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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 30, 2018 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

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and of course it's more about the individual. and sol taking that role. campbell is seen by some as a complex character. while contemporaries like frank lampard and steven gerrard have gone straight into high profile management positions, campbell takes over at macclesfield with the club rooted to the foot of league 2. i think for me, the colour of your skin, it's... it's academic for me. it's all about working hard, knocking on doors and waiting for that opportunity. while his task may be daunting, but at least campbell now has his chance. david ornstein, bbc news, macclesfield. time for a look at the weather. here's helen willetts. it's been one of those weeks, so much rain and wind and more to come for some of us this weekend, at the moment a bit quieter, this came from gwyneth, beautiful rainbow because we have showers around, we've also had beautiful sunny spells in between. we will see a mix of those
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throughout the day, living out in the atlantic is tomorrow's rain, in fa ct the atlantic is tomorrow's rain, in fact tonight and tomorrow, the low pressure starting to clear out of the way but the showers as you can see congregate across most of scotla nd see congregate across most of scotland and northern ireland, they will dampen down through the afternoon purely because we've got the next weather system rolling in. it's not quite as mild today but i think the sunshine compensates, the winds not as strong either. with the winds not as strong either. with the winds continue to fall light and showers easing further overnight we will see a colder night too. touch of frost are parts of scotland and northern ireland and patchy mist and fog, different story as you can see across england and wales, the rain might stretch into parts of northern ireland and southern scotland, uncertainty on her far north ireland and southern scotland, uncertainty on herfar north it ireland and southern scotland, uncertainty on her far north it will grow but these weather fronts bringing back the milder atlantic air, the delineation between the north and the milder air in the south so we wake up to a wet one tomorrow morning, probably brighter after the fog clears not. it will
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move through quickly, the heavier rain, probably with some rather gusty winds. temperatures starting at six or seven but it is milder but it will be remaining quite cloudy, it will be remaining quite cloudy, it might temporarily write an app but low cloud and drizzle whilst further north mist and fog to clear first thing but for scotland and northern ireland it looks like a decent day, fewer showers than today actually. still a bit wintry over the hills when you look at the temperatures it's no surprise, six and seven here. do we have more to come on sunday? we do, we say goodbye to that low pressure and in comes the next band, cloud and rain and its associated weather fronts as we go through saturday night into sunday, again a soggy start and again mostly we think for england and wales but there is a greater chance that will then spread north into scotland and northern ireland on sunday, this saturday night. colder in the north of frost wintry showers, rather wet start to the day
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further south. we clear that, more showers behind and the afternoon does deteriorate across scotland and northern ireland, lots of heavy showers later in the day and the air is cold and of course it's the beginning of december, when three level on the highest hills as you can see, 10—15 possible in the south. a reminder of our main story this lunchtime: the world's most powerful leaders gather in argentina for the g20 summit. but it's clouded by tensions over trade, climate change, and the conflict in ukraine. that's all from the bbc news at one, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. good afternoon. i'm will perry. it's 1:30pm and here's your latest sports news. manchester united forward alexis sanchez is facing a long time out with a hamstring injury,
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according to his manager jose mourinho. the chilean suffered the injury in training yesterday and will have a scan to determine the extent of the damage but mourinho says it looks serious. from the top of my experience, just the painful scream and the way the injury happened, i know that it is going to be for a long time. it is not a little muscular injury that in one week or ten days the player is ready. british rower anna thornton is seriously ill in hospital after an accident in the united states. she's been left in a coma after falling down some stairs in seattle, where she's studying. british rowing say she's in a "stable but serious condition". thornton, who is 21 and from nottingham, retained her double sculls title at the world under 23 championships injuly.
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british cycling have confirmed that ethan hayter was knocked off his bike by a car earlier this month, forcing him to pull out of this weekend's track world cup in berlin. hayter suffered a concussion and he posted on social media that he "hasn't quite recovered". he's one of the sport's bright young stars, with the european omnium title and two commonwealth games medals to his name. officials said he was disappointed but hoped to be back for the london round of the world cup in mid december. after their pre—fight press conference descended into chaos, tyson fury‘s suggested the traditionalface—off between boxers at the weigh—in should be stopped. both he and deontay wilder have been warned they could lose their fight purse if trouble like this spills over later when the two go head to head in the traditional stand off before tomorrow's fight in la.
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he's not going to be given the opportunity to get in me face again, because it shouldn't be like that. this is a sporting contest. many people around the world are watching this fight and it's a sport fight. this isn't a bare—knuckle street fight, it's a boxing contest at the highest level. so all that that sort of stuff shouldn't be allowed to happen, not on my behalf anyway. it will be a defining moment for both in a fight which pits the unorthodox but effective style of fury, against the raw punching power of wilder, or the bronze bomber, as he refers to himself in the ring. i want england to know he is scared and he should be. they are scared of me for a reason. because of my mindset, because of what i possess. every time i speak it, you see what happens. i want them to be because when i step in the ring, it is no more deontay wilder, it is the bronze bomber.
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that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. with a little over ten days until the crucial vote in parliament on theresa may's brexit deal, the prime minister is urging mps to get behind the agreement. she's asking members to think about the consequences for constitutents if they vote against the deal. the pm, who's in argentina for the g20 summit, has been speaking to our political editor, laura kuenssberg and wouldn't be drawn on the likelihood of her agreement being voted down in the commons on december 11th. iam i am focusing on the clear message that i will be giving to members of parliament. first of all, i think mps should recognise that we have
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negotiated a good deal. the european union has been very clear that this is the deal on the table, it is a good dealfor the is the deal on the table, it is a good deal for the uk. is the deal on the table, it is a good dealfor the uk. it delivers on the vote of the referendum but it protects people's jobs and security. it is that issue of making sure we deliver brexit but also do it in a way that protects jobs and livelihoods. many, many, many dozens of your colleagues have pledged to vote against it. do you feel you can turn this around? we are talking to collea g u es turn this around? we are talking to colleagues about this vote but when it comes to the vote that people are being asked to make in the house of commons, people should remember that we gave the vote of the british people as to whether or not to leave the european union. people voted for brexit and i think it's up to us to deliver brexit. the message i get is that they want the government to do that, they want is to deliver brexit, and we want to do it in a way that protects people's jobs. i think it is that interest in
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constituents that mps need to have. soa constituents that mps need to have. so a matter of conscience? would people's we lives ahead of... this is an historic decision that mps will be taking and i hope they will all be putting the interests of their constituents at the forefront. sadly, what we see from the labour party and their various attempts to frustrate brexit and frustrate this vote, they don't have an alternative. what they seem to be able to do is try to stop us from delivering what people wanted, which is brexit. but your colleagues make the difference here and you have not been able to get them all on board. do you think you have a chance of winning this vote? i am still working to make sure that when we come to the vote on the 11th of december, this is a really important moment for us, and i think it's important for us all to think of the national interest. sadly, i see a labour party that is playing party
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politics with this. we need to put the national interest first. that is about delivering on the brexit vote, doing it in a way that things about constituents, theirjobs and their futures. but one of the reasons some of your own colleagues don't like about this deal is that there will still be a big role for the european court. you said there are guarantees on trade and fishing but you know many of those things are in the political declaration, they are not guaranteed in the future. are you being misleading? there's nothing misleading about what we have agreed. the political declaration is very clear. we will have an independent trade policy, we will be able to negotiate trade deals around the world. that is absolutely clear. we are also very clear that there is not going to be a long—standing role for the european court ofjustice in having jurisdiction in the united
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kingdom. that will come to an end. it is one of the things people voted for. do you feel cross with some of the brexiteers who pushed brexit for so the brexiteers who pushed brexit for so long and now are intent on rejecting what you have managed to achieve? there are very strongly held views on this issue on both sides of the argument. but i think now is the moment when we have an opportunity to deliver brexit for the british people and that should be at the forefront of our thinking when we go to vote on december the 11th. would you rule out voting a second vote in parliament?” 11th. would you rule out voting a second vote in parliament? i am focused on the vote taking place on december the 11th and i want everybody participating to focus on what this vote does. you are not ruling out a second vote? what this vote does. you are not ruling out a second vote ?|j what this vote does. you are not ruling out a second vote? i am focusing on the vote in just over two weeks' time. to ensure that when
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members of parliament come to that, they actually recognise the importance. this is a vote that will deliver brexit for the british people. it is our duty to deliver brexit. if that vote falls, will you still be prime minister?” brexit. if that vote falls, will you still be prime minister? i am focusing on that vote, because this is not about me or any individual member of parliament. . .. no, is not about me or any individual member of parliament.... no, it isn't. this is your deal, do what the leader of the country, don't you think people want to know what happens if your deal is rejected by mps? happens if your deal is rejected by mp5? i happens if your deal is rejected by mps? i think what the public want to know is that every member of parliament is going to put the national interest first, is going to put the interests of their constituents at the forefront of their thinking, and about delivering their thinking, and about delivering the brexit boat when they come to that vote. this is the moment when we can vote and show people that we understood, they want is to leave the european union, the deal that is
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on the table does that in a way that honours that referendum vote but also protects people's jobs, protects people's futures, and ensures we are able to take the opportunities of that bright future outside the european union. i have said tojeremy corbyn we should have atv said tojeremy corbyn we should have a tv debate. i want to have a tv debate. that's because i've got a firm plan, i have a proposal, i have a deal i have negotiated. we don't see any proposals coming from the labour party. instead, what i see from labour is an attempt to frustrate what the government is doing to deliver brexit and that is a betrayal of british people. that was the prime minister speaking to our political editor in argentina. police in county durham are calling for parents to take responsibility for their "out of control" teenagers after officers were surrounded and attacked by a group of up to 100 children.
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it happened in stanley earlier this month, but the force has just released body cam footage of the incident. we are asking people nicely to move away. you can see what is going on. bleep move back! what's going on. bleep that footage released by durham police. in a social media message filmed by durham police themselves, local sergeant emma kay had this to say. over the last two weeks, we have faced outbreaks of out—of—control children in the town centre. there were a hard—core
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group of around 20 people who threw bricks, fireworks and attacked my officers. one pcso was punched in the face by a young person. disorder of this kind is totally unacceptable and violence against our officers will not be tolerated. action will be taken against all the individuals involved in the incident that night. whilst there was a hard—core group of individuals involved in this incident, there are many on the sidelines. young people who are going to affect their life chances by continuing to engage in this type of behaviour. we are asking for parents to step up to the plate, take responsibility for your children. do you know where they are or are they going to bring trouble to your door? it is up to you to keep your children safe, out of harm's way and out of trouble. well, a former senior detective with county durham police who has worked in the stanley area where the footage was filmed has blamed cuts to policing numbers for the violence.
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i think that it is really necessary for parents to appreciate that when their children to leave their home, this is what they are getting up to. it's not acceptable. i would think that the vast majority of those parents of those young people involved will agree with the police and will help them and support them. i think what has happened over the la st i think what has happened over the last number of years, the police numbers have been cut and cut and cut, there are less officers in the community, regardless of whatever spin the police want to put on it, thatis spin the police want to put on it, that is the facts. my experience of stanley, when i served there, there would be up to 30 officers working in the stanley area. i appreciate times have moved on, however, if you we re times have moved on, however, if you were to do a survey of how many office rs were to do a survey of how many officers are covering stanley and the surrounding area over a 24—hour
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period, i would suggest it would be very minimal, so for me there has beena very minimal, so for me there has been a breakdown with the community and the police. in a moment, we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. world leaders arrive in argentina for the g20 summit but it's clouded by tensions over trade, climate change, and the conflict in ukraine. rail fares will rise by an average of 3.1% injanuary — the biggest increase for five years. the marriott hotel chain says there's been a breach of its reservations database, potentially exposing information of around 500 million guests. now the business news. the records of 500 million customers of the hotel group marriott international have been hacked. the hotel chain said the reservation database of its starwood division had been compromised by an unauthorised party. 327 million guests had had
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a combination of phone, passport numbers, email addresses and other details taken, while another unspecified number had had payment card details compromised there was a slight uptick in annual house price growth during november but the market remains subdued. prices were 1.9% higher than a year ago, up from a five—year low of 1.6% in october, the building society said. mike lynch, the former chief executive of software giant autonomy, has been charged with fraud in the us. the charge which carries a maximum term of 20 years, relates to its 2011 sale to computer giant hewlett—packa rd. free charging for electric cars will be available for customers at some tesco stores from next year. the supermarket, in partnership with volkswagen, plans to install almost 2,500 charging bays at up to 600 stores by 2020.
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marston's pub chain is also unveilign a plans to become the uk's first pub company to roll our rapid chargers across sites nationwide. ianjohnston, ceo of charging service engenie, joins me now. give me an idea about what this is going to allow customers with electric cars to do. good afternoon. what these two deals will allow customers to do is charge their electric vehicles within their everyday lives. the deals will see companies installing charges at places like super sockets —— supermarkets so owners places like super sockets —— supermarkets so owners can places like super sockets —— supermarkets so owners can charge their vehicles whilst going about their vehicles whilst going about their day. how long will it take to charge? there are different charging devices for different uses. many will be able to charge their
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vehicles at home or at work, where the charge is —— car is sat still for a couple of hours. rapid charges can give you 80 miles in less than half an hour charge, depending on the car and battery. some of these would be free? can you give me an idea what that would mean in practical terms. my understand of the margaash —— tesco and volkswagen deal... this is really interesting because it could alter depending how far this goes, it could alter the whole way in which people charge vehicles generally. the service station could eventually become redundant. it is amazing, the change we are seeing today. the charge can ta ke we are seeing today. the charge can take 15—35 minutes. where would you wa nt to take 15—35 minutes. where would you want to spend that time? i don't wa nt to want to spend that time? i don't want to spend that time? i don't want to spend half an hour sat at a roadside stations are what companies are doing is putting the charging
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infrastructure at the place where you are happy to spend half an hour or 45 minutes. you are looking for places where you can have something to eat, something to drink, or your daily tasks. what about in terms of the amount of infrastructure, the cost of putting these things in place? is it just cost of putting these things in place? ' ' cost of putting these things in place? is itjust plug into the grid or do these places have their own generation of electricity?” or do these places have their own generation of electricity? i think the key point is that the slow charges you see, people will have at home or businesses will have, they can plug into a normal supply, but the rapid charges will have a bigger electrical infrastructure installed. not every company has the deep pockets that tesco volkswagen have. you do see company is providing that service for companies. they will pay for the infrastructure, will run the network for the post business, and share part of the profit as well.
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you have not mentioned the words, shell, bp, are they being overtaken? i don't think they are... or could they be? they don't seem to be leading the charge towards electric vehicles. they are active in the marketplace and the small investments they are making, but what we're looking at is a complete change in behaviour. what we used to do when we fuel our cars is not what you will do in the future when you charge your electric vehicle. what they are offering is a premium convenience service and customers expect that. thank you so much. asda says it will bring in its cut to petrol prices this saturday. the supermarket is slashing up to 2p per litre off the price of unleaded and diesel petrol following continued decreases in the wholesale cost. morrisons and sainsbury‘s are also planning cuts. collectively the supermarkets have hundreds of petrol stations across the uk. the new "millennial" railcard will be on sale injanuary and available to four million
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eligible passengers, but the launch is running slightly late. the rail delivery group had promised that the digital—only 26 to 30 railcard would be on sale before the end of the year. it has now announced it will be on sale from 2january. starbucks says it's going to block customers from visiting adult sites on its free wi—fi in all its us outlets,but not until next year. watching explicit content in starbucks stores has always been banned, but now the coffee giant says it will actively these sites. who should customers thank for this move? a virginia—based non—profit called enough is enough. that's all the business news. a snow leopard was shot dead, after a keeper at dudley zoo left the enclosure door open and it escaped. the zoo says eight—year—old margaash was killed after getting free last month when the zoo had closed and all visitors had left. an investigation found the door
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to his enclosure was left open through "keeper error". a disciplinary procedure has taken place into those involved and security is being reviewed. let's get more on this from our reporter ben sidwell, who's outside dudley zoo for us. what exactly are the zoo saying about this? they told us that this happened around 5pm on the evening of october the 23rd. the zoo had closed so there was no public in the zoo closed so there was no public in the zoo at the time. but a keeper left the door to a new enclosure, a purpose—built enclosure for the two snow leopards, eight—year—old margaash and a three—year—old as well, they left the door open and at some point margaash escaped. there we re some point margaash escaped. there were efforts made to encourage him back into his actual enclosure but those failed. a vet was brought in
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and after that that was brought in, and after that that was brought in, a decision was made not to tranquilliser him but to actually shoot him because of fears for public safety. and as we saw in that picture, he was a beautiful creature. there is a lot of controversy creature. there is a lot of co ntrove rsy now creature. there is a lot of controversy now about the decision taken to shoot him rather than possibly use a tranquilliser. yes, they are an endangered species. in they are an endangered species. in the wild, there are only between 4000 and 4000 -- 6500 left, but the decision was taken because margaash was heading towards wooded area. they can climb trees, and the fear was because dudley zoo is in the heart of dudley, near residential areas, he could have climbed those trees, he could have attacked a human, and public safety is absolutely paramount. they did consider, and the vet did consider using a tranquilliser, the problem was, the decision was made because
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that tranquilliser they feel would have taken too long and they didn't know how he would have reacted to that tranquilliser as well. it was a decision taken on public safety. the zoo says decision taken on public safety. the zoo says staff are absolutely devastated by what happened. it was a last resort and as you say, a disciplinary investigation has taken place and the zoo say safety yet now has been improved. thank you very much indeed. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. it is not the best weather forecast for the start of december. there is a little bit of wintry weather in there as well, particularly for the northern half of the country, but there will be some sunshine as well. we have had more sunshine today so far than we have had for much of the week. the low pressure is starting to move away but it is this area of low
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pressure coming in as we move towards tomorrow that will give us a 5°99y towards tomorrow that will give us a soggy start across the south. we have got showers congregating through the bristol channel, but especially for northern and western parts of scotland. they could be a little bit wintry. it is not quite as mild as it has been either. the wind little bit lighter. some sunshine for the next couple of hours. however, soon after dark, the clouds start to again and after midnight we get more rain coming into england and wales. the further north you are, under the clear skies, we could have a touch of frost towards dawn. but in the south, we have got that mild air. so it is going to be quite a mild but snoddy —— soggy start to saturday. it could be quite windy as well. the winds don't look as strong as we have seen in recent days but it is a developing system so we will keep an eye on it. it looks like rain event on top of what we have seen this
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week. the ground saturated, river levels will rise, and you can see that mild south—westerly wind bringing the rain—soa ked that mild south—westerly wind bringing the rain—soaked amateurs will recover through the rain. further north, it looks brighter and drier. some morning mist to act as frost but it should be a nice day for much of northern ireland and scotland. there will be showers but averages should get 27 or 8 degrees. than today. a lot of cloud hanging around, even when the main rain clears, but then there is more to come through saturday night. moving m, come through saturday night. moving in, so some heavy outbreaks of rain potentially year. then it starts to clear away. a cold night in a north again buta clear away. a cold night in a north again but a mild one in the south once again. frosty in some of the glens. a little bit of mist and fog again. this time it looks as though scotla nd again. this time it looks as though scotland and northern ireland will see a bit more cloud and rain. for
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england and wales, hopefully a bit more sunshine, but lots of showers as well. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at two. global tensions dominate the meeting of g20 leaders in argentina — but for theresa may the main issues are very much at home. i'm focused on the vote taking place on december 11 and i want everybody who is going to participate, all members of parliament, to focus on what this vote does. but you're not ruling out a second vote? i am focusing on the vote in two weeks' time. we'll be live in buenos aires for the latest in just a moment — also coming up on afternoon live all the sport. alexis sanchez faces a lengthy spell on the sidelines with a hamstring injury which left him screaming in pain in training yesterday according to his managerjose mourinho. news on that and more build up to sunday mornings heavyweight showdown between fury and wilder in la to come. thanks.
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