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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 30, 2018 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: a big plan to tackle type 2 diabetes — liquid, low—calorie diets will be offered to thousands with the condition in a bid to reverse the disease. in argentina for the 620 summit but still campaigning on brexit, theresa may urges her rebellious mps to think about the interests of their constituents. we are here at newland fish market in west cornwall to talk to fishermen, local businesses and local people about what they think about the latest progress or lack thereof. banking on us not switching. the big banks still hold around three quarters of all our current accounts. so why don't more of us shop around and switch to newer rivals? i'll speak to the boss of one startup bank a little later. leave it for the ring. after ugly scenes at their press conference, tyson fury and deontay wilder are warned they won't be paid if their weigh—in boils over. good morning. it's another unsettled
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day out there today with a mix of sunshine and showers are. i'll bring you the forecast for today and for the weekend throughout the morning —— sunshine and showers. it's friday the 30th of november. our top story: thousands of patients will be prescribed a low—calorie liquid—only diet after trials showed it can help to reverse type two diabetes in people who have been recently diagnosed. more than three million people across the uk are living with type 2 diabetes. nhs england says alongside the diet, it will also expand an existing prevention programme, which is designed to help people who are at risk of developing the condition. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. it's about cutting down, you know, small steps... at a community centre in leeds, the battle against diabetes is under way. reducing portion sizes and how frequent you have these naughty foods and all that... all the people here were on the cusp of developing type 2 diabetes.
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now they've been helped to lose a bit of weight and think about what they're eating. everybody should be educated about how we eat, what we eat, why we eat and when we eat. i've lost so much weight. i feel better, i feel happier. an estimated 12.3 million people in the uk are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. a quarter of a million people in england have already been referred to the special prevention programme, like the one running in leeds. on average, they've lost nearly likg, so now the scheme is being extended. weight loss is well and good, and we're delighted with the weightless trajectories that we've seen in participants on the programme. of course, what counts at the end of the day is whether we are preventing from arising, type ii diabetes that takes a little longer.
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and there is help too for those who have already developed type 2 diabetes. a recent trial of a very low calorie diet using liquid meals has helped almost half of those involved to reverse the condition. i decided to do something, walk around the house... that project is also being rolled out more widely, reflecting the growing concerns of the impact diabetes is having on our health. dominic hughes, bbc news. theresa may has urged mps to think about their constituents in her latest effort to get widespread parliamentary support for her brexit deal. on a plane bound for the g20 summit in argentina, mrs may once again refused to answer any questions from journalists about a plan b, should her deal be rejected by mps next month. let's get more from our political correspondent, iain watson. theresa may is away for a brief moment in time, but the reporters go with her, don't they, iain, and talk goes on back here about what will happen. reporters on the plane got 20 minutes with her but she didn't say anything dramatically new. compared
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to what she said two senior mps in an hourand a to what she said two senior mps in an hour and a half meeting yesterday in westminster. —— to mps are. our plan is the only plan effectively —— to mp5. she didn't want to discuss alternatives and wanted to put pressure on politicians wavering to get behind the deal. interestingly what she also said was that she was trying to put labour as the party of no deal, they've said this deal isn't good enough, and therefore blame them for any risks a no deal scenario might entail. that's interesting because to some extent, that's effectively a rehearsal for the position she would take in any tv debates if they can be agreed. as you know, she's agreed to a bbc debate, which includes some audience participation and jeremy corbyn would prefer an itv debate with the two of them going head to head. that hasn't been resolved but her line in those debates is clear, portraying
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labour as the party of no deal. to diffuse that, labour mp hilary benn, he has put down an amendment to her deal, the motion that will go before mps on december the 11th, and that is to say parliament would not accept a no deal scenario. that's been backed by his own front bench and buy a couple of conservative mps as well. if it was past it wouldn't be binding in the government but the moral pressure would be huge —— if it was passed. the g20 summit will get under way later. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james landale, has the latest from buenos aires. throughout the day and night, they arrived. more than 20 world leaders gathering supposedly to agree new plans to improve global trade and protect the environment, but this summit is likely to be defined by as much by what divides these leaders as unites them. donald trump has launched a trade war on china. he'll meet president xi for the first time since new tariffs were imposed, but few expect a break—through here.
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president putin is likely to face tough questions of russia's seizure of three ukrainian vessels in the black sea. president trump said he wouldn't meeting the russian leader until the confrontation was resolved. mohammed bin salman, the saudi crown prince, is also in town. he'll be looking to repair his reputation after the murder of the saudi journalist, jamal khashoggi. the french president said the world was still looking for answers. theresa may is here to bang the drum for her brexit deal, to win what international support she can while trying to reassure her counterparts that britain will still be open for trade come what may. this is the first g20 summit in south america, and many argentines are keen to shine an international spotlight on their own economic troubles, protesting loud and clear about the own government's performance. almost ten years ago, world leaders came together to revive the g20 so they could tackle
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the global financial crisis in one united body. well, here, a decade on, such unity may be hard to find. james landale, bbc news, in buenos aires. more than 5,000 trees are to be planted to revitalise the site of a huge moorland fire that burned for 41 days. the blaze at winter hill in lancashire broke out during the summer heatwave injune, and ripped through seven square miles of land. local residents and community groups will be invited to plant the new trees. talks are taking place to stop a power blackout on the channel island of sark today. with one of the highest tariffs in the western world, sark electricity was ordered to lower its prices, but the company says this would result in losses and has threatened to pull the plug. the local government is currently in talks to buy the provider which supplies the island's 300 homes. we've filled the bath up in the
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bathroom. we've got an ensuite shower in the bedroom and suchlike. we have plenty of water to flush the toilet and suchlike. are you nervous the lights are going to go off on friday? i think they are, i think they are. how long it's going to be, that's the other thing that's going to bea that's the other thing that's going to be a bit ofa that's the other thing that's going to be a bit of a surprise, they're talking about february, maybe easter. that's a way's off and it's not going to be just a couple of days it looks like. 127 people have been murdered in the capital so far this year. that includes a 72 fatal stabbings and 1a shootings. school pupils from across australia have taken part in a day of strikes to call for greater action on climate change. thousands gathered at rallies in sydney, melbourne and brisbane, despite being told to by the country's prime minister
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they should stay in school. the youngsters say they want australia's government to stop all new coal and gas projects. 5a years afterjulie andrews flew into cinemas as mary poppins, the magical nanny has made her comeback. the world premiere of mary poppins returns took place in hollywood last night. emily blunt takes over the main role, and one of the stars of the original 1964 movie, dick van dyke, makes an appearance at the age of 92. he is still sprightly, isn't he? the production has already been touted as an oscar contender. it's released in the uk on december the 21st. i remember those pictures from the royal premier. is it a remake or a news story? a very straightforward remake —— premier. news story? a very straightforward remake -- premier. that's what i understand, others might know better. i think it is the songs and the whole thing. i like the film and the whole thing. i like the film and the original. could be a film about this, tyson to do and deontay
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wilder. we've seen the success of the apollo creed films —— tyson fury. they are certainly dramatic, aren't they? he's a bit of an actor, tyson fury, with taking his shirt off at the last press conference before the big fight but they've been warned about the conduct with the traditional face—off with the weigh—in. they've already had a face of. if it gets fruity again they could lose their money —— face—off. they've been warned. isn't that what the industry likes? they're selling it, but yesterday, it felt like it was more genuine. yes you're going to have a bit of bravado to solve the fight, but this felt more genuine yesterday. we will wait to see what happens later! tyson fury and deontay wilder have been warned that any repeat of the scenes at their press conference when it comes to tonight's weigh—in and they won't be paid. fury says face—offs should be stopped, as they can get out of hand. celtic did what they needed to do in the europa league, beating rosenberg 1—0, so they only need a draw in their last game to qualify
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for the knock out stages. arsenal are already there. they finished top of their group with a 3—0 win over vorskla poltava in a match moved to a freezing kiev due to security concerns. the political instability and suchlike. and sol campbell says macclesfield town are getting someone who has been one of the best players in the world, after his appointment as the club's new manager. macclesfield are in league two. —— league two. 0nly macclesfield are in league two. —— league two. only the eighth black manager to manage in the top four divisions in english football out of 92 football teams, it illustrates the lack of opportunities. dion dublin was sitting there yesterday and we talked about black managers. we're hoping he might actually try to talk to a big club manager and talk about the issue. great that
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he's getting the opportunity. he retired from football a long time ago. it's taken a long time for him to get the chance. very good. see you ina to get the chance. very good. see you in a few minutes. we will look at the papers shortly. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. i think there's a bit of rain around and it is blustery. that's a lovely picture. good morning. good morning. that sums it up well, still u nsettled. that sums it up well, still unsettled. this was taken yesterday by one of our weather watchers in paignton in devon and a similar scene today, big shower clouds once again as our unsettled and blustery theme continues. not as windy for most as it was yesterday, still certainly breezy today with a mix of spells of sunshine and those heavy showers around. the unsettled theme is all down to the fact we've got this big area of low pressure sitting to the north of the uk, but with the wind is rotating around the low pressure, feeding in plenty more showers, especially in western parts. this morning, showers around
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in western scotland, north—west england, wales and the south—west. further east, more likely to stay dry so for central and eastern parts, a largely clear morning. this is 9am. some scattered showers blown in on the brisk westerly breeze across the south—west, wales, north—west england, a few in northern ireland and across scotland, some of the showers could be heavy, some hail and snow on the top of the mountains. particularly windy in northern parts of scotland and we could see gusts of 60—70 mph. breezy wherever you are, but sunshine than of late. plenty more heavy showers across the far north—west later this afternoon, but further south, the showers should tend to ease away. things becoming drier in the south and temperatures will range between 8—12 today. heading into the latter part of the afternoon and into the evening, still showers in the north—west. dry for a time still showers in the north—west. dry fora time in still showers in the north—west. dry for a time in the south—east but
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more rain approaching through tonight from the south—west, that's down to the fact this next frontal system down to the fact this next frontal syste m m oves down to the fact this next frontal system moves in from the south—west as we look ahead to saturday morning and will introduce milder air with the yellows. colder conditions holding on across the northern half of the uk. saturday starts with some rain across much of england and wales. the bulk of the rain should ease away to the east through the day on saturday, leaving the re m na nts of day on saturday, leaving the remnants of a few showers behind. more sunshine by the afternoon but temperatures only six or seven across some northern parts and much milder in the south. looking ahead to the second half of the weekend, and we've got some more showers to be coming through during the day on sunday. the initial rain i think for sunday. the initial rain i think for sunday will be in the east. that should clear array and then there's the mixture of sunny spells but also showery rain —— clear away. for northern ireland, southern scotland, wales and the south—west. 1a should feel mild in the south, but again it will be breezy and single figures
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further north in scotland. pretty u nsettled further north in scotland. pretty unsettled as we head through the course of the weekend. you'll notice the strength of the breeze, but although there will be showers, not although there will be showers, not a washout, some sunshine in between. thanks very much, sarah! let's take a look at the front pages of this morning's papers. the mirror's main story talks of a worrying rise in the number of children needing all of their teeth out because of sugary food and drink. the paper describes it as a "scandal". the i says christmas could be cancelled for mp5. it reckons the whips are threatening to cut short their festive break if the prime minister loses the vote on her brexit deal. the front page of the daily mail says the cbe bestowed upon the former head of network rail, mark carne, is "an insult to every rail user" because it comes on the day the industry regulator said network rail has "systemic failings" and ordered it to improve urgently. and the guardian says
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the government is going to relax immigration rules to let more foreign doctors to come to britain to plug gaps in the nhs. also there a picture of donald trump's former lawyer michael cohen who admitted lying about speaking to russian officials. then and john are with us on the radial things. —— ben. then and john are with us on the radialthings. -- ben. it is that time of year where we find out, slightly cogitated in the sense that some fares are regulated and limited and then there is the on regulated ones. “— and then there is the on regulated ones. —— unregulated. it is based on july's inflation figures of. we know that in january, july's inflation figures of. we know that injanuary, regulated fares will go up at 3.2%. this morning in the papers, the telegraph pointing out that that could cost an average user of £200 per yearfor
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out that that could cost an average user of £200 per year for things like season tickets on services that many are saying is not up to scratch. prices are going up and passengers and commuters are not seeing any group. what have you got john? there is a lot about growing grassroots football. 650 kids use this facility every weekend, it will close because they are doing away with it for a big indoor adventure park. through the winter months, it is always an issue, playing on waterlogged ditches or rose in pictures, so for all of these kids they will have to find somewhere else to play. there are 13 all—weather pitches. they will have do find other places. was it one of those places that was busy?m do find other places. was it one of those places that was busy? if you go in there, you can barely hear yourself, so much going on in there, so yourself, so much going on in there, so many yourself, so much going on in there, so many games and yourself, so much going on in there, so many games and matches. adults
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use it as well throughout the week for five aside soccer matches, at four kids on the weekend it is a great place to go. marcus rashford has played there. where will they play now? on the movie tin, talking about mary poppins and i didn't realise this, it is a new version, like a different story. it will be set in 1935 london, 25 years after the events of the original film. this is the one starring emily blunt as mary poppins. apparently there has been a family tragedy, that is all i will say. on that theme, on the most influential film ever. number one in that list, a film from 1939, the wizard of oz. influencing new, ben. —— influencing the u. —— influencing you.
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apparently, it is how it is referred to in future films and future conversations and it is referred back. alfred scott's habitat psycho, a head of king kong. space odyssey, you get it is of the scale of the whole film. you never seen it? no. wizard of oz, many times.|j whole film. you never seen it? no. wizard of oz, many times. i have not seen this gap space odyssey, but the wizard of oz is scary. —— space odyssey. laughter. ithink you wizard of oz is scary. —— space odyssey. laughter. i think you guys need to organise a screening of space odyssey, it is one of those films. desperate a tear to my eye this morning, but an easy thing to do. a boy of seven wrote a birthday
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ca rd do. a boy of seven wrote a birthday card for it is dad who had passed away. he asked the postman to deliver it to happen. in the letter, he had written, dear postman, can you take this to happen for my dad is the day? —— my dad ‘s birthday? what happened was that the office manager wrote and said ijust wanted to ta ke manager wrote and said ijust wanted to take this opportunity to contact you about how we succeeded in the delivery to a letter of your dad in happened. it was a difficult challenge, avoiding stars and intergalactic objects, i will continue to do all i can to ensure it gets delivered to have them safely. the little boy was overjoyed , safely. the little boy was overjoyed, as you could imagine. so, a seven—year—old whose year has been made. a very lovely story. url to be affected by that. —— you are a little bit affected. see you later
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on, gentlemen. the time is 6:21 a.m.. over the next two weeks here on breakfast, we'll be reporting from across the uk to gauge reaction to the brexit talks so far. in the first of our series, john maguire is in cornwall, an area that receives millions of pounds in eu funding, but also voted to leave. it is an interesting place. morning to you, john. absolutely fascinating place, we are at the fish market in west cornwall this morning. they started at around 6am, all sorts of wonderful fishy. if you are having a fish supper tonight, there is added chanceit fish supper tonight, there is added chance it is coming from a place like this. we havejohn dory, great looking cold, watch of flatfish. —— cod. they will drop their load on the quayside and come in. this is a pa rt the quayside and come in. this is a part of the world that did vote to
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leave in heavier numbers than the rest of the uk. i have been out and about in penzance along the coast talking about what they think about the latest development in the brig that negotiations. this is the bit in the tv report where we talk about tempestuous times and uncharted waters. cornwall boat and leave with a 50%% —— 56% share. what do people in penzance think about the negotiations now? they are in a mass. no plan b is a major problem. but you want to leave ? major problem. but you want to leave? yeah. to get back control of various aspects of our lives which at the moment we don't have control. i voted for a out and i am still out, but they have gone about it the wrong way and messed around too long. and what of the 4396 who wanted to remain? brexit is the hot topic
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in pubs, kitchens and front rooms across the uk. so many people out there who would like to vote again, knowing what it is all about now. we are already really struggling down here, things slowly got that and better after the crash, but still, there is so many in poverty that even the un are waking their finger at us. so, to push us further back seems absolute madness. if the pm came to penzance, she would need to convince all sides that she has the a nswe rs. convince all sides that she has the answers. i think it is down to the parliamentarians to look at all of the facts and make their decisions, thatis the facts and make their decisions, that is what we elect them to do and that is what we elect them to do and thatis that is what we elect them to do and that is what we elect them to do and that is what they need to get on doing. and those mps are on a countdown until they cast their crucial vote. yeah, countdown until they cast their crucialvote. yeah, ten countdown until they cast their crucial vote. yeah, ten days and counting. we have driven up country,
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let's talk to the harbour master robert and mark from cornwall. we go that fishermen have been unhappy with the common fisheries policy for many years, cornwall has received lots of honey, this in new fish market was paid for in part by european funding. absolutely. for us it isa european funding. absolutely. for us it is a period of not knowing what is happening. we got the money for market over in year ago on the european maritimes fisheries fund, it is very nice but what happens to the fisheries we don't know. in the port infrastructure point of view thatis port infrastructure point of view that is concerning that every fishing point around the country do not know what they can be subsidised by. it is a case of asking the question and getting and i don't know answers. have been certain sections of the industry that have been more closely aligned with europe than others, fishing one of them. this is the time of the year where the fishing quotas are renegotiated. it is a tough one, at the end of the day the fishermen are looking at it from a national
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perspective, it is 4% of gdp, it can be seen as a bit of a sell—out. unfortunately, places like newland, it isa unfortunately, places like newland, it is a huge employer. looking around the market, there is a five fishermen at sea, two bytes here and that goes back to their processing facilities which employee up to 20 people. getting that right post—brexit is essential, what we are after now is making sure that we get our waters back, we hope that is the case and if we do negotiate some people fishing in our waters, that they land in our ports. by lending in our ports then we will survive. at the moment we just don't know. —— landing. your challenge is to get people to visit cornwall. you have had an amazing summer, has opposed brexit vote created any uncertainty? not at the moment. the only thing is people are worried about going to water on the continent. at the moment it looks as though it might bea moment it looks as though it might be a slight plus next year but what
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we need is certainty, consumers to be confident. tourism needs confident consumers who will spend and normally good weather as well. there is a bit of uncertainty at the moment but we cope because tourism goes up and down quite a lot with the weather, it responds quite quickly to challenge is. people are sort of nervous getting ready for the challenges. lots of the people in the uk love coming down but you also get foreign visitors, the dutch, the germans are. they are. there have been a bit of things about our weak there have been a bit of things about ourweakanti— there have been a bit of things about our weak anti— european? the problem with overseas marketing is to say this is a political discussion, i will political problem, we are not that europeans are not welcome, this is politics, not people. thank you both very much. quite noisy in the market this morning. nice and busy. you can see all of these crates going out. just imagine when the fish has landed at the key, all of the end
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salary fisheries that the around it to ensure that you getting this wonderfulfish, nice to ensure that you getting this wonderful fish, nice and fresh on your plate for supper really interesting stuff, politically what theresa may were saying. moore coming up throughout the morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. there's been a big rise in the rent paid by traders who operate from railway arches across the capital. some say they're crippling, as network rail sells off some of its land. an investigation by the bbc has found a 25% jump in the average rent last year. the sale of units to private investment firms is part of a deal worth around £1.4 billion. the rail company says the money will be reinvested in upgrades and insists the increases are driven by regeneration and rising property values. it's feared rising numbers of young
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people will be homeless in the run up to christmas. charity centre point estimates around 1,600 people aged 16—25 could be sofa surfing or on the streets. it's dubbed november 30th ‘bleak friday‘ to highlight the growing issue and is urging councils to intervene sooner. food experts from a number of universities, including the university of london, are warning councils to set up "food resilience teams" after brexit. the report from the university of london suggests the new teams should map the existing situation in their region, outline where potentials risks and potential disruptions lie and clarify the limits to stockpiling. according to the report, every form of brexit will affect the food system in some way, particularly a no—deal scenario. let's take a look at the travel situation now. it is good news if you are using the
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tube because currently all london underground lines are running a good service. the a13 starting to build into town from the goresbrook interchange, dagenham. westminster bridge remains closed northbound between a3036 lambeth palace road and a3211 victoria embankment for security installations. and in burrow, the 82 great dover st remains closed in both directions between long lane and cowbridge road because of water main repairs. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today will probably be the nicest day of the week, weatherwise. certainly more pleasa nt week, weatherwise. certainly more pleasant today than it was this time yesterday morning. the wind is still fairly brisk coming in from the south—west, but it is not as blustery as was yesterday. we should stay mostly dry, a few showers out what the west and long spells of sunshine. a touch cooler than has beenin sunshine. a touch cooler than has been in recent days, starting off the morning between seven and 93 celsius. maybe one or two showers
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out towards western home counties at first, but i think most of us dry for most of the day. lots of sunshine around and we see tempertaures rise to between 9— 12 celsius by the end of the afternoon. overnight tonight we are still in that cooler air, it will feel quite chilly cottages down to four by degrees celsius underneath largely clear skies at first, but then we get outbreaks of rain into tomorrow morning and that wind is go to pick up. the rain will clear by saturday afternoon, dragging with it milder air. it should brighten up, highs of 30 degrees, mostly dry during the daylight hours on sunday. —— 13 degrees. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: thousands of patients will be
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prescribed a liquid only low calorie diet after research showed it could reverse the condition. more than three million people across the uk are living with type 2 diabetes. nhs england says alongside the diet, it will also expand an existing prevention programme. theresa may has urged mps to think about their constituents, in her latest move to gain widespread parliamentary support for her brexit deal. on a plane bound for the g20 summit in argentina, mrs may once again refused to answer any questions from journalists about a plan b, should her deal be rejected by mps next month. donald trump has cancelled a planned meeting with his russian counterpart vladimir putin. it follows an incident last weekend, where russian border guards fired on three ukrainian ships off the crimean peninsula, and seized their crews. the us president said he would not meet mr putin at the g20 summit because the ships and sailors had not been returned. the metropolitan police says it's considering deploying armed officers to tackle gang violence across parts of london. commissioner cressida dick said the move was a temporary measure, and would only be used
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in extreme circumstances. 127 people have been murdered in the capital so far this year, that includes 72 fatal stabbings and 14 shootings. the wizard of oz has been named as the most influential film of all time, according to a study of almost 50,000 films. the 1930s classic beat nearest rivals star wars and psycho. researchers at the university of turin ranked the films according to how often they were mentioned in later movies. it's referencing back to other films. is it wrong i find the wizard of oz scary? there were lots of scary elements, weren't there?” often feel like the tin man on sunday after playing football. because you haven't got a heart? i'm
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getting old, muscles are aching. you know that wasn't the tin man? he is in it, though! scary flying monkeys. the scarecrow was a little bit too bouncy, scary almost as well sometimes. you are supposed to have those scary characters in kids films. i don't think they intended them to be scary. tyson fury, scary? silly. deontay wilder, equally as scary? there's this debate about this business. where does it cross the line? there is going to be hoity—toity before a big fight, but when does it cross over. there was a feeling at the press conference last saturday before the big fight in la, they have been warned about their behaviour. i think you're feeling of argy—bargy, not hoity—toity. hoity—toity. .. argy—bargy, not hoity—toity. hoity-toity. .. hoity-toity is being
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a bit posh, a bit snooty.” hoity-toity. .. hoity-toity is being a bit posh, a bit snooty. i don't know if that is the right phrase! shall we go with argy—bargy? know if that is the right phrase! shall we go with argy-bargy? let's stick with argy—bargy, not hoity—toity! there we go! they have been warned about their hoity—toity behaviour. tyson fury and deontay wilder have been warned that they won't be paid if there's any repeat of this. they had to be separated at their press conference, and fury says he won't let wilder get anywhere near him at their weigh—in tonight. he's not going to be given the opportunity to get in the face again, because it shouldn't be like that. this is a sporting contest be many people around the world are watching this fight and it's a sport fight. this is not a bare knuckle street fight, it's a boxing contest at the very highest level. so all that that sort of stuff shouldn't be able to happen, not on my behalf anyway. celtic have given themselves a great chance of reaching the knockout stage of the europa league. they were 1—0 winners
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at norwegian side rosenberg. scott sinclair with the only goal of the game. it means that brendan rodgers side now need just a point from their final match against group leaders salzburg to go through. but rangers need to beat rapied vienna in their last match after they were held to a goalless draw at home to villareal, and they had daniel candeias sent off too. arsenal and chelsea had already qualified so they had the breathing space to give their young players a run out. among the scorers in arsenal's 3—0 win at vorskla poltava was joe willock, his first senior goalfor the club. they finished top of their group. and the same goes for chelsea, who had callum hudson—odoi on their scoresheet, as they beat paok salonika at stamford bridge. a name to look out for in the future. sol campbell says it's all about hard work now he's finally got his firstjob in management. he's taking over at the football league's bottom side macclesfield town but he says he travelled far and wide and made 12 to 15 applications before getting this chance.
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i think for me, you know, it's all about opportunities. i'm not going to go down that road and state the obvious. i think for me, i've got that opportunity. i'm going to take it with both hands. i'm going to work my socks off and see how far i can go. he's got a big job on his hands with the club facing relegation. the copa libertadores final, the south american equivalent of the champions league final, has been moved to a new continent! the second leg was postponed last week when river plate fans attacked the boca juniors team bus and it was decided it couldn't be played in buenos aires, so real madrid's bernabeu stadium will host the match a week on sunday. new rules mean the sussex all—rounderjoffre archer will be able to play for england next year. he was born in barbados but has an
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english father and a british passport. the ecb has cut the residency period required for overseas players from seven years to three, and it means he could feature in the world cup next year. it's an interesting one and will generate great debate. for other countries and nations, they will be fearful that the ecb might plunder a lot of their young talent and bring them over here to play. it happens in so many other sports. it does, especially if there's big money on offer. see you later. thank you. the environmental campaigner emily penn has led a number of all—female ocean clean—ups in her mission to save our waters from the growing amount of plastic. earlier this year, she came on the sofa to share the findings of her expedition to seattle, and accidentally hinted that there was another major project in the making. are you going again? yes, end of next year, we're actually looking at... not still life on earth. is it
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at... not still life on earth. is it a secret? it is a secret, i wasn't meant to announce it, you have to stand by. it's going to be big and exciting. and here she is with news of her latest expedition, emily penn is in our london newsroom. you can finally let the cat out of the bag officially and tell us what's going to go on. good morning. what is happening, what is going on with the project and why now? today we are announcing our next big project, x expedition around the world. we've been scaling up the world, work we've been doing over the last five years, sailing to accumulation zone is to explore plastics and solutions. we've had interest from people wanting to take part, this is our answer. we're going to take as many people as possible. 300 women willjoin us over the next two years to sale
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32,000 nautical miles around the planet. we'll talk about how you will find these women to join you in a moment, but practically speaking, how does this work? how many are on a boat at a time and how long will each leg last? there will be ten guest crew at a time on—board. each leg will be anywhere from 1—5 weeks, depending on where in the world it is. let's talk about how you're going to get these women. you want 300 women, who do you want to apply and get in touch with you? the key is diversity. what we realised is there's no silver bullet solution to solve the issues arising from plastic, so what we need is a really diverse mix of women coming from all different backgrounds, working from all different angles to tackle the problem. we're looking for these women so we can go out there and explore the problem first—hand, and work out where our skill set into
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sects that issue. that means scientists, but also communicators, filmmakers, teachers and packaging designers and policymakers, people who can solve the problem as well. you says a diversity but you it's only women, why is that —— you say. it started as only women because as we learned about the toxic pollution in ourocean, we we learned about the toxic pollution in our ocean, we realised it had a particular impact on women, they are end of crime disruptors, they get into our bodies and they mimic our hormones and we can pass it onto our children. word we started it as a —— we started it as an all women's project. the first mission, it was an amazing space on board and we kept it as all women. what is going to be done, what is going to be achieved with this journey? on one hand we will raise awareness, getting eyes on the water for two
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yea rs getting eyes on the water for two years constantly studying the issue. we're also going to be doing lots of scientific research, we will work in partnership with the university plymouth and the university of georgia to collect more critical data particularly of the impact of this plastic is having and finding out more about where it's coming from to lead towards solutions. the bit i'm really excited about is building an army, getting 300 women out there so they can bring that experience back to land and work out how to bring change in whatever sphere of influence they have available to them. good to talk to you, emma. i'm glad you finally got the chance to be able to say and announced the project. i know people can get in touch with you via their website to get their application in. it's just a video interview initially? exactly, an application form and an interview and then we will go from there. thank you very much. good luck. emily penn from our london newsroom. here's sarah with a look
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at this morning's weather. would you fancy a trip like that, you interested, i imagine you would be? i might get my application form m, be? i might get my application form in, iquite be? i might get my application form in, i quite fancy it! tell us about the weather. today is the final day of autumn according to the meteorological calendar, that autumnal unsettled theme is going to continue. this was taken by a weather watcher in devon yesterday, big shower clouds around. another showery picture. not as windy as it was yesterday, but still a blustery theme and a mix of sunny spells but also fairly heavy showers. the reason the weather is so unsettled is we've got low pressure that's been moving in from the atlantic. this area of low pressure is sitting to the north of the uk with the winds rotating around it, bringing further showers from the west. plenty of heavy showers in western parts of scotland and the north—west of england and the south—west this morning. the central and eastern parts of england start with a clear and note. temperatures around eight or nine at 9am. we've got the
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showers in the west, there could be heavy ones in the north—west of england and especially in scotland. a couple filtering into northern ireland, blowing through on the brisk north—westerly wind but some showers across scotland will fall as hailand showers across scotland will fall as hail and even snow on the top of the mountains. we keep the showery theme, one or two showers working further east. in general, eastern parts of the country should have a largely dry day with sunshine on offer. into the afternoon, plenty of showers in the north—west with temperatures only eight or nine. further south, sunny skies, highs of 12 but wherever you are, you will still note is the strength of the breeze. moving into this afternoon and evening, the next batch of wet weather arrives from the south—west and overnight into saturday, that works its way in across the bulk of england and wales. a soggy start to saturday here. further north in scotla nd saturday here. further north in scotland and northern ireland, we're into the cold air. still the blue colours in the north but into the
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weekend, we've got the milder air from the south with the arrival of the cloud and rain. a soggy start, especially across england and wales. as the bulk of the rain moves to the east, we'll still be left with scattered showers into the afternoon. the best of the sunshine will be in the north—west of the uk and temperatures nothing to write home about on saturday. the king to the second half of the weekend, low pressure still in charge as we got another frontal system coming in from the atlantic —— looking. a speu from the atlantic —— looking. a spell of rain comes in through saturday night into sunday. we start with the rain in the east on sunday. through the day, most of the showers will be in southern scotland and northern ireland. some brightness bore the south—east of england and northern scotland. temperatures pretty chilly in the north, seven or eight, but things turning milder, around 14 towards southern and south—eastern uk —— and for this beast. not particularly cold as we get into which your illogical winter
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—— for the least —— meteorological winter. we will talk about bank loyalty in a moment, how long have you been with your bank? since i was three. dashboard the south—east. i got a gold coin and i've still got it and got a gold coin and i've still got itandi got a gold coin and i've still got it and i stayed with the same bank —— for the south—eastern. it and i stayed with the same bank -- for the south-eastern. she's been with her bank for about 12 years i have not left my bank since university. what about you?” i have not left my bank since university. what about you? i did have a fallout with a bank, which resulted in a change. having said that, i have been with the same bank now probably 16 years. they hold us in. ben, you are looking at loyalty and once they get us, we are almost scared... nobody is as astute as sarah. we are almost afraid to leave them? statistics say we are more
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likely to get divorced than change our bank account. that means that the big four banks get us in and they don't have to do much to keep us happy. there are new banks, challenger coming in to shake things up. there are around 70 million current account customers, but the vast majority still bank with the big 4 — lloyds barclays, hsbc and rbs. that's despite several attempts to encourage us to switch. but could that be about to change? there's a new breed of banks emerging. many offering online and mobile banking only, they don't have branches. one of those is monzo, and its founder and boss is tom blomfield. he's with me. good morning to you. nice to see you. we talk about that loyalty we feel with banks. we don't know why. why are we not reaching those big four banks, even though in many cases, we don't like what we get. four banks, even though in many cases, we don't like what we getm is more a case of inertia than real loyalty. perhaps for some people, a
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lack of awareness of alternatives or that the switching process might it difficult, which is no longer true. when we talk about that switching process , when we talk about that switching process, you do worry about your direct debits or your salary getting to your account, that is the thing thatis to your account, that is the thing that is asked. even though there have been attempts of this account switching, there is a fear that it won't happen. the switching happens very well, it switches everything overin very well, it switches everything over in seven days and redirects everything to the new account. even before you fully switch, we are encouraging people to try before they buy. open the account and put they buy. open the account and put the new 100 pounds in and see if it meets their needs, that we can get an assessment of it before fully committing. you are a perfect example of one of these so—called challengers, you want to check it up and say we have a better way. what is your better way? to start with, it is the immediacy, visibility and control. at my old bank i would spend on my contactless card on
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monday and wouldn't see it until tuesday and then it was hard to budget. if i was overdrawn or bounced payment or become i went overseas it seemed they were adding a markup that i didn't know about. when i look at the statement it was remarkable. why is that transparency so difficult to achieve? you can prove you can do it, i am one of your customers, use your card and when i make a payment it appears, i could get charged extra for going abroad. the big banks could do this, but they don't. why not? a couple of things. modern technology makes those notifications easier. those big banks were made before this technology existed. the banks are adding fees to try and cover the cost of having branches and tens of thousands of staff, they don't actually have two, they could cut foreign exchange fees if they wanted to, but they use it as a profit generator. who are the people coming to you? the savvy people thinking i
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am fed up, i will move to a bank like yours. who are they? tech savvy people, people who do banking on phones? it started out with tech focused people in london, but now we are at1.2 million focused people in london, but now we are at 1.2 million and it has broadened out the on london, mostly younger, our customers are in 20s and 30s, but we have customers in their 80s and 30s, but we have customers in their80s and and 30s, but we have customers in their 80s and 90s. the overriding thing is you have to have a smart phone number crunchers. —— smart phone, no breaches. it is difficult to break into this market, yet to set up your systems and a lot of complaints and rules and regulations you have to comply with. you are making a big loss, why should i trust you with my money when your last loss was £33 million's we are investing upfront to build these scalable systems. the first thing is the financial service compensation scheme, they are covered, so your
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money is not at risk. we are very well capitalised, we have raised another £85 billion of investment and doing a crowd round, we have a good amount of capital to see us true. is not uncommon with this technology companies to see the first six years of loss—making to build a really solid foundation to invest for the future. i want to ask you about that, if anyone opens up a new “— you about that, if anyone opens up a new —— newspaper, who are obviously a lot of criticism here. the picture by the way. monzo lends customers money to buy its shares. you want to raise money to expand, but there is a lot of criticism that you are letting people use overdraft to buy a bit of your business, white?” think the article is very misleading. on one hand we are running crowd funding to allow customers to own part of the business. on the other hand, we offer ove rd rafts business. on the other hand, we offer overdrafts that are fair and transparent that allow people to meet short—term borrowing needs.
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transparent that allow people to meet short—term borrowing needsm says, if you are borrowing, the value of your investment can go up and down. people might warrant money but they become worthless if those shares go down. absolutely we never encourage people to buy shares out of debt. the question is, flipped it around, to prevent people are links, are we willing to turn off ove rd rafts are we willing to turn off overdrafts for all customers for the entire week? that seems grossly unfair. absolutely we will not turn off ove rd rafts, we unfair. absolutely we will not turn off overdrafts, we would not encourage people to buy shares, but the article really misses the point. we are not encouraging people to do so. we have crowd funding and ove rd rafts so. we have crowd funding and overdrafts and are not willing to u nfa i rly overdrafts and are not willing to unfairly turn off overdrafts to prevent that. nice to see you, thank you for coming in and good luck with that. more from me after seven, i will have that use for you on how much rail fares have that use for you on how much railfares will go have that use for you on how much rail fares will go up. see you, ben. the time is 6:52am.
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as nhs figures show worsening mental health among teenagers, researchers are urging the government to include ‘life skills' in the curriculum of english secondary schools. it follows a pilot study that taught students skills and techniques, to help them to navigate the pressures of growing up. here's our home editor, mark easton. slowly in, slowly out... for year 7, two—day's lesson is on how to breathe. keep your backs up high. this class has just done a four—year study programme, teaching them the skills and techniques for happier and healthier life. it isjust as ha rd and healthier life. it isjust as hard as maths bit as any to try and try these techniques to perfect them... with mental health and behavioural problems on most secondary pupils worsening, dozens of schools across england have been testing evidence —based programmes in theories from that in psychology. what if the other person want
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something else? you need to be able to negotiate and compromise that someone so they can have what they wa nt someone so they can have what they want and you can have what you want. weekly hour—long lessons on social and emotional learning relationships, resilience and wine fullness, designed for young people aged 11— to him. does it work? fullness, designed for young people aged 11- to him. does it work? these are very aged 11- to him. does it work? these are very hard skills, some adults struggle. academic and of pupils who completed the course with a control group that didn't participate. the results are group that didn't participate. the results a re really group that didn't participate. the results are really quite impressive. evaluations suggest a significant increase in children and young people ‘s general health and an improvement in life satisfaction thatis improvement in life satisfaction that is equivalent to an adult finding a partner. as a sufferer of anxiety, it has really helped as the coping mechanisms that we are taught has been effective in everyday life. it really helped me with exam stress and working through any issues i had
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on top of school and the pressure of dealing with it stands. there was definitely problems with academic stress, friendship groups and personal problems which i have been able to deal with in a more practical and a successful way. teachers must complete a week of intensive training before delivering lessons on a process that some found positively life changing. we actually had to test one of the theories we were learning about on ourselves. i personally found out a whole lot about myself, things i have been carrying around and be knowingly since my own childhood, issues that i have got. the experts behind the scenes of say the results are so impressive and the cost so low, £35 per year per, it should be pa rt low, £35 per year per, it should be part of the curriculum in every secondary school, notjust in return, but around the world. —— not just in britain. mark easton, bbc news. now, the day today is the 30th of november. the white house has put up
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its christmas decorations and trees. you have not seen these before. these are obviously indoor christmas trees and the beginning ones are red. this has caused controversy because 40 bright red christmas trees were unavailable this week and the first lady has said, she has defended her choice, it is the first lady who chooses how to decorate the white house. she says we are in 21st century, everybody has different tastes at the i personally do not have an issue with whatever christmas tree cover goes up. i have an issue with the thing we started off with, what is the date? 30th of november. it is nice! she decorated each one herself. we saw her putting the baubles on, which must have taken ages. ages and ages. really, really lovely. anyway, the debate rages. get in touch, top us what you
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think. something to talk about. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. there's been a big rise in the rent paid by traders who operate from railway arches across the capital. some say they're "crippling" as network rail sells off some of its land. an investigation by the bbc has found a 25% jump in the average rent last year. the sale of units to private investment firms is part of a deal worth around £1.4 billion. the rail company says the money will be reinvested in upgrades and insists the increases are driven by regeneration and rising property values. it's feared rising numbers of young people will be homeless in the run up to christmas.
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charity centre point estimates around 1,600 people aged 16—25 could be sofa surfing or on the streets. it's dubbed november 30th ‘bleak friday‘ to highlight the growing issue and is urging councils to intervene sooner. food experts from a number of universities including the university of london are warning councils to set up "food resilience teams" after brexit. the report from the university of london suggests the new teams should map the existing situation in their region, outline where potentials risks and disruptions lie and clarify the limits to stockpiling. according to the report, every form of brexit will affect the food system in some way, particularly a no—deal scenario. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a reasonable service on the tubes this morning, but the district line is part suspened between wimbledon and earls court because of a signal failure. on the roads, london bridge already very slow towards king william street where there are roadworks westminster bridge remains closed northbound between a3036 lambeth palace road and a3211 victoria embankment. that's for security installations.
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in borough, a2 great dover street remains closed in both directions between a2198 long lane and a100 tower bridge road due to water main repairs. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today will probably be the nicest day of the week, weatherwise. certainly a lot more pleasant today than it was this time yesterday morning. the winds are still fairly brisk coming in from the south—west, but it is not as blustery as it was yesterday. we should stay mostly dry, a few showers out towards the west and long spells of sunshine. a touch cooler than has been in recent days, starting off the morning between 7 and 9 degrees celsius. maybe one or two showers out towards western home counties at first, but i think most of us are dry for most of the day. lots of sunshine around and we see tempertaures rise to between 9—12 celsius by the end of the afternoon. overnight tonight we are still in that cooler air, it will feel quite chilly
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temperatures down to 4 degrees celsius underneath largely clear skies at first, but then we get outbreaks of rain into tomorrow morning and that wind is go to pick up. the rain will clear by saturday afternoon, dragging with it milder air. it should brighten up, highs of 13 degrees, mostly dry during the daylight hours on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: a big plan to tackle type 2 diabetes — liquid, low—calorie diets will be offered to thousands with the condition in a bid to reverse the disease. in argentina for the g20 summit but still campaigning on brexit. theresa may urges her rebellious mps to think about the interests of their constituents. we'll be talking to some of those
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constituents here in west cornwall, where the first catch of the day has just been landed in new newlyn, where we are talking fishing, and, of course, we're talking brexit —— on track for more price rises. in the next few minutes, rail companies will announce how much fares will go up from the start of next year. i'll have the details. leave it for the ring. after ugly scenes at their press conference, tyson fury says it's time to stop the face—offs. he's not going to be given the opportunity to get in me face again, because it shouldn't be like that. it's another blustery day today. showers in the west, sunshine in the east. i'll bring you a full forecast in about 15 minutes. good morning. it's friday the 30th of november. our top story: thousands of patients will be prescribed a low—calorie, liquid—only diet, after trials showed it can help to reverse type 2 diabetes. more than three million people across the uk are living with type 2 diabetes. nhs england says alongside the diet, it will also expand
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an existing prevention programme. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. it's about cutting down. you know, small steps... at a community centre in leeds, the battle against diabetes is under way. reducing portion sizes and how frequent you have these naughty foods and all that... all the people here were on the cusp of developing type two diabetes. now they've been helped to lose a bit of weight and think about what they're eating. everybody should be educated about how we eat, what we eat, why we eat and when we eat. i've lost so much weight. i feel better, i feel happier. an estimated 12.3 million people in the uk are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. a quarter of a million people in england have already been referred to the special prevention programme, like the one running in leeds. on average, they've lost nearly 4kg, so now the scheme is being extended. weight loss is well and good,
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and we're delighted with the weight—loss trajectories that we've seen in participants on the programme. of course, what counts at the end of the day is whether we are preventing type two diabetes from arising. that takes a little longer. and there is help too for those who have already developed type 2 diabetes. a recent trial of a very low calorie diet using liquid meals has helped almost half of those involved to reverse the condition. i decided to do something, walk around the house... that project is also being rolled out more widely, reflecting the growing concerns of the impact diabetes is having on our health. dominic hughes, bbc news. theresa may has urged mps to think about their constituents in her latest effort to get widespread parliamentary support for her brexit deal. on a plane bound for the g20 summit in argentina, mrs may once again refused to answer any questions from journalists about a plan b, should her deal be rejected by mps next month. let's get more from our
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political correspondent, iain watson. so, theresa may's out of the country for a couple of days now, but of course, all the talk about what will happen on december the 11th continues. it does indeed, charlie. she went be able to press the flesh of her own mps, many of whom are sceptical, some newspapers say up to 100 might oppose the deal —— would be able. our own calculations are nudging 90 —— won't be able. constituents could put pressure on to sort out brexit. interestingly on the plane we got a sneak preview of the plane we got a sneak preview of the kind of demelza she might make if some of the tv debates take place. what she was suggesting is labour are the party of no deal, posing a backstop solution in northern ireland —— we still don't know if it will
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happen because as far as i'm aware, she want to do a bbc debate, including audience participation for people with different views. jeremy corbyn would prefer to do an itv format which would have a straight head to head clash between the two politicians. that's yet to be sorted out but we got a sneak preview of where her message is going in this, and there was an attempt to diffuse that going on as well. hilary benn, labourmp that going on as well. hilary benn, labour mp who chairs the brexit committee, trying to amend this boat on december the 11th to say that evenif on december the 11th to say that even if theresa may's deal is rejected, the parliament would also rejected, the parliament would also reject no deal bash this vote. would be pulling an alternative deal in place at that point, but making it clear no deal isn't an option —— this boat. —— he won't be putting. if that goes ahead it isn't binding but it would make it difficult for the government to argue labour is
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simply the party of no deal —— this vote. the g20 summit will get under way later. our diplomatic correspondent, james landale, has the latest from buenos aires. throughout the day and night, they arrived. more than 20 world leaders gathering supposedly to agree new plans to improve global trade and protect the environment, but this summit is likely to be defined as much by what divides these leaders as unites them. donald trump has launched a trade war on china. he'll meet president xi for the first time since new tariffs were imposed, but few expect a break—through here. president putin is likely to face tough questions of russia's seizure of three ukrainian vessels in the black sea. president trump said he wouldn't meeting the russian leader until the confrontation was resolved. mohammed bin salman, the saudi crown prince, is also in town. he'll be looking to repair his reputation after the murder of the saudi journalist,
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jamal khashoggi. the french president said the world was still looking for answers. theresa may is here to bang the drum for her brexit deal, of theresa may is here to bang the drum for her brexit deal, to win what international support she can while trying to reassure her counterparts that britain will still be open for trade come what may. this is the first g20 summit in south america, and many argentines are keen to shine an international spotlight on their own economic troubles, protesting loud and clear about the own government's performance. almost ten years ago, world leaders came together to revive the g20 so they could tackle the global financial crisis in one united body. well, here, a decade on, such unity may be hard to find. james landale, bbc news, in buenos aires. just what you'll want to hear if you're about to catch a train to work, rail companies havejust announced how much fares will go up by from the start of next year.
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ben's here. they were never going to go down, we re they were never going to go down, were they? i always have to be the bearer of bad news on days like this. we've had the annual update of how much our tickets will go up by, the number is 3.1%. that's an average for all tickets we buy for train journeys, season tickets, average for all tickets we buy for trainjourneys, season tickets, on peak, off peak, 3.1% up. not good given how much we've heard about the ra i lwa ys given how much we've heard about the railways this year, the chaos caused by the timetable change that happened earlier this year that left many people unable to get to work. we know there's been destruction and problems on the railways. looking at the recent scores, a third of all commuters said they were satisfied by their current service. if you look at figures this week from the office of road and rail, they said punctuality and reliability on our rail network was the worst in five yea rs. rail network was the worst in five years. amid all of that, they're saying ticket prices will go up.
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already we've had a response from passenger groups, saying this is unacceptable and passengers are once again being asked to fund a failing service. on average it will put up costs by £100 on an average ticket. season—ticket? £100 on an average ticket. season-ticket? season tickets for commuters. that's a real problem. on average over a year, another £100, which is a real problem given what we've seen for the quality of the services. for their part, the train operating companies say 98p in every pound that we spend on tickets goes back into the railway. doesn't go to profit or shareholders, they say sake. i'll put that question to them in 40 minutes' time —— that's what they say. if you've got any thoughts. we could look at them? get in touch in all the usual ways, twitter, facebook and e—mail. tell us your experience of the railways and i'll put that to the boss of the rail delivery group
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about why prices are going up once again even though service doesn't seem to be up to scratch. let's see if it improves it! the metropolitan police says it's considering deploying armed officers to tackle gang violence across parts of london. commissioner cressida dick said the move was a temporary measure, and would only be used in extreme circumstances. 127 people have been murdered in the capital so far this year, that includes 72 fatal stabbings and 14 shootings. more than 5,000 trees are to be planted to revitalise the site of a huge moorland fire that burned for 41 days. the blaze at winter hill in lancashire broke out during the summer heatwave injune, and ripped through seven square miles of land. local residents and community groups will be invited to plant the new trees. school pupils from across australia have taken part in a day of strikes to call for greater action on climate change. thousands gathered at rallies in sydney, melbourne and brisbane despite being told to by the country's prime minister
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they should stay in school. the youngsters say they want australia's government to stop all new coal and gas projects. those are the main stories this morning. we will have the weather and the sport coming up for you a little later on. let's get more on our top story this morning, a liquid—only diet ofjust 800 calories a day will be prescribed to thousands of patients with type 2 diabetes. the nhs in england is piloting the treatment after a trial helped more than half of those involved to reverse the condition. in the uk, more than three million people are living with type 2 diabet a condition that's strongly linked to diet and lifestyle. treating people with type 2 diabetes costs the nhs £8.8 billion a year. and according to public health england, the number of diabetics will rise by one million by 2035. susanjebb is one of the researchers behind the nhs pilot and father paul lomas lost three and a half stone
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on a low calorie diet. his type 2 diabetes is now in remission. it is gone? in remission. remarkable. absolutely. backtrack a bit, over what period of time? nine weeks. over nine weeks. i went on a crash diet and i was on the programme for bbc, the take crash diet experiment. were you overweight them? 20 st, i had type 2 diabetes, i was on to drugs, one kicks the pancreas into producing insulin -- kicks the pancreas into producing insulin —— tricks. then your pancreas chances on you and then you have injections. it is chronic. that's the way i thought i was going. igo that's the way i thought i was going. i go on this diet and within nine weeks, lost the weight rapidly
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and then had lots of scans on my liver and then there we are, there i was, normal, didn't need any more drugs. paul, do you recognise yourself there? yes, a fascinating photo there, isn't it? we don't need to go into how that photo was taken and what happened! it does show the weight that you had on. tell me how you did it. this new plan, susan, we will talk to you in a moment, this new plan looks at limiting calories, liquid, the sheiks and things like that. i think it's around 800 or 900 calories a day —— shakes. that. i think it's around 800 or 900 calories a day -- shakes. 800 calories a day -- shakes. 800 calories a day -- shakes. 800 calories a day, four products. were you permanently hungry? no. the way your body chemistry works, the first few days were... we were together.
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i'm not going to say it was easy, but, you know, your body does... susan, i think people, if they're watching thinking they need to tackle this, they might not be convinced in their diabetes would com pletely convinced in their diabetes would completely reversed but they need to tackle their wake. the thought of 800 calories... i don't consider myself overweight but the thought of an 800 calorie a day diet would frighten me. you shouldn't think about that because you're not overweight, but for people seriously overweight, actually what we've shown is this can be a really good option. if you like it is the short, sharp shock treatment as opposed to the slow and steady weight loss and both of them can work. some people find it easy to put all their energy into a couple of months. you feel like you can do it for a couple of months, it feels more achievable. we want to say there's good evidence from trials that have now been done that around about half of people with
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type 2 diabetes who try this approach by one year will be free of their diabetes, approach by one year will be free of theirdiabetes, their approach by one year will be free of their diabetes, their diabetes will be in remission. it's not the answer for everybody, but it's worth giving ita for everybody, but it's worth giving it a go. for everybody, but it's worth giving itago.a for everybody, but it's worth giving it a go. a couple of things. .. i'm surprised how many people think it's acceptable, more than we would have imagined. a couple of things, sorry for interrupting, why didn't we do this sooner? in a funny way, it doesn't sound like rocket science. we've known for a long time weight isa we've known for a long time weight is a clear pathway to type 2 diabetes, and weight loss is achievable in a short space of time. why haven't we done it before? you're right. in specialist clinics this have been banned for some time but for relatively small numbers of people —— has been done. firstly there is a concern it's not accessible for most people, and perhaps you need specialist doctors and nurses taking care of you. these new trials have been done in primary care, and they've shown in fairly routine healthcare settings we can do this, it's more acceptable to
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people than we imagined, it is effective and safe. regular doctors and nurses can support people to make these changes, or we can refer people to other providers in the community who can provide that support. it's really important to remember that this is about a low—calorie diet, but it's also about behavioural support. you have eight or nine weeks losing weight, but then you've got to come back to normal food and you need help and support to do that to keep the weight off. how has that part been? it is the wan on one basis. the person who came to meet and weighed me and brought me the products in my own home, it wasn't the case of putting you somewhere for public humiliation, there was none of that. -- it is humiliation, there was none of that. —— it isa humiliation, there was none of that. —— it is a one on one asus. it was proper guidance. —— asus. —— basis.
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land i and sensible in what i cook and how much i cook and i still, basically, i have a couple of products and a couple of meals. basically, i have a couple of products and a couple of mealsm isa products and a couple of mealsm is a chance to break old habits. a simple rule, for a short at a time, just to have these products. this is targeting those who are overweight. there isn't a suggestion for people who are not overweight who have type ii diabetes that bears can be reversed through something like this. we don't know that. those trials have not been done. research is ongoing to find out what can we do for people who are not overweight who perhaps need a slightly different approach. one of the interesting things about this is that it changes the way we are about diabetes. doctors used to think this was a condition that he had to learn to manage, now we are saying maybe we can actually reverse this, or at least delay the time before people develop diabetes. that is to take quite a culture change for doctors
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to shift the way of thinking. what we now need to see is that when you are first diagnosed, the first thing that we say is try losing some weight. give it a go, you might be to put off the moment where you need further treatment. other people think that it is so much better, putting it in a better place. absolutely. not just putting it in a better place. absolutely. notjust that, my blood pressure come at no medication, sleep apnoea, that has reduced the occurrences of that by about 75%. win—win for me. occurrences of that by about 75%. win-win for me. thank you for sharing that this morning, thank you. it is 18 minutes past seven. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning. we are heading into the final day of autumn. the weather looking very autumnal, a story, breezy and we
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will see showers. this was a shower cloud taking by our weather watchers yesterday. more of the same today. it won't be as windy as it was yesterday and there will be some sunshine to be enjoyed. still blue skies especially in the east and 20 of blue skies in the north and west. this low pressure sitting to the north of the uk and the wind rotating around, most of a showers will pile in from the west. showers this morning across the north and west of scotland, north—west england down towards the south—west. further east, likely to say dry and clear. at risk for the south, a few showers dotted around devon, cornwall, towards wales into lancashire too. a few showers for northern ireland but dry for belfast. plenty of showers for scotland. blowing through on this wind, if you catch a shower it could be heavy with hail and even some snow across the mountains of scotland. dry for aberdeenshire through the days. there will be blue
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sky and sunshine especially across eastern part of england is to be one or two of the showers drifting further east but the bulk of them will be in the north—west of the beef averages around eight or nine degrees, further south we are likely to see highs of 11 or 12. into the evening, showers at ease for a time but the net batch of showers rise to the south—west, heading through tonight it will be a spell of soggy weather across parts of england and wales. scotland and northern ireland, clearer skies and the lowest temperatures tonight, a touch of rust in the north—west, should be mild further south—east. as we had through tonight into saturday, we have mild air arriving with all of that cloud and rain. temperatures will be on the up with the arrival of this weather system. rain eases towards the east after that soggy start, a few showers left into saturday afternoon. a bit of sunshine across scotland and northern ireland, temperatures only around six open eight degrees to be towards the south we could see 13
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celsius. into the second half of the weekend and the onset of thing continues. more rain into sunday, the next weather front lining continues. more rain into sunday, the next weatherfront lining up from the west. we start sunday with rain in the east which attempt to ease, but showers most likely across northern england, southern scotland, northern ireland with more showers packing in from the west later on. won't be a washout, sunshine for parts of eastern scotland, eastern england and it will be mild with temperatures up to around 40 degrees as we head into that start of winter, things looking pretty u nsettled. i tell you where it doesn't look u nsettled, i tell you where it doesn't look unsettled, looking rather tranquil and beautiful, wherejohn maguire is this morning. it looks absolutely lovely. that sky looks dramatic, the water look calm. you look like you are ready to captain a ship and go ona are ready to captain a ship and go on a voyage somewhere. are ready to captain a ship and go on a voyage somewhere. the way you are posing, it is all wonderful. what a buildup!
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are posing, it is all wonderful. whata buildup! i are posing, it is all wonderful. what a buildup! i am are posing, it is all wonderful. whata buildup! iam not sure i can follow that. lets throw bricks are in the mix. —— brexit. follow that. lets throw bricks are in the mix. -- brexit. you are absolutely right, we are in west cornwall fishing port, it is beautiful. listening to sarah, as you say, lovely blue skies but a big black cloud. is remembering about fishing, if you gave your fishmongers and complained about the price, if it is bad weather they cannot bring the catch in. sometimes they cannot set their net ‘s and if they cannot set their net ‘s and if they do not fish and catch fish, they do not fish and catch fish, they don't get paid. it is a really tough industry. we know how dangerous it can be for the fishermen out there. they are bound by european quotas and the common fisheries policy, that is a dreaded phrase in a place like this. cornwall itself voted to leave, 56% share. i was out and about in penzance and finding about what
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people think about the latest of elements in the brexit negotiations. so this is the bit in the tv report where we talk about tempestuous times and uncharted waters. cornwall voted to leave with a 56% share of the vote two years ago. what do people in penzance think about the negotiations now? they are in a mess. no plan b is a major, major problem. but you want to leave? yeah. yeah, to get back control of various aspects of our lives which at the moment we don't have control. i voted for out and i am still out, but they have gone about it the wrong way and messed around too long. and what of the 43% who wanted to remain? brexit‘s the hot topic in pubs, kitchens and front rooms across the uk. there are so many people out there who would like to vote again, knowing what it's all about now.
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we are already really struggling down here, things slowly got better and better after the big crash, but still, there is so many in poverty that even the un are wagging their finger at us. so, to push us further backjust seems absolute madness. if the pm came to penzance, she would need to convince all sides that she has the answers. i think it is down to the parliamentarians to look at all of the facts and make their decisions, that is what we elect them to do and that's what they need to get on doing. and those mps are on a countdown until they cast their crucial vote. we have just come around the other side of the key to talk about, i have got politics students who were at question time here in the local area last night and also paulfrom
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the cornish this produces organisation. i know you were in london yesterday that all sorts of meetings talking about brexit" is, what is the mood like amongst your industry at the moment? there is a little bit of concern the. brexit in general will be a big opportunities to come out from the common fisheries policy, get a fair share of quotas, control who fishes in our waters and general managers fisheries for the benefit of uk fishermen. i think the withdrawal agreement has brought some uncertainty into play. the noises are still right, the rhetoric is still right from theresa may and michael gove, but there is that niggling feeling that there is a sell—out around the corner. yesterday and the day before it was really about putting pressure on our politicians to make sure that they are going to deliver a brexit that they promised and that will take some doing. lots to talk about. the three guys are students from tamworth college, politics students. you are at question time last night, did they talk about brexit much at
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all? that was the majority of the show, not much else to talk about. there are so much opportunities that could happen. you didn't get a chance to ask your question, tell us what it would have been. my question would have been is a second vote now inevitable? you guys are all 17, he did not get a chance to vote, even if there was a second vote, you didn't get a chance. you would like to vote, i assume? yes, all of the young people who are disenfranchised for the 2016 referendum who have now turned 17, 18, they are being forced and lock out of the process and i think it is unfair and undemocratic because it will be our futures that are affected most. as a politic student, you study all manners of politics but it is so much to the
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four. what you think about what has been happening, especially recently, with the negotiations taking place? much like harry said, the withdrawal agreement that has come through now is still very unlikely to get through parliament. in both regards to the population and the parliament itself, there is a massive split between opinion, even between the different sites themselves. it will be really, really tricky and we are in turbulent waters in regards to how it will affect us all, especially for the younger generations who are going to have to live through that entire economic recess that follows. thank you very much indeed. great to hearfrom young people and the fishing industries. the sun is coming out, the sky is brighter. lots more chat and opinion from west cornwall later on in the programme.” and opinion from west cornwall later on in the programme. i thought you we re on in the programme. i thought you were starting to sing just then. the sun is out, the view looks beautiful... good start.”
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sun is out, the view looks beautiful... good start. i could do a sea shanty. looking forward to that! it looks so lovely there. we don't need a sea shanty from john, thatis don't need a sea shanty from john, that is not required. i will add that is not required. i will add that tom watson, the shadow labour leader is going to be talking to us little later on about a number of things, type ii diabetes in particular because as you know, he lost all of that weight and is involved in that process. we will also be talking to him about rigs as well. —— brexit as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollings. there's been a big rise in the rent paid by traders who operate from railway arches across the capital. some say they're "crippling" as network rail sells off some of its land. an investigation by the bbc has found a 25% jump in the average rent last year.
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the sale of units to private investment firms is part of a deal worth around £1.4 billion. the rail company says the money will be reinvested in upgrades and insists the increases are driven by regeneration and rising property values. it's feared increasing numbers of young people will be homeless in the run up to christmas. charity centre point estimates around 1,600 people aged 16—25 could be so called sofa surfing or on the streets. it‘s dubbed november 30th ‘bleak friday‘ to highlight the growing issue and is urging councils to intervene sooner. food experts from a number of universitiesare warning councils to set up "food resilience teams" after brexit. the report from the university of london suggests the new teams should map the existing situation in their region, outline where potentials risks and disruptions lie and clarify the limits to stockpiling. according to the report, every form of brexit will affect the food system in some way, particularly a no—deal scenario. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tubes
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this morning apart from severe delays on the district line because of earlier signalling problems. and on the roads, london bridge already very slow towards king william street — where there are roadworks. westminster bridge remains closed northbound between a3036 lambeth palace road and a3211 victoria embankment — that‘s for security installations. in borough, a2 great dover street remains closed in both directions between a2198 long lane and a100 tower bridge road due to water main repairs. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today will probably be the nicest day of the week, weatherwise. certainly a lot more pleasant today than it was this time yesterday morning. the winds are still fairly brisk coming in from the south—west, but it is not as blustery as it was yesterday. we should stay mostly dry, a few showers out towards the west and long spells of sunshine. a touch cooler than has been in recent days, starting off the morning between 7 and 9 degrees celsius. maybe one or two showers out towards western home counties
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at first, but i think most of us are dry for most of the day. lots of sunshine around and we see tempertaures rise to between 9—12 celsius by the end of the afternoon. overnight tonight we are still in that cooler air, it will feel quite chilly temperatures down to 4 degrees celsius underneath largely clear skies at first, but then we get outbreaks of rain into tomorrow morning and that wind is go to pick up. the rain will clear by saturday afternoon, dragging with it milder air. it should brighten up, highs of 13 degrees, mostly dry during the daylight hours on sunday. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news:
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thousands of patients will be prescribed a low—calorie liquid—only diet after trials showed it can help to reverse type 2 diabetes. more than three million people across the uk are living with type 2 diabetes. nhs england says alongside the diet, it will also expand an existing prevention programme. theresa may has urged mps to think about their constituents, in her latest move to gain widespread parliamentary support for her brexit deal. on a plane bound for the g20 summit in argentina, fa res fares will go up by an average of 31196 fares will go up by an average of 311% from january. many long—distance commuters will see the average cost of getting to work rise by around £100, and the new fares come into effect onjanuary the second. passenger groups say the rise comes as punctuality and reliability on the railways is the worst in five years and. train companies say 98p in every pound is reinvested into the railways —— five yea rs. theresa may has urged mps to think about their constituents, in her latest move to gain widespread parliamentary support
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for her brexit deal. on a plane bound for the g20 summit in argentina, mrs may once again refused to answer any questions from journalists about a plan b should her deal be rejected by mps next month. donald trump has cancelled a planned meeting with his russian counterpart vladimir putin. it follows an incident last weekend, where russian border guards fired on three ukrainian ships off the crimean peninsula, and seized their crews. the us president said he would not meet mr putin at the g20 summit because the ships and sailors had not been returned. the metropolitan police says it‘s considering deploying armed officers to tackle gang violence across parts of london. commissioner cressida dick said the move was a temporary measure, and would only be used in extreme circumstances. 127 people have been murdered in the capital so far this year, that includes 72 fatal stabbings and 14 shootings. more than 5,000 trees are to be planted to revitalise the site of a huge moorland fire that burned for 41 days. the blaze at winter hill in lancashire broke out during the summer heatwave injune, and ripped through seven square miles of land.
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local residents and community groups will be invited to plant the new trees. 54 years afterjulie andrews flew into cinemas as mary poppins, the magical nanny has made her comeback. the world premiere of mary poppins returns took place in hollywood last night. it doesn‘t seem that old, does it? it doesn't seem that old, does it?” think it kind of does. emily blunt takes over the main role, and one of the stars of the original 1964 movie, dick van dyke, makes an appearance at the age of 92. the production has already been touted as an oscar contender. it‘s released in the uk on december the 21st. there will be a lot of excitement about that film. one thing that will
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be guaranteed, john, are you a fan? love it, classic. absolutely. i think i would decide that i would like people if they did or didn‘t like people if they did or didn‘t like mary poppins. i feel that strongly. one thing about dick van dyke, who locked in fantastic form still at 92, i don‘t think he‘ll be doing the accent again or he‘ll be getting more tuition. didn‘t we hear not so long ago that the accident, he only got a day‘s training. not so long ago that the accident, he only got a day's trainingm not so long ago that the accident, he only got a day's training. it was a little bit loose around the edges. that is quite good! 92, you know, they might need someone else! we talked a lot about the behaviour around sport —— talk. we‘re on that theme with the boxing. we are. we will hear from tyson fury in a moment ahead of his big heavyweight bout with deontay wilder this weekend. he‘s even suggesting you stop the traditional head to head at the weigh—in ahead of the big fight, because as it often done does,
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things get out of hand. —— often does. tyson fury and deontay wilder have been warned that they won‘t be paid if there‘s any repeat of this. they had to be separated at their press conference, and fury says he won‘t let wilder get anywhere near him at their weigh—in tonight. he‘s not going to be given the opportunity to get in me face again, because it shouldn‘t be like that. this is a sporting contest. many people around the world are watching this fight and it‘s a sport fight. this isn‘t a bare—knuckle street fight, it‘s a boxing contest at the highest level. so all that that sort of stuff shouldn‘t be allowed to happen, not on my behalf anyway. it was a night for the youngsters to shine in the europa league with arsenal and chelsea already through to the knockout stage. among the scorers in arsenal‘s 3—0 win at vorskla poltava was 19 year old joe willock, his first senior goal for the club. they finished top of their group. another name to look out for, 18—year—old callum hudson—odoi, who scored for chelsea as they beat paok salonika at stamford bridge. celtic have given themselves a chance of reaching the last 32.
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they were one nil winners at norwegian side rosenberg. scott sinclair with the only goal of the game. theyjust need a point from their final match against group leaders salzburg to go through. rangers need to beat rapid vienna in their last match after a goalless d raw at home to villareal. they held on after having daniel candeias sent off. while the likes of steven gerarrd swiftly made the move into management, it‘s taken sol campbell a lot longer. he‘s had to drop down the leagues in his firstjob, taking over at macclesfield town, who are bottom of league two, as black managers continue to get overlooked for the top jobs in football. he had a hugely successful career as a player with arsenal and england. i think for me, you know, it‘s all about opportunities. i‘m not going to go down that road and state the obvious. i think for me, i‘ve got that opportunity. i‘m going to take it
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with both hands. i‘m going to work my socks off and see how far i can go. he‘s got a realjob on his hands as they look to avoid relegation. one of the bright young stars of british cycling, ethan hayter, has been forced to withdraw from this weekend‘s world cup event in berlin. hayter, the european omnium champion, was hit by a car earlier this month and he said on social media that he suffered a concussion and was not quite recovered. quite worrying. the first we have heard about that. wish him a good recovery. he thinks he will be back for the next event in mid—december, so that‘s good news. for the next event in mid—december, so that's good news. thanks, john. you‘re watching breakfast, thanks for joining you‘re watching breakfast, thanks forjoining us. you‘re watching breakfast, thanks for joining us. parliamentary history was made yesterday. lloyd russell moyle was the first mp to use a speech in the house of commons to reveal he‘s hiv—positive. the labour mp spoke passionately about his diagnosis.
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let‘s take a look. when you are first diagnosed, you get that call from the clinic and they just say, you get that call from the clinic and theyjust say, you need to come in. they don‘t tell you the details. and you know immediately something is going to be wrong. so all the different worst—case scenarios flash through your mind, and, of course, being someone who was a sexually active young man, hiv was one of those things that flashes through there. so you kind of know going in there. so you kind of know going in there something is wrong and it might well be serious. but at the same time, you‘re working out all the ways that this is just some joke, this is some technical error, this is some, kind of, tiny thing that they‘re going to tell you that you‘ll be laughing about later on. you try and imagine the ways that you‘re going to get out of this. thenin you‘re going to get out of this. then in that nhs room with the cream carpets and the plastic seating that we all know, they tell you. and it hits you like a wall. and then
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you‘ve prepared yourself for it in your mind, but nothing quite prepares you for when they say those words. i remember looking up at that ceiling, those soft ceilings that you get, and wishing that one of those tiles would fall away and it sucks you up and you would wake up and it will all be a dream. nathanial hall has written a play about his experience of being diagnosed with hiv, and finally talking illness with his family. good morning. i know you were watching the speech there. it must go back to when you finally told yourfamily and go back to when you finally told your family and revealed your diagnosis. you did it through a letter? i did. i'm in greater manchester. i haven‘t watched that yet because we premiered the show last night, i‘m seeing that for the first time. that‘s reminded me of how much of a radical act it still is to say you‘ve got hiv, which is why it was important for me to make
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this1—man why it was important for me to make this 1—man show and stand—up. talking about what you did with your family, you didn‘t tell them obviously for a long time after your diagnosis, how long was it and why did you decide them to tell them in a letter? it was 14 years after i told my family. i told them after a mini break down. i looked in the mirrorandi mini break down. i looked in the mirror and i thought, mini break down. i looked in the mirrorand i thought, i mini break down. i looked in the mirror and i thought, i didn‘t recognise the person i was any more because the shame and anxiety that built up around keeping the secret for so long had become too much. i wrote a letter and posted it to my mum and dad and brothers and sisters. because you thought they we re sisters. because you thought they were going to be outraged? no, no. the reaction was a bit underwhelming to be quite honest! i got a few texts a nd to be quite honest! i got a few texts and they came round and we had a conversation and they said they still loved me and that was it really. it was the fear of doing it that was the problem. built up in your head? completely. it's going back a step with your family, you
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are only 17 when your diagnosis came. that is so young. such an extraordinary thing to try and deal with. how vivid is it in your memory when you first found out? it's really, really vivid. it was two weeks after my 17th birthday. i remember getting the bus to the clinic. i remember getting the news. ican clinic. i remember getting the news. i can remember almost blanking out... you told them face-to-face -- we re out... you told them face-to-face -- were told face—to—face?” out... you told them face-to-face -- were told face-to-face? i remember the healthcare worker recognising i was very the healthcare worker recognising i was very young. i stayed two hours after the clinic closing time and they looked after me, credit to them. you help that secret for such a long time. what‘s important now is how different... illustrated by an mp in the house of commons and treatment and the prospects for people —— held. certainly from my era, i remember the adverts from the 19805 when the assumption was you
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we re 19805 when the assumption was you were going to die and so much has changed. hiv healthcare has come on radically, even since i was diagnosed. i was given a prognosis of 37 years. now a person with hiv will live with full life expectancy. we‘ve come leaps and bounds but u nfortu nately we‘ve come leaps and bounds but unfortunately attitudes take a lot longer to catch up with those progressions. longer to catch up with those ro ressions. we're longer to catch up with those progressions. we're fortunate you've put on this plague. the timing was all falling into place in the sense that you‘ve got this play on looking at your experience, but also when you resisted almost having the test, didn‘t you? you resisted almost having the test, didn't you? i did. they asked me if i wanted it, there were other sexually transmitted infections at the time. a series of events got you there? i said i don't want the test, ididn‘t there? i said i don't want the test, i didn‘t think it could happen to someone like me. i didn‘t think it could happen to me at all. i had just come out as gay. i‘d had that conversation with my parents about safer sex and stuff. it was with a
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slightly older guy and it was all mixed in with me coming out and the shame linked to being gay and all that. when i was diagnosed, that was another layer. you were told to have the test? they called me back and they said, they recognise i was potentially at risk. one of the things people are saying now, nathaniel, a younger generation, younger than you, maybe there‘s a deal of complacency now because, in a way, the amazing advancesin because, in a way, the amazing advances in medicine. sure. what do you make of that? it's really hard, isn‘t it? it‘s not a walk in the park with hiv, that‘s something we try to get across in the plague. the depression and things that come along with the diagnosis can be really tough to deal with —— play. it's really tough to deal with —— play. it‘s a treatable illness now. it‘s also a preventable illness. you can ta ke also a preventable illness. you can take medication pre—emptively called prep, available on a trial on the nhs at the moment. you can protect yourself in that we. we walked a
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fine line about getting out these safe sex message but also... if anyone is in any doubt, the word is go and get tested. get tested definitely. we‘ve just had is go and get tested. get tested definitely. we‘vejust had national testing week and it‘s been the highs profile one i‘ve ever known. get tested and know your hiv status because they knew would pass it on to anyone else. nathaniel, thank you. nathaniel‘s plague, first time, is on at the waterside viet in sale in greater manchester today and tomorrow. here‘s sarah with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning to you. as the sun rises on the final day of autumn, the geologically speaking, it is a sareen started the day for some of us but it is still looking u nsettled. us but it is still looking unsettled. this is the sunrise in tobermory this morning, also some shower clouds around too. another day of sunny spells but also scattered showers, particularly in the north and west, wherever you are a breezy day to come up for my place
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—— most places not as bad as it was yesterday. this area of low pressure sitting to the north of the uk, the wind is rotating around it and piling on the showers from the west. this morning we have showers across western parts of scotland, northern ireland, western parts of england and wales. central and eastern england is staying dry, clear skies across east anglia and the south—east. a few showers dotted around for south—east england, wales into north—west england and across the pennines copy one or two showers for northern ireland, belfast largely dry, lots of showers piling in on that risk westerly wind across scotland. some of the showers falling as hail and snow across the mountains. clear skies in the east for the likes of aberdeenshire. a lot of dry weather with sunshine, still blustery wind and one or two of the showers making their way further east but the bulk of them will be across north—western parts of the uk and snow on the mountains. temperatures in the north eight or nine degrees. 11 or 12 for most
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places. most of the showers he is for a places. most of the showers he is fora time, places. most of the showers he is for a time, but the next batch of wet weather arrives from the south—west through the course of the night. a soggy night to come across much of england and wales, clear skies for scotland and northern ireland. it is here where we will see the lowest temperatures. colder in the countryside. we still have the cold air with us for saturday on the cold air with us for saturday on the north, but the yellow colours show mild air associated with this frontal system in the south. it will be mild in the south but also a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain to start off the day on saturday. bulk of the rain looking like it clears to the east, a few scattered showers on saturday. probably the best will be for scotland and northern ireland, 6— eight degrees but much more mild, 14 celsius across the south—east. more rain to come on saturday night into sunday, the u nsettled saturday night into sunday, the unsettled thing continues. the next frontal system works in from the west through the day on sunday. likely to start with rain in the
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east but it should ease, sunshine for southern england, northern scotla nd for southern england, northern scotland come in between still active showers. more showery rain on sunday pushing in from the west later today. i do think it will be a washout. sunshine and temperatures in the south around about 40 degrees, only about 7— nine celsius further north. remaining fairly mild but unsettling through the course of it is definitely the end of november. it is 7:48 a.m.. rail fa res november. it is 7:48 a.m.. rail fares going up. yes, they are going up fares going up. yes, they are going up by fares going up. yes, they are going up by 3.1% and that coming at a time where rail punctuality and efficiency on the railways is at its worst in five years. this is the number you need to know. that is how much your railfares number you need to know. that is how much your rail fares will go up from january two at years. —— next year. about £100 extra over the course of
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the year. at huge extra and something coming when satisfaction with the railways is the low. we can talk to robert nisbet, regional director at the rail delivery group. he is at london bridge station for us. clearly one of the big questions that many people will want to know from him is whether this will deliver the improvements that are being promised. a lot of concern about whether that efficiency, we have seen those issues with northern rail, the problem with those transport and time tales so different over the year. clearly a lot of problems for other franchises, including southern railway. we were talking about this this morning while we were waiting for the regional to turn up, we were talking about how they decide these rail fares. talking about how they decide these railfares. there talking about how they decide these rail fares. there was a big talking about how they decide these railfares. there was a big debate whether it should be based on which measure of inflation each be based upon the one that includes mortgages and house prices, or not. basically
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what they do, it is about half and half. some of these fees are regulated by the government, rail companies have no say over and that is based onjuly‘s inflation figure and all of the others the companies are free to decide what they want. we can speak to him now at london bridge now. good morning to you. you are at london bridge for us. we were explaining that for most people they will see on average there are prices going up by 3.1% at a time where we know that reliability and punctuality is at a five—year low, the worst in five years. how do the train companies justify this? clearly, nobody wants to pay extra for their fares copy we appreciate that, but the interesting thing is that, but the interesting thing is that the difference between regulated and unregulated come is to hold down the average below the rate of inflation. despite the fact that
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the rail industry is facing rising costs. but we appreciate that performance has not been good in some parts of the country over the past few months. we know that, we are looking at the reasons why. what we don't want to do is stop the investment that these fairs allow us to fund a. basically, we are looking after the day—to—day running of the railways and that frees up taxpayers money to really concentrate on the big infrastructure projects. station refers like this one in london bridge and liverpool lime street, in aberdeen, but also new carriages, 7000 new carriages by the 20 20s, but also putting extra services that our passengers are asking for, 6400 services by 2020' as well. these fa re services by 2020' as well. these fare increases are funding massive investment that we know passengers want, but all the time the industry is well aware that this is painful for customers is why we tried to hold it below the inflation rate for
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the second year running. with respect, we look at these stations being built around the country, there is absolutely no point having nice, fancy station is full of cafes, restaurants nice, fancy station is full of cafes, restau ra nts a nd nice, fancy station is full of cafes, restaurants and bars if the trains do not run. we know that punctuality is an issue and it is something that we are concentrating on as an industry to try to improve and changed. we have a long—term plan to do just that. we have and changed. we have a long—term plan to dojust that. we have been saying as an industry for many months now that the way it is bolted together is not working for passengers and we welcome the government's williams review that we will be feeding into to try to get it, to get the industry to work with the customer at it parts. investment is necessary because this is a syste m is necessary because this is a system that is extremely popular. there are now double the number of passenger journeys there are now double the number of passengerjourneys as there were from the mid— 90s and we are still operating with victorian infrastructure. we need to put the money where it counts in order to
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deliver those extra services for passengers that passengers have been telling us that they want to.” passengers that passengers have been telling us that they want to. i have been doing thisjob telling us that they want to. i have been doing this job for about ten yea rs, been doing this job for about ten yea rs , we been doing this job for about ten years, we took that this every year, i have spoken to you and your predecessors and every single year you tell me the same in that people have got to put up with this because they‘re as being underinvestment for so long, money needs to be spent to make it at, bear with us because it just does not get better, does it? well, we are putting extra services, as we did in the may timetable, hundreds of services but the problem we had was that perhaps we were too ambitious. we tried to put too much on the railways. what you are seeing isa on the railways. what you are seeing is a record level of investment, the investment going into the railways since the victorian era and people are starting to see and touch it, notjust on stations are starting to see and touch it, not just on stations like this, but new rolling stock around the country. but we know that made went badly wrong for many passengers, not
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all of them, but many, and they have received compensation not just all of them, but many, and they have received compensation notjust from the daily delays that they had to cope with, but also those regular travellers, the equivalent of a months free to travel back to them asa months free to travel back to them as a way of apologising. what we will not say sorry for are our plans to invest as much as we can in this railway network and give the passengers what they have been calling for, which are more services, more reliable services, we appreciate that we are not there yet, we know that, we are listening to passengers, many of us working in the industry are rail passengers as well and we know when it is not working well, we are doing our best to try and get it back on track and we will be injecting as many new services as we can. let's look at specific examples of. punctuality figures, northern rail, this is it pouring all of the chaos in may. northern rail, 25.7% of trains were either late or cancelled in october, that got even worse in november,
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there worst in two years. the other north of england company, pennines express , north of england company, pennines express, punctuality issues with 30.6% of its services delayed or cancelled, back got even worse in july, a time where you would expect a railway to run pretty smoothly, 32% of trains late. the point is that customers have no choice. if that customers have no choice. if that train does not run, they do not get to work and they don‘t get to where they want to go. there are no alternatives. i don't want to get into statistics ping—pong, but if you look at the national figure, eight out of ten trains are arriving according to the timetable. there are bits of issues that we know that we are looking at and we are concentrating investment on those try to make that effort, but we know that there are systemic issues within the rail industry that have to be addressed to make this work for passengers. that doesn't mean that we should rest pause while we are looking at how we configure the network. we need to put investment where it is and trans— pennine, you
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mentioned there would be new stock coming on. next year would you will see plenty of new carriages on the railway network. this is the rail regulator talking about the amount of investment as guard island railway network the trainer make this was in is possible to passengers. what do they want? a reliable train, comfortable for the best possible value. to that end as well as an industry we are looking at the fare structure to though were better passengers. the go to a government try either happened. we know there are issues here. we are working hard to fix as many of them as we can. thank you. rail fares railfares going up, as listed by three x 1% and that comes into force
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from january two. as yukio, clearly a lot of work to time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m victoria hollings. there‘s been a big rise in the rent paid by traders who operate from railway arches across the capital. some say they‘re "crippling" as network rail sells off some of its land. an investigation by the bbc has found a 25% jump in the average rent last year. the sale of units to private investment firms is part of a deal worth around £1.4 billion. the rail company says the money will be reinvested in upgrades and insists the increases are driven by regeneration and rising property values. an investigation has been launched after a woman was attacked and robbed while using a cash machine from in east london. distressing images show the victim being slapped and and punched as she withdrew
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money from a cash machine on leytonstone road on wednesday afternoon. police are appealing for information about the attack. it‘s feared increasing numbers of young people will be homeless in the run up to christmas. the growing issue and is urging councils to intervene sooner. homeless in the run up to christmas. charity centre point estimates around one thousand six hundred people aged 16—25 could be so called sofa surfing or on the streets. it‘s dubbed november 30th ‘bleak friday‘ to highlight the growing issue and is urging councils to intervene sooner. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tubes this morning, with just minor delays on the district line. on the roads, very slow on the m25 anti—clockwise from junction 17 maple cross as far as junction 16 m40, where there has been a collision involving two lorries. westminster bridge remains closed northbound between a3036 lambeth palace road and a3211 victoria embankment for security installations. in borough, a2 great dover street remains closed in both directions between a2198 long lane and a100 tower bridge road due to water main repairs. now the weather with
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elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. today will probably be the nicest day of the week, weatherwise. certainly a lot more pleasant today than it was this time yesterday morning. the winds are still fairly brisk coming in from the south—west, but it is not as blustery as it was yesterday. we should stay mostly dry, a few showers out towards the west and long spells of sunshine. a touch cooler than has been in recent days, starting off the morning between 7 and 9 degrees celsius. maybe one or two showers out towards western home counties at first, but i think most of us are dry for most of the day. lots of sunshine around and we see tempertaures rise to between 9—12 celsius by the end of the afternoon. overnight tonight we are still in that cooler air, it will feel quite chilly temperatures down to 4 degrees celsius underneath largely clear skies at first, but then we get outbreaks
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of rain into tomorrow morning and that wind is go to pick up. the rain will clear by saturday afternoon, dragging with it milder air. it should brighten up, highs of 13 degrees, mostly dry during the daylight hours on sunday. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... a big plan to tackle type 2 diabetes. liquid, low—calorie diets will be offered to thousands with the condition in a bid to reverse the disease. on track for more price rises. rail companies say fares will go up by another 3.1% from the start of next year — adding about £100 to the average cost.
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i‘ll have the details. in argentina for the g20 summit but still campaigning on brexit — theresa may urges her rebellious mps to think about the interests of their constituents. and we are looking at breaks set and the impact on the fishing industry in west cornwall. i‘m in penzance to find out what are voters here saying about brexit with less than two weeks to go to the crucial vote in parliament. he is not going to get the opportunity to be in my face again. it should not be like that. leave it for the ring. after ugly scenes at their press conference, tyson fury says it‘s time to stop the face offs. i will bring you all of the details in about 15 minutes. it‘s friday the 30th of november. our top story. thousands of patients will be prescribed a low—calorie, liquid—only diet, after trials showed it can help to
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reverse type 2 diabetes. more than three million people across the uk are living with type 2 diabetes. nhs england says alongside the diet, it will also expand an existing prevention programme. here‘s our health correspondent, dominic hughes. it‘s about cutting down. you know, small steps. at a community centre in leeds, the battle against diabetes is under way. reducing portion sizes and how frequent you have these naughty foods and all that. all the people here were on the cusp of developing type 2 diabetes. now they‘ve been helped to lose a bit of weight and think about what they‘re eating. everybody should be educated about how we eat, what we eat, why we eat and when we eat. i've lost so much weight. i feel better, i feel happier. an estimated 12.3 million people in the uk are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. a quarter of a million people in england have already been referred to the special
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prevention programme, like the one running in leeds. on average, they‘ve lost nearly 4kg, so now the scheme is being extended. weight loss is all well and good, and we‘re delighted with the weight—loss trajectories that we‘ve seen in participants on the programme. of course, what counts at the end of the day is whether we are preventing type 2 diabetes from arising. that takes a little longer. and there is help too for those who have already developed type 2 diabetes. a recent trial of a very low calorie diet using liquid meals has helped almost half of those involved to reverse the condition. i decided to do something, walk around the house... that project is also being rolled out more widely, reflecting the growing concerns about the impact diabetes is having on our health. dominic hughes, bbc news. we have news this morning, in the last hour or so on train fares. ben
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has all of the details. iam the has all of the details. i am the bearer of bad news again. it's i am the bearer of bad news again. it‘s that time of year where we find out how much rail fares are going it‘s that time of year where we find out how much railfares are going up by, 3.1% on average, all tickets are going up from the start of next year. going up from the start of next yea r. clearly it going up from the start of next year. clearly it will not go down well with communities or train users. we know that punctuality and reliability, just this week, new figures have suggested it is the worst in five years, just one third of all rail users said they are happy with the service offered to them. putting up bills for commuters by about £100 per year on average and it comes at a time when people are and it comes at a time when people a re pretty and it comes at a time when people are pretty unhappy with the service offered. it makes you wonder. we spoke to the director of the rail delivery group earlier. how did he justify the rise? it is a familiar tale. we‘ve been doing thisjob justify the rise? it is a familiar tale. we‘ve been doing this job for quite a while. every year we have
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this story and the same excuses, that we have to sit tight and the money is being spent on investment and clearly things will get better in future because we have inherited a network that is old and underinvested and now they are putting it right. they are pointing at wonderful new stations with bars and shops but i say that we probably need those, we spend a lot of time there because trains are not going anywhere. and we know the chaos with time tables this year and the chaos. i asked wyatt was still happening. we are putting on extra services but the problem we had in may was that perhaps we were too ambitious, we tried to put too much on the ra i lwa ys tried to put too much on the railways but what you are seeing is a record level of investment, the biggest investment going into the railway since the victorian area. it's a familiar tale, sit tight and keep paying the money and it will get better but all of our patients has
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run out when it comes to this. there are awful examples. a lot of people getting in touch about their journeys that take an hour in the car but take two hours on the train, the cost is astronomical. a lot of reliability figures, like northern rail is criticised particularly this year, 29.7% of their trains are late or cancelled. no good if you are trying to get to work. you cannot separate this from household budgets. we have a certainty that fa res budgets. we have a certainty that fares are going up and then you have all of these questions about whether food prices will go up. it‘s related to brexit and other issues but they are worried about that and salaries dotted to the fundamental robin is we do not have much choice. over how much food we buy and we need food to live. we are all being encouraged to ta ke live. we are all being encouraged to take public transport but when we are in the position where it costs us more every year, the service is not up to scratch and people have no
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alternative but to get the car. that‘s the problem. the service is not matching the price. a lot of people commenting as well. ben, thank you. theresa may has urged mps to think about their constituents, in her latest effort to get widespread parliamentary support for her brexit deal. on a plane bound for the g20 summit in argentina, mrs may once again refused to answer any questions from journalists about a "plan b", should her deal be rejected by mps next month. let‘s get more from our political correspondent, iain watson. she cannot escape these questions, can she? they all travel with her in the plane! she might have wanted a moment of calm but it doesn‘t work like that? no, no moment of calm! i don‘t know whether she wanted to put ona don‘t know whether she wanted to put on a parachute and be let out! that she took 20 minutes of questions from journalists on the plane but not a lot of new answers. what was interesting, apart from suggesting once again that there would be
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potential uncertainty if the deal is not backed, she also went on the attack and attacked labour, trying to betray them, it would appear, that they are risking no deal —— make trying to portray them. it is interesting, that is probably the tactic that she would adopt if the television debate goes ahead. they are in deadlock at the moment, she prefers the bbc format which would include audience participation and questions from the audience and a range of voices including those who wa nt to range of voices including those who want to leave and those who want to remain. itv want a straight head—to—head clash, which isjeremy corbyn‘s preference. we have not ove rco m e corbyn‘s preference. we have not overcome that but we do have a rehearsal of the lines that will be put out there if it goes out the weekend before the vote. she suggests that labour are getting away with a potential deal and in order to diffuse that there has been another move, the chair of the brexit committee, hilary benn, a
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labourmp, is brexit committee, hilary benn, a labour mp, is putting forward an amendment to the deal, saying if it goes down, and labour reject it, then parliament would refuse to have ano then parliament would refuse to have a no deal option, they would need to come up with something better. that has been backed by the labourfront bench, and the labour leadership as a way of blunting the theresa may attack. that labour formed a way of blunting the theresa may attack. that labourformed if a way of blunting the theresa may attack. that labour formed if we we re attack. that labour formed if we were to leave without no deal at all. iain watson, thank you. donald trump has cancelled a planned meeting with his russian counterpart vladimir putin. it follows an incident last weekend, where russian border guards fired on three ukrainian ships off the crimean peninsula, and seized their crews. the us president said he would not meet mr putin at the g20 summit because the ships and sailors had not been returned. the metropolitan police says it‘s considering deploying armed officers to tackle gang violence across parts of london. commissioner cressida dick said the move was a temporary measure, and would only be used in extreme circumstances. 127 people have been murdered in the capital so far this year — that includes 72 fatal stabbings and 14 shootings. the authorities on the channel
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island of sark say that a last minute agreement has been reached to stop a power blackout from coming into effect tonight. with one of the highest tariffs in the western world, sark electricity was ordered to lower its prices, but the company said this would result in losses and had threatened to pull the plug. the island‘s head of state has said an agreement was reached in the early hours of this morning. we will try and get some comment from our reporter on the island of sark in 20 minutes. school pupils from across australia have taken part in a day of strikes, to call for greater action on climate change. they want the government to stop all new coal and gas projects, as our sydney correspondent, hywel griffith reports. they may not have the vote but they definitely have a voice. with placards, posters and plenty of one—liners, pupils walked out of schools and mobilised — organising protests in 27 towns and cities across the country. in sydney, more than 1.000
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rallied, demanding an end to all new coal and gas projects in australia. in melbourne, there was called for the grown—ups to respond. our government needs to take more action on climate change so our generation and our kids‘ generations and their kids can have a future that is sustainable and healthy in a planet we have not destroyed. australia‘s greenhouse gas emissions are rising, due in part to increased coal production. it is not on track to meet the paris climate agreement targets. before he flew to the g20 summit in argentina, australian prime minister scott morrison warned his country‘s students to stay in school, saying he wanted more learning and less activism. his comments seem only to have swelled the numbers and their anger. it is amazing how time appears in
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the mind, you don‘t think it sounds like too long ago. 54 years afterjulie andrews flew into cinemas as mary poppins, the magical nanny has made her comeback. i watch it every year! the world premiere of mary poppins returns took place in hollywood last night. emily blunt takes over the main role, and one of the stars of the original 1964 movie, dick van dyke, makes an appearance at the age of 92. the production has already been touted as an oscar contender. it‘s released in the uk on december the 215t. there will be a lot of very excited people! i am one of them, definitely! it is 8:12am. john has
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the latest in the sport later and sarah keeps us up—to—date with the weekend weather in four or five minutes. there are calls for a major campaign to raise awareness of coercive control, following the case of lance hart who shot and killed his wife clare and daughter charlotte, after he‘d inflicted years of psychological abuse. lance hart also took his own life on that day injuly 2016. we can talk now to the family‘s surviving sons, luke and ryan. good morning to you both. let me ask both of you how you are. we are doing quite well, we've been busy raising awareness this week so we are quite tired but it's been productive. why'd you think, you have such a powerful story to tell, why do you think it is important to tell this now? three years ago, the laws on coercive control were introduced. that was the case with you and your family? that's right, we had only moved our brother and sister away from our father five
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days before he killed them both. we found out on the news app but we we re found out on the news app but we were working in different countries, were working in different countries, we found out what had happened. we we re we found out what had happened. we were confused, our father had never been violent were confused, our father had never been viole nt towards were confused, our father had never been violent towards us but it came out of nowhere. we had always thought domestic abuse was about violence but it is only since we we re violence but it is only since we were in the police station in spalding, we look behind us and six months before the coercive control legislation came out, we saw financial abuse, psychological abuse, emotional abuse, all the mechanisms of a father used to control the family but then we realised this did not come from nowhere, he controlled our entire lives and it developed until he killed our mother and sister and when you consider murtagh to be the ultimate act of control, suddenly what appeared to come from nowhere made sense —— mcmurdo. we are hoping to raise awareness. from the outside looking in, there were no signs, effectively, as to what was happening in the household. can you
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give people a sense as to what you we re give people a sense as to what you were witnessing but may be did not realise at the time? what is key is to understand that coercive control isn't so much what it's done to you but what happens to yourself. our father took away our freedoms, while he kept us financially poor he gambled money. and he would use excuses as to where we could not see friends or take part in sports. we restricted our own social lives because we felt we could not take pa rt because we felt we could not take part in friendships in society and over the decades of that slow abuse, we end up controlling ourselves and limiting our lives. the reason why we've done this away from the family home was not because we were scared that our father was going to kill them that we were scared that they could not live. we took them away five days before he killed them but we found out that he was planning on killing all of us months before he
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planned to move out, because he could see the control was disappearing and we could survive financially away from him. anyone watching he may be in this situation you did not know you were ina situation you did not know you were in a coercive, abusive relationship, little things happen. there was an insta nt little things happen. there was an instant i read about a form of routine, your daily tea at 4:15pm instead of 4:30 p:m.. our father almost created a whole system of laws we had to abide by. they were designed so we could never meet them, so he had an excuse to yell at us. the bus got in at 4:30pm and our father always cooked dinner for 4:15 p:m., so he either burned it or put ona p:m., so he either burned it or put on a plate, ate his, ours was cold and he would yell at us. it was
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those small things where you begin to believe you are the problem because you are always doing something wrong, you are always to blame, it is your fault. that is what the abuser tells you. you are high achievers at school. the point is, perhaps teachers, it was not something to look at and you are not going to be considered as problem children. that is a key issue we wa nt children. that is a key issue we want to raise. the stereotype of an abuser is not necessarily someone who is violent and creates physical scars and bruises but as people we will not be snapping at people, we we re overly will not be snapping at people, we were overly compliant and quiet and highly successful, not out of determination but because we were afraid of failure and that comes from our home environment. failure was not an option. in our school life there were kids who got their heads down and worked hard because
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we had no other option. —— we were kids. not all victims are going to be aggressive. it might be they are responding to physical attacks that our environment was cultivated over decades, three slowly accustomed and adapted to be able to survive. we became overly compliant and fearful. that made us favour home and did not show itself in school in stereotypical ways. you have both been very brave and honest. the way you tell the story will be impacting. i assume a lot of people have responded, have they? as you say right at the beginning, you would not know from the outside. if this is happening in a household as it was in yours, you may well not know that these people could be living next door or be members of
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your own family. there were friends of ourfamily your own family. there were friends of our family who did not know. when we talk about domestic abuse we talked violence. violence is what abusers use to get control, it is a subset of control. i think that is a message we would like to convey. in the media, sometimes the media is pa rt of the media, sometimes the media is part of society, they assume abusers are violent people, violent out of angerand are violent people, violent out of anger and emotion. our father was cold—blooded, anger and emotion. our father was cold— blooded, it was anger and emotion. our father was cold—blooded, it was based on beliefs and control. if someone is in that circumstance, there will be people listening to this saying, i hear some of the things you are saying corresponds with allies. they might think about what shall i do? —— with our lives. our dad or someone in our family —— with our lives. our dad or someone in ourfamily is stopping us from doing things in our lives. it might not sound like much but it is
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an enormous thing. they might be wary. what is the problem? we would encourage anyone with any concerns to call the national domestic violence helpline and express what you have seen. by saying it is not that bad, that is what we said our entire lives. we kept thinking our lives should be worse —— could be worse. we all deserve to live freely and happily. if you are seeing some of the elements we talk about, talk to the experts and raise concerns and do not just to the experts and raise concerns and do notjust live and give in to that life you may have ended up in. one thing in our case, when women leave that is when they are most likely to be killed by partners. we did not realise that if you think you are being abused do not leave. that can trigger a loss of control. that can trigger a loss of control. that can trigger a loss of control. that can make you in danger. there
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was a great fear for anyone watching hugh wants to make their situation known of the consequences but also life after. —— who wants to make. how long does it take for you to get to this very composed and compassionate place? when we lost mum and charlotte we lost our purpose in life. not until we started speaking out a year and a half after the murders that we started to find new meaning. we started to find new meaning. we started to find new meaning. we started to make something good out of what happened. we did not want our father to win essentially. had we lived a life of regret and sadness he would have won in destroying our lives as well. what we tried to do was live a life that was meaningful that mum and charlotte would have been proud of and part of that is to speak out about what we suffered to raise awareness. we wrote our own book to share our story more widely. we hope to go into schools maybe one day and
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talk to anyone who would listen to us so we can do what we can do hopefully make sure our story is not repeated again. i am sure i speak on behalf of a lot of people who are amazed by your composure. it is remarkable how you tell your story and it will impact on a lot of people. at i think you have helped people. at i think you have helped people today. you must have done. and if you‘ve been affected by any of these issues, please visit the bbc‘s action line website, bbc.co.uk/action line. information is available there. here‘s sarah with a look at this morning‘s weather. it is the final day of autumn today and the weather continues to be autumnal and unsettled. this picture was taken by one of our weather watchers in tobermory. that will be the story today, another windy day with blue skies and spells of sunshine and especially in the east.
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plenty of showers in the north and west. the low pressure remains settled across the north of the country. wins are going around the area of low pressure. across western parts of the uk we have most of the showers. much of scotland, the north—west of england and northern ireland as well. in the east a lot of dry weather with blue skies being enjoyed through the day. wherever you are another windy day. not as windy further south as it was yesterday. plenty of bright and sunny weather for the midlands and east anglia. a few showers for the south west of england and wales. also showers packing in across the brisk breeze in the all in ireland and scotland. the showers will fall as hailand and scotland. the showers will fall as hail and snow over the higher ground. there could be an odd rumble of thunder, drier and brighter in the east of scotland. temperatures around eight or 9 degrees will stop
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the showers in the north will slowly ease away this evening and tonight. the next batch of wet weather arrives on saturday. saturday starts ona arrives on saturday. saturday starts on a cloudy and soggy note for the bulk of england and wales. for scotla nd bulk of england and wales. for scotland and northern ireland you have clearer skies to start the weekend and it would be a cold and frosty start. colder conditions holding on in the north. as the front holding on in the north. as the fro nt m oves holding on in the north. as the front moves in from the south—west it will bring milder air. as we head through the day on saturday we have all that cloud with outbreaks of rain across england and wales which will slowly clear in the east. and improving picture later in the day. scotla nd improving picture later in the day. scotland and ireland one or two showers with spells of sunshine. only around six to eight greece but in the south we are looking at a mild picture of 14 degrees will top three saturday night on into sunday as the next front moves into the atlantic, a period of dry weather for a time before rain comes in from
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the west. there will be some sunshine on sunday but still quite breezy in the south with more rain arriving from the west later in the day. temperatures on the mild side for the time of year, up to 14 degrees also but things will be u nsettled degrees also but things will be unsettled over the next few days. thank you very much. we are about to look at the white house decorations and we‘re having a big debate about when they should go up. matt is very strict about his source. no in his house until the 15t of december. i think the 15t of december is totally acceptable, isn‘t it? when do they come down? after the 12 days of christmas. it is bad luck if you keep the much longer than the 12 days of christmas. i have learned
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something about sarah. not only does she know all about the weather, she is superstitious as well. shall we see the white house? very modest. they have gone for the low— key modest. they have gone for the low—key approach this year. really toned down. just the 1000 trees or whatever, i have made that up. she chose 40 bright red christmas trees, which were unveiled earlier this week. the first lady said, we are in the 215t century and everybody has a different taste. that won‘t just finished off the whole thing. that is what i think. a lot of you have been commenting around the whole rules around christmas. peter kane delivered some christmas lights to a house a few months ago, thought nothing of it. he got to the front door and there was a wreath on the door and there was a wreath on the door on the whole house had been
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decorated for ages. paul dixon has beenin decorated for ages. paul dixon has been in touch. christmas eve at the earliest, he says. john has got in touch and said, roll on boxing day. should also say, i wanted to mention this one, can we have st andrew‘s day before we discuss christmas? hgppy day before we discuss christmas? happy st andrew‘s day. the. yes, happy st andrew‘s day and do enjoy your celebrations. let‘s celebrate christmas tomorrow. good morning. yesterday we had strong winds and heavy rain across many parts of the uk. they have caused issues here and there. some power cuts but today should be quieter. we have a mix of sunny spells and blustery showers. most of those will be across northern and
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western parts of the uk. all linked into this area of low pressure, coming in from the north—west and west. you can see the isobars are closer across the north west, the strongest went here today. gusts of 50-60 strongest went here today. gusts of 50—60 miles an hour in northern and western areas of scotland. they continue to feed in through the afternoon. snow on high ground. in north—west england, some in the south—west of england and further east, largely dry and bright with sunshine. maximum temperatures of 8-13d. we sunshine. maximum temperatures of 8—13d. we continue with showers in northern ireland and further rain to spread in gradually through the early hours of saturday morning. it could be chilly in northern areas, temperatures of two or three degrees, six or seven in the south. rain this weekend which will gradually move north and east. some showers in northern parts of england. during the afternoon,
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things quite down. sunny spells develop. temperatures of six or 7 degrees in the north, up to 14 in the south. on sunday, another weather system moving in from the south—west. sunday morning, starting similarto south—west. sunday morning, starting similar to saturday morning with outbreaks of rain but quickly, it moves northwards and eastwards. there will be dry weather, sunny spells develop as we go into the afternoon on sunday. more rain, showers moving into northern ireland. otherwise it‘s mostly dry on sunday afternoon. highs of 11 to 14 degrees. that‘s all from me, goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri and victoria fritz. global trade faces it‘s the worst crisis in 70 years, the head of the world trade organisation tells the bbc live from london, that‘s our top story on friday the 30th of november. roberto azevedo‘s warning comes
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as g20 leaders meet in argentina with the us china trade war right at the top of the agenda. also in the programme — leading british tech boss mike lynch is charged with fraud in the united states over the sale of his $10 billion company to hewlett—packa rd.
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