campaign of terror, of psychological abuse. they say, the brothers, that their father didn't need to resort to physical violence because they lived in terror of him. that fear is one of the reasons i imagine most people don't report it, because the fear of reporting it
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and therefore making the situation potentially much worse. you're absolutely right, and of course an abusive partner will use these tactics of that in intimidation, perhaps even threats to kill or to harm, and they will instil that fear. they will chip away at their victims' self—esteem. they will isolate them from friends or family. and those are some of the signs that you can look out for, and all of us can have that awareness and knowledge and confidence so that we might be able to help a friend or family member who is in a coercive and controlling relationship. and if you are affected by any of the issues covered injune's report you can go to the bbc action line website. president trump's former lawyer, michael cohen, is expected to plead guilty to a new charge being filed by robert mueller the man leading in the investigation in to possible collusion between russia and donald trump's presidential campaign. he has already admitted to breaking
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campaignfinance he has already admitted to breaking campaign finance laws. this story is developing well we are only so what has he said at the moment and what might he add? michael cohen hasjust might he add? michael cohen has just left court in new york surrounded by a huge scrum. it is always worth reminding people exactly who he is. here's someone who said he would take a bullet for donald trump the past. here's someone who knew huge amounts about his business and personal dealings. he was the man who arrange that controversial payment to the porn star to stop her talking about her alleged affair with the president in the lead up to the presidential election in 2016. but knowing at about those business dealings, he has already been asked about some of them and that relates to a congressional committee in which he was asked specifically about a tramp real estate projects that was taking
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place in moscow. he has admitted in court in new york this morning that he made false statements to that congressional committee, essentially he lied about when conversations stopped about the so—called trump ta ra stopped about the so—called trump tara moscow deal. suggestions previously that it stopped in 2015 and started in 2016. there are no suggestions that those conversations continued until 2016, right into the summer. that is of course when the presidential campaign was well under way. michael cohen said he lied to that congressional committee out of loyalty to president trump and he is pleading guilty to making that false statement as part of what seems to bea statement as part of what seems to be a corporation deal with robert mueller, the special counsel who is looking into these allegations of russian interference into the 2016 presidential election, claims of collusion with the tram campaign and questions of whether there was an attempt to obstruct justice.
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how worried could donald trump be right now? i think he will be watching this, simon, i think that is the one thing you can search this year. in the white house, the televisions will be honoured he will be watching to see exactly what michael cohen has to say. there is no doubt there is huge frustration with president trump when it comes to this special counsel investigation which he continually calls a witchhunt. at the moment he is already suggesting that it should be stopped, it should come to an end. you will remember he sacked his attorney generaljeff sessions not that long ago and replaced him with a temporary attorney general who has been critical in the past of the robert mueller investigation, even suggested it could be limited by starving out of funds. there were many in washington who thought that might be an indication that president trump was going to try and perhaps interfere with the probe, bring it to an end. but like eve ryo ne bring it to an end. but like everyone else, president trump is
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sitting waiting to find out exactly what information robert mueller has. he is sitting and waiting for this final report. they have been lots of rumours and allegations of potentially more indictments, of a final report coming, and i think part of the frustration with the president as he simply doesn't know what robert mueller knows. he probably has a better idea of michael cohen, exactly what he knows, and that probably gives you a better idea if we knew that of exactly how worried he would be by michael cohen now cooperating with the special counsel. you have a nice, quite few days ahead of you! thank you very much for that. plans for a live televised debate on brexit between the prime minister and jeremy corbyn are up in the air, following a clash between the two over the format. theresa may has agreed to the bbc‘s proposal for a programme on the sunday before the crucial vote in parliament. but mr corbyn has said that he prefers the itv offer. 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports. she may have emerged from the back door of downing street this morning but theresa may signalled
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she would be willing to put her brexit plans under the spotlight in a bbc debate. labour hasn't yet taken up the offer. but she was determined to get some practice in, anyway. she was on her way to a kind of political dragons' den to sell her deal to a panel of senior mps. my focus is on the vote that will take place on the 11th of december here in this house. but straightaway, rather than asking about her deal, they seemed more interested in what would happen if mps voted it down on december 11th. the question i'm asking you is is there planning going on for a different approach if the deal is defeated? this is the deal that has been negotiated and this is the deal that we need to focus on. knowing you for 20 years, ijust don't believe that if your deal goes down you are the kind of person who would contemplate taking this country into a no—deal situation. am i wrong?
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it will be a decision for parliament as to whether they accept the deal. and they also wanted to know if the prime minister would be unveiling her long—anticipated plans for a new post—brexit immigration system before mps vote on her deal. can you just confirm that we will definitely have the immigration white paper published before the meaningful vote on the 11th of december? there is still discussion ongoing as to the timing. and there's another issue to be settled. it is still not clear that we'll see theresa may debating directly withjeremy corbyn on television. politicians can't seem to agree on anything these days. she seems to be willing to accept a bbc proposal that would involve audience participation while he wants a head—to—head clash on a rival channel. the itv offer seemed a sensible one.
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it reaches a wide audience and the timing looks good to me because it is not inconveniencing people who may wish to watch other things later in the evening. and on the substance of brexit, the labour leader told itv‘s this morning that parliament wouldn't allow the prime minister to leave without a deal. well, the alternative isn't no deal, nobody‘s going to allow no deal. how could we? we've seen the prime minister and the leader of the opposition argue their case in very different settings this morning. whether we see them clash head—to—head is still, well, a matter of debate. the shrewsbury and telford nhs trust, which is already being investigated over claims of poor maternity care, has been rated inadequate by inspectors. the care quality commission said staffing levels were not high enough to keep patients safe. staff told inspectors there was a "culture of bullying and harassment" at its hospitals, and defensiveness from its leaders. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports.
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for 18 months, more and more families have come forward to raise questions about the maternity care they received at this trust over two decades. so far, more than 200 families have contacted an independent review of emergency services. why did you let me try a natural birth when you knew that there was something wrong with his head ? it could have been a completely different story. throughout, the trust have insisted that current care is safe, but today's report highlights a catalogue of failures. both maternity and accident and emergency are rated as inadequate for safety. staff say there was a culture of bullying and harassment. some of the executive team do not have the right skills and ability to provide high quality sustainable care. there is no doubt that the leadership was not creating the right culture in the organisation. staff told us they were fearful about raising concerns. that's not acceptable. staff need to be feeling
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free to raise concerns about safety for patients, and those concerns need to be acted upon. the trust was put into special measures earlier this month, due not just to failings in maternity but also because of long—standing problems in the a&e unit. critically ill patients left waiting hours to see a doctor and then more hours to be admitted to a hospital bed, because this is a trust that just cuts and cuts and cuts the number of available beds. given the extent of the problems, there are growing calls for the chief executive to resign, but simon wright said he won't walk away. i've worked on the nhs for nearly 25 years. my entire professional life has been part of that. i live in this community, my family live in this community. if i didn't think and believe that i was capable of leading this organisation, iwould have already walked away. the trust insist that care will improve and there are pockets of good practices within their inadequately—rated services. you're watching afternoon live,
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these are our headlines the family of a woman and daughter shot and killed by their abusive father call for a national campaign to focus on the impact of controlling behaviour in cases of domestic violence. the prime minister has said she'll take part in a brexit debate, televised live by the bbc on sunday 9th december, butjeremy corbyn has said he prefers itv. branded unsafe — the hospital trust being investigated over alleged failings in maternity care, is rated inadequate by inspectors. and in sport, arsenal are in the overhead of the europa league match on tuesday. political instability prompted uefa to move the match 200 miles to the red capital, kiev. manchester united have acted a one—year extension to goalkeeper david de gea's contract ahead of the
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tra nsfer david de gea's contract ahead of the transfer window. and some overseas cricketers will be available to play for england after living in the country for three years after new rules coming in on the 1st of january. more on all of those stories at half past three. let's return to brexit and the former conservative cabinet ministerjo johnson has appealed to all politicians to reject theresa may's brexit deal, which he described as bad for the country. his rallying call came during an event organised by the people's vote campaign group. joining me now from westminster is the conservative mp justine greening. she supports this campaign. good afternoon for you. i was part of that event as well. describe the mood at that meeting. is there real support for this? i think certainly for people who are younger in our country and are for the most part deeply concerned about brexit there
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isa deeply concerned about brexit there is a real desire to see another referendum. for my part, my concern is that britain now faces the clear choices. i just simply think in is that britain now faces the clear choices. ijust simply think in a democracy we have to ask people which of those three clear choices they want. they can either have the prime minister's deal, which people likejoejohnson prime minister's deal, which people like joe johnson and myself prime minister's deal, which people likejoejohnson and myself have had amendment will set out to deep concerned about, you can leave with no deal and have more of a free trade agreement like borisjohnson has argued for you can stay on the existing terms. what i am saying and campaignfor is existing terms. what i am saying and campaign for is for people to get the final say and i have proposed a three—way referendum where people would have a first and second preference vote, just like any mail contest. if parliament cannot find its own compromise because it is great loss, i think we should trust people to vent their own compromise and brexit. the trouble is, politicians have made the mistake of asking the public before and that is
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why, the printers, we are where we are. the prime minister has delivered on the referendum in the century has gone and negotiated a deal. the challenge is that it does seem that millions of lever voters don't really think that the romans to's deal actually delivers the kind of brexit they wanted. that is the bit debate you have seen playing out in parliament. my sense even before the summer was that if parliament is gridlocked and we can't pick a clear direction forward, the only route out of that gridlocked as to allow people to have the final say. let's talk about the practicalities. you reckon it could take only 22 weeks to get this physically done. reckon it could take only 22 weeks to get this physically donelj to get this physically done. i think you could of course they have the vote on the 11th but i think government could propose legislation injanuary and government could propose legislation in january and have that injanuary and have that debated earlier in the new year. i think you could then lead up to a campaign that was in march and april for, a
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campaign and apriland that was in march and april for, a campaign and april and may for a final vote on the 30th of may. there are some people thinking you can shorten the process beyond 22 weeks. my shorten the process beyond 22 weeks. myjudgment is broadly a 22 week process is enough. you need to extend article 50 by four months to the 29th ofjuly, 2019, but i think it is such a momentous decision for britain. if we take two or three more months then actually, it is time well spent if we get that decision right and we make a decision right and we make a decision we know the british people are behind because of the wrong decision. and because you think they got the decision wrong last time. not at all. i think the genuine point is that we don't really know what route forward people want at this stage, certainly like many mps i know that people have deep concerns about the prime minister's deal, remainers think we are accepting rules and therefore may as well be sat round the table setting them, livres in my constituency feel there simply is not the deliverer
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from the clean break from the european union. we are at the stage where we have some clear options on the table and we nowjust need to have the confidence to recognise that if parliament can't form a view on this, which it can't, then we should trust the public to actually reach their own conclusions and compromise. you see parliament can't, the prime minister is doing her damnedest to get her point across. i wonder if you have sensed she is getting some amount is there does appear to be a slight change in how people are feeling about this, and with this television debates, i doesn't hate you stand on that. one of the questions you would want to put in her people are feeling about this, and with this television debates, i doesn't hate you stand on that. one of the questions you would wa nt to that. one of the questions you would want to put an issue did sit next to jeremy corbyn any tv studio?|j want to put an issue did sit next to jeremy corbyn any tv studio? i think it's slightly odd to have the prime minister going round the country, making her case to people to get them to then lobby their mps to vote them to then lobby their mps to vote the right way in parliament. that's rather refreshing. i think she should just be prepared to actually allow people themselves to have
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their final say allow people themselves to have theirfinal say as allow people themselves to have their final say as the balance. i think it's good that we are going to have a debate between the prime minister and the leader of his opposition —— leader of the 0pposition. my question would be simply if this is the red route forward , simply if this is the red route forward, why not have the confidence to visit to the british people and them choose? it is so important, such an irreversible decision, it is so long—term, we have to make sure we get it right. i think that means you have to allow people a final say. good to talk to you, thank you very much for your time. in the nhs they are looking at staffing, and the available day of medicines. that hancock said that although the new deal scenario is unlikely, the government is preparing for all eventualities. let's speak now to our health
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correspondent catherine burns, who's at milton keynes hospitalfor us. here are a few statistics for you. of all the medicines we use in this country, two thirds, eitherfrom or via the eu. there is 86% of antibiotics, 92% of vaccines, and right now that is frictionless. they often come from calais to dover. but in the event of an ordeal brexit, the concern is that this would be blockages at the point. nhs in and at said keeping a transport following is the single most important thing. there is a plan around us, the government has asked drug companies to stop all an extra six weeks supply. another question is about new medicines that don't even exist at the minute. 0ne concern is is that if we leave the eu, maybe the uk might be that little bit less of a priority for .com bracelet comes to releasing new medicines in the future. i have been to meet one family who was worried about just that. that was a good goal.
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shiv is seven, and his big passion is football. now we're going to score. but he struggles to play. he has a rare condition called duchenne muscular dystrophy. boys with it tend to be in a wheelchair before they are 12, lose the use of their arms in their teens, and then, in their 20s, their hearts can stop working. it's life—limiting and, yeah, to be told that, it felt like we'd been given a death sentence for us. and then brexit comes along. that, for us, gives us even more sleepless nights than what duchenne already does. they are optimistic about better treatment or even a cure and there are hopeful signs from researchers, but there is concern that leaving the eu might mean we get new drugs and later, something the government says won't happen. we can have a medicine and medical devices regulation system that can provide for access to the best new medicines. but some industry figures are not quite so optimistic. do you think brexit will make the uk
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less of a priority when it comes to releasing new medication in the future? unfortunately, there's a high potential that that might be the case. so you prioritise america, europe, where the big populations are because you want to get your medicine to the maximum number of patients possible. now, the concern would be that the uk might fall down, theoretically, the pecking order. the hope is that it won't come to that, though. the government's aim is for us to continue to work closely with the european drugs regulator. and authorities say they want to make sure that patients get new drugs at the same time as the rest of the eu. but it's all down to negotiation and if it comes to a no—deal brexit, such close cooperation could be off the table. politicians must remember that these drugs save people's lives, they extend people's lives. they make sure that people
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don't end up in hospital. so again, it's really important to make sure they recognise and remember that as part of the negotiation. countries with less purchasing power do have to wait for new medications — switzerland tends to get them about five months later than the eu. but there is also a view that after brexit we might become faster at releasing some medicines, for example vaccines. as for shiv‘s parents, they feel that this is a race against the clock. every minute counts, every day counts, and we just simply don't have the time to waste. i'm joined now by two people who know a lot about medicines on the nhs. you saw him there in the piece, and mark from the trust. the family they said they described this as a race against time. i had a right to
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be so worried? unfortunately, i think the evidence suggests that when britain separates offer from the eu market after brexiter, they may be incentives for people to bring newjobs here slightly later than elsewhere. whereas the brexit deal that has been secured will really help with the little things like the business of getting medicines into the country over the border, this might be something that the current deal doesn't necessarily address much. but we need to remember that we are talking about delays for weeks, possibly months. i hope certainly it would be that these drugs will not arrive in the uk at all. but these families feel that time is of a is. so, onto the question of stockpiling. the government has said there is an awful lot of work to be done but as long as everyone does their bit, patients do to worry. do you agree? cani patients do to worry. do you agree? can i just say patients do to worry. do you agree? can ijust say that in terms of the overall deal, hard brexit, salt and babble soft brexit, people's's vote rs babble soft brexit, people's's voters were out of myjurisdiction. lam voters were out of myjurisdiction. iamjust voters were out of myjurisdiction. i am just worried about people's
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access to medicines. i want to be clear that the government are doing a fantasticjob. the department of health are looking sure very hard that people will have access to medicines. we have the stockpile being done and we are doing something to support that. we don't wa nt something to support that. we don't want people to stockpile medicines because if you started stockpile, you can a shortage that we have two meet the demand of. to pharmacist as they will know more about what is going on as we are keeping them fully informed as an organisation. that will hopefully make sure that you access your medication is all the time. we are not worried that if we get a deal in some form, make sure access continues. the risk is that if there out any delays in medicines across borders and how that will impact. that might have a greater impact on hospitals. we need to be really clear about what we don't want is to stockpile as a pharmacy, we have been asked not to, we are relying on the company 's and supply chains to make sure that we can continue to have access. if we
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have any problems, we will let you know. we are managing shortages today of certain medicines. this is just an extension of that same thing. but please rememberwe just an extension of that same thing. but please remember we are here to support you, not create problems for you. we are trying to make sure you get that access so please shout at us as well. i had ihada i had a patient last week, we couldn't get her medicine and i said the manufacturer can't supply. they couldn't understand that, the implication it had. they were why can't you get it for me? it is a very difficult concept, for us to say the manufacturer can't supply it. we are doing everything we can and recognise we will make sure that sometimes there will be occasions where you might have a longer press crepe shin and we might give you a bit of it because we want to give some to everybody. these are an emotive subject but it is important to say we are talking here about a
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no—deal brexit, so if we have a transition deal, there will be time to iron out these details. details. we'll be answering your questions about how brexit will affect the nhs including staffing and the supply of vital medicines at 5.30 today. we'll be joined by layla mccay, from the nhs confederation and danny mortimer, chief executive of nhs employers. you can text 611211, email hyperlink "mailto:askthis@bbc. co. uk"askthis@b— bc.co.uk or tweet using the hashtag bbcaskthis. some news coming in from isleworth crown court, we are hearing that a japanese pilot has beenjailed crown court, we are hearing that a japanese pilot has been jailed for ten months after preparing to fly a passenger jet from ten months after preparing to fly a passengerjet from heathrow ten months after preparing to fly a passenger jet from heathrow with more than nine times over the alcohol limit. now, this is a pilot who was 42, he was arrested at the airport afterfailing a who was 42, he was arrested at the airport after failing a breath test 50 minute before a japan airlines flight 50 minute before a japan airlines flight was due to take off. the
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plight was operated bier a boeing 747, holds up to 244 passenger, police say he pleaded guilty to exceeding the alcohol limit, at a magistrates' court and has been sentenced at isleworth crown court. tests revealed he has 189 milligrams of alcohol per 100 mill litres of blood in his system. that is almost nine times the 20 milligram limit for a pilot. we will have more on that, we have a correspondent at the court. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. what a windy wet start for many, that rain's riding out into the north sea and the winds will continue to ease as we go through this evening but for the next few hours certainly there will be some rather strong gusts of wind. and even with the showerses that are following on from the main rain band it isa following on from the main rain band it is a fairly gusty wind. taking the story through the evening, you can see we still have the rain
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across the north east of scotland, these are showers following in behind, southern coasts given the south—westerly wind, that is the direction where we will see most of the shower, there will be something more organised so long specials of rain in much of northern and western scotla nd rain in much of northern and western scotland through the night. again, pretty mild for most of us, perhaps a little cooler than recent nights but no real frost worry tomorrow looks less mild than it has been, but also less wet and windy, plenty of showers round and you can see there will be hail and thunder in there will be hail and thunder in there and snow over the hills. bye. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a review of the case of a man who killed his wife and daughter after inflicting years of psychological abuse has recommended a national campaign to raise awareness about the issue of coercive control. donald trump's former lawyer michael cohen pleads guilty of lying to congress during the inquiry into russian involvement in the us elections. confusion over a brexit tv debate
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between two party leaders — theresa may accepts the bbc‘s plan for a debate at 8pm on the ninth december, but jeremy corbyn prefers itv‘s proposal. good afternoon. it looked at one stage as though it wouldn't go ahead — poltical instability in ukraine prompting uefa to move arsenal's europa league match with vorskla poltava 200 miles to kiev despite protests from tonight's opponents — the decsion only taken on tuesday meaning disruption for some supporters already in poltava, now making the extra journey back to kiev. journey back to kiev, where temperatures will be around minus ten. a win will see arsenal top the group — they've already qualified as have chelsea, who are also in action. celtic need a win to keep them in contention.
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sol campbell facing the media for the first time since being appointed manager of league two macclesfield town — he becomes just the eighth bame manager in the premier league and efl — eight among the 92 clubs in the top four divisions, as black managers continue to be overlooked when it comes to managerial appointments. that press conference getting under way now — we'll hopefully hear from him in the next hour. it comes 40 years to the day that viv anderson became the first black player to play for england. he's been speaking about his experiences of the landmark moment but says he never saw himself as a trailblazer. clearly it was a big thing, but for me it was all about playing the game and trying to do well, as i didn't want to let my mam down, my dad down, people that knew me, so i was tunnel vision, playing the football. there aren't many black faces round all those years ago, it was tough, but at the end of the day i wanted to be a footballer, so i made an effort really early on, what anybody shouts or screams or throws at me i will dismiss and try and get on with playing football.
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manchester united have triggered the one year extension to goalkeeper david de gea's contract. the player's contract runs out in the summer meaning that he can speak to the player's deal runs out at the end of the season, permitting him to speak to overseas clubs from the first of january. united want to keep hold of their keeper and hope it will avoid any uncertainty over the player's future heading into the january transfer window. new rules will allow overseas cricketers to play cricket for england earlier, after three years living in the country. and that means pace bowler jofra archer is now available for england. the 23—year—old was born in barbados but has an english father and a british passport. he's tweeted to say "it may or may not happen but i would love to debut in front of my family" england have a tour of the west indies starting in january ahead of the world cup starting next may. and we're going to finish with some cheating in china. almost 250 runners were caught taking short cut during
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the shenzen half marathon. they were actually spotted by traffic cameras, and cut around two or three kilometres off the full 21k distance. all of those who cheated now face bans. that's all the sport for now. a japanese pilot who admitted being almost nine times the alcohol limit shortly before a flight from heathrow airport is due to be sentenced. first officer katsutoshi jitsukawa was arrested at the airport after failing a breath testjust 50 minutes before the japan airlines flight to tokyo was due to take off with him in the cockpit. thejudge sentenced the judge sentenced the pilot to ten months in prison, he also said in his summation that if repatriation to japan buzz applicable the court would welcome it. basically the pilot earlier, last month sorry was caught smelling of alcohol and being
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intoxicated. he was en route to co—pilot a flight from london heathrow to tokyo, it would have taken heathrow to tokyo, it would have ta ken round 11 heathrow to tokyo, it would have taken round 11 hours and 50 minutes, staff through security checks could smell alcohol upon him and alerted the security manager, who then travelled across the tarmac, to the bridge and cockpit where they found the pilot and removed him from the plane before asking whether he had had a drink, he claimed he had drank whisky the night before and then returned to the plane to collect some of his personal belongings was found in the toilet swishing mouth wash, he was removed from the plane, 40 minutes later police came, he failed a breathalyser —— breathalyser test, he was taken to a police station where a blood sample was taken and that is where they found he was nearly nine times over the legal limit for pilots, and that
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he was arrested, and this case took place. 0k. thank you very much. more now on the security minister ben wallace addressing concerns over security cooperation between the uk and european union after brexit. speaking earlier, mr wallace said the brexit deal agreed by the prime minister would establish a "broad, comprehensive and balanced" security partnership with the eu. joining me now from our westminster studio is tim durrant, senior researcher at the institute for government, an independent think tank which aims to improve government effectiveness. i wonder what you make of this brexit deal in terms of security? well, i think the important thing to remember at this stage is that the deal on future relationship between the uk and the eu isn't struck, it is an aspiration and the security arrangements are part of that future aspiration, both sides have said they want to work together closely but the current special arrangements the uk has won't be replicated
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exactly after we leave the eu. and one of the alternatives of course is ano one of the alternatives of course is a no deal, what would that mean? one of the alternatives of course is a no deal, what would that mean7m the security area, no deal would mean immediate change, it would mean that police force hearse in the uk would lose access to information from their counterparts across the eu, it would mean that we would have to fall back on much older cooperation mechanisms, that date from the ‘50s in some case, for things like extraditing people wa nted things like extraditing people wanted in criminal trial, which are much slower, they require more bureaucracy, more paperwork and therefore you know, taking people to justice and seeing through criminal prosecutions would become more complicated and a lot slower and more expensive. what is the deal with other countries not in the eu, in terms of security cooperation? at the moment with the eu? so, it depends on the country, every country has a sort of mishmash of different arrangements, so countries close by, like norway, they have close by, like norway, they have
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close cooperation with the eu, however, again, if we look at extradition, the extradition arrangement between norway and the eu took round 13 years to negotiate, and isn't fully enforced yet and when it is, it won't be as good as what member states have with each other, because norway won't be able to require the eu member states to extradite their own citizens if they don't want to, currently an eu country cannot block its own citizen being extradited to another eu country. under theresa may's proposals does that change? under the government's current proposals we initially they started out saying we initially they started out saying we wa nt we initially they started out saying we want everything to continue exactly as we have now, through the negotiation period so far, it's kind of softening it and realise it won't getan of softening it and realise it won't get an exact core bon copy of the benefit, but it is pushing for something special, bespoke for the eu and the eu said it can have that, so they are offering the uk things such as exchanging information on
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flight such as exchanging information on flight passengers, access to databases that hold things like dna information, fingerprint information that other non—eu countries don't have. the key question is how this is negotiated in detail through the future relationship. we don't know the exact arrangements that the uk will have. but tim, with something like security, doesn't pragmatism play a role? if you have got officers from security service, whether it is here or in europe or anywhere in the country who may feel it benefits's one to pass on information they are going to do it aren't they? i think that is right. as say it does play a role. the pragmatic answer is for cooperation to continue as closely as possible, you have to remember the eu is a sort, a legal structures it has clear rules and rules about what people inside the eu get and what those outside get and the uk in moving from one of those statuses to the other, is going to have to find a new way of working with the eu. good to talk to you, thank you for your a record number of citizens
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from european union countries left the uk last year. it brings the estimated net migration from the eu to the uk to its lowest level since 20 12. but the figures from the office for national statistics also show that an increasing number of people from outside the eu are coming to live in britain. a letting agency in east london is asking for non—refundable deposits of £300 from prospective tenants, before they have even viewed a property, the victoria derbyshire programme has learned. flintons deny any wrongdoing and insist that they do not charge for viewings but that holding deposits are always non—refundable. esme ash tried to rent a flat from them and soon became suspicious. she's been undercover to get the full story. searching for a room to rent, especially in central london, can be tough, as anyone who has tried it will know. but one particular letting agency called flintons has been demanding hundreds of pounds in payment, before prospective tenants are each allowing to view properties for rent. israel and his friend
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harry responded to one of flintons' adverts. he says they went to see an agent who told them they needed to pay a deposit to see a room, but that it would be refundable. so she explained the whole offer of, if you pay a holding fee, you can change your room. i'm like, "we can get our money back as well, can't we?" she's like, "oh, yeah, you can do that." not even like a proper affirmation, just, "yeah, we can do it, that's fine." after paying £300 each to see the property, israel says it wasn't long before he realised something was wrong, and his suspicions worsened after looking at online reviews of fli nto ns. in the end they chose not to see the flats and decided instead to seek an immediate refund. they returned to flintons to confront the agent in person. the first thing we said, "so, why can't we get our money back?" we didn't say hello, just, "why can't we get our money back," just wanted to get it done with. she literally got to the point where we were talking to her saying, "you basically told us we could get our money back, you told us this and that."
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£300 is half my rent gone. i feel annoyed about it, i always get really riled up when i talk about flintons, just knowing that my £300 is with them. what can i do? there's nothing i can do. i don't have the money to sue them. i don't have legal expertise to deal with it. just powerless. flintons told us they issue receipts specifying that the sums involved were non—refundable, but, whilst this is true, israel and others said they only received the receipts after they had paid. they also say they'd been assured verbally that they could get their money back and that they felt under pressure to pay the money immediately. yes, it's recording. it's recording? yes. after hearing the stories, we decided to go back to flintons with hidden cameras. i went in, leaving colleagues stationed outside. what is it, sorry? a reservation fee? it's like a deposit... unlike some cases we've been told about, the agent did explain that this payment was non—refundable, but was clear that if i wanted to see any of the available properties, i would have to pay this money upfront.
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if i want to see this tomorrow, i have to... if you want to make sure it is available tomorrow, you have to reserve it now. so, is it legal to demand upfront deposits before you can view a room to rent? we showed david smith, a property lawyer, ourfindings. asking someone for money without being able to see what that contract is about, to do a viewing, would be quite likely to be seen by professional people in the property sector as unreasonable and unfair behaviour, and therefore is very likely to be an offence under the consumer protection from unfair trading regulations. flintons deny any wrongdoing. they have told us that they do not charge any fees for viewings, and payment is only taken when a person confirms that they wish to take the property. they say that their holding deposits are always non—refundable and that they don't believe there would be any purpose in taking deposits if you could get your money back. flintons also told us that all the people in our reports were made aware that their deposits were not refundable and that they don't agree
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with the alleged version of events. morn that news that michael cohen has pleaded guilty to lying to congress, this is in relation to the russia inquiry. now, coen admitted misleading law makers about a real estate project in russia, he appeared unexpectedly at a court in manhattan, in august he pleaded guilty to violates finance laws in the presidential election by handling hush money for mr trump's alleged lover, this is the latest twist in the special counsel's investigation into whether there trump or his inner circle colluded with a russian attempting to influence the presidential election
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of 2016. mr cohen, a staunch trump loyalist once, there are suggestions that not only does he know where the bodies are buried but might be about to tell everybody. let us hear from donald trump. i will bring you what donald trump. i will bring you what donald trump. i will bring you what donald trump reacted to this, he is still speaking, he is son his way to argentina, to the g20 summit. he has been talking to reporters as he gets onboard marine 0ne, been talking to reporters as he gets onboard marine one, i will bring you that in a moment. but also, in another moment, we have the business news. that is with maryam who is here. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a review of the case of a man who killed his wife and daughter after inflicting years of psychological abuse has recommended a national campaign to raise awareness about the issue of coercive control. donald trump's former lawyer pleads guilty of lying to congress during the inquiry in to russian involvement in the us elections. the prime minister has said she'll take part in a brexit debate,
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televised live by the bbc on sunday ninth december, butjeremy corbyn has said he prefers itv‘s offer. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the frankfurt headquarters of deutsche bank have been raided by prosecutors in a money laundering investigation. 0ther deutsche offices in the city were searched in an operation involving about 170 police and officials. prosecutors are looking into whether deutsche bank staff helped clients set up offshore accounts to "transfer money from criminal activities". thomas cook swings to a loss as the heatwave hits sales. the travel firm reported a £163 million annual pre—tax loss compared to a £9 million profit last year. three online casino firms have been fined £14 million by the gambling commission uncovered failings in systems designed to prevent money—laundering and protect problem gamblers.
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let us talk brexit. and its effect on the countryside. i don't know who has brought that up that is tweet. it would be difficult to get the hairs out of your fleece, i a&e to get the hairs out of your fleece, ia&e am to get the hairs out of your fleece, i a&e am thinking about it in terms o fashion. more than 500 farmers, rural businesses and rural land managers from across england and wales will gather in westminster today to examine how the countryside plans to adapt as it enters a period of rapid and significant change post brexit. a survey shows that 79% of rural businesses having have no plans in place ahead of brexit. if you compare that to other businesses across the country who have all got
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their plans in place or contingency plans if place it is worrying. they have no baa—ck up plan. let us bring sanity into this. edward phillips, estate director at luton hoo estate. it's what you would call a diversified business in the countryside outside luton, importance of diversifying the business. what did you used to do and what do you do now? it's a traditional farming estate but to that further from that we have developed into residential property, commercial property, we used extensively as a filming location, we run events, weddings and other sort of events, and those are sort of some of the enterprises we have diversified into. why was it important for you to diversify, to change you do? one of the unique features about the rural land business, many of them
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are multi—generational and one of the ways we see giving that sustainability to the next generation, and passing on a healthy and vibrant generation, and passing on a healthy and vibra nt asset generation, and passing on a healthy and vibrant asset is really making sure that we can, whether any of the whether it is brexit as we are facing or climate change, orjust general economic shocks that we might see in a normal economic cycle. 79% of rura businesses, who we re cycle. 79% of rura businesses, who were asked in this survey said they hadn't really prepared for brexit, that sounds pretty worrying doesn't it? it is hugely worrying, and with fairly scant detail in terms of the trading arrangement that many rural businesses are going to be trading m, m businesses are going to be trading in, in terms of the commodity markets around the world, and also, legislation that could be coming through in terms of the alchurl bill it isa through in terms of the alchurl bill it is a worrying time for rural businesses and actuarial itself in the fact that change will happen and
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change will happen quickly final. do you feel the government is doing enough to help rural business to diversify? i spoke to someone earlier who said one of the many problems is for decent broadband service in the country, it is not there and that makes things hard. absolutely, all we are asking for is a levelling field so that the same advantages that urban businesses get, passed on to rural businesses, and that is whether that is true ensuring there is 4g for all, across the rural landscape, whether that is trying to get a betterjoined up thinking between local enterprise partnerships or local government bodies, potentially even looking at trying to have a minister in charge of rural economic charter, much in the same way that the government have developed with the northern powerhouse, to try and drive the vibrancy and the opportunity that there is, within the rural sector, at this challenging time, and, the
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question really is whether the government want to unleash the rural engine, that could really drive the economy forward, in the next coming year, there is already £13 billion a year, there is already £13 billion a year invested by rural businesses, annually, and i think that with the right legislation, the right touches, government could really give the sector a real impetus and give the sector a real impetus and give the sector a real impetus and give the general economy a real boost by helping the rural sector. 0k, good to talk to you, thank you to joining 0k, good to talk to you, thank you tojoining us. a very brief look 0k, good to talk to you, thank you to joining us. a very brief look at the markets. there they are, they are looking good. comments from the federal reserve about the pace of the changes having a positive impact on the markets. i will be back in an hour to talk markets again. this is what president trump had to say a few moments ago. so michael cohen has made my statements to the
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house as i understand it, and the senate. he put out a statement talking about a project which was essentially, i guess more or less of an option, that we were looking at in moscow, everybody knew about it, it was written about in newspaper, it was written about in newspaper, it was written about in newspaper, it was a well—known project, it was during the early part of 16 and i guess even before that, it lasted a short period of time, i didn't do the project, i decided not to do the project so i didn't do it. so we are not talking about doing a project, we are talking about not doing a project. michael cohen, what he is doing he was convicted, i guess, you will have to put it into legal terms but he was convicted with a fairly long—term sentence, on things totally unrelated to the trump organisation, having to do with mortgage, and having to do with cheating the irs perhaps, a lot of different thing, i don't know exactly, he was convicted of various things unrelated to u he was given a
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fairly long jail sentence, and he's a weak person, and by being weak, unlike other people you watch, he is a weak person, and what he's trying to do is get a reduced sentence, so he is lying about a project, that everybody knew about. i mean we were very open with it. we were thinking about building a build, it was an option, i don't know what you would call it, we decided, i decided not to do it, there would have been nothing wrong if i did do it. if i did, there would have been nothing wrong, that was my business. so that was donald trump, he was getting onboard air force one heading to the g20 summit in argentina. we will have more analysis later but now time for a look at the winds to continue to ease as we
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go through this evening but for the next few hours there will be some rather strong gusts of wind. and even with the showers that are following on from the main rain band it's a fairly gusty wind. taking the story through the evening, you can see we still have the rain across the north east of scotland, these are showers following in behind into western area, southern coasts, given the south—westerly wind that is where we are see most of the showers but something more organised so long specials of rain if you like in much of northern around western scotland. again, pretty mild for most of us, perhaps cooler than cent night bus no real frost worry, perhaps cooler than cent night bus no realfrost worry, tomorrow, therefore looks a little lit mild thanit therefore looks a little lit mild than it has been but also less wet and windy. you can see there will be hailand and windy. you can see there will be hail and thunder and snow over the hills. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4pm. 0ur father killed our mother and sister — the two brothers calling for better understanding of psychological abuse. from the outside it looked
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like we were a close—knit family. we were always together, we had a nice—looking house. and i think we put on a face as well, we didn't want anyone to know what was going on, almost. but on the inside we were terrified, we were fighting every single day. donald trump's former lawyer pleads guilty to lying to congress during the inquiry in to russian involvement in the us election. but the president denies any wrongdoing he's a weak person and by being weak, unlike other people that you watch, he is a weak person, and what he's trying to do is get a reduced sentence. confusion over a brexit tv debate between two party leaders — theresa may accepts the bbc‘s proposal, butjeremy corbyn prefers itv‘s. a damning report into shrewsbury and telford nhs trust — already in special measures — and now rated inadequate with criticism particularly of its maternity care. why did you let me try a natural birth when you knew that there was something wrong with his head ? it could have been
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a completely different story. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport. that is withjohn watson. that is with john watson. former arsenal and england defender sol campbell says he is grateful to league 2 side macclesfield for giving him the opportunity to take his first step in football management. we will talk to you later, thanks. helen willetts has the weather. we'd like to talk about the range of california in half an hour. in the uk the winds are easing at long last but we have more wet weather in store for the weekend and we will look at the weekend details later. helen, thank you very much. also coming this hour — heaven sent — a seven—year—old who posted a birthday card to his father in heaven is told by royal mail his letter has been delivered. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy.
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our top story this afternoon — the sons of a man who killed their mother and sister say more needs to be done to recognise coercive control as a form of abuse. lance hart shot his wife claire and daughter charlotte before turning the gun on himself in spalding in lincolnshire in 2016. a council—led domestic homicide review has detailed how mrs hart and her three children had been suffering from coercive control abuse by her husband for many years, without them realising. our home affairs correspondent june kelly has been speaking to harts' sons luke and ryan. claire and charlotte hart were a very close mother and daughter. and they were together when they were shot dead. just days before, they had finally escaped from the family home after years of psychological abuse. lance hart lay in wait for his wife and daughter with a gun outside a leisure centre.
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he knew they had gone there for a swim. after murdering claire and charlotte, he turned the gun on himself. throughout his marriage, lance hart had subjected his family to what is known as coercive control extreme psychological and emotional abuse, but which stopped short of serious violence. charlotte's older brothers, luke and ryan, say that before the killing, theirfather had never been violent, and they didn't realise his psychological bullying was domestic abuse. from the outside in, it looked like we were a close—knit family, always together, nice—looking house, on the inside, we were terrified, we were frightened every single day. we had never gone to school with a bruise, we had never encountered the police, never been to social services, we were top students, literally the top students. and then, our father killed our mother and sister. today's review by the safer lincolnshire partnership says the murders were a tragedy that
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could not have been foreseen. the family weren't on the radar of police and social services, because they had never contacted the authorities about lance hart. do i think that the public need to be more aware of coercive control? absolutely. that is a job notjust for police and agencies but for communities as a whole, and it's one of the key recommendations that this report makes, that our partnership will address. the coercive control which lance hart subjected his wife and children to became a criminal offence in england and wales at the end of 2015. that's seven months before the murders. 0ur mum especially, he limited her life as much as he could, he didn't let her work more than part—time, so she had no financial independence. over time, mum just got more and more worn down. her friendship groups were closed off, herfamily were closed off,
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because our father kept moving us away, so we were physically distant from anyone who knew us. and he essentially turned our mother into a slave for him. she lived just to serve him. today's review talks about the need for gps to question patients about suspected domestic abuse and says there should be a national publicity campaign to raise awareness of what coercive control is, using this family's story to show how such abuse can end in tragedy. let's speak now to jane monckton—smith. she's a forensic criminologist specialising in homicide, coercive control and stalking. the difficulty here is we are talking about something that is usually literally hidden behind closed doors. coercive control is very, very hidden and because of a lot of the perpetrators don't always
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use violence, there is no evidence for people on the outside that anything is going wrong. as somebody, a police officer or whoever trying to investigate, what are you looking for? what are the tell—tale signs? people often find it difficult to explain what has been happening to them. people do find it very difficult and one of the problems with coercive control is that they have very little contact, meaningful contact, with the outside world, so one of the choices they have in life and the freedoms most of us enjoy, they don't have, and they are managing a very dangerous person and trying to manage the consequences of upsetting that person. so there are questions that person. so there are questions that can be asked by the police and others. i'm not saying that it's easy. are the victims behaving in their own best interests, for example? and if they are not, why not? very difficult for these two brothers to talk about a period of their lives so damaging and with
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such terrible consequences. yes, it must be very, very difficult for them, especially with the consequences they have suffered. and it's happening more and more often that people are finding out but all of the danger signs were there in the journey in the run—up to the homicide but nobody recognised them as dangerous because we are always looking for violence. what we should be looking for is control. it's a much, much better predictor of serious harm. it's that element of unspoken menace? usually people living with coercive control, it becomes their normal, they don't necessarily see themselves as victims of domestic abuse because we a lwa ys victims of domestic abuse because we always think of domestic abuse as involving violence. so, they live in a world that is very menacing, there isa a world that is very menacing, there is a lot of fear, there is not necessarily any violence but there is always the threat of it and they
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tend to manage their world so as the perpetrator doesn't get upset, doesn't become threatening, and doesn't become threatening, and doesn't menace them. two macro of the ways of dealing with it, you challenge it, or you leave, but that in turn will frighten many people because of the effect that may have on the perpetrator. somebody who is using coercive control, the biggest fear they have is that they will lose control of the person they are controlling. so, at the point of separation, if that victim decides to leave they are at the highest danger then. and many of them absolutely know that and we need to start recognising that we need to help victims to escape safely from these people. jane, really good to talk to you. thank you for your time. that's jane monckton—smith. and if you are affected by any of the issues covered our story you can go to the bbc action line website at bbc.co.uk/actionline. president trump's former personal
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lawyer has pleaded guilty to charges that he lied to congress. michael cohen's comments were part of his evidence to the investigation into russia's role in the 2016 presidential election. responding to the news, mr trump told reporters at the white house that cohen is a "weak person". so, michael cohen has made many state m e nts so, michael cohen has made many statements to the house, as i understand it, and the senate. he put out a statement talking about a project which was essentially, i guess, more or less of an option that we were looking at in moscow, everybody knew about it and it was written about in newspapers and it was a well—known project. it was during the early part of 16 and i guess before that. it lasted a short period of time. i didn't do the project, i decided not to do the project, i decided not to do the project so i didn't do it. so we are not talking about doing a project, we are talking about not doing a
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project. michael cohen, what he is doing is, he was convicted, i guess, you will have to put it into legal terms, but he was convicted with a fairly long term sentence on things totally unrelated to the trump 0rganization, having to do with mortgages and having to do with cheating the irs, perhaps. a lot of different things. i don't know exactly. but he was convicted of various things unrelated to us. he was given a fairly long jail sentence and he is a weak person. and by being weak, unlike other people that you watch, he is a weak person and what he's trying to do is get a reduced sentence. so, he is lying about a project that everybody knew about. i mean, we were very open with it, we were thinking about building a building, it was an option, i don't know what you would call it, we decided, i decided ultimately not to overdo it, they would have been nothing wrong if i did do it, if i did do it they would have been nothing wrong. that was my business. let's get more from
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our correspondent in washington chris buckler. i don't know if he is worried, i don't know if he looks it, one minute you think he is and the other i don't know, you tell me. he insists he isn't in any way concerned. i would insists he isn't in any way concerned. iwould imagine, though, they have been watching very carefully in the white house exactly what has been playing out in new york today. it is worth reminding people exactly who michael cohen is beyond what president trump describes as a weak and not very smart person. despite that claim by the president, he was for many years his personal lawyer and his so—called mr fix it. his personal lawyer and his so—called mrfix it. he was intimately involved in many of his personal and business dealings, and all of this, these false statements relate to one of those dealings. backin relate to one of those dealings. back in 2015 to the start of 2016 the trump 0rganization was looking at building a real estate project in moscow. what was sometimes referred to as the moscow trump tower. now,
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it seems congress were looking into this as part of their wider investigations into questions about whether there was potentially some relationship, or some conversations between the trump campaign and russia. now, what michael cohen has pleaded guilty to today in court is that he lied about some of the state m e nts that he lied about some of the statements he made about that real estate deal. he says that actually they were still talking about that real estate deal in moscow injune 2016. that's when the presidential campaign was getting into full swing. he's also lied about contacts he had between russia and himself, specifically the kremlin. there seems to have been a 20 minute conversation that took place between michael cohen and some representatives of the kremlin and according to court documents i've been looking through, basically that telephone call was arranged by the press secretary for the president of russia, essentially president
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putin's press secretary. so, presumably everybody is waiting to hear from robert mueller. presumably everybody is waiting to hearfrom robert mueller. because he's the man. yes but robert mueller, as you know, simon, is the quiet man. he's the person who sits in the background and investigates and tries to avoid public comment, perhaps unlike the president. i think that has partly been some of the frustration from president trump. fact that robert mueller is continuing to do this work in the background and he is not sure what he knows, or exactly what he's looking at. we do know that this is a very active investigation taking place with robert mueller because recently in the last few days we have had paul manafort, who is a former campaign chairman of donald trump, we have seen a court hearing in which there has been frustration with robert mueller saying he has agreed to a plea deal but actually he is not cooperating with that plea deal and there is some suggestion paul manafort has been lying about some of the questions he has been asked and now we have michael cohen
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in court. but afterwards, his lawyer made upa in court. but afterwards, his lawyer made up a specific point about michael cohen continuing to cooperate with robert mueller‘s investigation. in washington there has been a huge amount of rumour and speculation in recent weeks, lots of talk about potentially more indictments and lots of talk as well about a final report, maybe this is getting towards the end game. some of that has been prompted by the fa ct of that has been prompted by the fact president trump has answered some questions robert mueller had, he gave some written answers in to those questions. but truthfully, we do not know when robert mueller‘s end report will come, or potentially if and when there will be some further indictments. chris, thank you very much. chris butler in washington. plans for a live televised debate on brexit between the prime minister and jeremy corbyn are up in the air, following a clash between the two over the format. theresa may has agreed to the bbc‘s proposal for a programme on the sunday before the crucial vote in parliament. but mr corbyn has said that he prefers the itv offer. 0ur political correspondent
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iain watson reports. she may have emerged from the back door of downing street this morning but theresa may signalled she would be willing to put her brexit plans under the spotlight in a bbc debate. labour hasn't yet taken up the offer. but she was determined to get some practice in, anyway. she was on her way to a kind of political dragons' den to sell her deal to a panel of senior mps. my focus is on the vote that will take place on 11th december here in this house. but straight away, rather than asking about her deal, they seemed more interested in what would happen if mps voted it down on december 11th. the question i'm asking you is, is there planning going on for a different approach if the deal is defeated? this is the deal that has been negotiated and this is the deal that we need to focus on. knowing you for 20 years, ijust don't believe that if your deal goes down
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you are the kind of person who would contemplate taking this country into a no—deal situation. am i wrong? it will be a decision for parliament as to whether they accept the deal. and they also wanted to know if the prime minister would be unveiling her long—anticipated plans for a new post—brexit immigration system before mps vote on her deal. can you just confirm that we will definitely have the immigration white paper published before the meaningful vote on 11th december? there is still discussion ongoing as to the timing. and there's another issue to be settled. it is still not clear that we'll see theresa may debating directly withjeremy corbyn on television. politicians can't seem to agree on anything these days. she seems to be willing to accept a bbc proposal that would involve audience participation while he wants a head—to—head clash on a rival channel. the itv offer seemed a sensible one. it reaches a wide audience
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and the timing looks good to me because it is not inconveniencing people who may wish to watch other things later in the evening. and on the substance of brexit, the labour leader told itv‘s this morning that parliament wouldn't allow the prime minister to leave without a deal. well, the alternative isn't no deal, nobody‘s going to allow no deal. how could we? we've seen the prime minister and the leader of the opposition argue their case in very different settings this morning. whether we see them clash head—to—head is still, well, a matter of debate. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster. they could always have a referendum on who should hold it, i suppose! it just sort of adds to this whole sense of no decisions. yeah, we are
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heading towards a decision of some kind quite soon, although no one really knows what that's going to be, whether we are talking about the debates or anything else. let's pick up debates or anything else. let's pick up on those things with the snp's westminster leader ian blackford. he is with me now. first on the idea of a debate at the bbc says its proposal which at the moment has been accepted by theresa may, would have a panel of people representing other views on brexit. what do you think about it? this has to be a debate of all the opinions, the snp are the party of government in scotland and we have a distinctive voice in this and we have argued for staying in the european union and argued at the least for staying in the single market and customs union, and of course we will support the principle of a peoples vote. there is much to discuss around that. if you are going to have jeremy corbyn at theresa may it is going to be a pretty narrow debate and i have to appeal to the bbc, pretty narrow debate and i have to appealto the bbc, i pretty narrow debate and i have to appeal to the bbc, i think it's disrespectful not to have the third party at westminster fully represented in that debate. i think we should be there and we can give leadership to a lot of people. we are obviously going into the debates
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which will start in the house of commons next tuesday and we know the responsibility we have, we have got to make sure that we throw out theresa may's deal, it is not a cce pta ble theresa may's deal, it is not acceptable to the house of commons. i also want to make sure that we give leadership to making sure that the commons votes against a no deal, let's take that off the table, the risks many people have talked about from no deal has to be removed. i think we need to be part of that debate on bbc television if the debate on bbc television if the debate takes place and make sure we are giving leadership to these voices. that's not going to come with a narrow debate just with jeremy corbyn and theresa may. let's not forget both of those parties supported brexit in the election in 2017, we have a distinctive voice and it should be heard. when you talk about trying to stop a no—deal scenario, the reality is if you vote down theresa may's deal the only thing in legal terms that will happen is that we leave without a deal. how will we stop it?|j happen is that we leave without a deal. how will we stop it? i want to make sure there is an amendment that gets cross party support that will
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say the house of commons will not support no deal, let's remove that and remove theresa may's deal. as pa rt of and remove theresa may's deal. as part of that we need to extend article 52 give us time. and then we can look at the other options. we have talked about staying in the single market and customs union, and i should say the reason we should do thatisitis i should say the reason we should do that is it is the least worst option in terms ofjobs. we would be happy to see this put back to the people. we want to stay in the european union. —— article 50. and other mps, we know from the uk government's own analysis that from any scenario the people will be poorer and politicians have a responsibility to look after their constituents. the la st look after their constituents. the last thing we should be doing is saying to any of our constituents that unemployment is a price worth paying for it, at the end of the day, ideology and an ideology that simply doesn't work. are you talking to other parties about trying to get your way, trying to work on other options? we are trying to get a consensus by speaking to people across the parliament. i think staying in the single market and
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customs union is a sensible option and the snp has put that forward as and the snp has put that forward as a compromise over the course of the la st two a compromise over the course of the last two and a half years and we are happy to explore all of the opportunities across parliament so we protect the interests of the economy, constituents and our businesses. ian blackford, the snp's westminster leader, thank you. everybody looking ahead to the big moment in the house of commons on the 11th of december and people working out different scenarios depending on what happens. vicki youngin depending on what happens. vicki young in westminster, thank you. a record number of citizens from european union countries left the uk last year. it brings the estimated net migration from the eu to the uk to its lowest level since 2012. but the figures from the office for national statistics also show that an increasing number of people from outside the eu are coming to live in britain. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: a review of the case of a man who killed his wife and daughter after inflicting years of psychological abuse has
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recommended a national campaign to raise awareness about the issue of coercive control. donald trump's former lawyer pleads guilty of lying to congress during the inquiry in to russian involvement in the us elections. the prime minister has said she'll take part in a brexit debate, televised live by the bbc on sunday 9th december, butjeremy corbyn has said he prefers itv‘s offer. in sport, sol campbell says he is grateful to macclesfield town for giving him the opportunity to take his first step in football management. he became isjust the eighth ba me management in the top four micro—divisions in british football. arsenal are in kyiv ahead of the match. they had to move the match 200 miles to the ukrainian capital kiev. manchester united have enacted a one—year extension onto david 0'hare's contract to avoid any
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interest in the transfer window. —— davit —— david de gea. ajapanese co—pilot has been jailed after being caught more than nine times over the legal alcohol limit, as he prepared to fly a passenger jet from heathrow airport. judge phillip matthews described first officer — katsutoshi jitsukawa — as "very intoxicated" ahead of the flight in october. he was sentenced to ten months in prison. mrjitsukawa was arrested at the airport after failing a breath testjust 50 minutes before the japan airlines flight to tokyo was due to take off. ahead of the 30th world aids day on saturday — a labour mp has revealed that he is hiv positive. lloyd russell—moyle, the mp for brighton kemptown, told the house of commons that he's the only current sitting mp to disclose he is living with the virus. world aids day was created to raise
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awareness of the aids pandemic caused by the spread of hiv and to mourn those that had died from the disease. in two days' time we mark its 30th anniversary. this event gives us pause to reflect how far we have come and to remember those who we have lost. but such events are also deeply personal to me. because, mr deputy speaker, next year i will be marking an anniversary of my own. ten years since i became hiv positive. it has been a long journey from the fear of acceptance, and today, hopefully, advocacy. knowing that my treatment keeps me healthy and protects any partner that i may have. that was lloyd russell—moyle. four months today — the uk is scheduled to leave the european union — and different sectors of the economy have been gearing up for the change. in the nhs, they're looking at key areas that could be affected — including staffing, the supply of vital medicines,
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and access to new treatments. the health secretary matt hancock has told mps that although a no—deal scenario is unlikely the government is preparing for all eventualities. let's speak now to our health correspondent catherine burns, who's at milton keynes hospitalfor us. catherine, let's talk more about the cost implications of all of this — what are your main findings so far? the thing to remember is the nhs uses more taxpayer money than any other sector so anything that happens to the economy will have a big impact on the nhs, so yesterday we had the treasury saying that no matter what kind of brexit we have we will be worse off than if we stayed in the eu and obviously that has led to lots of concern about knock—on effects for the health service. you've got to think, health has been one of those issues from the beginning when it came to the brexit debate. remember on that bus, that promise of £350 million extra a week to the nhs. i'm joined by a couple of guests who know about this. a professor in diversity and
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public health and mark from the nuffield trust. that £350 million promise, will that materialise? well, unfortunately, ithink promise, will that materialise? well, unfortunately, i think not. promise, will that materialise? well, unfortunately, ithink not. in the long run we will save some money by not paying into the eu budget any more but it was never really as much as 350 million a week, that figure had been somewhat pumped up and the unfortunate reality from the credible studies done so far including the government's own one, although we will save some money from not paying into the eu's offers that will be more than balanced out by the tax revenue we lose from the economic slowdown associated with brexit, especially if we are looking ata harder brexit, especially if we are looking at a harder brexit or a no—deal brexit in particular. you've done a bit of work calculating how much you think i know deal brexit could cost the nhs. what are we talking about? sign back under a no—deal brexit there will be a lot more red tape for companies because you will have two regulatory systems instead of one and the full in the value of sterling will also mean it is more expensive to buy things from
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elsewhere. not just expensive to buy things from elsewhere. notjust the eu but elsewhere. notjust the eu but elsewhere. what does that mean in terms of pushing up the prices of medicines, medical supplies and other things the nhs needs? under a no—deal scenario i've calculated it could be as much as 2.3 billion, a pretty big chunk of even a budget as big as the health service's. £2.3 billion. another big issue is staffing. there is already 100,000 nurse and doctor vacancies in england and 5% of the health workforce come from the eu so the worry is that will be worse from now on. but you think there is an opportunity here, don't you? at the university of bedfordshire we were commissioned to look at how we can widen participation in the nhs workforce to increase diversity in our workforce, but most importantly recruit uk—based residents to nursing and midwifery. what our research has shown is twofold. 0ne is that at the moment historically non—white people are less likely to apply to do professions such as
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nursing and midwifery. and secondly, there are not enough role models in those communities who are out in the community to show what a fantastic profession they can be. we were piloting an intervention on behalf of nhs health education called the community targeted outreach programme. we went out to the community had worked with community leaders who explained the shortage and they told authentic stories where we have real stuff to talk about some of the pros and cons of being in the nhs and we are finding that that is leading to more people from diverse communities wanting to apply to be in in nursing and midwifery. if they can see it they can be at type thing? that's all very interesting but we are living infour very interesting but we are living in four months' time so there isn't very long to sort out the staffing problem. you are not wrong, thanks very much. we'll be answering your questions about how brexit will affect the nhs including staffing and the supply of vital medicines at 5:30pm today. we'll be joined by layla mccay, from the nhs confederation and danny mortimer, chief executive of nhs employers. you can text 61124, email
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askthis@bbc.co.uk or tweet using #bbcaskthis. the royal mail has written to a seven—year—old boy to let him know that they had safely delivered a birthday card to his dad in heaven. jase hyndman, from west lothian in scotland, wrote on the envelope "dear mr postman, can you take this to heaven for my dad's birthday?" a manager at the royal mail wrote back to jase to say they succeeded despite "a difficult challenge avoiding stars and other galactic objects en route". time for a look at the weather. helen willetts. we are all the same sort of doing this. let's talk about what is happening in america because in california we have been reporting on these terrible fires in the last few weeks and there is a real change happening there. a welcome change in some respects
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because they don't get much rain. a lot of the vegetation has now disappeared with the fires. so what will hold that rain? the concern is for flash flooding and mudslides. will hold that rain? the concern is forflash flooding and mudslides. in the next couple of days the focus is bringing the first snows across california, so good news if you are heading there towards the christmas break period. the rain will not last a long time but it is going to give probably 24—36 hours of some rain in some very probably 24—36 hours of some rain in some very dry parts of the united states, even la seeing some rain and it will tend to scuttle through and by the end of fry day it is to raya. there is more waiting in the wings, coolish westerly wind, the chances some of the showers will head further south —— —— by the end of friday. that is warm air coming northwards from mexico from the
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mississippi valley and it looks really nasty if you are travelling. there will be flash flooding and disruption. we will be talking about that later on. in the meantime, closer to home, it has been a bit grim, particularly parts of the south—west. we have had power outages. the good news is the wind has started to ease and the sun has been out. i had a nice walk around. we are into the sunshine and showers scenario now. you can see from this picture earlier this afternoon it has been very stormy. we have had gusts of wind in excess of 70 mph. this was taken at port talbot. these we re this was taken at port talbot. these were some of the highest gust speeds, these were exposed areas like needles and mumbles. but benson and yeovil are quite far inland, populated areas getting lively gusts of wind. and both have airports. you had better tell us what to expect over the next few days. i will do. we have the rain moving out this evening and showers
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following on behind, so although the winds will ease in the south and the rain will ease it is not going to be a dry story will stop we have replaced the quiet frosty and foggy weather for gales and wet weather over the coming days. although the winds will not be quite as strong they will be strong enough to keep they will be strong enough to keep the temperatures above freezing, showers across the north and west. quite wet in the north—west of scotland. it is centred right next to the area of low pressure and that will be the case for tomorrow. as such, no real weatherfronts across the uk tomorrow but the showers will tend to congregate a lot across the northern and western isles, the highlands and the grampians. also some snow over the mountains potentially. the gusts of wind first thing in the morning combining with the rain to make it unpleasant for travelling but nothing exceptional, not for scotland and the time of year. not for scotland and the time of yea r. lots of not for scotland and the time of year. lots of showers through the morning will pester southern and western coasts, one or two getting inside, they could be hail and thunder but i'm hoping they will dampen down later with the approach of the next weather system. the temperatures will not be as high,
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not as mild as it has been but given some sunshine it will be better for most. it does not last, this comes in on saturday. at this stage we think it will be the morning hours so the afternoon looks drier. timings and location bringing across the southern half of the uk so it might be scotland and possibly northern ireland excavate the worst of the rain and stay in the cool air, brightand of the rain and stay in the cool air, bright and chilly, whereas it will be mild with a spell of wet and windy weather in the south and dry weather in the afternoon. through saturday night and into sunday the next area of rain will march through. you can see what's happening already three significant bands of rain this weekend another two to come over the weekend so concerns about the river levels starting to build up and the ground is saturated. sunday looks like we will take some of the wetter weather, potentially hills no further north into scotland, so clearly there are weather warnings, the next few hours not particularly pleasa nt the next few hours not particularly pleasant on the road with the remainder of the rain and gusty winds but it is easing for many of us. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a review of the case of a man who killed his wife and daughter after inflicting years
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of psychological abuse has recommended a national campaign to raise awareness about the issue of coercive control. donald trump's former lawyer michael cohen pleads guilty, to lying to congress, during the inquiry into russian involvement in the us elections. confusion over a brexit tv debate between two party leaders — theresa may accepts the bbc‘s plan for a debate at 8pm on the ninth december, but jeremy corbyn prefers itv‘s proposal. the head of an nhs trust says he won't resign, after a range of services, including emergency and maternity, were found to be inadequate. inspectors said there were significant problems at the shrewsbury and telford nhs trust. sport now on afternoon live withjohn and we have a first managerial job for sol campbell, he's been speaking about joining macclefield town. we do. it's been long time coming for the former arsenal and england defender. the fomer arsenal and england
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defender sol campbell told macclesfield town they're getting one of the best players in the world after being appointed manager of the league two club. after an impressive playing career wih arsenal and england, he's struggled to take the first step into football management, but does so with the silkmen who are bottom of league two. he's just the eighth bame manager among the 92 clubs in the top four divisions, and suggested clubs remain reluctant to hire black managers. i think for me, it is all about opportunities. i will not go there and that role and state the obvious, for me, i have an opportunity, take it with both hands, i'm going to work my socks off, and see how far i can go. that is the thing for me really. when you start getting on the sidelines, i think it really you wa nt the sidelines, i think it really you want the situation to become normal. you don't see black—and—white. you
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do see a football manager. it will appear surprising with all the experience he has as player that has taken him this long to get the job but a realjob now understand, four points off relegation. let's talk europa league. arsenal play in ukraine. yes they are. a little over an hour to kick off — at one stage arsenal's match looked as though go ahead — poltical instability in ukraine prompting uefa to move arsenal's europa league match with vorskla poltava 200 miles to kiev despite protests from tonight's opponents — the decision only taken on tuesday meaning disruption for some supporters already in the ukranian city, now making the extra journey back to kiev. where temperatures will be around minus ten. kick off is in a little over two hours time. a win will see arsenal top the group — they've already qualified as have chelsea, who are also in action. celtic need a win to keep them in contention. manchester united have triggered the one year extension to goalkeeper david de gea's contract. the player's contract was due to run
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out next summer meaning that he would have been able to speak to overseas clubs and sign a pre—contract agreement. from the first of january. united want to keep hold of their keeper and hope it will avoid any uncertainty over the player's future heading into the january transfer window. wales flanker ellis jenkins will have surgery after suffering a serious knee injury in last saturday's win over south africa. the player has told the bbc he's still hoping to be part of next september's world cup campaign. jenkins received treatment on the pitch for several minutes after the final whistle with players from both sides going over to check on him. new rules will allow overseas cricketers to play cricket for england earlier, after three years living in the country. and that means pace bowler jofra archer is now available for england. the 23—year—old was born in barbados but has an english father and a british passport. he's tweeted to say "it may or may not happen but i would love to debut in front of my family".
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england have a tour of the west indies starting in january ahead of the world cup starting next may. and we're going to finish with some cheating in china. almost 250 runners were caught taking short cut during the shenzen half marathon. they were actually spotted by traffic cameras, and cut around two or three kilometres off the full 21k distance. all of those who cheated now face bans. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide — and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to peter levy in hull, where look north has been looking into a review into the tragic murders of a mother and daughter in 2016 by the family's father, which has sparked calls for a national awareness campaign
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over the issue of coercive control. 0ur lead story. apologies because i know peter you have been to meet the two young men. we'll talk about that ina two young men. we'll talk about that in a moment. and richard westcott is in cambridge for us where look east have been meeting the engineers behind an innovative new heart monitor which could provide significant improvements to detection of cardiac problems. first of all, peter, a heartbreaking story... two remarkable young man, luke and ryan, you have met them. a story we have covered this afternoon, with their contribution, it really does hit home, do the? it does. to refresh people's members, july 2016, let's shocked that his wife claire and doctor charlotte outside a letter centre in spalding. he then shot himself. —— daughter charter. a story that shocked the country. today the review findings have been published and emerged that the family was subjected to years of mental abuse and controlling by
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lance hart. it's been highlighted that domestic abuse and this is so important, doesn't always mean physical abuse. in was, somebody isn't necessarily always hurt physically. today, in an effort to get the message out about coercive control, and mental abuse, lance hart's two sons luke and ryan have been talking. i spoke to them earlier. give us some idea of the things that your father would do, typical things and this course of and controlling relationship. so, when we were growing up, we never are driven on a's behaviour to control, so we were quite poor. —— contributed our fathers behaviour. we felt like the control of a life, we did have the money to see friends, to go out, even to heat rooms in the house, we would only eat the living room. —— did not have the money. we always got financially limited resources. we didn't think it was off on a controlling us. he
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wouldn't let you might have? no, they tried to keep our mum isolated from friends and family. he liked her passport away in a safe and she wasn't allowed on social media. —— he locked her. to isolate her so she had no support network so she cannot compare a situation to what it could be. nobody watched wonder how you have coped if you don't mind, tell mea have coped if you don't mind, tell me a little bit about your mum and charlie. they were incredibly selfless women. they taught us even in great suffering you can choose to love. and i believe that is why we are the men we are today. we were showing that you always have a choice, and life, and the violence and abuse is never a correct response to any circumstance. there a difficult question, had he feel about your father now?|j a difficult question, had he feel about your father now? i would say that our father is controlling. —— how do you feel. controlling to the point where we didn't matter. we
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we re point where we didn't matter. we were just possessions. he just always as banks and what characterised our father. —— always as banks and what characterised ourfather. —— hejust saw us set things. eloquent on the subject, hard to believe that they lost their sister, mother and father two years ago. two remarkable young man and plenty more on the programme tonight. peter, thank you. let's go tonight. peter, thank you. let's go to richard. this amazing device that can tell you about your heart from wherever. yes. some dramatic steps to start with. about half a million of us have a problem with the heart, slightly out of sync but we don't even know it. why is that a problem? if you have a heart that is out of sync, you are more a danger having a stroke, obviously a terrible consequence, killed around 25,000 people a year. so what you need is a way of finding if you have this heart out of sync, if you go to our hospital or a doctor now, the advice they give you is quite big and
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clu nky they give you is quite big and clunky and they put these bits all over your body, 20 or so of them and you can't wear it. you can't were in the shower and it can take weeks for the shower and it can take weeks for the results to come in. sol the shower and it can take weeks for the results to come in. so i have been to cambridge where they are designing into the device much easier and you snap it onto your chest and then best of all it can read your science real time. basically, what could possibly go wrong, chatting to the inventor while i was one device at cambridge and he was in boston, massachusetts. here's what happened. —— wearing the device. i on, here's what happened. —— wearing the device. ion, iwant here's what happened. —— wearing the device. ion, i want to plug my chest on people for too long, and you are a cardiologist, you helped inve nt you are a cardiologist, you helped invent this device and you are seeing my readings from my heart alive in america. if you stand still, and do some spots going up and down holding your breath, you'll see rhythm change. —— do some squats. i'm like a true pro. doesn't even hurt. we have a few army cadet
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here. —— a true army cadet. even hurt. we have a few army cadet here. -- a true army cadet. he doesn't know you like i know you. laughter the thing about this is that it could save lives, could admit? it could. the other thing about is to use artificial intelligence, algorithms to look at the data. not a person pouring over in taking weeks, a computer poring over it and flagged up any problems it sees, then they tell your doctor and if you can go and get medicine to prevent it becoming a major problem. it is a preventable thing but they're also developing it for some fitness fanatics as well, not just preventing strokes. they are talking to a premiership football club, i won't tell you which one, i didn't play for them unfortunately, and also a top rugby team, hopefully we can film them in action with these thing strapped to the chest while playing. remarkable. linda mori look east tonight. richard, thank you. peter, before you go, somebody tell
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me there was a snake on the losing a patch. that was the news for me but this of a real one. it is a real one. a boa constrictor. —— that was not news for me. eight foot long, the police asking for people to be careful to keep the doors and windows and external vents shut. the constructor is not venomous but they can't attack prey with their teeth and they can constrict. lincolnshire police have warned it is likely he is found somewhere warm, so he left lincolnshire. laughter anybody who sees it, they want you to call 999. a real story. i'm glad you covered it here. it can be vicious, and likes his food, you can see the boldest. stop! stop! laughter i give it to you. every time. peter, richard, thank you. if you will like to see more are any
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of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. and a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. breaking news ...president trump has in the last few minutes been tweeting that he is calling off a meeting with president putin on the sidelines of the g20 in argenina because of the incident at the weekend when russia seized three ukrainian ships off the coast of crimea the tweets read... that tweet coming through in the
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last few moments. as he had threatened to do, he has decided not to meet president putin of russia. you are watching afternoon live. an nhs trust in shropshire, which is under review following alleged failings in maternity care, has been rated inadequate by inspectors. the care quality commission said there were significant problems with emergency and maternity services at the shrewsbury and telford hospital trust and raised questions about the organisation's leadership. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. for 18 months more and more families have come forward to raise questions about the maternity care they received at this trust over two decades. so far, more than 200 families have contacted an independent review of emergency services. why did you let me try a natural birth when you knew that there was something wrong with his head ? it could have been a completely different story. throughout, the trust have insisted that current care is safe,
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but today's report highlights a catalogue of failures. both maternity and accident and emergency are rated as inadequate for safety. staff say there was a culture of bullying and harassment. some of the executive team do not have the right skills and ability to provide high quality sustainable care. there is no doubt that the leadership was not creating the right culture in the organisation. staff told us they were fearful about raising concerns. that's not acceptable. staff need to be feeling free to raise concerns about safety for patients, and those concerns need to be acted upon. the trust was put into special measures earlier this month, due not just to failings in maternity but also because of long—standing problems in the a&e unit. critically ill patients left waiting hours to see a doctor and then more hours to be admitted to a hospital bed, because this is a trust that just cuts and cuts and cuts the number of available beds. given the extent of the problems,
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there are growing calls for the chief executive to resign, but simon wright said he won't walk away. i've worked on the nhs for nearly 25 years. my entire professional life has been part of that. i live in this community, my family live in this community. if i didn't think and believe that i was capable of leading this organisation, iwould have already walked away. the trust insist that care will improve and there are pockets of good practices within their inadequately—rated services. michael buchanan, bbc news. miriam is back and happy business news in just miriam is back and happy business news injust a moment. —— has the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a review of the case of a man who killed his wife and daughter after inflicting years of psychological abuse has recommended a national campaign to raise awareness about the issue of coercive control. donald trump says his former lawyer michael cohen is lying to get a reduced sentence after he pleaded guilty to lying to congress
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during the inquiry in to russian involvement in the us elections. the prime minister has said she'll take part in a brexit debate, televised live by the bbc on sunday 9th december, butjeremy corbyn has said he prefers itvs offer. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the frankfurt headquarters of deutsche bank have been raided by prosecutors in a money laundering investigation. 0ther deutsche offices in the city were searched in an operation involving about 170 police and officials. prosecutors are looking into whether deutsche bank staff helped clients set up offshore accounts to "transfer money from criminal activities". thomas cook swings to a loss as the heatwave hits sales. the travel firm reported a £163 million annual pre—tax loss compared to a £9 million profit last year. three online casino firms have been fined £14 million pounds by the gambling commission uncovered failings in systems designed to prevent money—laundering
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and protect problem gamblers. let's have a look at the markets. the main point today, applause the main point today, applause the main point today, applause the main point today, we have seen productivity. the main key point. the reason why. this is the dead. the reason why. this is the dead. the us federal reserve. they have been talking about the rate at which they've raised the cost of borrowing. they are hinting last night they might slow the breakdown. that hastert sent investors into positive territory. —— that has sent. that means we have seen markets in new york and in london and europe rise. we haven't seen everybody happy. thomas cook, your member early in the week, the
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trouble company says the heat wave has basically did that is profit. the share prices down and also the price of oil which was dropping quite considerably. recovering a little bit but still below $60. let's talk all of the student now. —— talk all of this. craig erlam, senior market analyst, 0anda thomas cook problems thank you forjoining us. talk about why investors were so cheered to hear those words from the federal reserve chief. as we have become accustomed to come it takes small changes in a central banker's with convey a different message the public, one which triggers fears of recessions scored very overly high interest rates. this is something that powell made the mistake of doing a few months ago, triggered the start of the sell—off because people anticipated much higher interest rates over there. since then he has clearly learned his lesson, i think he is very new to the job as chair, maybe not quite used to some scrutiny. yesterday, he
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made a comment suggesting they are close to the peak in interest rates which is given a comment suggesting they are close to the peak in interest rates which is given mss additional confidence because a couple more rate hikes over the next year is not too bad for the economy. that is a completely different story if we are talking four or five. that can cause a recession. thomas cook now. the problem started on tuesday. they have continued now. what is going on with this company? you mentioned earlier that he wasted to have been a big driver. they rely quite heavily on last—minute deals, customers flying off a brought to catch late summer sun, and theyjust didn't quite see as much trans action this time because people are enjoying the sun in the uk and across europe and didn't feel the need to travel abroad. this is squeezing margins which had an impact on the bottom line and has been some other charges related to store closures, some of these issues which can chip away at the bottom line but all of these factors together have led to these losses. it feels like it is tough out there
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for a lot of these big holiday companies. let's talk about deutsche bank. what is going on here, officers raided in frankfurt i believe. what is this all lead to, what are investigators saying? it goes back to the panama papers, league 2 offshore accounts, tax avoidance, and it is a case, potential activity. the data they had from they had forced him to go into the office and get more information, a link to to to individuals but i imagine given the number of investigators link to this, i imagine they are hoping to uncover much more signs that this is a more inherent problem and this isn't deutsche bank's first scuffle with the authorities in relation to this type of activities, money laundering earlier this year we had another example and lash or we had one again. it seemed to be a common trait with them. thank you, craig. a quick look at the markets. that is
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what i was talking about. they lost about 30% of their price, thomas cook. investors not enjoying the news that it has gotten into a loss. brent crude prices have recovered. still below 60. anything below 60 is not good for oil—producing nations. that is not good news for them. i'm hoping 0pec and 0pec plus will do something about that in december and let the market is looking good. thank you. music by the likes of bob marley and jimmy cliff is now considered to be a global treasure that must be safe—guarded, with unesco declaring that reggae should be protected. music the jamaican music was born in the poorer neighbourhoods of kingston in the 60s. it spread across the world with its calls for social justice, peace and love. reggae's most famous songwriter and performer, bob marley, became a global superstar with hits like "no woman, no cry" and "get up, stand up".
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unesco said: reggae music's "contribution to international discourse on issues of injustice, resistance, love and humanity underscores the dynamics of the element as being at once cerebral, socio—political, sensual and spiritual," reggae —ishjust great reggae —ish just great music, reggae —ishjust great music, isn't it? that's it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at 5 with martine croxall. time for a look at the weather... here's helen willetts. hello. what a windy and wet start to the day. that rain arriving its way out into the sea in the winds will continue to use as we go through this evening but for the next few hours, certainly there will be some rather strong gust of wind. and even with the showers that are following on from the main ban, fairly gusty wind as well, taking just over to the evening, you can see we still have a brand across northeast of scotland, these are showers following behind. southern coast
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given the south—westerly wind, the direction we will see most of them but there will be something a little bit more organised, so longer spells of rain across a much of northern and western scotland. again, pretty mild for most of us, perhaps a little cooler than recent nights but no real frost worries. little cooler than recent nights but no realfrost worries. tomorrow, therefore looks a little less mild than a has—been but also less wet and less windy. plenty of showers around, hailand and less windy. plenty of showers around, hail and thunder and there, and snow over the hills. goodbye. today at 5pm, two brothers whose mother and sister were killed by their father call for a better understanding of psychological abuse. 19—year—old charlotte and her mother claire were shot by lance hart after yea rs of intense, controlling behaviour by him. from the outside in, it looked like we were a close—knit family. we were always together, we had a nice—looking house. and i think we put on a face as well. we didn't want anyone to know what was going on, almost. but on the inside, we were terrified. we were fighting every single day.
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it comes as a review says the case should be at the centre of greater awareness of the crime of coercive control. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm: donald trump's former lawyer pleads guilty to lying to congress in relation to the russia inquiry, but the president hits back. because he's a weak person, and not a very smart person. what he's trying to do is end... and it's very simple.
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