Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 30, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

11:00 am
you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's 11.00, and these are the main stories this morning. tackling type 2 diabetes — the nhs is to offer thousands a low—calorie, liquid diet in a bid to reverse the condition. i have lost so much weight. i feel better. i feel happier. rail fares increase for millions of commuters by an average of 3.1% from january. ukraine bans russian men from entering the country as tensions between the two sides esclates. world leaders gather at the 620 summit in argentina. president trump cancels a meeting with vladimir putin over russia's actions in ukraine move back now. as a new video emerges of up to 100 teenagers surrounding and attacking police officers in county durham, officers in stanley call on parents to take responsbility for their children.
11:01 am
and has an agreement been made to stop the blackout on sark? we'll be live on the channel island to find out. good morning. it's friday 30 november. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm annita mcveigh. a liquid—only diet ofjust 800 calories a day will be prescribed to thousands of patients with type 2 diabetes. the nhs in england is piloting the treatment, after a trial helped more than half of those involved to reverse the condition. in the uk, more than three million people are living with type 2 diabetes, a condition that's strongly linked to diet and lifestyle. treating them costs the nhs £8.8 billion a year. and according to public health england, the number of diabetics will rise by one million by 2035.
11:02 am
here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. it's about cutting down. you know, small steps... at a community centre in leeds, the battle against diabetes is under way. reducing portion sizes and how frequent you have these naughty foods and all that... all the people here were on the cusp of developing type 2 diabetes. now they've been helped to lose a bit of weight and think about what they're eating. everybody should be educated about how we eat, what we eat, why we eat, and when we eat. i've lost so much weight. i feel better, i feel happier. an estimated 12.3 million people in the uk are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. a quarter of a million people in england have already been referred to the special prevention programme, like the one running in leeds. on average, they've lost nearly likg, so now the scheme is being extended. weight loss is well and good,
11:03 am
and we're delighted with the weight—loss trajectories that we've seen in participants on the programme. of course, what counts at the end of the day is whether we are preventing type 2 diabetes from arising. that takes a little longer. and there is help too for those who have already developed type 2 diabetes. a recent trial of a very low—calorie diet using liquid meals has helped almost half of those involved to reverse the condition. i decided to do something, walk around the house... that project is also being rolled out more widely, reflecting the growing concerns of the impact diabetes is having on our health. dominic hughes, bbc news. professor mike lean from glasgow university carried out the trial. he told me which patients would find the strategy most helpful. the first step is to bite the bullet and say, if you develop type 2 diabetes, we shouldn't waste any time, because we know that the cumulative time effect
11:04 am
of having the disease adds to the problems at the long run. so the sooner we can offer this, the better, and there may be other signposts. i think this pilot scheme is going to do various things, one of which will be to decide when is the best time to offer a chance of remission. is it on day one when you're first found to be diabetic, or should we wait until somebody thinks about adding a drug, and then going to wait, why would you wait? so it is a matter of arranging resources in such welcome to programme, thank you for talking to us this morning. you were diagnosed with type two diabetes backin diagnosed with type two diabetes back in 2010, juliet could be controlled by diet and exercise, but initially he did not do that, did you? know, i felt initially he did not do that, did you? know, ifelt 0k initially he did not do that, did you? know, i felt 0k myself, initially he did not do that, did you? know, ifelt 0k myself, and i felt reasonably comfortable with my weight, and it just
11:05 am
felt reasonably comfortable with my weight, and itjust did not really seem a weight, and itjust did not really seem a matter of urgency to me to do anything about it. i was happy with my lifestyle. and were you being given medication at this stage? yes, initially they said to try and control it through diet, but that didn't... i didn't really grasped theissue didn't... i didn't really grasped the issue at that time. so that started on a relatively low dose of metaphorical, carried on with that for a few years. and then increased ata for a few years. and then increased at a little bit. and then the last year, the increased it again. so after that, i knew that the next step would be great to a change of medication are going onto insulin or something like that. and i think that started to ring alarm bells for me at that point. we can show our viewers a before and after image of you on the right of the screen, our viewers can see before you lost the weight. how much did you lose a
11:06 am
total? i have lost just weight. how much did you lose a total? i have lostjust over weight. how much did you lose a total? i have lost just over three stone since february this year. and what made you make the change, if for all those years you were perhaps a little complacent, perhaps it is fairto a little complacent, perhaps it is fair to say. yes. what drove you to make the change? clicky thing was from the last year, a very close friend of mine the same age as me got cancer, nothing to do with diabetes, but she got cancer and she died. and it'sjust really, you know, made me feel that life was short, i shouldn't be locking myself into an early grave. i didn't want to be ill in my old age, if i could avoid it, and i would like to do something about the way i felt. sol started thinking about that, and then injanuary started thinking about that, and then in january this year, ijoined an online fitness and lifestyle programme, and that is what has run helped me take the weight off. i'm
11:07 am
sure you have been watching and listening with interest to news about the trial today. as we said, you are not a part of that trial, this was through your own efforts that you have lost the weight and brought your type two diabetes entered remission. but looking at the details of that trial, the liquid milkshake throughout the day, 800 calories a day, how does that compare to what you were doing when you were dieting? to be honest, i haven't been dieting as such. what i haven't been dieting as such. what i have been doing as i have been trying to follow a balanced macro, so trying to follow a balanced macro, so for those who don't know what that is, that is the balance of protein, fat and carbohydrate in your diet. basically, iwasjust eating too much, too big portions, and too much in the way of carbohydrates, things like potatoes, rice, pasta, and not enough protein. so what i tried to do is cut down my
11:08 am
portion size, and just taking a lot of the carbohydrates out of my diet. that is something that is very sustainable, isn't it? i hope so, thatis sustainable, isn't it? i hope so, that is the intention, i want to sustain this, i do not want to start putting the weight back on. and it is also i have been following a fitness programme as well, which is ha rd fitness programme as well, which is hard work and would not be suitable for everybody, but i have managed to do it, and i have carried on doing it. and i'm working out for a mac times a week, probably —— four times. maybe do some running as well, which is quite a lot of effort. it wouldn't sit liberty. that must take a lot of willpower, but congratulations on what you have achieved, 2a talking to us. gavin robinson. thank you very much indeed. -- karen.
11:09 am
rail passengers can expect an increase in train fares of more than 3% on average next year. the rise, announced by industry body the rail delivery group, comes after a year of timetable chaos, strikes, and delays on some parts of the network. labour have criticised the fare rise. the labour shadow transport secretary, andy mcdonald, told me prices should freeze, and train companies should cover the cost. this is a real slap in the face to long—suffering rail passengers, who have had a year of misery, and this is exactly the wrong response from the government. what we should be seeing is a freeze on those fares, in those areas where people have had to put up with absolute chaos and mayhem, and that should be funded by the train operators themselves. but to put a 3.1% increase across the board is a real insult, and that means that, since 2010, people have suffered rail increases three times faster than the rate of their wages have increased. so this is grossly unfair, and a lot of people will be feeling very aggrieved thinking about the months of suffering that
11:10 am
they have had, and they go into the new year facing yet another price hike. our business correspondent theo leggett has been guaging reaction from rail passengers at london bridge station. it is fair to say that they are not happy. 0ne chap i spoke to was actually filling in his claim for a delay that he had experienced this morning, and he said to me, "why if "we are experiencing all these delays are "the prices still going up?" and of course, price increases on the railways are something of an unpopular winter tradition in this country. this year, it is not as bad as it could be. on average, ticket prices are going up by 3.1%. that is a little bit below the retail price index rate of inflation on which these kind of things are measured. but nevertheless, it is an increase, it is going to put say £100 on the cost of some of our more expensive season tickets, and so on. so how does the industry justify all this?
11:11 am
well, to explain a little bit about that, i am joined by robert nisbet of the rail delivery group. now, robert, what is your message to commuters? why'd you have to increase prices now? nobody wants to pay extra for their fares, we understand that, but let me just try and explain why the prices are going up. the rail industry, like other industries, has to cope with rising prices as it goes about its business. you know, staff wages are growing up, fuel prices are going up. but what we have done as we have looked at what the government has set with its regulated fares at 3.2%, and we tried to shield passengers as much as possible from the greater extent of inflationary pressure, by pegging our increases a little below that. so that the average now, as you say, is below the rpi rate of inflation. but we know it has been a tough few months, we acknowledge that. the may timetable change led to pockets of real difficulty for passengers, you know,
11:12 am
in parts of the country, and we have apologised for that. but what we are saying today is those fare increases help fund the day—to—day running of the railway, allowing for the billions of pounds of extra investment to be targeted where it's really needed, in stations like this at london bridge, liverpool lime street, aberdeen, for example, but also new rolling stock, which passengers have been asking us for. but what people have been saying to me this morning is, this year has been the worst of many years. we get delays, we get strikes on a regular basis. this year, because of the timetabling fiasco and everything else, it has been so much worse. wasn't there a case on this occasion for fares to be frozen? well, if fares were frozen, how would we cope with that extra investment? you know, ok, maybe for one year, if the fares were frozen, with its still be able to carry out the investment programme, but after that, then it has to be the taxpayer that would fund that extra investment, if passengers wanted the service improved. and we have got a long—term
11:13 am
commitment, a plan together as an industry, to increase the number of services and the carriages. 7000 new carriages by the 2020s. we want to carry on putting that money where it is going to be appreciated most. robert, thank you very much. these fare rises will come into force on the 2nd of january, so i guess in another month or so, we will be talking about this a lot more. ukraine is banning russian men from entering the country. president petro poroshenko said he wanted to prevent the formation of "private armies", and a repeat of what happened in 2014 when russia seized crimea and supported a rebel uprising in eastern ukraine. 0ur correspondentjonah fisher sent us this update from kiev. president poroshenko referred back to what had happened in 2014 when the so—called little green men were involved in the seizure of crimea.
11:14 am
and then russia backed rebel groups in eastern ukraine. so what he is saying in this move which will affect russian men aged between 16 and 60, he wants to enter ukraine, he is saying that that mood is being taken to stop the formation of private armies, effectively to stop a repeat of what happened 4.5 years ago, when russia effectively managed to start this war in eastern ukraine by arming and equipping rebel groups, and to take crimea effectively by sending in its own soldiers without uniforms and effectively ta ke soldiers without uniforms and effectively take over crimea. does it amount to a ban on men aged between 16 and 60? because i read something out there saying that russian men can still enter if it was for humanitarian reasons. we only heard about this about an hour ago, and it came as something of a surprise. the details. have to be
11:15 am
worked out and be made clear, but certainly in the statement that has come from the president's offers, not a mention of those human terry and business. there has been a comment about bouts of someone has to come across the border for a funeral, perhaps that might be allowed. it might affect people particularly in the eastern parts of ukraine, where a lot of people live on one side of the border and nick ross regularly, people who have families on one side of the border. with christmas coming up, this might be when families are thinking about coming together. that will no longer be possible inside ukraine if people wa nt to be possible inside ukraine if people want to cross from russia into ukraine. that situation in ukraine is having an impact at the g20 summit. the g20 summit will get under way later, with tension over trade complicating relationships among many world leaders. they are expected to discuss the trade war between the united states and china. president trump has cancelled his planned meeting with
11:16 am
vladimir putin at the summit, citing the current situation between moscow and ukraine, including the seizure of three ukrainian navy vessels and see men “— of three ukrainian navy vessels and see men —— seamen. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale has the latest from buenos aires. throughout the day and night, they arrived. more than 20 world leaders gathering supposedly to agree new plans to improve global trade and protect the environment, but this summit is likely to be defined as much by what divides these leaders as unites them. donald trump has launched a trade war on china. he'll meet president xi for the first time since new tariffs were imposed, but few expect a break—through here. president putin is likely to face tough questions of russia's seizure of three ukrainian vessels in the black sea. president trump said he wouldn't meet the russian leader until the confrontation was resolved. mohammed bin salman, the saudi crown prince, is also in town. he'll be looking to repair his reputation after the murder of the saudi journalist, jamal khashoggi. the french president said the world was still looking for answers. theresa may is here to bang the drum
11:17 am
for her brexit deal, to win what international support she can while trying to reassure her counterparts that britain will still be open for trade come what may. this is the first g20 summit in south america, and many argentines are keen to shine an international spotlight on their own economic troubles, protesting loud and clear about the own government's performance. almost ten years ago, world leaders came together to revive the g20 so they could tackle the global financial crisis in one united body. well, here, a decade on, such unity may be hard to find. james landale, bbc news, in buenos aires. the headlines on bbc news — the nhs is to offer thousands an ultra low—calorie, liquid diet in a bid to reverse type 2 diabetes. rail fares will rise
11:18 am
by an average of 3.1% in january, the biggest increase for five years. ukraine advanced russian men from entering the country as tensions between the two saves escalate. —— ukraine bans. arsenal won cellular political with victory last night. —— their usual pub league crook. it was a chance for a very young players to shame. and tyson fury and dealt a welder have been warned that any repeat of this could mean they will lose their purse. more on those stories that 11.30. police in county durham
11:19 am
are calling for parents to take responsibility for their "out of control" teenagers — after officers were surrounded and attacked by a group of up to 100 children. it happened in stanley earlier this month, but the force has just released body cam footage of the incident. (tx sor) 0ver over the last few weeks, we have faced outbreaks of out—of—control children in the town centre. a hard—core group of around 20 people who threw bricks, fireworks, and attacked my officers. 0ne pcso was punched in the face by a young person. disorder of this kind is unacceptable. violence against our officers will not be tolerated. action will be taken against all individuals involved in the incident that night. whilst there is a hard—core group of individuals involved in this incident, there are many people stood on the sidelines. young people who are going to affect their life chances by continuing to
11:20 am
engage in this type of behaviour. and in a social media message filmed by durham police themselves, local sergeant emma kay had this to say. parents were asked to come and review the footage from the officers' body, must the incident that night. they are likely to do behaviour of their was appalling. whilst there is a hard—core group of individuals involved in this incident, there are many people stood on the sidelines. young people who are going to affect their life chances by continuing to engage in this type of behaviour. we are asking parents to take responsibility for their children. do you know where they are, either good to bring children to your door? is up to you to give your children safe, out of harm ‘s way, and out of trouble. a former detective in the area has
11:21 am
blended cuts to policing numbers for the violence. —— blamed. blended cuts to policing numbers for the violence. -- blamed. parents need to appreciate that when their children with the home, this is what they are getting up to. it is not acceptable, and i would think that the vast majority of the parents of those young people involved will agree with the police and will help them and support them. i think what has happened over the last number of years is that police numbers have been cut and cut, there are a few office rs been cut and cut, there are a few officers in the community, regardless of whatever spin the police officers want to pure not, thatis police officers want to pure not, that is the fact. —— fewer officers. when i served there, there would be up when i served there, there would be up to 30 officers in the stanley area, andl up to 30 officers in the stanley area, and i appreciate times have changed, but if you were to do a survey of how many officers are working and covering the stanley
11:22 am
side, over a 24—hour period, but suggest that it would be very minimal. so firmly, there has been a breakdown with the community and the police. —— for me, there has been a breakdown. a dispute over the cost of power on one of the channel islands is threatening to leave the community cut off. sark has a population of about 500 people, and one of the highest electricity tariffs in the western world. when an independent commissioner stepped in and ordered the local electricity company to drop its prices, the firm reacted by threatening to pull the supply, plunging the community into darkness. 0ur reporterjohn fernandez is on sark — tell me more about the agreement reached last night. have they come to some sort of resolution? we have not been able to contact the two parties since we
11:23 am
heard about the late—night agreement that has allegedly been made, according to the senior of sark. it isa according to the senior of sark. it is a small island, so i am on my way to now to find out what is going on. there is a funeral on sark today, the funeral of the most senior politician on sark. so i think if there is good to be an announcement tonight, it could come quite late, which may make people a little nervous. obviously the profits of the sark electricity company would be affected clearly by this lower tariff. but do people on the island expect the rules to be slightly different, given that they are in is not a unique position, a pretty unusual one? yes, i think a lot of people understand the economies of scale and sark, the fact that the infrastructure is very expensive and
11:24 am
the factors, the cost of electricity is always good to be high. you're not going to be paying 14p per kilowatt hour here. but what people believe is went up to 66p per kilowatt hour earlier this year, that was just too much. so there is a sense of understanding from sark residents that the price of electricity board inevitably be high, it has been moved to 52p per kilowatt hour, which has led to this impasse we are out now. perhaps it is not an impasse, we have found a solution, but we just don't know about it yet. the fear was that the power would be shut off tonight. how worried are people that that could still happen, what sort of contingency planning have been able to make? as always and sark, there are two camps. some people are absolutely terrified, they have candles last night and were stocking
11:25 am
up candles last night and were stocking up on bottled water so that they could flush the toilet. there is a quirk with sark that electricity is needed to pump water, so if the largest eagles, so do the running water, it could be a public health issue. the other side is people who did not believe that the interesting would be switched off, some people treating it with a sense of... cannot find a safer than sick, but with a bit more great, i was cycling to the island hole last night, someone was coming to the island hole last night, someone was coming to the darts league and they said, next week, we will just wear league and they said, next week, we willjust wear a head torch at the darts league. i pointed out that that might be a bit dangerous. but it shows you that some people are worried about it, and some people who think it is not good to happen or that it is not that much of a big deal. 0k, thank you, john. earlier, i talked to a resident of sark, paul armogie
11:26 am
who runs the stocks hotel on the island and asked him how people are worried about this electricitiy issue in sark? it has been a distressing couple of weeks, but we made a huge contingency, 500 people on the island, it is a close—knit community. we have been concerned about what is on the table, but delighted to whip up this morning to the news that it looks as if resolution has long last been found. let's hope that the power would go off tonight at midnight, but if it is to, and albert would, but if it is to, and albert would, but if it is to, and albert would, but if it is to, then we are safe in the knowledge that every provision has been made to be sure that we are being kept safe. electricity on sark does all sorts of things, we have no mains waterdrainage, does all sorts of things, we have no mains water drainage, and therefore our pumps and our sewage mains water drainage, and therefore our pumps and our sewage system are largely fuelled by which is a day. so it would have created a huge potential health risks to the island. so we are delighted that hopefully a resolution has been found moving forward. tell us more
11:27 am
about the contingencies you have been putting in place, especially with a business to run. we are very fortunate to have our own generator in the hotel, which we installed about nine years ago, just for this sort of eventuality. so they're very fortunate. and as soon as we understood what was happening on the island, we contacted the local emergency services committee, and offered our hotel for any elderly or vulnerable people, so up until yesterday we had been talking to them and we were due to have three people moving into the hotel today, people moving into the hotel today, people who rely on electricity 24 hours a day. so we were very much pa rt of hours a day. so we were very much part of that contingency in terms of providing provisions, both for accommodation and also for food and drink and heat and warmth. all the things that we all quite rightly ta ke things that we all quite rightly take for granted in the 215t—century. take for granted in the 21st-century. as a businessman, you're obviously appreciate the need to make a profit, and clearly the owner of sark electricity is concerned about the impact of the new alla rdyce to tariffs concerned about the impact of the new allardyce to tariffs on the
11:28 am
ability of the company to make profit. —— electricity tariffs. in a small island community, do you think different rules need to apply?|j have different rules need to apply?” have lived on sark for 40 years, we have lived on sark for 40 years, we have all was accepted that electricity on sark will be more expensive than it is in the uk or on guernsey jersey. it expensive than it is in the uk or on guernseyjersey. it is about being distributional expensive, and the price went up this summer to 66p per kilowatt hour. i think that is the most expensive watches the world. and yes of course, sark have to make a profit. the dispute has been, watch at that level of profit be? and it is widely felt on the island, and has been for quite a long time, that the profits at 66p are extortionate. paul, a sark residents talking to me earlier. a snow leopard was shot dead, after a keeper at dudley zoo left the enclosure door open and it escaped. the zoo says eight—year—old margaash was killed after getting
11:29 am
free last month when the zoo had closed and all visitors had left. an investigation found the door to his enclosure was left open through "keeper error". a disciplinary procedure has taken place into those involved and security is being reviewed. now it's time for a look at the weather forecast. yesterday we had pretty stormy conditions across the uk but today it is much more tranquil. this is in greater london, blue skies. it is around north and west in areas where there is a bit more cloud around and we have got some showers feeding in, mainly across western parts of wales, south—west england, northern ireland and scotland. those showers have got a bit of snow over the higher ground. elsewhere it should
11:30 am
stay mostly dry. tonight there will bea stay mostly dry. tonight there will be a few clear spells here and there but more rain spreads into the south—west for the start of the weekend. temperatures staying above freezing. perhaps just getting to freezing. perhaps just getting to freezing in some rural areas of scotland. it is quite difficult to summarise the whole of the uk weather over the weekend but there will be rain in the forecast on saturday and sunday mornings. sunny spells during the afternoons. hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: the nhs is to offer thousands an ultra low—calorie liquid diet in a bid to reverse type 2 diabetes. rail fares increase for millions of commuters by an average of 3.1% from january. ukraine's president bans russian men from entering the country as tensions between the two sides esclates. world leaders arrives in buneos aries for the g20 summit.
11:31 am
president trump cancels a meeting with vladimir putin over rising tensions with ukraine. police in county durham call on parents to take responsibility for their children after a video is released of officers being attacked by up to 100 teenagers in stanley. the sport now. good morning. manchester united forward alexis sanchez is facing a long time out with a hamstring injury according to jose long time out with a hamstring injury according tojose mourinho. he suffered the injury in training yesterday and will have a scan to determine the extent of the damage but he was screaming in pain. it is not a little muscular injury for which will be ready in a week or ten days. he has scored just four goals for manchester united since joining in january.
11:32 am
his old club are coping just fine without him. arsenal and chelsea already through to the knockout stage of the europa league. among the scorers for arsenal was a 19—year—old, his first senior goal for the club. another name to look out for, alan hudson, who scored for chelsea as they won at stamford bridge. they also won at their group. celtic scored the only goal of the game through scott sinclair and they need just one point to top the group and go through. rangers have to beat rapid vienna in their last match after a goalless draw at home against villarreal. they held on after having a player sent off. steven gerrard said he had
11:33 am
run out of words to praise his goalkeeper who he says cap ranges in the game. british rower anna thornton is seriously ill in hospital after an accident in the united states. she was left in a coma after falling down some stairs in seattle, where she is studying. she is in a stable but serious condition. she achieved a double sculls championship back in july. after their pre—fight press conference descended into chaos, tyson fury suggested the traditional face—off should be stopped. both he and deontay wilder have been told they could lose their fight purse if trouble like this spills over later when they go head to head at the traditional stand—off before tomorrow's fight in los angeles. he is not going to be given the opportunity to get in my face again because it shouldn't be like that.
11:34 am
this is a sporting contest. many people around the world are watching this fight and it is a sporting fight. this is not a binnacle street fight, this is a boxing contest at the highest level so that kind of thing should not be allowed to happen. it will be a defining moment for both in the pre—fight, which pits the unorthodox and effective style of tyson fury against the raw punching power of deontay wilder. i want england to know he is cleared and he should be. they are scared of me for a reason. because of my mindset, because of what i possess. every time i speak it, you see what happens. i want them to be because when i step in the ring, it is no more deontay wilder, it is the bronze bomber. that is all the sport for now. let's return to brexit now, and that all important vote
11:35 am
on the deal in the commons on the 11th december. theresa may has been trying to gather support for the withdrawal agreement she has negotiated with the eu. but are enough mps going to back it? christian fraser has been taking a look. theresa may, who's arrived in argentina for the g20 summit, has urged mps to think about the views of their constituents when they vote on her brexit deal next month. mrs may said that her tour of the uk this week had given her an "overwhelming sense" that people wanted parliament to back the agreement. there will be five days of debate ahead of the world, no end of warnings about the risk no deal might bring, and you just can't tell how many will deduct the decision altogether and ab stain? but eve ryo ne altogether and ab stain? but everyone seems to be getting a commons majority is going to be a almighty struggle. so let's remind you of the numbers we do know about in the house of commons. the conservative party has 315 mps. not
11:36 am
enough to command the majority. but in this parliament it has remarked —— relied on the agreement with the dup, whose ten mps support the prime minister in key votes. 0ver dup, whose ten mps support the prime minister in key votes. over here, on the opposition benches, labour has 257 mp5. the the opposition benches, labour has 257 mps. the scottish national party has 35, the liberal democrats have 12, there are eight independence, four plaid cymru mps and the green party has won. that is a grand total of 317 mps, but as we know, brexit has divided the two main parties. some mps will do what their whips tell them. so let's look at who doesn't like the deal. first, there is the dup, all ten of them. they say they can't vote for a deal that includes the irish backstop, so let's put them in the no column for now. then there are the 80 brexit supporting conservatives who are on the record as opposing the deal, and
11:37 am
also be tory remainders, who say they will rebel. so the total number of conservatives against this deal now stands, by our estimates, at 92. next comes labour and all the other opposition parties and altogether that could mean 306 —— 312 votes against the prime minister. who is going to vote for the deal? the best estimate from bbc research is 225 conservatives will fall in behind her and one lib dem, which means on these calculations, the prime minister would be short by 95 votes. again, we don't know how many of this group might ab stain, lowering this group might ab stain, lowering this overall total. and we don't know how many labour mps might back the deal who have not yet made a decision, but if it is important to note by
11:38 am
what margin, because if it is big, the prime minister and her government may fall with it. there are some in number ten who are confident but right now this looks even harder than it was securing the deal in brussels in the first place. 0ur political correspondent iain watsonjoins me now. a long wait before that vote on the 11th of december but she has a two pronged strategy at the moment. that appeal directly to the public and saying to mps, listen to your constituents, but she is also trying to undermine labour, saying labour do not have a solid alternative plan. so the complicated manoeuvring continues quite clearly. she was talking to reporters en route to buenos ivories for this g20 summit earlier today and those two messages came across. she was seeing mps should listen to their constituents but what we also got what a seat preview of how she will conduct herself if any of these tv debates
11:39 am
ta ke herself if any of these tv debates take place withjeremy corbyn. they seem take place withjeremy corbyn. they seem to be at a stalemate. but the kind of lines she has been putting out there would be to suggest that labour are the party of no deal. she has been putting that out there so labour have been trying to garner their defence. the first is very straightforward, when the vote comes on december the 11th, they are putting forward their alternative, an amendment that says they will do things differently including keeping britain ina things differently including keeping britain in a customs union with the european union. but secondly there is this other amendment, another attempt to attack this from a different angle, from backbench labourmp hilary benn, different angle, from backbench labour mp hilary benn, the chair of the cross—party brexit committee, and he is saying, if theresa may's deal fails, and he is saying, if theresa may's dealfails, parliament and he is saying, if theresa may's deal fails, parliament can and he is saying, if theresa may's dealfails, parliament can rule out no deal as an option. he is simply
11:40 am
saying no deal should not be an option. he has got some cross—party support for that from people in the snp, plaid cymru, and crucially from two conservatives. so it might stand a better chance of getting approved in the house of commons than the official labour amendment, the official labour amendment, the official labour amendment, the official labour position. if that is the case, the question is, what happens next? it is not a binding vote but it would carry the moral authority of the house of commons and it would be up to parliamentarians to decide what they do next. some would hope the next step would be to move towards a new referendum, for example, but certainly in the short term, what it is designed to do is neutralise theresa may's attack that labour would countenance leaving without a deal at all. interesting comments from jack straw today, saying that this deal needs to be put back to the electorate in another vote and saying that within
11:41 am
jeremy corbyn's own constituency, there is overwhelming support for another vote. do you think all this is pushing jeremy corbyn towards a more fixed position on this than he perhaps until this point hasn't been particularly comfortable with. no, i don't. jack straw is one of the more eurosceptic members of the labour party, he has always been fairly critical of some of the things you did. he had read lines in negotiations with them as foreign secretary, sceptical towards a single currency, but his position now is that they has to be a referendum because people had not seen referendum because people had not seen the details of the prime minister's deal at the time. you would think that would add pressure onjeremy corbyn. but as far as i am aware, at the moment, jeremy corbyn is not moving in that direction any
11:42 am
time soon. he certainly wants to make sure that the argument is made that if theresa may's deal fails, they ought to be a general election. also he would like to push this idea that she should go back to brussels if she fails to call a general election and try to establish something more in line with labour's position, including a customs union. he will only move towards another referendum if he feels every other option has failed so he is i think less enthusiastic, perhaps a shade different from some of those who actually voted to leave. thank you very much. thousands of schoolchildren in australia have taken part in a day of rallies to demand action on climate change. the students, who marched in sydney, melbourne and brisbane, say they're disappointed by the way adults have tackled climate change and they want australia's government to halt all new coal and gas projects.
11:43 am
but the country's prime minister, scott morrison, said he wanted the children to stay in school. we do not support our schools being turned into parliament. what we want is more learning in schools and less activism in schools. let's listen to 14—year—old harriet 0'shea carre give a speech at a rally in melbourne, australia. she's one of the teenagers who organised the strikes. to all the politicians who know they could be helping us save our futures but choose to turn away, there is no plan b, australia needs you now. you have been elected with the expectation that you will do what is in the best interests of the country. don't let us down. the victoria derbyshire programme spoke to harriet after she had returned from the strike. she said she was surprised at how many people had turned up to support her. it is incredible how many people
11:44 am
have come. i was so astonished, even just a day when i came around the corner and i saw just a day when i came around the corner and i saw everyone on just a day when i came around the corner and i saw everyone on the steps of parliament house. i was like, wow, so many people. so where did this all start? what was the germ of the idea and how did you pull it all together? my friend read an article about a 15—year—old swedish girl who had been striking out front of the swedish parliament and she told me about that and we immediately were like, we have got to do this in australia because we are both in a position where we are so terrified about our future and what is going to happen, because it is so unstable, our position right now, and we knew we needed to do
11:45 am
something, so this is the perfect thing. and did it grow simply through social media, by putting it out there and encouraging people to come out? we had done a couple of strikes prior to this main event, so we had been going up to our local mps' offices and trying to talk to them, talking to people on the streets, and we were reading articles in newspapers and things. so, yeah. but mainlyjust through social media and things because it is something people already care about a lot so lots of people are just looking for somewhere to channel their feelings and this is a great solution. and what do you make of the australian prime minister bracingly slapping you down and saying you should be in school, let the people in power sort this out, you should be studying. well, the
11:46 am
people in power are not sorting this out, which is why we have to strike. if we continue to live the way we do, by 2050, climate scientists would it only 500,000 people will survive. the chances that everyone and everything i love will survive is practically impossible and we cannot bear that. if our politicians will deal with that, the emergency that it will deal with that, the emergency thatitis, will deal with that, the emergency that it is, we have got to make them. in a moment, we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. the nhs is to offer thousands a ultra low—calorie, liquid diet in an attempt to reverse type 2 diabetes. rail fares will rise by an average of 3.1% injanuary — the biggest increase for five years. ukraine bans russian men from entering the country as tensions between the two sides escalates.
11:47 am
now the business news. there was a slight uptick in annual house price growth during november but the market remains subdued. prices were 1.9% higher than a year ago, up from a five—year low of 1.6% in october, the building society said. mike lynch, the former chief executive of software giant autonomy, has been charged with fraud in the us. the charge, which carries a maximum term of 20 years, relates to its 2011 sale to computer giant hewlett—packa rd. free charging for electric cars will be available for customers at some tesco stores from next year. tesco, in partnership with volkswagen, plans to install almost 2,500 charging bays at up to 600 stores by 2020. a standard 7kw charger will be available for free, but drivers will have to pay for a faster service. uncertainty in the economy, as well as a squeeze
11:48 am
on household budgets, is keeping potential buyers out of the housing market, a lender has said. the nationwide building society said that demand from buyers was "subdued" and unlikely to pick up soon. it's figures show uk house prices rose by 1.9% in the year to november with the average value of a home now atjust over £214,000. analysts said brexit uncertainty was also making buyers cautious. robert gardner, chief economist at the nationwide. first of all, talk me through what exactly the figures show for the month of november. we have seen a bit of a pick—up in annual house price growth to 1.9%. that is still close to the range that has been prevailing since the first half of 2017. nevertheless, that is a bit
11:49 am
more subdued than you would have expected, given the labour market is pretty strong and employment near 40 year lows and borrowing costs still close to historic lows. ifi year lows and borrowing costs still close to historic lows. if i were someone close to historic lows. if i were someone thinking of selling my home, should i be worried that buyers are not interested right now? they are taking a wait and see approach. one of the things holding back the man is the squeeze on household incomes. wages are not keeping up with the increases in the cost of living. that is starting to ease now so real earnings is back in positive territory but there is still economic uncertainty holding people back. new buyer enquiries are still pretty subdued but hopefully once this uncertainty starts to clear, we will see people coming back into the market. is there a big difference between london and the rest of the uk? what we have seen in london is annual price growth has been in
11:50 am
negative territory so prices falling bya negative territory so prices falling by a modest amount. prices in london are still only 3% below their peaks from last year but prices in london are so much higher than the rest of the country. they are still 50% higher than in 2007, where the rest of the country, prices are only 20% where they were in 2007. where are we seeing the fastest house price growth? so, we are seeing places like the midlands seeing rapid rates of house price growth but they are still only around 4% year—on—year, and if you look at price levels where we see affordability is best, it is around wales, the north of england, scotland, where house prices compared to incomes are much lower than places like the capital, where affordability is much more stretched. thank you. shares in deutsche bank tumbled 3.23% to an all—time low of e8.03 after its head office in frankfurt was raided
11:51 am
by prosecutors on thursday in a money laundering investigation. germany's public prosecutor alleged that two staff members have helped clients launder money from criminal activities. the new "millennial" railcard will be on sale injanuary and available to four million eligible passengers, but the launch is running slightly late. the rail delivery group had promised that the digital—only 26 to 30 railcard would be on sale before the end of the year. it has now announced it will be on sale from 12:00 on 2january. starbucks says it's going to block customers from visiting porn sites on its free wi—fi in all its us outlets, but not until next year. watching explicit content in starbucks stores has always been banned, but now the coffee giant says it will actively block porn sites. who should customers thank for this move? a virginia—based non—profit called enough is enough. a quick look at the market. they are
11:52 am
treading water mainly. they are waiting to see what is going to come out of the g20 summit in argentina. president trump and the president of china, what will that mean for the global trade situation? all questions will be answered over the weekend. that's all the business news. a christmas grotto for pet dogs and their owners has opened its doors for a special event in hayling island in hampshire. more than 30 dogs were greeted by santa at the one—off event, and given a toy if they had been good. this report is from lenny the elf's house.
11:53 am
i have been here to see people's dogs and to see which dogs have been naughty and which dogs have been nice. i am naughty and which dogs have been nice. iam pleased naughty and which dogs have been nice. i am pleased to say that every dog i have seen has been very, very good. coming! come in! we are allowed to show you that, aren't we? it is december tomorrow. i expect we will be doing a lot more of that over the next few weeks. now it's time for a look at the weather. the last day of november, the last day of media logical autumn as well, so we head into winter tomorrow. it has probably felt like that for a number of weeks already. yesterday we had some stormy conditions, today
11:54 am
much more tranquil for many of us. much more sunshine out there. in leicestershire, lots much more sunshine out there. in leicestershi re, lots of much more sunshine out there. in leicestershire, lots of blue skies. further west, some more cloud and showers moving in. this is the satellite image. you can see we're we have got that sunshine, across central and eastern areas. speckled cloud across western and northern areas. and here are the showers. this is the forecast for the rest of this afternoon. mostly dry across england. if you are out and about this afternoon, those showers will continue to feed in. i have put these black wind gusts on the chart because it is still quite gusty out there. you will have most of the showers across scotland and northern ireland. maximum temperatures through this afternoon will be up to around 13 celsius. tonight, we will
11:55 am
continue with a few showers across northern parts of england and scotland, but some clear spells so temperatures could drop close to freezing. this rain is going to move its way in for the early hours of saturday. temperatures staying above freezing. we start of the weekend with this area of rain. it is going to move gradually north and east but it might take time to do that. breaking up into some showers across northern parts. a few bright sky is developing into the afternoon, particularly for scotland and northern ireland. 0n the milder side across the south. into sunday, we have got another weather system that is going to push its way in from the south—west. sunday morning could well start off with some outbreaks of rain. that will move away quicker during sunday and there will be brighter skies developing. then some showers moving into wales,
11:56 am
south—west england, northern ireland and scotland. but those temperatures still on the mild side. that mild a link in with that weather system but as that moves away in the early part of next week, we set up this northerly wind and the blue starting to return across the uk so it will turn chilly into next week. goodbye. you're watching bbc newsroom live. these are today's main stories — rail fares increase for millions of commuters by an average of 3.1% from january. what we are seeing today is those fa re what we are seeing today is those fare increases help fund the day—to—day running of the railway, allowing for the billions of pounds of extra investment to be targeted where it is really needed, in stations like this. tackling type 2 diabetes — the nhs is to offer thousands a low—calorie, liquid diet in a bid to reverse the condition.
11:57 am
ukraine bans russian men from entering the country, as tensions between the two sides escalate. world leaders gather at the g20 summit in argentina. president trump cancels a meeting with vladimir putin over russia's actions in ukraine. move back. move back now! as a new video emerges of up to 100 teenagers surrounding and attacking police officers in county durham, officers in stanley call on parents to take responsbility for their children. and it's emerged that this snow leopard was shot dead at dudley zoo last month after it escaped from its enclosure. good morning. good afternoon, in fact!
11:58 am
welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm annita mcveigh. rail passengers can expect an increase in train fares of more than 3% on average next year. the rise, announced by industry body the rail delivery group, comes after a year of timetable chaos, strikes, and delays on some parts of the network. our business correspondent theo leggett has been gauging reaction from rail passengers at london bridge station. it is fair to say that they are not happy. 0ne chap i spoke to was actually filling in his claim for a delay that he had experienced this morning, and he said to me, "why if "we are experiencing all these delays are "the prices still going up?" and of course, price increases on the railways are something of an unpopular winter tradition in this country. this year, it is not as bad as it could be. on average, ticket prices are going up by 3.1%. that is a little bit below the retail price index rate of inflation on which these kind of things are measured. but nevertheless, it is an increase, it is going to put say £100 on the cost of some of our more expensive season tickets, and so on.
11:59 am
so how does the industry justify all this? well, to explain a little bit about that, i am joined by robert nisbet of the rail delivery group. now, robert, what is your message to commuters? why'd you have to increase prices now? nobody wants to pay extra for their fares, we understand that, but let me just try and explain why the prices are going up. the rail industry, like other industries, has to cope with rising prices as it goes about its business. you know, staff wages are growing up, fuel prices are going up. but what we have done as we have looked at what the government has set with its regulated fares at 3.2%, and we tried to shield passengers as much as possible from the greater extent of inflationary pressure, by pegging our increases a little below that. so that the average now, as you say, is below the rpi rate of inflation. but we know it has been a tough few months, we acknowledge that. the may timetable change led to pockets of
12:00 pm
real difficulty for passengers, you know, in parts of the country, and we have apologised for that. but what we are saying today is those fare increases help fund the day—to—day running of the railway, allowing for the billions of pounds of extra investment to be targeted where it's really needed, in stations like this at london bridge, liverpool lime street, aberdeen, for example, but also new rolling stock, which passengers have been asking us for. but what people have been saying to me this morning is, this year has been the worst of many years. we get delays, we get strikes on a regular basis. this year, because of the timetabling fiasco and everything else, it has been so much worse. wasn't there a case on this occasion for fares to be frozen? well, if fares were frozen, how would we cope with that extra investment? you know, ok, maybe for one year, if the fares were frozen, you'd still be able to carry out the investment programme, but after that, then it has to be the taxpayer that would fund that extra investment,
12:01 pm
if passengers wanted the service improved. and we have got a long—term commitment, a plan together as an industry, to increase the number of services and the carriages. 7,000 new carriages by the 2020s. we want to carry on putting that money where it is going to be appreciated most. robert, thank you very much. these fare rises will come into force on the 2nd of january, so i guess in another month or so, we will be talking about this a lot more. joining us now is anthony smith — he is the chief executive of transport focus, a transport watchdog. thanks for your time this afternoon. what is your reaction to this 3.1 average increase? passengers catching trains today will be amazed that the prices are going up at all. had the terrible timetable crisis in the summer, ongoing poor performance, and the value for money
12:02 pm
from the industry just performance, and the value for money from the industryjust as not they are at the moment. i think passengers are baffled. we had the rail delivery group saying that this will go towards the day—to—day running of things, allowing other money to be put into investment on the railways. but do you think that passengers overwhelmingly, is it fairto passengers overwhelmingly, is it fair to say overwhelmingly, feel that they do not get value for money? passengers are putting in over £10 billion a year into the air industry to the fare box, the government is putting a lot of taxpayers' money, it'sjust seems that the value for money is not there in terms of keeping a lid on prices, and i think passengers will judge value for money when they can really rely on the service. we do a lot of research amongst passengers, and we know from our own experience we just want trains to arrive on time as promised. and that happens consistently, i think passengers will start to think the fares are a bit more value for money. in the meantime, is there anywhere in this market to somehow peg these
12:03 pm
increases to satisfactory performance? it is very important that passengers are not getting what they are promised, the complaint. we have got a new rail passenger ombudsman set up this week, so if you have not got what you were promised, complain. what difference is that going to make in terms of fa re is that going to make in terms of fare increases? it sends a very important message to the industry that they have got to get trains running on time, they have got to deal with complaints properly and manage information much better. and in these relatively monopoly markets, if that message is not sent very strongly from passengers, there is no real incentive to improve. and do you think the message isn't being said strong enough? and do you think the rail industry is listening?” think it is listening, but the pressure like a normal business to put a lid on costs and to drive up sales perhaps is not clear in this type of industry, said the government, the rail regulator, ourselves, and passengers above all
12:04 pm
else, have got to make their voice heard. if you have not got what you we re heard. if you have not got what you were promised, the timetable is not delivered, complain. ok, thank you very much, anthony smith, chief executive of the independent watchdog, transport focus. a liquid—only diet ofjust 800 calories a day will be prescribed to thousands of patients with type 2 diabetes. the nhs in england is piloting the treatment, after a trial helped more than half of those involved to reverse the condition. in the uk, more than three million people are living with type 2 diabetes, a condition that's linked to diet and lifestyle. treating them costs the nhs £8.8 billion a year. and according to public health england, the number of diabetics will rise by one million by 2035. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. it's about cutting down. you know, small steps... at a community centre in leeds, the battle against diabetes is under way. reducing portion sizes and how frequent you have these naughty foods and all that...
12:05 pm
all the people here were on the cusp of developing type 2 diabetes. now they've been helped to lose a bit of weight and think about what they're eating. everybody should be educated about how we eat, what we eat, why we eat, and when we eat. i've lost so much weight. i feel better, i feel happier. an estimated 12.3 million people in the uk are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. a quarter of a million people in england have already been referred to the special prevention programme, like the one running in leeds. on average, they've lost nearly 4kg, so now the scheme is being extended. weight loss is all well and good, and we're delighted with the weight—loss trajectories that we've seen in participants on the programme. of course, what counts at the end of the day is whether we are preventing type 2 diabetes from arising. that takes a little longer. and there is help too for those who have already developed type 2 diabetes. a recent trial of a very low—calorie diet using liquid meals has helped almost half of those involved
12:06 pm
to reverse the condition. i decided to do something, walk around the house... that project is also being rolled out more widely, reflecting the growing concerns about the impact diabetes is having on our health. dominic hughes, bbc news. breaking news, the hotel group marriott international is a saying that a database of its guest has been breached, potentially exposing information of about 500 million guests. this is the guest reservation database guests. this is the guest reservation data base of guests. this is the guest reservation database of its starwood hotel brand. marriott is saying an unauthorised third party had copied and encrypted information and that there had been an authorised access to the starwood guest reservation
12:07 pm
database since 2014. the company says it has taken steps to rectify the situation. we understand the information could include some combination of name, mailing address, phone numbers, e—mail addresses, passport numbers, and other details, according to the marriott hotel group. breaking news just coming into the zone of the last few minutes. 0ne just coming into the zone of the last few minutes. one other detail, the information also includes in some cases payment card numbers and expiration dates on those cards. but those numbers were instructed, the hotel chain is saying. —— encrypted. ukraine is banning russian men from entering the country. president petro poroshenko said he wanted to prevent the formation of "private armies", and a repeat of what happened in 2014 when russia seized crimea and supported a rebel uprising in eastern ukraine. 0ur correspondent jonah fisher is in kiev. what can you tell us about this ban?
12:08 pm
this is just the latest in the ratcheting up the rhetoric. we had martial law introduced in parts of ukraine earlier this week. and then today the announcement that russian men aged between 16 and 60 will no longer be allowed to come into ukraine, and the reason being given his as you said, to prevent what they are commonly formation of private armies, and their minds are very much going back to what happened in 2014 when the so—called little green men were involved in the takeover of crimea. they turned out to be russian military personnel, and of course that russia supported the rebel uprising in eastern ukraine. silly justification in that president poroshenko is giving for this move is that there is an imminent threat of a russian military attack, possibly even a russian military invasion, and this
12:09 pm
isa russian military invasion, and this is a necessary russian military invasion, and this is a necessary move russian military invasion, and this is a necessary move to prevent fighting aged men, basically, coming into ukraine from russia. has there been a reaction from moscow? yes, from the foreign ministry spokeswoman this morning in moscow. she said that russia would not reciprocate. there was a possibility that russia would then declare that ukrainians could not go to russia. she says that is not the case,, and she went on to say that the russian line all week has been these moods and ukraine, talk of war in ukraine, it is not about the broader geopolitical situation and tensions with russia. it is much more about the political fortunes. we with russia. it is much more about the politicalfortunes. we are with russia. it is much more about the political fortunes. we are four months away from a presidential election in ukraine. poroshenko is currently polling at less than 10%, and the russians are saying this is all being topped up so that president poroshenko can position himself as being a great patriotically dog standing up to
12:10 pm
russia, and quite possibly trying to boost his opinion poll ratings. —— a great patriotic leader. thank you, and you will have heard about that situation is affecting meetings at the 620, situation is affecting meetings at the g20, where president trump has pulled out of a private discussion with president putin of the tensions in ukraine. we will be talking to her correspondence in buenos aires soon. her correspondence in buenos aires soon. more on today's stories coming up soon. more on today's stories coming up on bbc newsroom live. the headlines on bbc news — rail fares will rise by an average of 3.1% injanuary — the biggest increase for five years. the nhs is to offer thousands a ultra low—calorie, liquid diet in an attempt to reverse type 2 diabetes. ukraine bans russian men from entering the country, as tensions between the two sides escalates. time for your sport update now.
12:11 pm
perhaps not quite, a lot of technical issue. we will come back to that as soon as we can. the g20 summit is getting underway in buenos aires, attended by heads of government from the 19 leading industrialized nations plus the european union. they're expected to discuss the trade war between the united states and china, among other issues. arriving in the past hour, president trump has cancelled his planned meeting with russian president vladimir putin at the summit, citing moscow's current situation with ukraine over it seizing of three ukrainian navy vessels and seamen from the kerch strait. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale has this report. throughout the day and night, they arrived.
12:12 pm
more than 20 world leaders gathering supposedly to agree new plans to improve global trade and protect the environment, but this summit is likely to be defined as much by what divides these leaders as unites them. donald trump has launched a trade war on china. he'll meet president xi for the first time since new tariffs were imposed, but few expect a break—through here. president putin is likely to face tough questions over russia's seizure of three ukrainian vessels in the black sea. president trump said he wouldn't meet the russian leader until the confrontation was resolved. mohammed bin salman, the saudi crown prince, is also in town. he'll be looking to repair his reputation after the murder of the saudi journalist, jamal khashoggi. the french president said the world was still looking for answers. theresa may is here to bang the drum for her brexit deal, to win what international support she can while trying to reassure her counterparts that britain will still be open for trade come what may.
12:13 pm
this is the first g20 summit in south america, and many argentines are keen to shine an international spotlight on their own economic troubles, protesting loud and clear about the own government's performance. almost ten years ago, world leaders came together to revive the g20 so they could tackle the global financial crisis in one united body. well, here, a decade on, such unity may be hard to find. james landale, bbc news, in buenos aires. 0ur correspondent katy watson is in buenos aires. katy, one of the big questions is what is good to have been between the usa and china in terms of those trade was, whether things are going to improve get worse, and how that might impact on the other nations there. i think in this summit, the
12:14 pm
620, there. i think in this summit, the g20, there are so many headlines that could come out in the next few days. certainly the meeting with president trump and president xi, where everybody will be watching closely, because this is a summit held by the president of argentina. he wanted to hold this summit as a way to show that argentina was opening up after years of isolation. he came to power in 2015, promising new market reforms, showing that he isa new market reforms, showing that he is a market friendly president. but three years on, he is working with presidents who about populism than about globalisation. so that'll be interesting over the next few days, what can be achieved if anything, and how much will be talked about with tariffs, with protection, and which way the global trade war will go. and katy, one other feature as you say, lots of headlines potentially from this summit today, the presence of the saudi crown
12:15 pm
prince, the continuing investigation into the murder of jamal prince, the continuing investigation into the murder ofjamal khashoggi. how many other leaders are co mforta ble how many other leaders are comfortable with having those photographs taken, comfortable with having those photographs ta ken, the comfortable with having those photographs taken, the handshakes with the crown prince, giving the investigation? —— given the investigation? —— given the investigation? well, security is incredibly tight around the saudi embassy. we'll be watching closely the family photo, how the other leaders will be reacting to him, and how they will be acting towards him. this is a summit that is very short, already a lot of countries haven't necessarily turned their backs on saudl necessarily turned their backs on saudi, so whether they will be refusing to shake his hand or it will just be refusing to shake his hand or it willjust be an uncomfortable for them, we will see. but i do not think we will necessarily see any kind of headlines coming out of that. it is a game of diplomacy settlement, this g20. ok, thank you very much, katy watson in buenos aires for us. and it is time for sports now. good afternoon.
12:16 pm
manchester united forward alexis sanchezis manchester united forward alexis sanchez is facing a long time out with a hamstring injury according to jose mourinho. he suffered the injury in training yesterday and will have a scan to determine the extent of the damage. jose mourinho says it is not a little muscular injury that he will be back from week or two. he has scored just four goal clinic for united since joining from arsenal in january. goal clinic for united since joining from arsenal injanuary. additional and thornton is seriously ill in hospital after the accident in the united states. —— british rower anna thornton. after a pre—fight press conference descended into chaos, tyson feeley suggested that the traditionalface—off tyson feeley suggested that the traditional face—off between boxers ata traditional face—off between boxers at a way and should be stopped. both he and dion to wales have been
12:17 pm
warned that they could was their fight purse if trouble like this spills over later in the traditional stand—up before twaddle's heavyweight showdown in los angeles. he will not get the opportunity to get in my face again. because it should not be like that. this is a sporting contest, many people around the world are watching this. this is not a bare knuckle street fight, it isa not a bare knuckle street fight, it is a boxing contest at the highest level, so all chartered staff should not be allowed to happen. —— all that sort of stuff. it'll be a defining moment for both. in a that pits the effective style of fury against the punching power of wilder. they are scared of me for a reason. because of my mindset, because of what i possess. every timel because of what i possess. every time i speak it, you see what happens. , they are scared of me,
12:18 pm
they should be, i want them to be. because when i step in the it is no more deontay wilder, it is the bronze bomber, can't you see? that is the sport, i hope it was worth the wait. more in the next hour. police in county durham are calling for parents to take responsibility for their "out of control" teenagers — after officers were surrounded and attacked by a group of up to 100 children. it happened in stanley earlier this month, but the force has just released body cam footage of the incident. we are asking people mostly to move away. you can see what is going on. —— asking people nicely. bleep
12:19 pm
in a social media message filmed by durham police themselves, local sergeant emma kay had this to say. over the last few weeks, we have faced outbreaks of out—of—control children in the town centre. a hard—core group of around 20 people who threw bricks, fireworks, and attacked my officers. 0ne pcso was punched in the face by a young person. disorder of this kind is unacceptable. violence against our officers will not be tolerated. action will be taken against all individuals involved in the incident that night. whilst there is a hard—core group of individuals involved in this incident, there are many people stood on the sidelines. young people who are going to affect their life chances by continuing to engage in this type of behaviour. we are asking parents to take
12:20 pm
responsibility for their children. do you know where they are, or are they going to bring trouble to your door? it's up to you to give your children safe, out out of harm's way, and out of trouble. a former senior detective with county durham police, who has worked in the stanley area where the footage was filmed, has blamed cuts to policing numbers for the violence. what has happened over the last couple of years, the police numbers have been cut and cut. there are less officers in the community, regardless of whatever spin the
12:21 pm
police want to put on it, that is a fa ct. police want to put on it, that is a fact. my experience of stanley, was when i served there, there would be probably up to 30 officers working in the stanley area. i appreciate that times have changed and moved on, but if you were to do a survey of how many officers are working and covering the stanley area, over a 24—hour period, i would suggest that they would be very minimal. so for me, there has been a breakdown with the community and the police. as nhs figures show worsening mental health among teenagers, researchers are urging the government to include life skills in the curriculum of english secondary schools. it follows a pilot study that taught students skills and techniques to help them to navigate the pressures of growing up. here's our home editor, mark easton. slowly in, slowly out... for year seven, today's lesson is on how to breathe. keep your backs up high.
12:22 pm
chancellor's school in hertfordshire has just done a four—year study programme, teaching them the skills and techniques for happier and healthier life. ——just begun. it is just as hard as maths, this lesson, you need to try and try these techniques to perfect them... with mental health and behavioural problems in most secondary pupils worsening, dozens of schools across england have been testing evidence—based programme using theories from positive psychology. you need to be able to negotiate and compromise with someone so they can have what they want and you can have what you want. weekly hour—long lessons on social and emotional learning relationships, resilience and mindfulness, designed for young people aged 11—15. does it work? these are very hard skills, some adults struggle with these, by the way. academics compared the wellbeing with pupils who completed the course with a control group that didn't participate. the results are really
12:23 pm
quite impressive. evaluations suggest a significant increase in children and young people's general health and an improvement in life satisfaction that's equivalent to an adult finding a partner. as a sufferer of anxiety, it has really helped, as the coping mechanisms that we are taught has been effective in everyday life. it really helped me with exam stress and working through any issues i had on top of school and the pressure of dealing with exams. there was definitely problems with academic stress, friendship groups, and also personal problems which i have been able to deal with in a more practical and a, i'd say, successful way. teachers must complete a week of intensive training before delivering lessons, a process that some found positively life—changing. we actually had to test all of these theories we were learning about on ourselves. i personally found out a whole lot about myself, things i have been carrying
12:24 pm
around unbeknowingly since my own childhood, issues that i have got. the experts behind the scheme say the results are so impressive and the cost so low, £25 a year per pupil, it should be part of the curriculum in every secondary school, notjust in britain, but around the world. mark easton, bbc news, hertfordshire. now it's time for a look at the weather. a little quieter than the last couple of days, with some wind and rain. still some gusty winds around. the picture behind me was taken an hour or so ago, around the showers. wintry over the scottish mountains. that continues throughout the rest of the afternoon. winds are quite gusty near the showers, but generally quite a lot down on what we had yesterday. but so are the temperatures. but the sunshine does
12:25 pm
compensate, and we have more sunshine today and we have had for much of the week. however, under the starry skies overnight, it will turn colder than it has been for much of the week in scotland and northern ireland, but not for england and wales. more atlantic mild air bringing back more wind and rain, so it stays relatively mild, but it means we put a soggy start to the saturday. england and wales will get most of the wet weather again this weekend, and it certainly looks colder and brighter for scotland. hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: the nhs is to offer thousands of people an ultra low—calorie, liquid diet in a bid to reverse type 2 diabetes. the hotel group marriot says the records of 500 million customers have been involved in a data breach. rail fares are increasing for millions of commuters, by an average of 3.1% from january. ukraine's president bans
12:26 pm
russian men from entering the country as tensions between the two sides esclates. as world leaders arrive in buneos aries for the g20 summit, president trump cancels a meeting with vladimir putin over rising tensions with ukraine. police in county durham call on parents to take responsibility for their children after a video is released of officers being attacked by up to 100 teenagers. we arejust going we are just going to see some live images from argentina now where that 620 images from argentina now where that g20 summit is taking place. it is an incredible way to end a presidency. you don't see that happen very often. i look forward to working with president lopez for many years to come and i know our
12:27 pm
relationship will be a good one. we have had great conversations and i think we will have a great, great relationship. i would think we will have a great, great relationship. iwould now like think we will have a great, great relationship. i would now like to invite the president and the prime minister to say a few words and perhaps we can start withjustin. thank you. justin, please. applause. good morning. thank you all for being here and thank you to president trump. donald, thank you for your words this morning. and retake, this, as donald said, on your last day in office, it is a wonderful day to be here on this historic moment. justin trudeau speaking in french at the 620 justin trudeau speaking in french at the g20 summit and that summit
12:28 pm
getting under way properly with one of the emerging headlines the news that donald trump will not be meeting president putin of russia as planned because of the ongoing and increasing tensions over ukraine, but meanwhile, they are getting on with other business there. a lot of focus on what will happen between the usa and china and the ongoing trade war between the two countries. justin trudeau speaking in english now. that rely on strong, reliable trading relationships with our closest neighbours. that is why i am here today. the new agreement lets the risk of serious economic uncertainty that lingers throughout the trade renegotiation process. uncertainty that would have only gotten worse and more damaging had we not reached a new deal. but when
12:29 pm
faced with this challenge, canadians came together and rolled up their sleeves. canadians from every order of government and walks of life but their country's interests first and worked hard to achieve a new modernised agreement that will protectjobs, modernised agreement that will protect jobs, strengthened the middle class and create new opportunities for businesses. he speaks french we arejust going we are just going to pull away from that. if there is anything more of interest for you coming from that news conference, where a deal has just been signed, we will come back to it. but let's return to brexit
12:30 pm
now. theresa may has been trying to gather support for the withdrawal agreement she has negotiated with the eu. but are enough mps going to back it? christian fraser has been taking a look. we don't know what will be in the minds of mps when they come to vote on theresa may's brexit deal. there will be five days of debate ahead of the vote, no end of warnings about the risk no deal might bring, and you just can't tell how many might duck the decision altogether and abstain. but right now everyone seems to agree that getting a commons majority is going to be an almighty struggle. so let's remind you of the numbers we do know about in the house of commons. the conservative party has 315 mps. not enough to command a majority. but in this parliament it has relied, of course, on the confidence and supply agreement with the dup,
12:31 pm
whose ten mps support the prime minister in key votes. over here, on the opposition benches, labour has 257 mps. the scottish national party has 35, the liberal democrats have 12, there are eight independents, four plaid cymru mps and the green party has one. that is a grand total of 317 mps, but as we know, brexit has divided the two main parties. some mps won't do what their whips tell them. so let's look at who doesn't like the deal. first, there is the dup, all ten of them. they can't vote, they say, for a deal that includes the irish backstop, so let's put them in the no column for now. then there are the 80 brexit supporting conservatives who are on the record as opposing the deal, and also the tory remainers, who say they will rebel. there are at least 12 of them.
12:32 pm
so the total number of conservatives against this deal now stands, by our estimates, at 92. next comes labour and all the other opposition parties, and altogether that could mean 312 votes against the prime minister. who's going to vote for the deal? well, the best estimate from bbc research is 225 conservatives will fall in behind her and one lib dem, which means on these calculations, the prime minister would be short by 95 votes. again, we don't know how many of this group might abstain, lowering this overall total. and we don't know how many labour mps might back the deal who haven't yet made a decision, but if the deal fails, it's important to note by what margin, because if it is big, the prime minister and her government may fall with it. there are some in number 10 who remain confident but right now this looks even harder than it was securing the deal in brussels in the first place.
12:33 pm
we have just heard from the president of the european council, donald tusk, who is saying that if parliament rejects that deal in the vote on december the 11th, britain's choice would be to leave the european union without a deal, in no—deal brexit, or to abandon brexit altogether. donald tusk saying a few days before the vote in the house of commons, it is becoming more and more clear this deal is the best possible, the only possible one, reinforcing what the eu has said, that it has no more room for renegotiation on this deal. that coming through from the president of the european council, donald tusk.
12:34 pm
a leading girls' independent school has asked families to sign a contract pledging to cut their smartphone use at home. south hampstead high school in north—west london said it wanted to help families get out of the habit of being glued to their screens. the voluntary contract asks pupils and their parents to outlaw phones during meal times and the daily commute, and read, listen to a book or talk instead. we can now talk to irene tse, a teacher and also a mum who has already been trying hard to cut mobile phone use at home. it must be of great interest to you to hear about this particular story at this school, instituting this family phone pledge. what have you done at home to try to cut smartphone news? i have always been aware that handing over a piece of equipment that has got such advanced technology over to a child has
12:35 pm
positives and a lot of negatives as well. when my daughter acquired a phone at 11 years old, she always knew they would be age restrictions and she was always quite willing to give me her password as well, which ijust presumed give me her password as well, which i just presumed would give me her password as well, which ijust presumed would be the norm, and it's only when you start talking to other parents, of her friends really, that you realise not a lot of pa rents really, that you realise not a lot of parents do this and not a lot of pa rents of parents do this and not a lot of parents don't even know how to restrict their phones, but i do agree with what the school is doing. mobile phones, social media has become the modern age addiction really and i do feel that there needs to be better guidelines and regulations. do your daughters feel you are tough compared to the pa rents of you are tough compared to the parents of some of their friends? 0r do they just accept parents of some of their friends? 0r do theyjust accept because those have always been the parameters in your house? at the beginning, when
12:36 pm
she was younger, she is 14 now, she just accepted it anyway. and with their own peer groups, she will have that peer pressure because she notices that her friends get to do whatever they want whenever they wa nt whatever they want whenever they want and it is quite funny because it was only a couple of months ago that she actually told me she had discussed how i deal with things with her friends and she thanked me for it and said she realises that she is quite happy that she doesn't get to go on her phone all the time and she actually gets to speak to herfriends, so her privacy is more in the conversation she has with her friends, the time she spends with people, and she is present with me, her brother, family members as well, rather than always feeling that you
12:37 pm
have to be available for messages to a nswer have to be available for messages to answer them straightaway. that is really interesting. do you get any sense that there might be, among your daughter and her friends, not sense that there might be, among your daughter and herfriends, not a backlash, that is too strong, but a realisation that perhaps they need to withdraw from smartphone technology a little bit?” to withdraw from smartphone technology a little bit? i do think there are some children that we are lies they do spend too much, and adults as well, really, spend too much time on their device or that social media, i suppose, because everything is filtered, nothing is real, because they are constantly bombarded by imagery from celebrity... i can't even say it. we
12:38 pm
know what you mean. and bloggers, where they all look perfect, but it is all filtered. when people have that realisation, actually, it's not real, they will only show you beautiful parts, and they realise, you want more genuine friendships and genuine relationships. in my daughter's case, she does realise that and she has realised that over the last couple of years, really. thank you very much for talking to us. the international trade secretary has been in bristol today giving a speech in support of theresa may's brexit deal. in that speech liam fox has been outlining why he thinks the deal will be good for future trade. iam i am pleased to say he joins us from
12:39 pm
bristol now. you say the divisions of the referendum need to be consigned to the past, and in politics we cannot always have the luxury of doing what we want for ourselves. are you the pragmatic brexiteer and how many of your collea g u es brexiteer and how many of your colleagues are going to follow you and back to theresa may in that vote ? and back to theresa may in that vote? the point i was making today was that there is a world beyond europe and there is a time beyond brexit and we had to prepare for that, but we have to take account of the realities of our trade and while we are leaving the european union and while our total trade as a proportion with europe has gone down over the last decade or so, it is still responsible for 44%, so it is essential we have good access to the european market as we leave the eu because jobs and profits are dependent on that, but it is also important that we have the freedom to follow a trade policy that is independent and gives us an opportunity to deal with the
12:40 pm
fastest—growing parts opportunity to deal with the fastest—g rowi ng parts of opportunity to deal with the fastest—growing parts of the global market. there is a balance between them. i know that there are those who say trade with the eu doesn't matter, but it does matter. and those who say europe is much more important than the rest of the world but that is not true either. we have to get the balance right. the prime minister is in argentina, talking, although do not main focus, post—brexit britain, talking to trade partners there, but are you concerned the uk might be left in trading limbo during the transition phase and any backstop? we know in the transition period that we are not able to implement new trade agreements, we agreed that more than agreements, we agreed that more than a year ago. what we would be able to do is to prepare any future trade agreements so that they could be implemented on the 1st of january 2021, when we would leave that transition period itself. but what i was setting up today is that we have
12:41 pm
got to stop being so focused on the concept of just free trade agreements because as we leave the eu, we will also be taking our independent seat at the world trade 0rganisation, independent seat at the world trade organisation, and a great deal of what will happen in the liberalisation, on multilateral or two lateral, for example, we others will's second biggest exporters of services but global liberalisation of services is a long way behind, so there is a real opportunity for the uk to have an independent voice in setting a global agenda. but is any major economy going to finalise a trade deal with the uk until it knows the exact nature of the uk's relationship with the eu? they will wa nt to relationship with the eu? they will want to see how that develops over time and the eu will be doing the same, because people will want to know what the access to the eu market will be, what the relationship with the uk will be
12:42 pm
going forward for those who want to do trade agreements with the european union. it is in both our interests to come to a swift conclusion, remembering that at the moment we are not doing the trade agreement, we are doing the withdrawal agreement, the divorce pa rt withdrawal agreement, the divorce part of proceedings and the future trading relationship will follow, but it is in everybody's interest to be as swift as we can about that.” just want to ask about those comments from donald tusk, the european council president, saying if parliament reject the deal presented by theresa may on the 11th of december, britain's choice will be to leave the european union without a deal, or to abandon brexit altogether. do you accept that is the choice? i think it certainly brings those choices into stark relief. for me, failing to honour the referendum would not only be undemocratic but i think it would be quite dangerous in terms of the way
12:43 pm
the public would view their political establishment in the united kingdom. if the public vote for brexit and parliament would try to steal that from the british public, i think that would create a real schism between parliament and the electorate, and the consequences of that would be unknown. so will the government hold another vote, if it loses the vote, on the 11th of december? should it, in your opinion? unsurprisingly, doing a series of interviews, when the questions are, what if, what if, what if... it is right to consider what if... it is right to consider what if, though, isn't it? of course, but ouraim what if, though, isn't it? of course, but our aim is to get that vote through the house of commons and to make it clear to members of parliament what the consequences would be if we can't get that vote through. i hope that my colleagues will be thinking hard about the consequences, not just will be thinking hard about the consequences, notjust our relationship with the european
12:44 pm
union, but the entire economic well—being of the united kingdom. you don't want no deal, do you?” have always said that getting an agreement with the european union both on the withdrawal and the future trading agreement is beneficial and better than having no agreement whatsoever. i think what those star potential alternatives of either dishonouring the referendum result by having brexit stolen from the british people order of leaving without an agreement, both those are outcomes that i really don't want to see in terms of the country. i was saying this morning that when you go into politics, you can't always have the luxury of doing exactly what you wa nt the luxury of doing exactly what you want and getting exactly what you want, but we do have a duty to do what we believe to be in the national interest. liam fox, thank you very much. a snow leopard was shot dead, after a keeper at dudley zoo left
12:45 pm
the enclosure door open and it escaped. the zoo says eight—year—old margaash was killed after getting free last month when the zoo had closed and all visitors had left. an investigation found the door to his enclosure was left open through "keeper error". a disciplinary procedure has taken place into those involved and security is being reviewed. let's get more on this now from frank tunbridge, who's a big cat expert. hejoins me from gloucester. i understand that you have seen margaash before? yes, i have. i have been to dudley zoo in the past, when the kids were small, and i saw the snow leopard in the zoo, in a small compound. and we have seen a photograph of margaash an absolutely beautiful snow leopard in his prime at eight years old. from what you
12:46 pm
know of this incident, do you think his death could have been prevented? yes, i do. his death could have been prevented? yes, ido. basically, ifan his death could have been prevented? yes, i do. basically, ifan animal can be shot, it can also be tranquillised as well. with modern technology and new tranquilliser methods, the animal could have been contained. it could have been shot with a tranquilliser gun. it takes less tha n with a tranquilliser gun. it takes less than a minute for it to take effect. and then it could have been recovered, put back in its compound, and it would have been a much better end to the story. let me ask you about what the zoo director is saying, that euthanasia is and a lwa ys saying, that euthanasia is and always will be a last resort. they say as the animal was close to surrounding woodland and darkness approaching and attempts to persuade him to return to its enclosure had failed, the vet did not believe a tranquilliser dart was a safe option due to the amount of time the drug ta kes to due to the amount of time the drug takes to work. it sounds like you fundamentally disagree with that
12:47 pm
view. i do, actually. all you have to watch is natural history programmes on the television and you can see how quickly these tranquilliser drugs can work. and this is on large animals like rhino and joe roth. i think it isjust this is on large animals like rhino and joe roth. i think it is just the easy option out. it seems to be a policy now rather than taking a second look at it is too shoot the animal. there was a case some years ago ina animal. there was a case some years ago in a zoo in wales where a small female eurasian lynx escaped and what happened there, the same thing, the links offered no threat to the public but it was shot as well. i think it should have been rethought. i know they have to make a decision very quickly but the zoo was closed and the confines of the zoo, i would have thought they could have surrounded the animal and used a tranquilliser gun. snow leopards are very, quite passive, they don't
12:48 pm
offer the same amount of fear as a tiger, and along with the cheater they are one of the most passive of they are one of the most passive of the big cats out there. even if it did escape, it was probably would have gone into woodland and they would have found it with thermal imaging and recaptured it that way. thank you very much for your time today. more now on our top story that thousands of patients with type two diabetes are to be prescribed an 800—calorie, liquid—only diet. nhs england says initial trials show it can reverse the condition, in people who've recently been diagnosed. professor mike lean from glasgow university who carried out the trial said the pilot scheme is a big step forward in turning the disease around for three million people living with it in the uk. we did a very daring thing which has never been done before, to say, can we actually turn this disease around intentionally? what we found was, yes, you can. in about nine out of ten cases, we can turn people with type 2 diabetes into people who no longer
12:49 pm
have the disease and potentially no longer have all the terrible complications of this disease because this used to be called mild diabetes, when people used to get it in their 70s and 80s and they didn't live much longer. now we are seeing people with type 2 diabetes in their 60s, 50s and even 40s, and they are getting terrible, terrible medical complications, so turning the disease around for the three million or more people in the country would be a huge challenge and the pilot scheme now being announced is a big step forward. we have done the research, we know it is possible, we know it can be done in primary care with substantial weight loss. it is not easy, it is tough, but it is much less tough than chemotherapy for a cancer, which is a less serious disease than type 2 diabetes. in the trial last year, i thinkjust a little over half the people who took part, the condition was reversed, which is a fantastic success rate. why did it work for some of those people on the trial and not for others?
12:50 pm
good question. the answer is quite simple and that is that those who lost about two stones in weight, nine out of ten, it reversed it, so it is potentially reversible. and those who didn't manage to reverse the disease, mostly, they found it too tough, they weren't able to get enough weight loss. so the diet is challenging. existing on these shakes alone for three months, it is clearly a challenge. it is, and the programme we are using is notjust the shakes and notjust a liquid diet, it is a very carefully structured programme lasting now two years and programmed for weight loss maintenance, so the main thrust is long—term weight loss. most people who have got a weight problem know they can lose weight but they find the biggest difficulty in maintaining that weight loss when they go back to the world that led to the weight gain in the first place. this programme, it is called counterweight plus. there are any which are similar, but this one has the evidence and it is a very carefully
12:51 pm
structured programme that went on for two years and we are now moving into the third year to maintain weight loss. the big thrust is, let's get as much weight loss off as we can in the first few months and we know how to do that and we are getting better at it, and then focus on long—term maintenance of that to keep the disease away in the future. in a moment it's time for the one o'clock news, but first it's time for a look at the weather. after recent days of wet and windy weather, today is at least a little calmer out and about, but we are not without some big showers producing some rainbows, thunder and lightning. beautiful rainbow in north wales. in derbyshire we had sunshine this morning and that is the name of the game. sunshine industries with showers. you can
12:52 pm
already see the next area of low pressure starting to move in. through the evening and overnight, as the showers start to deplete in the north, we get more rain coming into parts of northern ireland, southern scotland, but it looks fairly wet. it will be a cold night. we could come close to frost levels because that is with the cold air is sitting. with weather systems attendant in southern areas, there will be milder air. we will see that split for much of the weekend. a rather soggy start on saturday, particularly for england and wales is. some gusty winds along the southern coast of england as well, which will blow that rain out of the way steadily. brightening up in parts of southwest england and wales. that might affect parts of the east of northern ireland but most in the north will have a day of sunny spells and showers. crisp, wintry sunshine around. it is going to be called in scotland and
12:53 pm
northern ireland. a little lower than today, actually. but england and wales, back into that milder air. so that is bad area of low pressure scooting out of the way. through saturday night, our next area of low pressure moving in. saturday night looks quite wet again for england and will. that is the third orfourth for england and will. that is the third or fourth spell of wet weather this week. we will have a cold night and the risk of some frost and some fog first thing on sunday morning. the rain should clear the way so it looks like the afternoon is drier and brighter with a few showers. it does look as though scotland and northern ireland will see more persistent rain and wintry conditions over the hills. goodbye. the world's most powerful leaders gather in argentina for the g20 summit. but it's clouded by tensions over trade, climate change, and the conflict in ukraine.
12:54 pm
we'll have the latest from our diplomatic correspondent in buenos aires. also this lunchtime. a 3.1% rise in railfares — unions and passengers say it's a kick in the teeth. most times i have to stand all the way to london bridge, and all the way back home. so, no, not happy. a mass data breach of the marriott hotel chain. the personal details of 500 million guests may be compromised. an air, land and sea search for this couple whose car was washed up on a scottish beach. and after years of campaigning for more black managers in english football, sol campbell says he's honoured to become one
12:55 pm
12:56 pm
12:57 pm
12:58 pm
12:59 pm

16 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on