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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 30, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at two. global tensions dominate the meeting of 620 leaders in argentina — but for theresa may the main issues are very much at home. i'm focused on the vote taking place on december 11 and i want everybody who is going to participate, all members of parliament, to focus on what this vote does. but you're not ruling out a second vote? i am focusing on the vote in two weeks‘ time. we'll be live in buenos aires for the latest in just a moment — also coming up on afternoon live all the sport. alexis sanchez faces a lengthy spell on the sidelines with a hamstring injury which left him screaming in pain in training yesterday according to his managerjose mourinho. news on that and more build up to sunday mornings heavyweight showdown between fury and wilder in la to come. thanks. more rain this weekend but not for all, wintry in scotland and northern ireland, more later.
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good afternoon, the world's most powerful leaders have gathered at the 620 summit in argentina where they will grapple with issues including trade, security and global warming. we can nowjoin my colleague tim willcox who's in buenos aires. welcome to the first 620 to be held in south america is well under way. in the past few minutes we have seen world leaders greeted by the president of argentina, all world leaders here apart from angle oracle who is not due to arrive for a few
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more hours, flat plane broke down en route, she is expected about 6pm —— angela merkel. the summer started with a breakfast meeting with the president and donald trump, both men have known each other for decades and have been involved in real estate deals and the pasture years. president putin was a little late some of his meetings have been postponed but already summit has been overshadowed by those tensions russia and ukraine. 0ne been overshadowed by those tensions russia and ukraine. one of the big focuses of the summit will be trade, what will happen in that dinner meeting tomorrow at between the president of china and president trump. 0ne trade deal has already been signed and president trump has been signed and president trump has been happy with that saying it is a historic deal as far as the united states is concerned. theresa may is here as well, she has been talking
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to the bbc. we have also heard from the eu. let's catch up with all these elements far at this cheap 20 620 summit. these days, international summits tend to focus on one man, what he says, what he tweets and what he does. this morning donald trump met his host, the president of argentina, and at least for now he was all charm. we have been friends for a long time, many years. he was a very young man, very handsome man. what the us president doesn't like is being part of a crowd. at this summit he is one of 20 world leaders converging on buenos aires, all with their own agendas and plans for world affairs. theresa may is the first british prime minister ever to visit this city, taking a break from her brexit troubles, but her focus was inevitably on persuading mps to support her deal back home. people voted for brexit and i think it's up to us to deliver brexit. the message i get from members of the public is they want the government to do that.
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they want us to deliver brexit and we want to do it in a way that protects people's jobs. the main issue at this summit is donald trump's trade war with president xi jinping of china. they will meet for the first time since new tariffs were imposed on billions of pounds worth of goods but few expect a breakthrough here. president putin is likely to face tough questions over the russian seizure of ukraine's vessels. president trump said he would not meet the russian leader until the confrontation was resolved. and mohammad bin salman, the saudi prince is also in town looking to repair his reputation after the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi. theresa may says she is looking for a full and transparent investigation. but for all the tensions, european leaders said it was important for the 620 to come together to tackle the world's problems. no one country, no one region, can go it alone. during these 620 meetings, we are of the
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opinion there is no alternative to multilateral cooperation. a trade war, naval confrontation, tensions with saudi arabia and the presence of donald trump. this is not a recipe for a smooth summit. the question is, what can these leaders find to agree on? james landale, bbc news, buenos aires. as we saw, theresa may is already here. before she arrived at the summit she gave an interview to the bbc asked how did she answer the critics who said that mid on had let down those britons by giving them a false brexit. there's nothing misleading about what we have
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agreed, the political declaration is very clear, we will have an independent trade policy and negotiate trade deals around the world. the secretary of state for international trade is making a speech today but we are also clear that there's not going to be a long—standing role for the european court ofjustice having you the leg jurisdiction in the united kingdom. it is one of the things people voted for and that is will come to an end. in october and you told she would ci’oss in october and you told she would cross with borisjohnson, do you feel cross that some of the brexiteers therapy for so long and unknown intent on rejecting what you have managed to achieve? there have been very strongly held views on this issue by both sides of the argument by many people. but now is the moment when we have an opportunity to deliver brexit for the british people and that should be at the forefront of our thinking when we go to vote on december 11. if your vote falls would you rule
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out holding a second vote in parliament? i am focused on the vote on december 11 and they want members of parliament to vote on this. but you're not ruling out a second vote? iam you're not ruling out a second vote? i am focusing on the boat and two weeks' time to insure than members of parliament come to that they recognise the importance. this is a vote that will deliver brexit for the british people. it is our duty to deliver brexit for the british people. we 620 is made up of 19 of the top world economies and the eu and jean—claude juncker and donald tusk at here and they have been speaking about the brexit legacy issues and what their plans well for reforming the wto. donald tusk had this to say. a few
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days before the vote and the house of commons at is becoming more and more clear that this deal is the best possible. and fact the only possible one. if this deal as dejected in the commons we are left as was stressed if few weeks able an alternative, no deal or no brexit at all. i want to reassure you that you must prepare for every scenario. the three key issues at this year's 620 are trade, also the saudi crown prince and how the world will respond to him and treat him, this is the first occasion he has been on the world stage since the murder of the world stage since the murder of the saudi journalist and also those tensions and escalations between russia and ukraine. i have been
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speaking to the international editor of foreign policy magazine, also the author of a book called the fix, how countries use crisis to solve the worlds worst problems and with that hat on and i spoke to him earlier i asked him how he viewed the latest escalation russia and ukraine. the book focuses on how crises are critical to countries solving big structural problems because it is only at moments of intense crises that leaders are able to assemble the political will and get the broad popular support to make painful reforms. the problem with applying that to the situation as you also need great courage from readers and a willingness to do painful things that may not serve their short—term article interest. it seems highly unlikely that that is on the cards from either the ukrainian but especially russian leadership and
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this case. putin has little reason to back down or compromise. but as with everything to do with russia and ukraine, it is incredibly obligated. this part of the black sea was agreed to be shared able to countries 15 years ago but since the annexation of crimea russia has built that bridge, which i think has been built deliberately low to prevent big ships getting into ukrainian ports. have you detected thatis ukrainian ports. have you detected that is part of this idea are perhaps of russia strangling off ukrainian ports because of crimea? absolutely and this is russia doing an analogue of what china is trying to do and the south china seed which is to declare the waters on its borders or any contested regions not open seas are accessible to everyone which is of course the way things are supposed to work under the un convention on the law of the seas but exclusive russian territory. let's move to china, the is a dinner
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between president xi and donald trump on saturday, how desperate do you think officials are to try and bring about some troops here because donald trump whether he was asked whether he could do a deal said you either like things at the moment, the tariffs bringing billions of dollars into the us economy. speaking of desperation, i have to say that i feel great sympathy for the argentinians, this was supposed to be the great coming out party for argentina and is a standard to be like a funeral attended by zombies and the sense that nothing on the original agenda is going to be accomplished and almost all the leaders who are showing up at grievously wounded of not moribund. angela merkel as a lame duck, macron has more popularity than richard nixon during watergate, the mexican president has one day left in office
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and president trump arrives at the because moment in his presidency because news yesterday and the day before, as personal lawyer admitting that trump was deeply involved in this attempt to strike a real estate deal with russia during the campaign. we are expecting a photograph in about 45 minutes, eve ryo ne photograph in about 45 minutes, everyone keen to see what the body language as between world leaders with all these various issues coming to the fore at the 620. after that there will be a plenary and more bilaterals throughout the day, a gala dinner later and then the 620 continues tomorrow. who will be seeing the saudi crown prince? we're hearing
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theresa may will probably meet him at some stage, we're not quite clear how for more that meeting will be. a lot happening here at the 620 and still no sign of angela merkel, she is due to arrive in a few hours, effectively missing the first day of this 620 and one sided. let's find out what is happening closer to home and the prime minister saying she is focused on voters happening here particular that first vote. interesting that you do not rule out a second vote, but she is saying it is this deal or nothing, and doing very clearly that effectively mps should listen to their constituents, get behind her deal and on message, donald tusk from the european union saying much
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the same thing. an attempt here to try to focus minds very much on that vote on december 11 but there are other manoeuvrings going on here at westminster, labour have published their amendment to her final deal vote, it calls for a different approach, a customs union with the eu, it is unlikely to pass but there's another amendment doing the rounds which is maybe more interesting from labour backbencher hilary benn, he has been talking to other opposition parties, he has the snp on board, plaid cymru, the green mp and a couple of conservatives and what his amendment would do if it was passed would say that if theresa may's deal falls in the option of no deal is taken off the table. 0ne may's deal falls in the option of no deal is taken off the table. one of public arguments is that if she does not get backing then no deal as a possibility and other adamant she is making, a street party particle
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argument is that they not effectively becoming the party of no deal, they are risking a no deal scenario because they are opposing her deal. if you get a motion that says no deal is off the agenda entirely that would blunt her attack. but motion is not binding on ministers, that is the major flaw in it. none the less the hope would be that ministers would listen to parliament and in then effectively taking no deal of the table come up with something else. that's something else for some people as another referendum, for others it is trying to get theresa may to move more towards labour's position on a customs union. from our point of view it is not getting support for her deal, it is big sure these alternatives are also voted down and that will be a huge challenge because 12th talking to world leaders and argentina some of her own backbench mps in westminster might need right a few words of their own ear because at the moment we reckon around 90 or so are refusing to give their backing. because if that is a second vote
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talkers through this, the first vote on december 11 said christmas is cancelled in the newspaper. reasonably the second vote would have to be early in the new year. now there's a lot about mps about it how it is a vote in the national interest, how destiny is at stake. this puts to the test as to whether they would be prepared to sacrifice they would be prepared to sacrifice the christmas holiday. i am it would quite come to that but what would happen is technically in any case as she is defeated on december 11, the government has to three weeks to ta ke government has to three weeks to take stock and come back with an alternative plan. it is far more likely that because there would likely be a disruption in the markets they would do this more quickly. people have been talking about potentially parliament meeting over the weekend of the 15th and 16th of december, potentially even getting close to christmas as well but she would then come back with an alternative deal. the eu are saying
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we don't want to open this withdrawal agreement but there may be some movement on the declaration that has not yet a legally binding. theresa may wants to avoid that scenario by insisting as eu officials but that is not really a possibility, it is her deal or nothing. there are other scenarios, and to speculation here but it could be if there's a big defeat some of oui’ be if there's a big defeat some of our own mps decide they have had enough of hard and put in a motion of no—confidence, it could be that labour try to put that followed in the house of commons to try to call an early general election so there are many possibilities that she rather avoid, not least of which is cancelling christmas. thank you. the marriott hotel chain says there's been a breach of the reservations database of its starwood division — potentially exposing information about 500 million guests. the brands affected include sheraton and le meridien. among the details accessed were passport numbers, payment card information,
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addresses and phone numbers. it's thought the unauthorised activity has been going on since 2014. it's one of the biggest such breaches in recent years. and we'll discussing this story in more detail in our business news a little later this hour you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines world leaders arrive in argentina for the 620 summit — but it's clouded by tensions over trade, climate change, and the conflict in ukraine. the american hotel chain marriott international says there's been a breach of the reservations database in its starwood division — potentially exposing the information of around 500 million customers. rail fares will rise by an average of 3.1% injanuary — the biggest increase for five years. and in sports alexis sanchez faces a lengthy spell on the sidelines with a hamstring in sports ith a hamstring
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injury which left him screaming in pain in training yesterday according to his managerjose mourinho. news on that and more build up to sunday mornings heavyweight showdown between fury and wilder in la to come. and the european 0mni and champion at has pulled out of the european champions, the has not recovered from a concussion. rail passengers and unions have reacted with outrage to news that train fares are to rise by 3.1% in the new year. the rise comes after a year of timetable chaos, strikes, and delays on some parts of the network. about 40% of fares, including season tickets, will be affected. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. the cost of taking a train is going up. from january, the average price of a fair will increase by 3.1%. next year, a season ticket from manchester to leeds will increase from £3172 to 3272, an increase of £100. a london to brighton ticket will go
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up from £4696 to 481m, a rise of £1118 was that many travellers at london bridge station today were distantly unimpressed. a bit outraged, really. i expect there will always be increases every year, but really they are not performing. most times i have to stand all the way to london bridge and all the way back home. so, no, i'm not happy. i wouldn't mind paying an increase if they manage to get trains into the station on time and at the moment they are not. the annual increase in the price of rail tickets is one of the less welcome winter traditions in britain. but this year travellers have particular reason to be angry. a timetabling fiasco and a succession of strikes have led to thousands of trains being cancelled or delayed and made a lot of people very angry. that has led to calls for fares to be frozen. i think passengers are paying more
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than enough towards the cost of the railway and the government should look at the balance and keep pressure on the industry to reduce its costs and pass it on to passengers like a normal industry but the rail delivery but the rail delivery group, representing train companies and network rail, says the extra money is badly needed to cover rising costs and fund new investment. nobody wants to pay extra for their fares but what do the increases cover? the day to day running of the railways, allowing billions of extra money to be focused on investment. new stations, new carriages and extra services. the industry is promising major improvements to the railway network, allowing thousands of new services every week from 2021 and making travel more comfortable and reliable. but that is likely to be cold comfort for passengers as they had to work in january faced with a new year of higher prices. theo leggett, bbc news. ukraine is banning russian men
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aged between 16 and 60 from entering the country. it's comes amid rising tension between the two countries — after russia seized three ukrainian naval vessels off the coast of crimea. ukraine has already declared martial law, and it's now banning russian men of fighting age to prevent what it calls the formation of ‘private armies.‘ richard lister reports. another day of exercises for these ukrainian troops amid growing fears of a russian invasion. kiev has already imposed martial law in these border regions. now the ukraine president has banned russian men of fighting age from crossing into the country. translation: these measures are to block the russian federation from forming private armies here under the leadership of the russian armed forces and to prevent them from carrying out operations like those we saw in 2014. when russia annexed ukraine's crimean peninsula four years ago, it was these russian militia men in unmarked fatigues
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who led the way. they quickly took over the airport and other key sites. ukraine sees last week's clashes in the kerch strait when russia seized three ukrainian vessels and their crews is the first steps to another russian land grab. but moscow accuses kyiv of overreacting. translation: i think it would be very scary if anyone tried to mirror the decisions taken in ukraine. this would be madness. what has happened there is the result of a dysfunctional government. kiev wants nato to patrol this stretch of water between russia and ukraine to stop ukraine's allies are wary of inflaming tensions further but the eu has signalled today that it is likely to extend sanctions against russia later this month. richard lister, bbc news. police in south west scotland are searching for a couple whose car was found washed up on a remote beach after flooding in the area. the vehicle belonging tojim and susan kenneavy was discovered by workmen clearing debris from a flooded coastal road
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beside drummore beach in dumfries and galloway. 0ur correspondent katie hunter has been following developments there is a very intense search going on here, dozens of people scouring the shoreline. police say they are very worried about james and susan, the couple not seen since wednesday afternoon. the card found washed up ona afternoon. the card found washed up on a beach not far from afternoon. the card found washed up on a beach not farfrom here afternoon. the card found washed up on a beach not far from here at 7:30am yesterday. it is a lovely day here today, a bit windy, a different story on wednesday, high waves lashing the coastal road behind me. there are about 30 people involved in the search at the moment, they probably only have a few more hours of daylight left, i am told the search is expected to continue until
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daylight fades and possibly beyond but the longer the search goes on the more concern grows forjames and susan but emergency services are keen to emphasised this is very much a search and rescue operation. time for a look at the weather... here's helen willetts you said there was the possibility of flash flooding in california. yes, we have had the catastrophic fires and that is no vegetation left to hold that water. this was the satellite picture through yesterday, you can see the cloud and rain moving across california, easing away but that is more waiting in the winds, that looks like it will go farther north but a north—west coming in and strong winds but the water is the colour of chaco, it has ash in it and unfortunately that amount of rain falling in such a small space of time, it has led to
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many evacuations and many flood warnings. legal several thousand miles away, the same in the mediterranean, in turkey. this autumn, they have had the time of it so autumn, they have had the time of it so this was in the south—west of turkey, on the coasts, look how deep the water is, a whirlpool developed with the sheer amount of rain and because it has been wet this autumn the ground cannot take much more at the ground cannot take much more at the rivers will be topping over so u nfortu nately the rivers will be topping over so unfortunately these are the sort of effects we have been seeing in the past 24 hours. looking at that, it looks quite lively coming towards us as well. but for pataki itself it looks like we might see things slowly —— turkey itself. more rain due, hopefully not as windy ali windy. we are going into winter and it
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might feel more wintry if you live in the north. we have had some showers, felt like april and showers will see at november four most of us. this was in wales and then this one showing the sunshine and this is the sort of phases of the weather we have been seeing, sunshine and showers but as mentioned and looks like we have something more significant heading our way, into england and wales a little uncertainty and at the moment cold a across the country not as mild as it has been in recent days so some showers over the tops of the scottish mountains falling as snow and we will see that progressively over the weekend. mostly over the hell at this stage but perhaps into next week, keeping close eye on things. into saturday morning, the wet weather arrives, possible into northern ireland and southern scotland, certainly england and wales. farther north of bill be cold
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up wales. farther north of bill be cold up than it has been, a touch of frost. you can see the difference in the across the uk, the mild atlantic air with cloud and rain and stronger winds, probably not as strong as yesterday but nevertheless fairly brisk breeze blowing the rain eased through the morning. the rain may clear out across england and wales, temporarily but we keep a lot of clouds even after brightons it'll turn progressively cloudy and drizzly, misty over hells crossed for the north it is likely we think the rain will be mostly across england and wales mac but rushing into the borders of scotland and northern ireland, claiming to allow bright and whether and should be quite a crisp day, between six and eight which is lower than we have seen all week. on sunday we get more rain which happens to be saturday night, the area of cloud, rain and low pressure and the attendant with a front coming in 6oogle as a wet night on saturday. it looks like
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this time scotland and northern ireland will see some rain as well so this is how we go through saturday night if you are out and about and heading out late, you might well get wet. that clears way and we get the cold air in the not so fast to start sunday and fog as well but it looks in scotland and northern ireland willjoin in with the unsettled weather on sunday but it is cold aerosol look at that, some snow over hells and showers for the rest of us. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the american hotel chain marriott international says there's been a breach of its reservations database in its starwood division — potentially exposing information of around 500 million customers. world leaders arrive in argentina for the 620 summit — but it's clouded by tensions over trade, climate change, and the conflict in ukraine. meanwhile, the prime minister has refused to rule out another commons vote on her brexit deal if mps reject it the first time. rail fares will rise by an average of 3.1% injanuary —
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the biggest increase for five years. the nhs is to offer thousands of people an ultra low—calorie, liquid diet in a bid to reverse type two diabetes. sport now on afternoon live with will and one of the best paid players in the premier league alexis is not going to be playing for a while... the premiership, get their name right! the premier league. what kind of generation are you from? you know exactly which one! i know! only a bit more than we pay you per week, £500,000 per week. not a good time for him. he's not been starting many games underjose mourinho since he arrived from arsenal. manchester united forward alexis sanchez is facing a lengthy spell out with a hamstring injury according to his managerjose mourinho. have a look at this, this is him
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relaxing at home today and his golden retriever looking concerned. i don't know whether that is atom or humber. why do i know their names? because in a loser. that is an icing machine. —— because in a loser. the chilean suffered the injury in training yesterday and will have a scan to determine the extent of the damage but mourinho says it looks serious. from the top of my experience, the painful scream and the way the injury happened, i know that he is going to be out for a long time. it's not a little injury in one week oi’ it's not a little injury in one week or ten days, the player is ready.
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he has only scored four goal since arriving from arsenal nearly a year ago last january. more is expected of him and he will miss that game against his former club on the 5th of december. and you know names of his dogs? what a weirdo! now, a punch—up between two boxes wouldn't normally make news but at the press conference the other day and the big fight at the weekend is ratcheting 7 fight at the weekend is ratcheting up? is it pantomime? tyson fury says no. he says the rivalry with deontay wilder is jane when that not long until the fight that many of us have been waiting to see. after their pre—fight press conference descended into chaos, tyson fury‘s suggested the traditionalface—off between boxers at the weigh—in should be stopped. both he and deontay wilder have been warned they could lose their fight purse if trouble like this spills over later when the two go head to head one last time before tomorrow's fight in la.
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he's not going to be given the opportunity to get in me face again, because it shouldn't be like that. this is a sporting contest. many people around the world are watching this fight and it's a sport fight. this isn't a bare—knuckle street fight, it's a boxing contest at the highest level. so all that that sort of stuff shouldn't be allowed to happen, not on my behalf anyway. it will be a defining moment for both in a fight which pits the unorthodox but effective style of fury, against the raw punching power of wilder — or the bronze bomber, as he refers to himself in the ring. i want england to know that he is scared of me, he shouldn't be. they are scared of me for a reason. because of my mindset and what i possess. i speak and believe and receive it and every time i speak it you see what happens. they are
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scared of me. i want them to be. when i step into the ring, it isn't deontay wilder, it's the the bronze bomber, can't you see? british rower anna thornton is seriously ill in hospital, after an accident in the united states. she's been left in a coma after falling down some stairs in seattle, where she's studying. british rowing say she's in a "stable but serious condition". thornton, who is 21 and from nottingham, retained her double sculls title at the world under 23 championships in july. british cycling have confirmed that ethan hayter was knocked off his bike by a car earlier this month, forcing him to pull out of this weekend's track world cup in berlin. hayter suffered a concussion and he posted on social media that he hasn't quite recovered. he's one of the sports bright young stars, with the european omnium title and two commonwealth games medals to his name. officials said he was disappointed but hoped to be back for the london round of the world cup in mid december. that's all the sport for now.
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the reason i know the names of his dogsis the reason i know the names of his dogs is because they used to live in a hotel next to me, and i used to go down and stroke his dogs before i would go to the gym. and you get paid asa would go to the gym. and you get paid as a dog walker? i know what is going on, subsidising your income! thanks for that. the commonwealth secretary general, baroness scotland, has warned that the threat of climate change to small countries in parts of the commonwealth nation is putting their economic development at risk. it's been just over a year since hurricanes irma and maria — two of the most powerful atlantic storms recorded in a decade — devastated parts of the caribbean. for the 53 countries in the commonwealth — many of which are vulnerable to natural disasters — climate change represents a big threat, especially with an increase in global temperatures and higher sea levels. thank you for coming, i cannot believe it is a year since you were
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last here! the problem is greater thanit last here! the problem is greater than it was a year ago. the warnings you have then about we cannot ignore climate change, you have seen first—hand what it is doing. absolutely, we spoke about what happened to dominique, it was nearly destroyed by maria last year. it caused 226 damage to the gdp, and if you look at what has happened this year, the hurricanes and the storms, and the fires, theyjust kept on going. and the risks to small and vulnerable countries is even more acute. in this world of 24-hour news, the focus moves elsewhere and actually what happens in small countries like this afterwards is, in many ways, more frightening than the actual cause? it is, and for we in the secretariat and in the commonwealth we say, what do we do? many of the smaller countries do not
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have enough money to make the repairs that they need to and to mitigate and adapt. they've got to make sure it does not happen again. what do we do now to shore that up? the international community has made a lot of money purportedly available but for many of these countries, they cannot get their hands on it. they are small, vulnerable and do not have the skills or the resources . not have the skills or the resources. what we are doing in the secretariat is we have created some of the tools that will help them. 0ne of the tools that will help them. one of those is the climate change finance access hub, which means we are putting experts on the ground to help them to make the applications and most of those coming through now, 71% of them, are about adaptation. weight and what about those who say, it is very well pouring money into these areas but if global temperatures rise and with global warming getting worse, what is the point? absolutely not, we
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have to analyse what we need to do to ensure that the damage is less likely to happen again. in the past, we would just replace what was there with what had been there before. it isa with what had been there before. it is a bit ofa with what had been there before. it is a bit of a no—brainer. the same thing will happen. now, we are looking at the science and working together, looking at a restorative and a regenerative approach, so we really don't just and a regenerative approach, so we really don'tjust mitigate and make better but we adapt, change and build in resilience. real resilience, to make sure these countries have a future. the climate change conference you are going to, you have been to many in the past. what do they achieve in reality? we are bringing together focus and commitment and we need a sense of urgency. more than 25,000 people
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turn up to this conference and they are coming because, at last, it is realised that it is urgent. the commonwealth has been on this track since 1989. we are putting up the flag saying, this is an existential step. people did not believe that before but now we have had real exa m ples of before but now we have had real examples of where economies have been destroyed and whole countries have been destroyed. so nobody can pretend it isn't real anymore. is there a lot of perspective, certainly here at the moment, given the political climate in the uk that brexit seems to overrule everything at the moment? there are so many important issues and it is always the same. what we have to do is concentrate on those that will really make the difference. climate is affecting all of us. it affects us is affecting all of us. it affects us in the united kingdom, across europe, and it affects africa, asia,
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every pa rt europe, and it affects africa, asia, every part of the world. the caribbean, the pacific. we are seeing it daily on our televisions. somewhere is a fire. somewhere is an earthquake. that is not going to change. 6etting global attention on this is really important in poland. i hope they speak. does it frustrate you sometimes, not the obsession, but if there is a wildfire in california or something happening in australia, there appears to be a lot of coverage of that. it is partly logistical, it is difficult to get those pictures out but we don't know so much about other parts of the world. that is ourjob and that is why it is fantastic that the bbc has not forgotten these small areas. it is important for us to understand there is no part of the world any longer where you can say, it's not about me. what has happened is when
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it hits the bigger countries, they are understanding that these little countries are like the canaries that you send down the mine. able be burnt first, but the bigger ones will be burnt later and what is happening globally as we are finally realising that this is about all averse. and we all have to fix it. there are things we can do. we need to share what works and share what does not work. i think there are opportunities for us to do things, like building. a understanding of vulnerability, universal vulnerability, universal vulnerability index so people can see this is where they fit and finding instruments that enable people to make the difference that we need to and make sure the poor and vulnerable countries get the money that they need to be the difference. they did not make the problem that they are certainly suffering from it. while you are here, they are words that most
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people dread! the brexit issue, that issue of trade, global warming is a bigger issue for the planet but the issue of trade is one globally. for the uk, it's important in the coming yea rs the uk, it's important in the coming years and you often here that the commonwealth will be important. do you sense a change in not only the ukippers approach to the commonwealth but vice versa? trade has always been important and in 2015, before brexit, there was an understanding that there was real opportunity for the commonwealth. the whole 53 countries of which the uk is one. there is a 19% advantage of trading with one another. into commonwealth trade was 585 billion. it could be anything up to a trillion. we had 700 billion by 2020. there is a huge opportunity for us to grow that intercom and
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will trade and make sure that our countries grow together in prosperity. so we have that opportunity, the commonwealth is making the charge, and i think people are noticing. when one thinks of countries like new zealand that we re of countries like new zealand that were not happy at the sudden cutting of trade, when the uk joined the european economic community? we had a very mature development of the relationship since then, and there are opportunities now that everybody wa nts to ta ke are opportunities now that everybody wants to take advantage of. those opportunities also are there, for green and blue economies. we have created the commonwealth blue charter to deal with issues in the oceans. we now know that the oceans have as much richness as we have online. we need to harvest that in a way that is sustainable so we do not make the mistakes and compound it. these are real opportunities, the
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small island states are big blue ocean states. this coming together by the commonwealth, we are 53 countries, one third of the worlds population. 60% of the commonwealth is under the age of 30. that is the market. trade is going from west to east. it is a growth area. i think it is an exciting time to be in the commonwealth, it is a challenging time and we have to look after the earth and be prosperous, that is our commonwealth future, we want to be fairand commonwealth future, we want to be fair and prosperous. all of it is therefore us, but to do that, unless we do something about climate change it will be intolerable. all of it needs to be done. the opportunity is therefore us and we are taking it.
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it is quite an agenda! baroness scotland, it is great to see you. thank you. thousands of people in england are to be prescribed an ultra—low calorie, liquid—only diet after initial trials showed it can reverse type two diabetes in people who've recently been diagnosed. nhs england says the diet will be used alongside an expanded programme that focuses on prevention. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. it's about cutting down. you know, small steps... at a community centre in leeds, the battle against diabetes is under way. reducing portion sizes and how frequent you have these naughty foods and all that... all the people here were on the cusp of developing type 2 diabetes. now they've been helped to lose a bit of weight and think about what they're eating. everybody should be educated about how we eat, what we eat, why we eat, and when we eat. i've lost so much weight. i feel better, i feel happier. an estimated 12.3 million people in the uk are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
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a quarter of a million people in england have already been referred to the special prevention programme, like the one running in leeds. on average, they've lost nearly 4kg, so now the scheme is being extended. weight loss is all well and good, and we're delighted with the weight—loss trajectories that we've seen in participants on the programme. of course, what counts at the end of the day is whether we are preventing type 2 diabetes from arising. that takes a little longer. and there is help too for those who have already developed type 2 diabetes. a recent trial of a very low—calorie diet using liquid meals has helped almost half of those involved to reverse the condition. i decided to do something, walk around the house... that project is also being rolled out more widely, reflecting the growing concerns about the impact diabetes is having on our health. idid it i did it because i did not want to die. i wanted to live, i have young
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kids and so i did it to live for my children. that was me finding my own way of dealing with it and that is what i would say to people. do it for yourselves. poor diet and weight gain is driving the growth in type two diabetes. the number living with the condition in the uk is approaching 4 million. it's a health crisis that campaigners say is beginning to be addressed. we need to ta ke beginning to be addressed. we need to take rapid action and that is why we are delighted that nhs england have made the announcement today, not only to think about prevention but also for those living with type two diabetes now, to think about the potential for them to put it into remission. improving the health of patients in saving the nhs money. the fight against the type two diabetes epidemic has been stepped up. jamie is here with the business news, going to new york in a moment. first, the headlines. the american hotel chain
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marriott international says there's been a breach of the reservations database in its starwood division — potentially exposing the information of around 500 million customers. world leaders arrive in argentina for the 620 summit — but it's clouded by tensions over trade, climate change, and the conflict in ukraine. rail fares will rise by an average of 3.1% injanuary. here's your business headlines on afternoon live... there was a slight uptick in annual house price growth during november but the market remains subdued. prices were 1.9% higher than a year ago. prices grew byjust1.6% in the year to october. mike lynch, the former chief executive of software giant autonomy, has been charged with fraud in the us. the charge which carries a maximum term of 20 years, relates to the 2011 sale of the company to computer giant hewlett—packa rd.
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free charging for electric cars will be available for customers at some tesco stores from next year. tesco, in partnership with volkswagen, plans to install almost 2,500 charging bays at up to 600 stores by 2020. while pub chain marstons has also announced its plans to roll out rapid chargers across sites nationwide. donald trump has signed one of the most important us trade deals in history, mexico and canada have worked hard in agreeing this, nafta will be gone and it will be fantastic for all, he says. we may see the markets respond to that. but this marietta story, in terms of data breaches, not the biggest, but it will affect a lot of people. data breaches, not the biggest, but it will affect a lot of peoplelj wonder whether the headline should
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be 7% of the world's population has just been hacked. it is a lot of people. to get it straight, if the hotel that you went to as marriot, thatis hotel that you went to as marriot, that is not affected. it is the sta rwood that is not affected. it is the starwood sector but it is a lot of hotels. it seems as though it has been going on for quite some time. we know that there are something like 327 million guests who had their names, e—mail addresses and so on, they have been compromised in some way. and passport details? yes. but from a financial point of view, there is an unspecified number of people with their credit card details and expiry dates. we do not know the degree and whether encryption details have been taken away but dotted why has it taken so
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long? they only found out recently. literally, it seems this last month that there was a security alert within their system which told them something had been going on but they say this has gone back several years that they have been compromised. it's a real problem for a while. let's go to the united states and michelle fleu ry to the united states and michelle fleury is our correspondence there. it's a shocking story. and it could be one of the biggest ever? that's right, they got an alert from their security system, pointing out that something was going on and there was an attempted breach. when they looked into it, they discovered it we nt looked into it, they discovered it went all the way back to 2014, it had been going on for four years at the starwood division of the company, affecting all these guests who had come and stayed and shared information on their registration system. there were details about
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passport numbers, all of that they fear has been revealed. also credit ca rd fear has been revealed. also credit card details, typically they are encrypted but there was concern that possibly, whoever the hacker is, they have the key to that and they can essentially get the details and expiration dates. not clear but we are waiting to find out more. in the uk, the data regulator has said they are looking into this. it is significant because if you recall that eu rules went into effect on gdp are data protection regulation where if the company violates its rules, they face fines at the maximum end of that to 4% of their global revenue. and what does this due to the company? it is huge, one of the biggest in the world. it is the starwood division but it is irrelevant, unless you are a
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customer and your details could be vulnerable but it could be disastrous for the company? the share price is down 7% this morning and we only started the trading day 23 minutes ago. this will be costly to the company. we've seen it in the past, the yahoo breach, and aqua facts, they track peoples credits here in america. when it was compromised to cost the company dearly. they are setting up a website, they will not ask people for their website, they will not ask people fortheire—mails and website, they will not ask people for their e—mails and more information, they are asking customers to come to them and look at the website and they will try and get to the bottom of it. they are offering credit protection to customers who may have been affected that this is early on in the customers response and we will see what happens going forward. are hotel businesses down as a result.
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where is safe at the moment?” haven't looked, but there are shares in cybersecurity companies which may be doing better today. if you have a job in compliance at any company, you may be double—checking your systems are up—to—date and everything is in order. these hacks, whether you are hotel, yahoo, or a retailer, like target, that was a big breach in the united states. it shows that now, more and more of us are sharing data and trying to keep that safe becomes a more expensive challenge for companies. michelle, thank you. they have issued a free helpline for uk customers. we will give that number out throughout the afternoon. 08081891065.
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give that number out throughout the afternoon. 08081891065m give that number out throughout the afternoon. 08081891065. it is the perfect base for a scan, they say they can sort it out for you, all cold calls, take them with a pinch of salt. do not answer them. anyone with real concerns would reach you by letter, you should be enquiring from them and take the initiative to see whether things have gone wrong rather than waiting for a cold call. the reality, from this companies point of view, they will be doing a lot of damage limitation, trying to rollback the problems that could go out of control for this company. if they do not exercise some sort of damage limitation. and what about the markets. and there we saw the ftse drop below 7000. it's just
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moved up again. the oil price is down. below $60 per barrel. even though we have had reports from us stock, saying that they are still very high. that is one of the reasons why the price is coming down. except at the pubs! we never get that! thanks, talk to you later. time for a look at the whether with helen willetts. thank you. after recent wet and windy weather, todayis after recent wet and windy weather, today is karma. not without big showers, producing some rain and funder, and lightning. this is in wales, a beautiful rainbow, looking out towards the shower cloud. in derbyshire, some sunshine. that's the name of the game, shower and sunshine, you can already see low— pressure sunshine, you can already see low—pressure beginning to move in through the evening and overnight. as showers deplete in the north, we
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get marange coming in, into parts of northern ireland and southern scotla nd northern ireland and southern scotland but it is looking wet. under clear skies, it is colder, some frost levels. missed and fogg. cold air with this weather system attending in some areas. mild air. we do have a soggy start on saturday, especially in england and wales. possibly as far north as southern scotland. 6usty on southern and western coasts, which will blow the rain out the way through the morning. brightening up in south—west england and wales. that rain could stretch towards the scottish borders, affecting east of northern ireland. we have a day of sunny spells, crisp and wintry sunshine around, there's showers will be wintry over the hills. colder in scotland once again, six or seven. in england and wales, we have mild air. 13 or 14 degrees.
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low— pressure have mild air. 13 or 14 degrees. low—pressure moving out the way. on saturday night, we have this area of rain, and low—pressure moving in. on saturday night, it is wet again in england and wales, the third or fourth spell of wet weather through the week so far, not so much further north but we do have a colder night, the risk is there of frost and fog first thing on sunday morning. but that rain should clear. it looks like the afternoon is dry and bright with some showers. scotland and northern ireland will see persistent rain, and wintry weather over the hills. by then, showers coming in thick and fast in southern and western areas too. 6oodbye. hello, you're watching
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afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3. the global hotel chain, marriott international says there's been a breach of its reservations database — in its starwood division — potentially exposing the information of half a billion guests 6lobal tensions dominate the meeting of 620 leaders in argentina — but for theresa may the main issues are very much at home. i'm focused on the vote taking place on december 11 and i want everybody who is going to participate, all members of parliament, to focus on what this vote does. but you're not ruling out a second vote? i am focusing on the vote in two weeks' time. rail fares rise for
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millions of commuters, by an average of three point one percent in january. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — that's with will perry. more on alexis sanchez‘s injury which is likely to keep him out of action for manchester united for a long time according to his managerjose mourinho and more build up to sunday morning's heavyweight showdown between fury and wilder in la to come. thanks will, and we'll be joining you for a full update just after half—past. helen willetts has all the weather. more rain due for the weekend after the sunny skies we have enjoyed today, disappointing for some but drier and brighter weather and called in the north, more later. thanks helen also coming up — as the nhs offers an ultra low—calorie, liquid diet to try to reverse type two diabetes — we'll be speaking to a consultant on how a change in lifestyle can help alter the condition. hello everyone —
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this is afternoon live. the marriott hotel chain says there's been a breach of the reservations database of its starwood division — potentially exposing information about 500 million guests. the brands affected include sheraton and le meridien. among the details accessed were passport numbers, payment card information, addresses and phone numbers. it's thought the unauthorised activity has been going on since 2014. it's one of the biggest such breaches in recent years. our technology reporter chris foxjoins me now. lots of questions as to why it has taken so long to jealous about this but what first of all of these hackers got? the company believe they have started to encrypt and make a copy of a customer database
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so that had 500 million customer records on it, love those more than 300 million had some combination of name, e—mail address, postal actress, booking dates and so on and so for 300 million people that there's a lot of information, possibly up to 500 million, do not how far the attack has got them copying the data base copying the database on whether based all it at all but they have to assume the worst and that is why they have notified customers. what exactly they have notified customers. what exa ctly d o they have notified customers. what exactly do we think has happened? is ita exactly do we think has happened? is it a deliberate attack, on what? on the database which is used to reserve hotel rooms, a thing used throughout the chain and the related companies and it is a booking system with lots of personal information. how does someone get that? we do not quite know yet, the hotel has not revealed that but if it has been going on for years it could be an insider, someone who has figured out
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how to get access and has taken a long time for them to spot, only got flagged in september when an automated a lot when they know someone was trying to get access to the system. talking about a hotel chain, you and using their wi—fi, putting an information using sometimes your own laptop, is that vulnerable as well? they always say if you want to be safe to not use the hotel wi—fi because you don't know if it is the genuine network, someone could be taking you into signing up to a separate network so stay on your own devices and drug use hotel wi—fi. stay on your own devices and drug use hotelwi-fi. thank you. joining me now is dr max eiza, lecturer in computing and security at the university of central lancashire. how big a deal could this be? it's actually a big deal because of this isa actually a big deal because of this is a lost lot of user accounts, 500
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million personal information, names, dates of birth excess. this is a big deal because a lot of people use this data to create passwords on other social media accounts. there isa other social media accounts. there is a massive data breach u nfortu nately, we is a massive data breach unfortunately, we have not seen something like this since yahoo. as it goes back to 2014, it would seem strange that no one has spotted this. i think the company has been slow in responding to this because if you have this problem from 2014 and it's to queue for years —— for yea rs and it's to queue for years —— for years to find out what happened, there is a real problem there, a concern over personal data security and privacy within the company and
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the company that bought the chain recently so it is a really concerning. and people finding out about this just now, what should they be doing? the company says they will e—mail customers affected, if you receive it and will not ask you for personal information because something to watch out for is that scammers use data breaches like this to send out lots of e—mails to trick people into handing over more information. mcafee has set up a specific website you can get the information on the mcafee website so if in doubt call the official helping, do not respond to official e—mails. helping, do not respond to official e-mails. or tails are particularly vulnerable to the sort of thing? yes, the problem is that security has been taken as an afterthought so you get the system up and you deal
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with the security problems later. this was a problematic especially before gdp are coming into effect so it isa before gdp are coming into effect so it is a problem because a lot of businesses, not hotels in particular but a lot of businesses when they are taking personal data from customers or business contacts, there is issues around storing the data, encrypting the data and making sure only authorised people have access to it, making sure their systems are secure and protected against such attacks. you also need against such attacks. you also need a good data process to be able to discover any attack and not leave matters like this since 2014 up and don't know which is the end of 2018. a massive potential damage to reputation but what else is at risk? potentially huge fines, even though
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marriott is based in the us, this has been going on since gdp is introduced at the hat to comply with that if they are tackling us citizens, the information commissioner said they are looking into it a particularly interesting was they said they had encrypted the financial information, payment information was encrypted, very sensible but they say they think the attackers may have also stolen the encryption keys which is like locking your house and leaving the key under the mat, why were they available on the same system? thank you. (pres). the world's most powerful leaders are gathering at the 620 summit in argentina where they will grapple with issues including trade, security and global warming. but it's a summit marked by tensions and divisions among major powers, with the us and china locked in an escalating trade dispute, and western allies alarmed at russia's seizure of ukrainian ships. there's also tension with saudi arabia over the murder
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of the journalist jamal hashoggjee. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale reports from buenos aires. these days, international summits tend to focus on one man, what he says, what he tweets and what he does. this morning donald trump met his host, the president of argentina, and at least for now he was all charm. we have been friends for a long time, many years. he was a very young man, very handsome man. what the us president doesn't like is being part of a crowd. at this summit he is one of 20 world leaders converging on buenos aires, all with their own agendas and plans for world affairs. theresa may is the first british prime minister ever to visit this city, taking a break from her brexit troubles, but her focus was inevitably on persuading mps to support her deal back home. people voted for brexit and i think it's up to us to deliver brexit. the message i get from members of the public is they
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want the government to do that. they want us to deliver brexit and we want to do it in a way that protects people's jobs. the main issue at this summit is donald trump's trade war with president xi jinping of china. they will meet for the first time since new tariffs were imposed on billions of pounds worth of goods but few expect a breakthrough here. president putin is likely to face tough questions over the russian seizure of ukraine's vessels. president trump said he would not meet the russian leader until the and mohammad bin salman, the saudi prince is also in town looking to repair his reputation after the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi. theresa may says she is looking for a full and transparent investigation. but for all the tensions, european leaders said it was important for the 620 to come together to tackle the world's problems. no one country, no one region, can go it alone. during these 620 meetings, we are of the opinion there is no alternative
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to multilateral cooperation. a trade war, naval confrontation, tensions with saudi arabia and the presence of donald trump. this is not a recipe for a smooth summit. the question is, what can these leaders find to agree on? james landale, bbc news, buenos aires. theresa may has just 11 days left to convince mps to back her in the commons a week on tuesday. the odds appear to stacked against against her. labour is backing a cross—party bid to try and stop the uk leaving the eu without a deal, if the prime minister's brexit plan is defeated next month. and the president of the european council donald tusk — has reitterated that the only alternatives to the current plan — are no deal, or no brexit. let's get more now from our political correspondent, jonathan blake at westminster— how significant is this support from labour? labour applause
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attem pt labour applause atte m pt to labour applause attempt to amend the motion on which parliament will vote when it comes to approve or block the deal is significant but what i think is most significant but what i think is most significant is a cross—party attempt to amend the motion of parliament will vote on, led by hilary benn the chair of the brexit scrutiny committee and what's this seeks to do isa committee and what's this seeks to do is a rule out the option of a no—deal brexit. if parliament is expected at the moment, the people putting their names to this amendment, they expect parliament to vote down theresa may's deal, their aim then as to ta ke may's deal, their aim then as to take no deal of the table. as to what exactly would happen as a result of that is that it is not clear but it is an attempt by those people, some labour mps led by
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hilary benn, supported by the shadow brexit secretary and the green party, plaid cymru, snp and some tories to rule out what they see as the worst—case scenario. someone who is not being drawn on any of that at this stage the prime minister who spoke to political editor and buenos aires earlier. i'm focused on the vote taking place on december 11 and i want everybody who is going to participate, all members of parliament, to focus on what this vote does. but you're not ruling out a second vote? i am focusing on the vote in two weeks' time. not ruling out a second vote but theresa may's focus in the days leading up to but i am sure repeatedly is that first vote on her deal in parliament. she is appealing to mps to think of their constituents if not their own political beliefs and vote as she
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seesitin political beliefs and vote as she sees it in the national interest. someone else who is not entertaining any other options as the president of the european council auditors. —— donald tusk. it is becoming more and more clear that this deal is the best possible. in fact the only possible one. if this deal is rejected in the commons we are left as was stressed a few weeks ago an alternative, no deal or no brexit at all. i want to reassure you that the eu is prepared for every scenario. someone reinforcing that position as the irish foreign minister who said the irish foreign minister who said the eu are not bluffing on this, there's no other deal on offer apart from the one agreed by all 28 eu members including the uk. theresa
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may will be aware of the numbers are stacked against her, she may be taking the view that mps have a christmas break, a second vote and some of them made us change their mind. she might be thinking that but as you heard in the section of the interview there, she is certainly not going there in terms of setting out what she sees as what the next steps could be but you are right to raise that as an option because there are some mps who come what may well vote against theresa may's deal in the first instance because the scale of opposition to it seems to be so much so that it is not really what those who will perhaps be on the fence a little considered they might change their minds doing so just yet. because they want to register their opposition to it, they want to perhaps open the door to potentially alienate negotiations of parts of the deal on other scenarios we have been talking about. certainly as things stand despite what the prime minister is saying about focusing on the first
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vote it does seem that it is going to be very difficult for her to win it. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines the american hotel chain marriott international says there's been a breach of the reservations database in its starwood division — potentially exposing information of around half a billion customers. world leaders arrive in argentina for the 620 summit — as the prime minister as theresa may refuses to rule out another vote on her brexit deal if mps reject it. rail fares will rise by an average of three point 1% injanuary. tyson fury and deontay wilder have been warned any repeat of this at their weigh—in later could mean they lose their purse ahead of sunday mornings heavyweight showdown in la manchester united's alexis sanchez faces a long time out with a hamstring injury suffered in training yesterday. his managerjose mourinho has revealed he was "screaming" in pain and european 0mnium champion ethan hayter has pulled out of this weekend's track world cup in berlin after being knocked off his bike by a car.
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hayter suffered a concussion earlier this month and hasn't quite recovered. i'll be back with more on those stories at 3.30. thousands of people in england are to be prescribed an ultra—low calorie, liquid—only diet after initial trials showed it can reverse type two diabetes in people who've recently been diagnosed. nhs england says the diet will be used alongside an expanded programme that focuses on prevention. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. it's about cutting down. you know, small steps... at a community centre in leeds, the battle against diabetes is under way. reducing portion sizes and how frequent you have these naughty foods and all that... all the people here were on the cusp of developing type 2 diabetes. now they've been helped to lose a bit of weight and think about what they're eating. everybody should be educated about how we eat, what we eat, why we eat, and when we eat. i've lost so much weight.
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i feel better, i feel happier. an estimated 12.3 million people in the uk are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. a quarter of a million people in england have already been referred to the special prevention programme, like the one running in leeds. on average, they've lost nearly 4kg, so now the scheme is being extended. weight loss is all well and good, and we're delighted with the weight—loss trajectories that we've seen in participants on the programme. of course, what counts at the end of the day is whether we are preventing type 2 diabetes from arising. that takes a little longer. and a new pilot scheme will help those who have already developed type 2 diabetes. it will build on a recent trial of a very low—calorie diet using liquid meals and helped almost half of those involved to reverse the condition. a combination of diet and exercise helped labour's deputy leader tom watson shed seven stone and put his type 2 diabetes into remission.
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i did it because i didn't want to die. i wanted to live. i've got young kids. so i did it to live for my children, really. and that was me finding my own way of doing it and that is what i would say to people, you need to do this for yourselves. poor diet and weight gain is driving the growth and type 2 diabetes. the number living with the condition in the uk is approaching 4 million. it is a health crisis that campaigners say is beginning to be addressed. we need to take really, really rapid action and this is why we at diabetes uk are delighted that nhs england has made this announcement today, notjust to think about prevention but also for those living with type 2 diabetes now, to think about the potential for them to put it into remission. improving the health of patients and saving the nhs money, the fight against the type 2 diabetes epidemic has just been stepped up. dominic hughes, bbc news. dr shivani misra is a consultant in?metabolic
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medicine at imperial college london and joins me now... this looks on the face of it very exciting. absolutely. we are in desperate need of strategies to try and prevent and improve the care of people with type two diabetes so this is really welcome news for someone like me who is on the front line dealing with these individuals every day. not for everybody though? yes, it is fair to say that any treatment for any disease will never be 100% successful and everyone at what is great about the news today as we now have an opportunity to explore exactly who will benefit the most from this kind of intervention and of course it is not going to work on everyone, we have seen that from some of the studies published in the last year. it is an ultra low calorie diet which would appear to be far less than previous recommendations on cover the counting when treating diabetes?
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absolutely, we have known about these potential diet and effects of a low—calorie diet for people running up to surgeries but this is the first and we have taken it out of specialised context and into the real world and the studies i alluded to earlier which came out in the last year have shown every implement these and the real—world setting there as a new potential to remit diabetes. in the realworld, this is tough for anyone but particularly someone who perhaps enjoys a lifestyle to which this is going to be completely alien so how do you persuade them of the benefits of this? this is where the studies from the last few years have been so wonderful because they have shown us that people who might have been relu cta nt to ta ke that people who might have been reluctant to take on such a step change in their diet and lifestyle have actually responded very well to those kind of treatments. as i
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mentioned it is not going to suit eve ryo ne mentioned it is not going to suit everyone and some people have suggested it may not be the magic bullet that it is an older individuals with type two as it is an younger individuals who might have slightly bigger lifestyle factors that have led them to develop type two diabetes. you mentioned younger people, this affects 7000 people under 25 in england and wales, you do not normally associated with young people. you reported on this i think last week that the number of able are definitely going up, we have seen it in paediatric cases in england and last week that isn't thousands of people under the age of 25 and for those of us who work in diabetes, we are seeing these individuals up until the ages of 40 who are developing type two diabetes so there is a massive increase in the caseload and sulphite is welcome about the news today as we have a real opportunity to tackle it head
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on in the early stages of the disease. if you are with a patient and they say that looks very tough, why should i do it, what do you say to them? i would go back to the data. we are lucky in the uk to have had these fantastic studies that underpinned the announcement by nhs england today and the results from that asta na england today and the results from that astana sheng and individuals respond —— the results are astonishing. 6racie sunday with type two diabetes and everyone will tell that person but that is the 6p that you need to lose weight and how they have done that to date has been very different depending on which you when you are an essentially what we now have is an object is to standardise the approach with the proposal from standardise the approach with the proposalfrom nhs standardise the approach with the proposal from nhs england. standardise the approach with the proposalfrom nhs england. i'm guessing you don't use words like astonishing very often, this is quite a development.” astonishing very often, this is quite a development. i believe so, i
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can only give you my personal view, i see these individuals very frequently and we are lucky in diabetes that we have lots of different drug treatments but if i could say to someone here is an intervention, it is going to be challenging but we will support you with it and if you do then is a chance that you might be able to remit your diabetes and lose weight, thatis remit your diabetes and lose weight, that is a step change formica legal practice. —— for my clinical practice. —— for my clinical practice. thank you. rail passengers and unions have reacted with outrage to news that train fares are to rise by 3.1 per cent in the new year. the rise comes after a year of timetable chaos, strikes, and delays on some parts of the network. about 40% of fares, including season tickets, will be affected. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. the cost of taking a train is going up. from january, the average price of a fare will increase by 3.1%. next year, a season ticket from manchester to leeds will increase from £3172 to 3272, an increase of £100. a london to brighton ticket will go
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up from £4696 to 4844, a rise of £148 was that many travellers at london bridge station today were distantly unimpressed. a bit outraged, really. i expect there will always be increases every year, but really they are not performing. most times i have to stand all the way to london bridge and all the way back home. so, no, i'm not happy. i wouldn't mind paying an increase if they manage to get trains into the station on time and at the moment they are not. the annual increase in the price of rail tickets is one of the less welcome winter traditions in britain. but this year travellers have particular reason to be angry. a timetabling fiasco and a succession of strikes have led to thousands of trains being cancelled or delayed and made a lot of people very angry. that has led to calls for fares to be frozen.
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i think passengers are paying more than enough towards the cost of the railway and the government should look at the balance and keep pressure on the industry to reduce its costs and pass it on to passengers like a normal industry but the rail delivery but the rail delivery and fund new investment. nobody wants to pay extra for their fares but what do the increases cover? the day to day running of the railways, allowing billions of extra money to be focused on investment. new stations, new carriages and extra services. the industry is promising major improvements to the railway network, allowing thousands of new services every week from 2021 and making travel more comfortable and reliable. but that is likely to be cold comfort for passengers as they had to work in january faced with a new year of higher prices. theo leggett, bbc news.
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let's bring you some live pictures now from the official welcoming ceremony at the 620. they are the focus of much of the tension with expected talks between president xi and donald trump over tavis, hopes have been dampened and the trade war may escalate. but all smiles, theresa may waving as well. a very positive photograph but this is where the nitty—gritty gets under way, the plenary session were talks get under and leaders are gathering for those opening remarks with hopes of progress of others tavis in talks with china and the us dampened, the
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issue over climate change also one of the biggest obstacles, a joint communique with a summit ends on saturday and also a dramatic test for the saudi crown prince over the possible involvement of the moderate journalist. we will get back to that rummy get some news from there. a snow leopard was shot dead, after a keeper at dudley zoo left the enclosure door open and it escaped. the zoo says eight—year—old margaash was killed after getting free last month when the zoo had closed and all visitors had left. an investigation found the door to his enclosure was left open through "keeper error". a disciplinary procedure has taken place into those involved and security is being reviewed. frank tunbridge is a big cat expert — he says the snow leopard should have been tranquilised instead of shot dead. you watch natural has programmes on
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television, you can see how quickly these tranquilliser drugs can work and large animals like giraffes and rhinoceros. i think it is an easy option, it is a policy to rather than take a second look is to actually shoot the animal. there was actually shoot the animal. there was a case some years ago and wales where a small female eurasian lynx escaped and the same thing happened, links are no threat to the public and it was shot. it should have been rethought, i know they had to make a quick decision but there were no people in the zoo, it was closed and the confines i would have thought they could have maybe surrounded the animaland they could have maybe surrounded the animal and used a tranquillising gun. snow leopards are quite passive big cats, we do not offer the same amount of fear as a tiger, along
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with a sheet they are one of the most passive and the animal even if it did escape with mostly have gone into woodland and they would have thought they could have found it with thermal imaging and recaptured it in that way. we have asked the zoo it in that way. we have asked the zoo for a comet but they said an investigation has been launched, we will keep you up—to—date throughout the programme. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willets. local mother sunshine has returned today, there are some winds close of the low—pressure centre across scotland. it will tend to ebb away a little overnight with the onset of more persistent rain once again in wales, england and possibly parts of northern ireland and southern scotland. where it stays clear further north it will be colder,
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close to frost levels. there will be fog first thing on saturday morning. then there will be some sunshine. in england, a soggy and windy start but that will blow away. it will keep a legacy of cloud for some time before bright skies return. it is mild, we have cloud. 0n bright skies return. it is mild, we have cloud. on saturday night, next, another band of rain comes in. mostly in the south of the country. we do get a lot of showers in the north on sunday. it is a tale of two halves. it will be chilly in scotla nd halves. it will be chilly in scotland and northern ireland, mild with rain further south. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the american hotel chain marriott international says there's been a breach of its reservations database in its starwood division — potentially exposing information of around half a billion customers. the 620 summit gets under way in argentina — but it's clouded by tensions over trade, climate change, and the conflict in ukraine. meanwhile, the prime minister has refused to rule out another commons vote on her brexit deal if mps reject it.
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there's been an angry reaction after it was announced that rail fares will go up by 3.1% injanuary. the rmt rail union described the move as "another kick in the teeth" for travellers. the nhs is to offer thousands of people an ultra low—calorie, liquid diet in a bid to reverse type two diabetes. sport now on afternoon live with will. we are previewing a big punch—up in los angeles? a big punch-up in los angeles? that is one way of looking at it. will you be watching it or listening? i have an image of you in your pyjamas on sunday morning here? that's an image people will never be able to get rid of! shall we move onto another heavyweight?m able to get rid of! shall we move onto another heavyweight? is good! tyson fury, though, he has basically suggested that the traditional
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face—off between boxes at wayans should be stopped. we have 5.5 hours until they get a final look at one another before sunday mornings heavyweight bout in los angeles. both he and deontay wilder have been warned they could lose their fight purse if trouble like this spills over later when the two go head to head one last time before tomorrow's fight in la. he's not going to be given the opportunity to get in me face again, because it shouldn't be like that. this is a sporting contest. many people around the world are watching this fight and it's a sport fight. this isn't a bare—knuckle street fight, it's a boxing contest at the highest level. so all that that sort of stuff shouldn't be allowed to happen, not on my behalf anyway. i want england to know that he is scared of me, he should be. they are scared of me for a reason.
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because of my mindset and what i possess. i speak and believe and receive it and every time i speak it you see what happens. they are scared of me. i want them to be. when i step into the ring, it isn't deontay wilder, it's the bronze bomber, can't you see? away from that image of you in your pyjamas, it will be fascinating. it is an incredible mix of styles, they will both switch to southpaw, you have the bronze bomber, known for his power punching, and the unattractive and eclectic mix of styles that tyson fury will bring. studio: call me cynical but this is all showbiz! i knew that you would say that! there is an element of pantomime to let. tyson fury is all well and good saying, let's get rid
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of the weigh—in and face—off to one another but they can sell more tickets and the box office purchase is going through but there is an element of pantomime to it. is going through but there is an element of pantomime to itm is going through but there is an element of pantomime to it. it isn't as though it is on pay—per—view. 0h, it is! and alexis sanchez, you know the names of his dogs? yes. atom and humber. two golden retrievers, beautiful! and what about his injuries? manchester united forward alexis sanchez is facing a lengthy spell out with a hamstring injury according to his managerjose mourinho. the chilean who's spent much of this season watching from the bench suffered the injury in training yesterday and will have a scan to determine the extent of the damage but mourinho says it looks serious. from the top of my experience, just
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the painful screen and the way that the painful screen and the way that the injury happened, i know that it will be a long time. it's not the little muscular injury that, in one week or ten days, the player is ready. alexis sanchez will miss tomorrow's game against southampton and, more importantly, a reunion with his old club, arsenal, on the 5th of december and probably will not be back until next year. studio: well, i will speak to you later on. bye— bye! with a little over ten days until the crucial vote in parliament on theresa may's brexit deal, the prime minister is urging mps to get behind the agreement. she's asking them to think about the consequences for constitutents if they vote against the deal. the pm, who's in argentina for the 620 summit, has been speaking to our political editor, laura kuenssberg , and wouldn't be drawn on the likelihood of her agreement being voted down in the commons on december 11th.
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prime minister, how do you assess your chances of getting this crucial vote three in 11 days' time?” your chances of getting this crucial vote three in 11 days' time? i am focusing on the clear message that i will be given to members of parliament. first, when mps come to look at the vote they should recognise we have negotiated a good deal and the eu have been very clear that this is the deal on the table, it isa that this is the deal on the table, it is a good dealfor the uk and it delivers on the vote of the referendum and protects jobs and security. for a member of parliament there is the issue of ensuring we deliver brexit, that is what people asked of us and to do it in a way that protects jobs and livelihoods. but many dozens of your colleagues have pledged to vote against this, can you turn it around? we are talking to colleagues about the vote but when it comes to the vote, that people are being asked to make in the house of commons, people should remember that we gave the vote to
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the british people as to whether or not to leave the eu, people voted for brexit and it's up to us to deliver it. the message i get from members of the public is that they wa nt members of the public is that they want the government to do that and deliver brexit and we want to do it a nyway deliver brexit and we want to do it anyway that protects jobs. i think it is that interesting constituents that mps need in their minds too.“ it contrast? they should put real lives ahead of politics? this is about a historic moment in the life of our country and a historic decision that mps will be taking. i hope they will all be putting the interests of their constituents and people at the forefront but what we see from the labour party and their various attempts to frustrate brexit and the vote, they do not have an eternity. they haven't got an alternative plan but they do seem to be able to stop us from delivering what they wanted, which is brexit. but it is your colleagues to make the difference here and you've not been able to get them on—board. do
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you think you have a chance of winning the vote? i am still working to ensure that when we come to the vote on the 11th of december, that mps, this is a really important moment for us, and i think it is important for us all to be thinking of the national interest. sadly i see a labour party that is playing politics. and some of your own colleagues? we need to put the national interests first, delivering on the back set vote and delivering it in on the back set vote and delivering itina on the back set vote and delivering it in a way where things about —— that thinks of constituents. but the reasons why that thinks of constituents. but the reasons why some that thinks of constituents. but the reasons why some of your colleagues don't like the deal is they think some of the claims you've made about it are misleading, you say it gives control of our laws but there is a big role for the european will stop you say there are guarantees on trade in fishing that you know that some of those are in the political declaration. they are not guaranteed for the future. some people think you are being misleading? there is nothing misleading about what we've agreed. the political declaration is
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very clear. we will have an independent trade policy and can negotiate trade deals around the world. the secretary of state for international traders making a speech on this today. that is absolutely clear but we are also clear that there is not going to be a long—standing role for the european court of justice. a long—standing role for the european court ofjustice. in having jurisdiction in the united kingdom. it won't, that will come to an end. it won't, that will come to an end. it is what people voted for and it will come to an end. in october you told us that you were cross with borisjohnson for some told us that you were cross with boris johnson for some of the told us that you were cross with borisjohnson for some of the things he did, are you cross with some of the brexiteers, who pushed for brexit for so long and are now rejecting what you managed to achieve? there have been strongly held views on the issue on both sides of the argument, by many people for a long time but i think now is the moment where we have an opportunity to deliver brexit for the british people and it should be at the forefront of our thinking when we go and vote on december the 11th. if the vote falls would you rule out a second vote in parliament
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on your deal? i'm focused on the vote on december the 11th, and i wa nt vote on december the 11th, and i want everybody who is going to participate, all members of parliament, to focus on what the vote does not but you are not ruling out a second vote? i am focusing on the vote in just over two weeks' time, to ensure that when members of parliament come to that they recognise the importance. this is a vote that will deliver brexit for the british people. it is our duty to deliver it for the british people. and if it is, will you be prime minister in a fortnight? what iam doing prime minister in a fortnight? what i am doing is focusing on the vote because this is not about me or individual members of parliament. but this is your deal, you are the leader of the country. don't you think the public may be have a right to know what your plans are if your deal is rejected by mps? what i think the public want to know is that every member of parliament is going to put the national interest first, and the interests of their
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constituents at the forefront of their thinking and is going to put their thinking and is going to put the importance of delivering on the brexit vote on the british people at the forefront of their thinking, when it comes to that vote. this is the moment when we can vote and show people that we understood. they want us people that we understood. they want us to leave the european union. the deal that is on the table. the deal. it does that in a way that honours the referendum vote, but also protects peoples jobs, and the referendum vote, but also protects peoplesjobs, and futures. it also ensures that we can take the opportunities of that bright future outside the eu. and what is your view on having a television debate with jeremy corbyn?” view on having a television debate with jeremy corbyn? i said to him i think we should have a television debate, we should. and that is because i've got a plan and a proposal and i've got the deal i negotiated. we do not see any alternatives coming forward from the labour party, people need to be aware of that. instead, all i see is an attempt to frustrate what the
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government is doing to deliver brexit for the british people and thatis brexit for the british people and that is the betrayal of the british people. police in county durham are calling for parents to take responsibility for their "out of control" teenagers — after officers were surrounded and attacked by a group of up to 100 children. it happened in stanley earlier this month, but the force has just released body cam footage of the incident. we are asking people nicely to move away. you can see what is going on. bleep in a social media message to the public, filmed
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by durham police themselves, local sergeant emma kay had this to say. over the last few weeks we have faced outbreaks of out—of—control children on the town centre. there were a hardcore group of about 20 people who threw bricks, fireworks and attacked my offices. 0ne pcso was punched in the face by a young person. disorder of this kind is totally u na cce pta ble. violence against our officers will not be tolerated. action will be taken against all the individuals involved in the incident that night. whilst there is a hardcore group of individuals involved in this incident, there are many, many people stood on the sidelines. young people who are going to affect their life chances by continuing to engage in this type of behaviour. we are asking for parents to step up to the plate, take responsibility for your children. do you know where they are, or are they going to bring trouble to your door? it's up to you to keep your children safe, out of harm's way and out of trouble. well, a former senior detective
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with county durham police — who has worked in the stanley area where the footage was filmed — has blamed cuts to policing numbers for the violence. what has happened over the last couple of years, the police numbers have been cut and cut. it's necessary for parents to appreciate when children leave the home, this is what they are doing. i would think the vast majority of parents of those young people involved would find and would agree with the police and help and support them. ithink with the police and help and support them. i think what has happened over them. i think what has happened over the last number of years, police numbers have been cut and cut and cut, there are less offices in the community, regardless of whatever spin the police want to put on it, those are the facts. when i serve there, there would be up to 30 office rs there, there would be up to 30 officers working in this area and i appreciate that times have changed
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and moved on but if you want to do a survey of how many officers are working in stanley and derwent, over 24—hour is, i would suggest there would be very minimal numbers. for me, there has been a breakdown with the community and police. jamie will be bringing us the business needs but first the headlines. the american hotel chain marriott international says there's been a breach of the reservations database in its starwood division — potentially exposing information of around half a billion customers. the 620 summit gets under way in buenos aries — as theresa may refuses to rule out another vote on her brexit deal if mps reject it. rail fares will rise by an average of 3.1% injanuary. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. there was a slight uptick in annual house price growth during november
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but the market remains subdued. prices were 1.9% higher than a year ago. prices grew byjust1.6% in the year to october. mike lynch, the former chief executive of software giant autonomy, has been charged with fraud in the us. the charge which carries a maximum term of 20 years, relates to the 2011 sale of the company to computer giant hewlett—packa rd. free charging for electric cars will be available for customers at some tesco stores from next year. tesco, in partnership with volkswagen, plans to install almost 2,500 charging bays at up to 600 stores by 2020. while pub chain marstons has also announced its plans to roll out rapid chargers across sites nationwide. have you drunk out of this? no, then
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why have you put it there? carry on! let's talk about marriott, in terms of historical breaches this is one of historical breaches this is one of the big ones. i was looking at the records, for you here, 3 billion people had their accounts affected in 2013. this is huge and potentially very damaging to the hotel chain, one of the biggest in the world. it is their starwood division. it is not marriot hotels. if you have stayed there, you are all right but it is companies like sheraton, four point, and also sta rwood sheraton, four point, and also starwood time—shares as well. if you go to the website they will give you a helpline. if you stayed there on or before the 10th of september, this goes back to 2014 as well, that is what is so alarming, such a range of people, 327 million people it is thought had things like
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e—mail addresses, people it is thought had things like e—mailaddresses, ordinary addresses, passport numbers and a number of other important but not absolutely vital details ta ken. number of other important but not absolutely vital details ta kenm you got all over those things together do who knows? i don't think they know so far yet. marriott were alerted by an internal security search into their systems, and that told them that the problem went back many years. well, for years also. there is reputational damage which will be something and the shared damage which is already happening. and they could also face huge fines? and they could also face huge fines? and lawsuits, that is the other possibility. there is a massive great damage limitation exercise. trying to offer them some sort of
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compensation as well, if money has been leaked out. as you say, that could be an unpleasant court case. lets have a look at one of your headline stories. tesco and charges? it goes along with electric cars, it depends how far they go —— chargers. 0ne depends how far they go —— chargers. one of the reasons why it isn't going quickly is because there are not enough chargers. and you aren't going to find them in service stations either. who wants to go to a service station in the middle of england and sit there for half an hour while you are charging? why not go to hour while you are charging? why not gotoa hour while you are charging? why not go to a cafe where your destination happens to be and charge up there? 0ryour happens to be and charge up there? or your office? that is where the points will be, rather than in
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service stations. unless those service stations. unless those service stations. unless those service stations changed beyond all recognisability. the other thing is, different companies are coming in. you have tesco's and volkswagen coming into do this and other companies are moving in. it will not necessarily the people like shell or bp, although they are making moves in this direction as well. on this particular detail, on this particular detail, on this particular operation, we spoke to ianjohnston particular operation, we spoke to ian johnston about what it particular operation, we spoke to ianjohnston about what it means for customers when they go into one of these stations. i think the key point is the slow charges that you see, that people have at home or visitors, they can plug into the normal supply but these electrical infrastructures, not every company has the deep pockets that volkswagen and tesco have. if you look at marston is, you have companies providing it to businesses like
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marstons. a company like ours will pay for all of the infrastructure and the network for the host business and pass on profit as well. shall we have a look at the markets? the ftse has been below 7000, not anymore. it is still looking a little negative. the dowjones not moving very much. and oil prices down again. that is because at the moment there is an enormous amount of oil in american stocks. they have been re—measuring how much they have in supply and in reserve in america and it is high. that is why the price is down. the pound is looking weak. there is a lot of nervousness at the 620 as well. talk to you later on. researchers are urging the government to incorporate life skills into the national curriculum in england, after a study found weekly lessons su bsta ntially improved teenagers' mental and physical health. it follows a pilot study that taught students skills and techniques,
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to help them to navigate the pressures of growing up. here's our home editor, mark easton. slowly in, slowly out. for year seven, today's lesson is on how to breathe. get your backs up high. this class at chancellor's school in hertfordshire hasjust begun a four—year study programme teaching them the skills and techniques for a happier and healthier life. it's just as hard as maths, this lesson, because you need to try and try and try these techniques to perfect them. with mental health and behavioural problems among secondary pupils worsening, dozens of schools across england have been testing an evidence—based programme using theories from positive psychology. what if the other person wants something else? you need to be able to negotiate and compromise with someone so they can have what they want and you can have what you want. weekly hour—long lessons on social and emotional learning,
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relationships, resilience and mindfulness is designed for young people aged 11 to 15. does it work? these are very hard skills. some adults struggle with these. academics compared the well—being of pupils who completed the course with a control group which didn't participate. the results are really quite impressive. evaluations suggest a significant increase in children and young people's general health and an improvement in life satisfaction that is equivalent to an adult finding a partner. as a sufferer of anxiety, it has really helped, as the coping mechanisms that we are taught has been effective in everyday life. it really helped me with exam stress and working through any issues i had on top of school and the pressure of dealing with exams. there was definitely problems with academic stress, friendship groups and personal problems, which i have been able to deal with in a more practical and successful way. teachers must complete a week
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of intensive training before delivering lessons. a process that some found positively life changing. we actually had to test all these theories we were learning about on ourselves so i personally found out a lot about myself. things i've been carrying around unbeknowingly since my own childhood, issues that i've got. the experts behind the scheme say the results are so impressive and the cost so low, £25 a year per pupil, it should be part of the curriculum in every secondary school, notjust in britain but around the world. time for a look at the weather... all of the headlines in a couple of minutes but first a look at the weather. hello. after recent days, wet and windy weather, today is at least calmer out and about but
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we have seven big showers with rainbows and thunder and lightning. this is in wales. beautiful rainbow, looking out towards the shower club. in derbyshire we had sunshine this morning, that's the name of the game. sunshine into dispersed with sunshine, you can see the next area of low pressure moving in. through the evening and overnight, as showers deplete in the north, we get more rain coming in. we think into northern ireland and scotland, but in the north, it's a night. close to frost levels with mist and fog. that is where colder areas are sitting. in southern areas, mild air. they split for much of the weekend. we have a soggy start to the saturday, particularly for england and wales and in the far north and southern scotland. 6usts of wind on southern and western coasts of england, that will blow the rain steady through
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the morning, up three south—west england and wales, it may stretch up towards the scottish borders, affecting parts of the east of northern ireland but most in the northern ireland but most in the north have sunny spells and showers, and crisp and wintry sunshine around because they will be a little wintry over the hills. cold in scotland and northern ireland, sixes and sevens, lower than today but in england and wales, mild air, a mild start with i3 wales, mild air, a mild start with 13 and 14. low pressure scooting out the way, strong winds for some time. 0n the way, strong winds for some time. on saturday night, the next area of rain and low pressure moving in. saturday night live sweat again, for england and wales, the third or fourth spell of wet weather through. not so much further north that there isa not so much further north that there is a cold night, the risk of frost and fog first thing on sunday morning. but the rain should lay away. the afternoon is dry and bright with some showers. it looks
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like scotland and northern ireland see persistent rain, and wintry weather over the hills in the afternoon and by then, showers thick and fast in southern and western areas as well. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4. the global hotel chain, marriott international says there's been a breach of its reservations database — in its starwood division — potentially exposing the information of half a billion guests. 6lobal tensions dominate the meeting of 620 leaders in argentina — but for theresa may the main issues are very much at home. i'm focused on the vote taking place on december 11 and i want everybody who is going to participate, all members of parliament, to focus on what this vote does. but you're not ruling out a second vote? i am focusing on the vote in two weeks' time. rail fares rise for millions of commuters, by an average of 3.1% injanuary. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — that's with will perry. coming up in the sport we'll hear
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from frank bruno ahead of sunday's huge heavyweight showdown in los angeles between deontay wilder and tyson fury and we'll bring you the latest on alexis sanchez‘s long term injury at manchester united. thanks will, and helen willetts has all the weather. we will take a brief look at what is happening around the world and making the headlines and the weekend is upon us, a detailed look at that as well. thanks helen. also coming up — as the nhs offers an ultra low—calorie, liquid diet to try to reverse type 2 diabetes — we'll be speaking to someone who successfully trailled the scheme and reversed their condition. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. one of the world's biggest hotel groups, marriott international, says hackers have managed to gain access to the personal details of half a billion guests. the reservations' data base
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for its starwood division, which includes sheraton and le meridien, has been breached for the past four years. names, addresses, dates of birth, as well as passport numbers and credit card details are thought to have been exposed. while the numbers are known to be huge, it's not yet clear exactly how much information was stolen in the data breach, as our technology reporter chris fox explained the company believe they have started to encrypt and make a copy of a customer database so that had 500 million customer records on it, of those more than 300 million had some combination of name, e—mail address, postal address, booking dates and so on and so for 300 million people there's a lot of information, possibly up to 500 million, they do not know how far the attack has got in copying the database on whether they stole it at all but they have to assume the worst and that is why they have notified customers.
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what exactly do we think has happened? this is a deliberate attack, on what? 0n the database which is used to reserve hotel rooms, a thing used throughout the chain, sta rwood branded hotels and the related companies and it is a booking system with lots of personal information. how does someone get in? we do not quite know yet, the hotel has not revealed that but if it has been going on for years it could be an insider, someone who has figured out how to get access and it has taken a long time for them to spot, it only got flagged in september when an automated alert let them know someone was trying to get access to the system. talking about a hotel chain, you check in and are using their wi—fi, putting in information using sometimes your own laptop, is that vulnerable as well? they always say if you want to be safe to not use the hotel wi—fi because you don't know if it is the genuine network,
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someone could be tricking you into signing up to a separate network so stay on your own devices and don't use hotel wi—fi. thank you. joining me now is dr max eiza, lecturer in computing and security at the university of central lancashire. how big a deal could this be? it's actually a big deal because this is a lot of user accounts, 500 million of personal information, names, dates of birth, etc. this is a big deal because a lot of people use this data to create passwords on other social media accounts. there is a massive data breach unfortunately, we have not seen something like this since yahoo. and it goes back to 2014, it would seem strange that no
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one has spotted this. i think the company has been slow in responding to this because if you have this problem from 2014 and it took you four years to find out what happened, there is a real problem there, a concern over personal data security and privacy within the company and the company that bought the chain recently so it is really concerning. and people finding out about this just now, what should they be doing? the company says they will e—mail customers affected, if you receive it it will not have any attachements or ask you for personal information because something to watch out for is that scammers use data breaches like this to send out lots of e—mails to trick people into handing over more information.
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marriott has set up a specific website where you can get the information and there is a helpline so if in doubt call the official helpline, do not respond to e—mails. hotels are particularly vulnerable to this sort of thing? yes, the problem is that security has been taken as an afterthought so you get the system up and you deal with the security problems later. this was problematic especially before 6dpr coming into effect so it is a problem because a lot of businesses, not hotels in particular but a lot of businesses when they are taking personal data from customers or business contacts, there is issues around storing the data, encrypting the data and making sure only authorised people have access to it,
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making sure their systems are secure and protected against such attacks. you also need a good data process to be able to discover any attack and not leave matters like this since 2014 up to now which is the end of 2018. a massive potential damage to reputation but what else is at risk? potentially huge fines under 6dpr, even though marriott is based in the us, this has been going on since 6dpr was introduced and they have to comply with that if they are targeting services at eu citizens. that may be a huge fine. the uk information commissioner said they are looking into it and particularly interesting was they said they had encrypted the financial information, payment information was encrypted, very sensible, but they say they think the attackers may have also stolen the encryption keys
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which is like locking your house and leaving the key under the mat. the world's most powerful leaders have just begun a session at the 620 summit in argentina — where they'll grapple with global issues including trade, security and climate change. in the last hour they‘ve come together for the traditional ‘family photo‘, but this summit is marked by tensions and divisions among major powers, with the us and china locked in an escalating trade dispute, and western allies alarmed at russia‘s seizure of ukrainian ships. there‘s also tension with saudi arabia over the murder of the journalist jamal hash—ogg—jee. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale reports from buenos aires. these days, international summits tend to focus on one man, what he says, what he tweets and what he does. this morning donald trump met his host, the president of argentina, and at least for now he was all charm.
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we have been friends for a long time, many years. he was a very young man, very handsome man. what the us president doesn‘t like is being part of a crowd. at this summit he is one of 20 world leaders converging on buenos aires, all with their own agendas and plans for world affairs. theresa may is the first british prime minister ever to visit this city, taking a break from her brexit troubles, but her focus was inevitably on persuading mps to support her deal back home. people voted for brexit and i think it‘s up to us to deliver brexit. the message i get from members of the public is they want the government to do that. they want us to deliver brexit and we want to do it in a way that protects people‘s jobs. the main issue at this summit is donald trump‘s trade war with president xi jinping of china. they will meet for the first time since new tariffs were imposed on billions of pounds worth of goods but few expect a breakthrough here. president putin is likely to face
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tough questions over the russian seizure of ukraine‘s vessels. president trump said he would not meet the russian leader until the confrontation was resolved. and mohammad bin salman, the saudi prince is also in town looking to repair his reputation after the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi. theresa may says she is looking for a full and transparent investigation. but for all the tensions, european leaders said it was important for the 620 to come together to tackle the world‘s problems. no one country, no one region, can go it alone. during these 620 meetings, we are of the opinion there is no alternative to multilateral cooperation. a trade war, naval confrontation, tensions with saudi arabia and the presence of donald trump. this is not a recipe for a smooth summit.
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the question is, what can these leaders find to agree on? james landale, bbc news, buenos aires. the president of the european council donald tusk has reitterated his warning that the deal negotiated by theresa may for britain to leave the eu is the best one possible. speaking at the 620 summit in argentina — which is also being attended by mrs may — he added that the only alternatives were no deal, or no brexit. a cross—party alliance of mps have tabled an amendment to the prime minister‘s brexit agreement, calling for it to be rejected, and for parliament to have a say on what would happen next. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake explained to me the importance and possible impact of these efforts at westminster. labour‘s attempt to amend the motion on which parliament will vote when it comes to approve or block the deal is significant but what i think is most significant is a cross—party attempt to amend the motion
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parliament will vote on, led by hilary benn the chair of the brexit scrutiny committee and what this seeks to do is rule out the option of a no—deal brexit. if parliament as expected at the moment, the people putting their names to this amendment, they expect parliament to vote down theresa may‘s deal, their aim then is to take no deal off the table. as to what exactly would happen as a result of that is that it is not clear but it is an attempt by those people, some labour mps led by hilary benn, supported by the shadow brexit secretary and the green party, plaid cymru, snp and some tories to rule out what they see as the worst—case scenario. someone who is not being drawn on any of that at this stage the prime minister who spoke to political editor and buenos aires earlier. i‘m focused on the vote taking place on december 11 and i want everybody
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who is going to participate, all members of parliament, to focus on what this vote does. but you‘re not ruling out a second vote? i am focusing on the vote in two weeks‘ time. the day second vote but theresa may‘s focus and then she would hear repeatedly as that first vote on her deal in parliament. she is appealing to mps to think of their constituents, if not their own political beliefs and not as she seesitin political beliefs and not as she sees it in the national interest and someone who else who is not entertaining any other options as the president of the ub in counsel donald to as. —— donald tusk. it is becoming more and more clear that this deal is the best possible. in fact the only possible one.
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if this deal is rejected in the commons we are left as was stressed a few weeks ago an alternative, no deal or no brexit at all. i want to reassure you that the eu is prepared for every scenario. someone who is reinforcing the position is the irish foreign minister has said the eu are not bluffing on this, there is no other deal on offer apart from the one i agreed by all 28 eu members including the uk. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines the american hotel chain marriott international says there‘s been a breach of the reservations database in its starwood division — potentially exposing information of around half a billion customers. the 620 summit gets underway in buenos aries — as theresa may refuses to rule out another vote on her brexit deal if mps reject it. rail fares will rise by an average of 3.1% injanuary. and in sport...
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are we set for more of this at tonight‘s weigh in? tyson fury and deontay wilder have been warned any repeat of the argy bargies later could mean they lose their purse ahead of sunday morning‘s heavyweight showdown in la manchester united‘s alexis sanchez faces a long time out with a hamstring injury suffered in training yesterday. his managerjose mourinho has revealed he was "screaming" in pain. and lance stroll signs for force india — completing formula 0ne‘s driver line up for 2019... i‘ll be back with more on those stories at 4.30. thousands of people in england are to be prescribed an ultra—low calorie, liquid—only diet after initial trials showed it can reverse type two diabetes in people who‘ve recently been diagnosed. nhs england says the diet will be used alongside an expanded programme that focuses on prevention. here‘s our health correspondent, dominic hughes. it‘s about cutting down.
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you know, small steps... at a community centre in leeds, the battle against diabetes is under way. reducing portion sizes and how frequent you have these naughty foods and all that... all the people here were on the cusp of developing type 2 diabetes. now they‘ve been helped to lose a bit of weight and think about what they‘re eating. everybody should be educated about how we eat, what we eat, why we eat, and when we eat. i‘ve lost so much weight. i feel better, i feel happier. an estimated 12.3 million people in the uk are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. a quarter of a million people in england have already been referred to the special prevention programme, like the one running in leeds. on average, they‘ve lost nearly 4kg, so now the scheme is being extended. weight loss is all well and good, and we're delighted with the weight—loss trajectories that we've seen in participants on the programme.
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of course, what counts at the end of the day is whether we are preventing type 2 diabetes from arising. that takes a little longer. and a new pilot scheme will help those who have already developed type 2 diabetes. it will build on a recent trial of a very low—calorie diet using liquid meals and helped almost half of those involved to reverse the condition. a combination of diet and exercise helped labour‘s deputy leader tom watson shed seven stone and put his type 2 diabetes into remission. i did it because i didn‘t want to die. i wanted to live. i‘ve got young kids. so i did it to live for my children, really. and that was me finding my own way of doing it and that is what i would say to people, you need to do this for yourselves. poor diet and weight gain is driving the growth and type 2 diabetes. the number living with the condition in the uk is approaching 4 million. it is a health crisis that campaigners say is beginning to be addressed. we need to take really, really rapid action and this is why
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we at diabetes uk are delighted that nhs england has made this announcement today, notjust to think about prevention but also for those living with type 2 diabetes now, to think about the potential for them to put it into remission. improving the health of patients and saving the nhs money, the fight against the type 2 diabetes epidemic has just been stepped up. dominic hughes, bbc news. dan sodergren reversed his type 2 diabetes using this method as part of the itv show ‘fast fix diabetes‘... he‘s also the founder of ‘be free of type 2‘ and hejoins me now from salford... 6ood good to see you, it works, but was it tough to do? that was part of the programme and we did it over two months and i was too and hearn stones doing this approach and it is
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very hard, and this is the key thing to remember, it is not easy and actually it could be potentially something that might have background effects, it is a great first step. i have been petitioning the government is to make this fast change and if likely have changed the way they look at diabetes and that you can put it into remission with diet and exercise like tom watson as a brilliant first step. you have to remember the sheiks are a great way of doing it but you could do it with real food, low carb and high—fat diet, there are different ways. but it can be reversed by diet that is why i started the research, because thatis why i started the research, because that is so much research, hundreds of people behind it and now after a decade we have proven that you can reverse put into remission type two
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diabetes with diet and exercise and thatis diabetes with diet and exercise and that is a believably exciting because potentially you could save the nhs billions of pounds, maybe £10 billion a year and millions of lives. it is not for everybody but evenif lives. it is not for everybody but even if it is only 50% the effects will be quite something. absolutely. looking at the numbers, 12 million people in danger of having it, it is a terrible condition but you can reverse it with your own lifestyle and real food and reverse it with your own lifestyle and realfood and changing reverse it with your own lifestyle and real food and changing the way, do not eat so many carbohydrates, you can save the nhs billions of pounds by making these lifestyle changes, it is brilliant that the 6overnment changes, it is brilliant that the government have got behind it. changes, it is brilliant that the government have got behind itm also affects so many and as an afro—caribbean man you are six times more likely to develop this than many others. that was a shock for me, i thought i was eating healthily but it is all in comparison, every bodyis
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but it is all in comparison, every body is different and afro—caribbean males are six times more likely, my daughter is twice as likely because i have it, four times likely if you are so than asian so there are different factors but the headline is every single person can get rid of it with diet and exercise and thatis of it with diet and exercise and that is amazing news. you did this tv programme, you had a spurt to do it but most people sitting in front of the television, maybe with a takeaway, having a pint of beer, a lifestyle i suspect you recognise, how easy is it to maintain after that? this is the main thing for me as if you change the way that you look at food, as nutrition and realise high glucose levels and type two diabetes is about high levels of carbohydrate in your diet, if you go for low carbohydrate and high—fat you can pretty much not eat what you wa nt
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you can pretty much not eat what you want but have a fantastic mediterranean diet and still enjoy a glass of wine and cooking at home and all the things. 6oing glass of wine and cooking at home and all the things. going on a starvation way of doing it when you get starvation carcasses is not a great week, it is quick and cost—effective but you could maybe do it yourself over a year as long as you have the support of changing your diet so for me it is great to do it over three months but the 6overnment do it over three months but the government and nhs after look at the package of support and give someone has done this, i know it is hard to maintain that, almost impossible and changing to the low carbohydrate and high—fat way exit easier for everyone. to maintain. good to see you looking so healthy. thank you. rail passengers and unions have reacted with outrage to news that train fares are to rise by 3.1 per cent in the new year. the rise comes after months timetable chaos, strikes, and delays on some parts of the network. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. the cost of taking
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a train is going up. from january, the average price of a fair will increase by 3.1%. next year, a season ticket from manchester to leeds will increase from £3172 to 3272, an increase of £100. a london to brighton ticket will go up from £4696 to 4844, a rise of £148 was that many travellers at london bridge station today were distantly unimpressed. a bit outraged, really. i expect there will always be increases every year, but really they are not performing. most times i have to stand all the way to london bridge and all the way back home. so, no, i'm not happy. i wouldn't mind paying an increase if they manage to get trains into the station on time and at the moment they are not. the annual increase in the price of rail tickets is one of the less welcome winter
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traditions in britain. but this year travellers have particular reason to be angry. a timetabling fiasco and a succession of strikes have led to thousands of trains being cancelled or delayed and made a lot of people very angry. that has led to calls for fares to be frozen. i think passengers are paying more than enough towards the cost of the railway and the government should look at the balance and keep pressure on the industry to reduce its costs and pass it on to passengers like a normal industry. but the rail delivery group, representing train companies and network rail, says the extra money is badly needed to cover rising costs and fund new investment. nobody wants to pay extra for their fares but what do the increases cover? the day to day running of the railways, allowing billions of extra money to be focused on investment. new stations, new carriages and extra services. the industry is promising major improvements to the railway network, allowing thousands of new services
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every week from 2021 and making travel more comfortable and reliable. but that is likely to be cold comfort for passengers as they had to work in january faced with a new year of higher prices. theo leggett, bbc news. police in county durham are calling for parents to take responsibility for their "out of control" teenagers — after officers were surrounded and attacked by a group of up to 100 children. it happened in stanley earlier this month, but the force has just released body cam footage of the incident. we are asking people nicely to move away. you can see what is going on. bleep in a social media message filmed
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by durham police themselves — local sergeant emma kay had this to say. have faced outbreaks and last few weeks, officers attacked, disorder of this kind is totally unacceptable, and violence against our officers will not be tolerated. action will be taken against all the individuals involved in the instant that night. whilst it is a hard—core group of individuals involved in this incident there are many able stood on the sidelines, young people who are going to affect the life
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chances by continuing to engage in this type of behaviour. we are asking for parents to step up to the plate, take responsibility for your children. do you know where they are other are they going to bring trouble to your door? it is up to you to keep your children safe, out of harm ‘s way and out of trouble. that was durham police sergeant emma kay more than 5,000 trees are to be planted to revitalise the site of a huge moorland fire that burned for 41 days. the blaze at winter hill in lancashire broke out during the summer heatwave injune, and ripped through seven square miles of land. local residents and community groups will be invited to plant the new trees. time for a look at the weather... yesterday you were talking about california and a rain forecast and you said that could cause flash flooding and that is what we have seen. it has on a huge scale. mostly
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under control but the rain has no vegetation to hold the rain and that has led to that. this is the low pressure we can see, it has moved through but this the pineapple express when one low pressure after another comes in and hits the west coast of america and canada. these pictures are quite incredible, you can see the cover, full of ash, little vegetation left. that is the repercussions of having no vegetation. another part of the world as the mediterranean, and turkey in particular. it has been such a turbulent autumn, flooding in italy and the balearic islands, spain and portugal and greece and turkey, this was taken in by them ali in the south—west of turkey, a lot of energy though we are getting
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towards winter and that is where the biggest storms are, a whirlpool with that car disappearing. it is because of low pressure through the course of low pressure through the course of last month, high pressure across much of europe squashing the low pressure to the south and towards the north. as we have seen in the uk and the low pressure sitting across the mediterranean has given us yet more wet weather and you can see this was the forecast model running for the last 24 hours, very wet and heavy with snow across the mountains, high elevation starting to ease a little bit. and looking behind you, does not look pretty and that will affect us. , let‘s look at the uk, the all—important weekend. today felt more like april with sunny spells and showers, the two faces we have seen, rainbows with heavy and thick cloud and sunshine. we replace our sunny spells and showers with more persistent rain
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off the atlantic for tomorrow. john was continuing to ease through the night, still quite ported across the far north of scotland but more persistent rain replaces the showers from the south so relatively mild but a cold night across scotland and northern ireland, potentially frost in the 6lens, working up to fog off thing. the reason is the contrast in error, mild atlantic area, cold air towards the north and the rain may spread to northern ireland and southern scotland but the bulk across england and wales, mild sore rather murky and grey, quite windy with a strong wind for most, blowing the rain through, the heaviest living for a time, maybe brightening but not staying that way, lots of close to follow. the north across scotla nd close to follow. the north across scotland and northern ireland, brighter and colder, mr fog scotland and northern ireland, brighter and colder, mrfog to clear first thing and if that is rain
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towards the borders, that should clear and i day of sunny spells and scattered showers, fewer than to debug chillier worst father so that all feel milder with the cloud and more to come. 0n all feel milder with the cloud and more to come. on saturday if you are out and about the low pressure system is waiting in the winds, particularly late on saturday so looking quite wet into sunday morning, the heavy rain crossing england and wales, to the north still cold and frosty again and possibly icy patches with showers, mist and fog and for many parts starting on a grey and drizzly note again. the rain clears for england and wales on sunday, brighter skies to follow, cheryl is looking like a wet day in scotland and northern ireland on sunday and cold for snow over the hills. it is the first weekend of december after all. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines. the american hotel chain marriott international says there‘s been a breach of its reservations database in its starwood division — potentially exposing information of around half a billion customers. the 620 summit gets under way in argentina — but it‘s clouded by tensions over trade, climate change, and the conflict in ukraine. meanwhile, the prime minister has refused to rule out another commons vote on her brexit deal if mps reject it. there‘s been an angry reaction after it was announced that rail fares will go up by 3.1% injanuary. the rmt rail union described the move as "another kick in the teeth" for travellers.
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the nhs is to offer thousands of people an ultra low—calorie, liquid diet in a bid to reverse type two diabetes. sport now on afternoon live with will. there is a boxing match this weekend? a bit more than that! but are we set for more fireworks at the weigh—in between tyson fury and deontay wilder in 4.5 hours? at 9pm gmt, deontay wilder in 4.5 hours? at 9pm 6mt, 1pm local time, deontay wilder in 4.5 hours? at 9pm 6mt,1pmlocaltime, no deontay wilder in 4.5 hours? at 9pm 6mt, 1pm local time, no matter what you think of the build—up, you may think it is pantomime, is it genuine or is it fake? we will find out when they get into the ring but this is one of the biggest heavyweight title fights in recent history. certainly the biggest in the us since lennox lewis fort klitschko years ago. both fighters have been
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warned they could lose their fight purse if trouble like this spills over later when the two go head to head one last time before tomorrow‘s fight at the staples centre. it‘ll be a fascinating clash of styles on sunday morning, fury 27 and zero, wilder 40 and zero, 39 by knockout...but which way is it going to go? ? ? here are the thoughts of former heavyweight champion frank bruno. if wilder catches tyson fury he will be doing some break dancing bert tyson fury can use his size and his reach and his jabs, and i hope all of the anger that deontay wilder has been showing, especially at the weigh—in, tyson fury kept his cool, deontay wilder was angry and letting out a lot of energy. if he can get frustrated, he can do very well. mr
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mccoy, set your alarm at four o‘clock on sunday morning. listen to myself, mike costello and adderley, from los angeles. iu going out there? no, just pretending! -- are you going out there? let‘s move on. alexis sanchez has picked up a nasty injury? manchester united forward alexis sanchez is facing a lengthy spell out with a hamstring injury according to his managerjose mourinho. the chilean, who‘s spent much of this season watching from the bench suffered the injury in training yesterday and will have a scan to determine the extent of the damage, but mourinho says it looks serious. from the top of my experience, just the painful scream and the way the injury happened, i know that it is
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going to be for a long time. it is not the little dot muscular injury that in one week or ten days, the players ready. force india have completed formula 0ne‘s driver line—up for 2019 with confirmation that lance stroll will race for them next season... the move had been expected since august when a consortium led by stroll‘s father took control of the british—based team after they went into administration. stroll says in a statement that it‘s the beginning of an exciting journey — and "i look foward to working alongside a successful team with a great culture". british rower anna thornton is seriously ill in hospital, after an accident in the united states. she‘s been left in a coma after falling down some stairs in seattle, where she‘s studying. british rowing say she‘s in a "stable but serious condition". thornton, who is 21 and from nottingham,
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retained her double sculls title at the world under 23 championships in july. that‘s all the sport for now, much more in the next hour, not from me but from someone else. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to beccy barr in salford where north west tonight have been following the woodland trusts effort to return some greenery to stretches of mooreland which were devastated by fires over the summer. john fernandez is on the channel island of sark for us where an agreement over energy prices has been agreed in a dispute which could have seen the island plunged into darkness had a deadline set for today had been allowed to pass. first, beccy — just remind us of the extent of the ecological destruction? that‘s right, some of the images we
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saw this summer were very striking, as moorland fires ranged across the new “— as moorland fires ranged across the new —— raged across the north west, devastating many of the landscapes. the blaze at winter hill in lancashire broke out injune and ripped through seven square miles of land, and raged for 41 days. that was just at winter hill. is an estate near bolton in that area that we are looking at. 220 hectares burnt away, one third of the estate was lost in the fire at that time. dozens of species were killed or left the area during that period. common lizards, brown hares, they left the area as well. and many trees were burnt in that period as well. not only was there the fire but the drought that went with it. it killed many trees, that were saved from the fire itself. there is
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a huge amount of devastation on the moorlands around manchester. and now some greenery could be returning? that is right, the woodland trust are doing some work around this to restore the moorlands to their former glory. to a certain extent, mother nature is doing itsjob itself, we heard from one of the representatives who explained how various flora and fauna are managing to regenerate. the birds of prey have come back, the smaller birds have come back, the smaller birds have come back because they are in among the grass and things. the mammals, not so lucky. if they could not get away from the fire, they couldn't. we expect to see them back. nature is a wonderful thing and it does recover quite quickly. it does recover quite quickly but it needs extra help. the heather hasn‘t recovered, all the peat, and those trees, thousands of trees that were
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lost. at smith hills, and the woodland trust, and volunteers, they are beginning to plant over 5000 trees. they will be going in over the next few months to bring this area back to its former glory. and of course, some viewers may be aware of course, some viewers may be aware of the northern forest project, hoping to add many thousands of trees after that. for now, it looks like the moorlands around manchester are getting a helping hand and returning to the beautiful landscape we know so well. it seems a long way off from the pictures we saw before. 6ood off from the pictures we saw before. good news there. becky, thank you. and the isle of sark. john fernandez, we spoke a few days ago, there was a possibility of the island being blacked out tonight midnight? it's not going to happen, and 11th hour agreement with 12 hours to go until the power was scheduled to go out. you can hear
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generators outside, the power is still on. the agreement is seeing 66p per colour what our, that will be the price electricity is sold out in future. the control order is being annulled, meaning that sark electricity have to sell at 52p per hour which is mean they had to think about cutting the power tonight and the the government in sark will look at buying the company in the next three months, looking at the value and seeing how much they can purchase it for in february. with that in mind, and with a lot of people nervous, i asked major christopher beaumont, the head of state for the island, why the deal took so long? these things always do, the negotiation goes down to the wire because you are keen to get the best deal you can. that is what everyone does. a deal is never done
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until it is done. that was always going to take a long time. now the deal is agreed, is anything left unresolved, or can people put their switches on in full confidence? you can, that is very right. the electricity will continue being supplied for the next three months but there is a lot up in the airfor the next three months, they need a value for the company and the infrastructure and generators. it has been a bone of contention on the island for years. three months, they started on good footing. david 6ordon started on good footing. david gordon brown from sark electricity says there is good footing to begin negotiations and there is hope by february there will be a resolution which means they can buy. david 6ordon which means they can buy. david gordon brown is in the room there with sark electricity asking why it took so long and how he is feeling. we could not keep running at the old price, we would go out of business.
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we we re price, we would go out of business. we were bankrupting ourselves. but we got an agreement before it was too late. john, where are you, it looks like a shed? this is the headquarters of sark electricity, the generators powering the island of 300, 400 people are behind me. there is a generated this side —— generator this side powering. it has been a huge issue for these people but the small shed is what it is about. there is the infrastructure that takes it to the houses in sark but it is part of the operation and this is sark electricity. thank you for your update. becky barr, this is sark electricity. thank you foryour update. becky barr, plenty more tonight from north—west tonight. thank you to both, that is nationwide. if you would like to see more on any
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of those stories, access them via the bbc iplayer and a reminder we go nationwide every afternoon at 4:30pm here on pramac afternoon —— here on afternoon live. ukraine is banning russian men aged between 16 and 60 from entering the country. it‘s comes amid rising tension between the two countries — after russia seized three ukrainian naval vessels off the coast of crimea. ukraine has already declared martial law, and it‘s now banning russian men of fighting age to prevent what it calls the formation of ‘private armies.‘ richard lister reports. another day of exercises for these ukrainian troops amid growing fears of a russian invasion. kiev has already imposed martial law in these border regions. now the ukraine president has banned russian men of fighting age from crossing into the country. translation: these measures are to block the russian federation from forming private armies here under the leadership of the russian armed forces and to prevent them from carrying out operations like those we saw in 2014.
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when russia annexed ukraine‘s crimean peninsula four years ago, it was these russian militia men in unmarked fatigues who led the way. they quickly took over the airport and other key sites. ukraine sees last week‘s clashes in the kerch strait when russia seized three ukrainian vessels and their crews is the first steps to another russian land grab. but moscow accuses kyiv of overreacting. translation: i think it would be very scary if anyone tried to mirror the decisions taken in ukraine. this would be madness. what has happened there is the result of a dysfunctional government. kiev wants nato to patrol this stretch of water between russia and ukraine to stop ukraine‘s allies are wary of inflaming tensions further but the eu has signalled today that it is likely to extend sanctions against russia later this month. richard lister, bbc news. theo leggett is here —
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in a moment he will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live... the american hotel chain marriott international says there‘s been a breach of the reservations database in its starwood division — potentially exposing information of around half a billion customers. the 620 summit gets under way in buenos aries — as theresa may refuses to rule out another vote on her brexit deal if mps reject it. rail fares will rise by an average of 3.1% injanuary. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live... there was a slight acceleration in annual house price growth during november but the market remains subdued. prices were 1.9% higher than a year ago. they grew byjust1.6% in the year to october mike lynch, the former chief executive of software giant
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autonomy, has been charged with fraud in the us. the charge which carries a maximum term of 20 years, relates to the 2011 sale of the company to computer giant hewlett—packa rd. free charging for electric cars will be available for customers at some tesco stores from next year. tesco, in partnership with volkswagen, plans to install almost 2,500 charging bays at up to 600 stores by 2020. pub chain marstons has also announced plans to roll out rapid chargers across its sites nationwide. chargers app helps? that could be controversial! now, let‘s talk about the data breach at marriott. controversial! now, let‘s talk about the data breach at marriottm looks major? it really does. they are looking at their starwood booking system which has been hacked, the records of 500 million
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customers may have been accessed. the data that has apparently been stolen includes e—mail addresses, passport details, dates of arrival. and it could also include credit ca rd and it could also include credit card information which makes things more serious but it is meant to be in corrected. this appears to have been going on for a while, since 2014, which would explain the numbers involved but this is not the first time we‘ve seen a major company having their computer database hacked. company having their computer data base hacked. it company having their computer database hacked. it appears to be something of a growth industry in terms of crime. and the price of oil has been going down? the price of brent crude was above $86 a barrel and going upwards. since then, it has been tumbling. below $59. as always it is supply and demand. when prices were
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rising due to concerns that american sanctions on iran would reduce the amount of supply and there would be amount of supply and there would be a shortage. prices going up but now the price is falling because supplies are plentiful, there is still oil coming from iran and saudi arabia and russia all producing oil hand over fist but the cost of oil affects everything we do. transport costs for business, energy costs, all that kind of thing so the prices we pay for goods in the shops are directly related to the price of oil. when the oil comes down the price of pumps tends not to? tax is involved in that. lets move on. the ftse has ended the month on a sound note? the second month in succession that the indexis second month in succession that the index is ending in the red. the full is not as steep as it was, but it is still declining. a lot of this is likely to do with talks over brexit, and the deal that raise may could
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negotiate —— that theresa may could negotiate. there is a certain degree of stability. there is uncertainty as to whether it would get through the house of commons. jasper lorna joins me now. what do you make of this? the ftse is down for another month. it is not the kind of full that we saw in october. but clearly it is not great at the moment —— my kind of fall. not another great month. 0ne kind of fall. not another great month. one thing to note in addition to the fact that there was a second month of decline is when you compare the ftse 100 to other big indices out there, like in the us or the japan, they have underperformed in all of those too. a relative loss on the month as well. it is dour towards uk stocks, understandable, as you mention, brexit being a major
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consideration. the ftse100, and how it is made up, a lot of oil companies are in there and are commodities based. it is a tough time for ills prices, the shares have suffered as well. and prices are falling but obviously we have an 0pec meeting coming up in a week or so. do you think they will be talking about cutting back on production? if opec have any hopes of stabilising the oil market, they have to cut production. the current consensus is one to 1.5 barrels per day. this has been the consensus for a little while, the markets have continued to drop. through this supply and demand dynamic and the iran sanctions, 0pec need to step up. the problem overall here is
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people have forgotten about us shale oil, they are a marginal producer. 0pec can make a difference in the short—term but every time the price rises, the oil will go back down again. and marriot hotels, and cybersecurity breach. is the time coming where companies have two justify to investors what they are doing to protect themselves against this kind of thing? i would like to say yes but the evidence so far is that these data breaches tend to have a marginal effect on company earnings. so, as an investor, your main focus is owners per share. there is not quite the incentive that there should be. in this case, maybe it could be slightly different. the data breach involves and effects sta rwood‘s
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different. the data breach involves and effects starwood‘s loyalty programme. people may be more reticent to sign up going forward. it could affect owning space —— earnings this time around and it could be the first case where it does. jasper lawler, thank you for joining us. and a quick look at the markets? the ftse 100 and a quick look at the markets? the ftse100 ending the month in the red. not a ftse100 ending the month in the red. nota huge ftse100 ending the month in the red. not a huge full but still noticeable. and the dowjones is also down, only by a small margin but it is. brent broke down 86 cents, 1.5%. —— brent crude. but it is. brent broke down 86 cents, 1.5%. -- brent crude. thank you very much. a snow leopard was shot dead, after a keeper at dudley zoo left the enclosure door open and it escaped. the zoo says eight—year—old margaash was killed after getting free last month when the zoo had closed and all visitors had left. an investigation found the door to his enclosure was left open through "keeper error". a disciplinary procedure has taken place into those involved and security is being reviewed.
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frank tunbridge is a big cat expert — he says the snow leopard should have been tranquilised instead of shot dead. you watch natural history programmes on television, you can see how quickly these tranquilliser drugs can work on large animals like giraffes and rhinoceros. i think it is an easy option out, it is a policy to rather than take a second look is to actually shoot the animal. there was a case some years ago in wales where a small female eurasian lynx escaped and the same thing happened. lynx are no threat to the public and it was shot. it should have been rethought, i know they had to make a quick decision but there were no people in the zoo, it was closed and in the confines i would have thought they could have maybe surrounded the animal and used a tranquillising gun. snow leopards are quite passive big cats, they do not offer the same amount of fear as a tiger, along with a cheetah they are one of the most passive of big cats and the animal even if it did escape
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would most likely have gone into woodland and i would have thought they could have found it with thermal imaging and recaptured it in that way. frank tunbridge there. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at 5 with ben brown. time for a look at the weather... hello, after recent days of wet and windy weather, today is at least, out and about but not without big showers producing thunder and lightning, this is in wales. a beautiful rainbow, looking out towards the shower cloud. in derbyshire, sunshine this morning. that‘s the name of the game. low
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pressure and close to the north, windy in scotland that you can see that next area of low pressure moving in. through the evening and overnight, showers deplete in the north and we have more rain coming in. in parts of northern ireland and southern scotland but it looks wet. further north, under clear skies, southern scotland but it looks wet. further north, under clearskies, it is cooler. frost levels with mist and fog. colder areas are sitting there. with weather systems attendant in some areas. mild air. it is split for the weekend. we have this soggy start on saturday, especially in england and wales but possibly far north in southern scotland. 6usty winds in southern and western coasts of england, that will blow the rain out the way through the morning. brightening up in parts of south—west england with showers following. they may stretch towards the scottish borders, affecting eastern northern ireland but in the north, we have a day of sunny spells and showers. crisp and wintry sunshine around. those
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showers will be wintry over the hills. in england and wales, we have mild air. we have a mild start where we see 13 or 14. low pressure scooting out the way. strong winds for some time. on saturday night fever we have this area of rain and low pressure moving in. saturday night is looking wet again for england and wales. the third or fourth spell of wet weather through the week so far. possibly not so much further north but we do have a cold night. a risk of frost and fog first thing on sunday morning. the rain should clear, the afternoon is dry and bright with some showers. it does look like scotland and northern ireland will have persistent rain, and wintry weather over the hills and wintry weather over the hills and by then the showers are coming in thick and fast in southern and western areas as well. today at five — 6lobal tensions dominate the meeting of 620 leaders in argentina, but for theresa may
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the main issue is brexit. speaking in buenos aires, she calls on mps to deliver on the referendum but doesn‘t rule out another commons vote if they reject her deal the first time round. i‘m focused on the vote that is taking place on december the 11th. i want everybody who is going to participate, all members of parliament, to focus on what this vote does. you‘re not ruling out a second vote. i am focusing on the vote in two weeks‘ time. we‘ll be live at the summit shortly with my colleague tim willcox. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. a breach of data at the marriott international hotel chain‘s starwood division, 500 million guests have their personal details compromised
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