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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 1, 2018 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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good morning welcome to breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. our headlines today... the former us president george bush sr has died at the age of 94. the news was announced in the past few hours by his son george w bush who described him as a man of the highest character. george h w bush was the 41stus president and was vice—president to ronald reagan. we'll be live in the united states with the reaction. also this morning: another resignation over brexit. the universities and science minister, sam gyimah, quits calling the prime minister's plan "naive". aftershocks rock alaska after a devastating earthquake strikes its biggest city. in sport, one of the biggest comebacks ever... that's how tyson fury, sees his return to the ring, as he flexes his muscles for the last time, before his heavyweight showdown with the man in the mask, deontay wilder... a right royal game of real tennis. i take on prince edward, as he tries to breathe fresh life into a 600—year—old sport.
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good morning, all. it is the first weekend of december, and it is a cloudy affair for most of us. there is also some rain in the forecast, but it's not a complete wash—out. in fact, some of us will see some brightness later on. i will have all the details coming up shortly. it's saturday the first of december, our top story... the former american president, george bush senior, has died aged 94. he served in the oval office between 1989 and 1993, succeeding ronald reagan, before losing out to bill clinton. he made a fortune in the oil business in texas and also became head of the cia. in april, he was admitted to a hospital intensive care unit with an infection, a week after the death of his wife barbara. his son, george w bush, who also became president, released this statement a short time ago. he described his father as a man
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of the highest character and said he was the best dad any son or daughter could ask for. president trump has paid his tribute in the last couple of hours, he said his example lived on and would "continue to stir future americans to pursue a greater cause". the former american president barack obama has also paid tribute, he said america had "lost a patriot and humble serva nt". our north america editorjon sopel looks back at his life. i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states... that george herbert walker bush had reached the highest office in the land almost seemed predestined. were so help me god. —— were so help me god. -- so help me god. he was born into a family of wealth, privilege and politics. his father was a us senator. george attended yale, before volunteering for the navy in world war ii.
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he was shot down over the pacific, his rescue remarkably caught on film. peacetime took him to texas, where he made a fortune in the oil business, and then came the lure of politics. he was elected to congress, served as an ambassador, and became head of the cia, before pitching to become the republican presidential candidate in 1980. he lost to ronald reagan, but reagan put him on the ticket, and served as vice president. in 1988, he had another crack at the presidency, this time successfully. but there were new uncertainties notably iraq's annexation of kuwait in 1990. margaret thatcher told him to stay firm, apparently saying, "this is no time to go wobbly, george." he didn't. iraq will not be permitted to annex kuwait. and that's is not a threat, it's not a boast, it'sjust the way it's going to be. a wide coalition was forged, and operation desert storm began. the ground war would lastjust 100 hours, in a decisive victory for american military expertise and superiority. i can report to the nation, aggression is defeated. the war is
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over. cheering. the 1992 election pitched the patrician bush against the young, charismatic, and hitherto—little—known democratic governor from arkansas called bill clinton. his clear advocacy of a new vision for america swept him to a decisive victory. so help me god. congratulations. within a decade, there was another bush in the white house, george w. bush senior was the last of america's cold war leaders, and the demise of communism during his period was managed deftly, as former soviet satellites embraced the values of democracy and freedom. george herbert walker bush remained active into old age, even parachute—jumping in his 805. atta boy! and, of course, the one constant throughout all that, his wife, barbara. they were married for over 70 years. many tributes emerging this morning.
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in the last hour, sirjohn major has his own personal tribute, saying that above all else, george bush senior was a family man and, for him, the american people were part of that family. he said in a statement that he felt "privileged to have worked with him, and even more privileged that he became a lifelong friend. he was, quite simply, one of the most deep down decent people i have ever known." he added that in public office george bush served as he lived, with compassion, courage, dignity and grace. earlier we spoke to our california correspondent david willis. he told us about the great role he had played in american politics. this was a man seen as a patriot, a shining example of public service in america and very much a patriot. but
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he had one of the most impressive cvs for a man in public life that is possible, really, to get. he was congressman, he was a former envoy to china, vice president, director of cia, and of course president himself before losing out to bill clinton. it is thought his legacy, really, will be that of foreign policy, and he presided over this country at a time of them world events. the collapse of the soviet union, the fall of the berlin wall, and so on, but it was the economic downturn, here at home in the united states, that was to ultimately prove his downfall. plus the fact that bill clinton just his downfall. plus the fact that bill clintonjust seem to his downfall. plus the fact that bill clinton just seem to have a little bit more spirit and vision, perhaps, when he was elected. president trump, who of course is a republican as well, although of a
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very different kind to that of george hw bush, said in a statement, he praised george bush'sjudgment, common—sense and unflappable leadership, as he put it, also, the former president, barack obama, said america had lost a patriot and humble servant and the former us secretary of state, james baker, who served under george hw bush, said the legacy of george hw bush will be forever etched in the history of america and the world. david willis reporting and we have more reaction throughout the programme in response to the death of george bush senior, who died aged 94. theresa may has suffered another major blow to her hopes of winning the backing of mps for her brexit deal after another cabinet resignation. the universities and science minister sam gyimah who voted to remain
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in the eu referendum, has announced he's quitting his job in protest at the prime minister's withdrawal agreement. in an interview with the telegraph he claimed the deal would leave britain worse off, and that the country would be left out of vital discussions on its future — branding it a "loss of sovereignty the public will rightly never acce pt". the latest ministerial resignation is the 10th over may's brexit proposals, following the likes of dominic raab, esther mcvey and jo johnson. but, just as significantly, he joins the growing number of conservative mps who've said they'll vote against the deal. currently, it's thought the number stands at around 100. peter saull has the latest. we will be speaking to sam gyimah in the next few minutes. theresa may has urged the crown prince of saudi arabia to hold the murderers ofjamal khashoggi to account as he meets world leaders on the sidelines of the g20 summit in argentina. later today, president trump will meet president xi jinping of china at the summit to discuss the trade war between their two countries.
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a series of aftershocks have rocked the us state of alaska after a devastating earthquake struck its biggest city, damaging buildings and forcing people to run into the streets. the quake was centred about seven miles north of the city of anchorage and there are no reports of serious injuries. laura westbrook reports. earthquake! alaska is used to earthquakes but this is far bigger than most. the seven magnitude quake took many by surprise. earthquake drills are all very well but reality can be quite different. there are tvs on the ground. the first quake caused damage inside buildings, forcing all the local tv stations of the error. many people have returned to their offices when a powerful after—shock sent them scrambling out
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again. the bbc spoke to a local reporter a short time later. this state sees on average more than 800 a week but because our state is so large, a lot of quakes are not big enough to feel that this is the biggest we have felt here in alaska. outside, the damage was clear to see, but authorities were quick to assure the public. the fact we went through something significant with this minimal amount of damage says we are very well prepared as a community. president trump responded on twitter, sailing, the great people of alaska have been hit hard by a big he promised the federal government would spare no expense in its response. as many continue to assess the damage, residents have been warned to expect more after—shocks. the fbi has launched
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an investigation after the records of five—hundred—million customers of the hotel group marriott international were involved in a data breach. the hotel chain said the guest reservation database of its starwood division had been attacked, exposing the personal data of customers, including some payment card numbers. starwood's hotel brands include w hotels, sheraton, le meridien and four points by sheraton. if you're waiting to see who the first celebrity was to leave the jungle last night, then you'd better leave the room for a moment. it was a surprise result to the first public vote, which saw one of the most well—known faces leave. the first person to leave this series is... noel noel. see you in a bit, guys. am i
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supposed to look disappointed?” noel. see you in a bit, guys. am i supposed to look disappointed? i am sure he is not because apparently he got close to 100 grand for it. tv veteran noel edmonds entered the jungle later than his camp—mates but quickly struck up a bromance with football manager harry redknapp. harry has been a real favourite in this. he lasted just 10 days down under, and is reported to have been paid a £600,000 fee for his appearance. i bet when he created mr blobby, he never thought he would be getting paid that much to go into the jungle. he is an interesting character, noel edmonds. i remember once he came in on bbc breakfast and said publicly he was refusing to pay the tv licence fee. he said, i am not going to do it and they can come and get me if they want to. i wonder if they did! anyway... 30 minutes
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past nine. all of the sport coming up past nine. all of the sport coming up later and past nine. all of the sport coming up laterand a past nine. all of the sport coming up later and a look ahead to the weekend weather. but back now to one of our top stories, sam gyimah has become the latest member of government to resign over to reason may‘s brexit plan. the former universities minister who voted to remain in the referendum has announced he has quitted hisjob in protest at the withdrawal agreement. we will speak to someone just a moment but first, let's hear what the culture secretary had to say about the deal earlier in our programme. negotiation is about compromising you don't generally get everything you want. and we haven't here. but the question is not, for colleagues, ministers and everybody else to consider, the question is not, does this deal compare favourably with the idealised version of brexit i have in my head? and everyone will have a different idealised version, that's not the
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question. the question is, how does it compare with the realistically available alternatives? and when you look at those and the content of this deal, then i think people will start to have a rather more favourable view of this deal than some currently do. over the next ten days, that's exactly the process my colleagues will have to go through. we're joined now by sam colleagues will have to go through. we'rejoined now by sam gyimah. thank you forjoining us this morning. you heard the culture secretary, jeremy wright, one of your colleagues, seeing this deal is a compromise, the best possible. i have you quit? well, i resigned because this is the biggest vote i will have to vote in as an mp. after taking quite a long time to look at the details of the proposal, i came to the conclusion it was not in the national interest. the reason why the deal is not on the national interest is there's actually no deal at all, it is a deal in name only. what we have in front of us is almost like a wish list we have
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agreed with the eu, that we would to negotiate over the next 2—4 years. so, we will leave the eu, surrender our voice, power of veto and our vote. we will have known the average, it will be negotiated against 27 countries, each of whom has significant interests and they set the rules, they are the referee and they decide who wins. our interest, i believe, will be com pletely interest, i believe, will be completely battered and we will come out of that process as a country, crippled by the eu and that is not in the national interest. if you think this deal is no deal at all, are you saying, we would be better having no deal efficiently? no, i am saying this deal is a deal in name only, there is nothing there. so it would be the same as no deal? no, absolutely not. what we have in front of us is not a tangible proposal that we can pack on. what
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we need to do is look at other alternatives because this proposal is materially worse than, for example, staying in the eu. so, maybe we should do is go back to the people and let them decide whether they want this deal, whether they wa nt to they want this deal, whether they want to remain, or whether they want to leave. but to put the country in a position where we go down this path, that we know who will be terrible for the country, would be a dreadful mistake. so, you will vote against this deal? that is why i have had to resign, i will be voting against this deal and that is why, with great reluctance, i have given up with great reluctance, i have given up thejobi with great reluctance, i have given up thejob i love. with great reluctance, i have given up the job i love. some people might say you're running away. not at all. i have been involved in detailed eu negotiations, the galileo satellite system is something i have been involved with and that is actually what has led me to this position, i
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realised during that, the uk has invested over 1 billion realised during that, the uk has invested over1 billion but overnight, they kicked us out because we're leaving the e0, even though we share a lot of security interests together. this is not going to be a level playing field. negotiating with the european union is like playing a game of football where the other side is a referee and they make up the rules and they decide who wins. it's very hard and the prime minister's deal commits us toa the prime minister's deal commits us to a path where we would have to accept that situation and that's not in our national interest. that is why i have reluctantly had to resign. why now? the galileo stuff has been brewing a while. boris johnson and david davies decided a long time ago this wasn't right. why now? you have to take time to think about these things that is what i have done. i have also received hundreds of e—mails from my constituents, by constituency voted exactly in line with the country,
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urging me to vote against the deal andi urging me to vote against the deal and i think the right thing to do is ta ke and i think the right thing to do is take yourtime, and i think the right thing to do is take your time, consider things and icame to take your time, consider things and i came to the view this is something cannot support. had he been in any plan b negotiations? what they mean? have you started looking at what we can do instead? there are a number of different options. the choice we have been given is it is this deal or chaos, i think that is a false trice. there are a number of different options we can take from here on in, including extending the article 50 deadline, for example, as isaid, holding article 50 deadline, for example, as i said, holding a second referendum, a number of other options mps are looking at but i believe that this decision is irreversible, we will live with the consequences for years to come, so we must take our time to
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get it right. will other colleagues follow you ? get it right. will other colleagues follow you? it is for every mp and minister... but you must know, you must all talk to each other?|j minister... but you must know, you must all talk to each other? i know there are a lot of colleagues who feel very uncomfortable and disagree with this deal. but it is for eve ryo ne with this deal. but it is for everyone to make up their mind how we deal with that. my message to all of them, particularly those of us in the generation who will have to live with the consequences of this for yea rs with the consequences of this for years to come, is that we should think carefully before voting for a deal, if i am going to college at, that will hobble britain for decades to come. sam gyimah, thank you for your time this morning, that the former universities and science minister who has just it is 9:20am. louise is here the weather. the weather is not under the influence
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of europe, it is under the influence of europe, it is under the influence of what is happening in the atlantic. you can see what is waiting in the wings. plenty of wet weather, into the week ahead. the rain is moving through quickly, some heavy, from northern ireland, north—west england, stretching to the midlands and across the south, gusts of wind is, 35—40 mph, that rain clears during the morning and then we will see an improving picture. wet weather is not expected to last and will continue to move south eastwards into east anglia. around lunch time, brighter skies developing across south—west england and wales. the heaviest rain in northern england, northern ireland, that too will shift east to the pennines, scotland, a completely different kettle of fish today, scattered showers in the north—west and after a chilly start, brighter skies in the north—east. we could cling onto brighter and drier
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weather here but temperatures will struggle. further south, a south—westerly wind drives in milder air, double digits, brighterskies, air, double digits, brighterskies, a lot of cloud still, 11—14, the high. staying dry through the night, but turning wet. all those fronts in the atlantic fishing in, bringing heavy rain across southern england, persistent rain in northern england, northern ireland and scotland. the best of the weather in the north—east. maybe some mist and frost but as we go through the day, low— pressure frost but as we go through the day, low—pressure moving through and starting to sit across scotland. the rain clears away from england and wales and sunday will be a better day with more sunshine. northern england reign will drift into the south of scotland and northern ireland will stay cloudy. 9 degrees,
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further south, incredibly mild, 14 or 15. looking ahead, further south, incredibly mild, 14 or15. looking ahead, more rain, not com pletely or15. looking ahead, more rain, not completely miserable, some brightness from time to time. but looking pretty and steph put —— pretty unsettled. louise, thank you. iam wearing pretty unsettled. louise, thank you. i am wearing a summary of the weather on my shirt. cloud and rain and rainbows... you have meteors on there as well. we have an astrophysicist here who could tell us. astrophysicist here who could tell us. yeah, they look like falling rocks. let's have a look at the newspapers.
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i was just talking to the former science minister and he was talking about galileo, a lot of people will wonder what it is. can you tell us? galileo has been in the works for the last 20 years or so, it is funded by the european union, which is why it's coming up with breaks of negotiations, basically, it is a set of satellites that will be 30 in orbit around the earth when complete, and they will send precise plot signals back to us on earth and you can use your phone, the gps can find a couple of the satellite and look at those signals and say exactly where you are. galileo is the most accurate in terms of location by fire, of any gps network out there. 20 times more accurate and it is already in use. clearly you're not a politician but the releva nce to you're not a politician but the relevance to brexit is what? we don't have access? what happens
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instead ? don't have access? what happens instead? the important distinction is there is a public version of galileo and an encrypted members only version of galileo. people in the uk, we will still see the benefits of galileo for the next few years, we're already seeing benefits that there is an encrypted version, the uk was heavily involved in the security and building the satellites, wanting to host ground stations as well, we lost that contract earlier this year and all of this is coming up because in the rule book, there is a security element and if you leave the eu, you no longer have access. no doubt that will become part of the extended negotiations at a later date because some of those details will be ironed out. yeah, the uk is now going to be looking at the feasibility of doing its own network of satellites, i think many in the space industry would say that is an expensive initiative to undertake. but it is possible in terms of skills? very
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possible in terms of skills? very possible in terms of skills and the ingenuity that it isjust possible in terms of skills and the ingenuity that it is just a possible in terms of skills and the ingenuity that it isjust a question of cost and what that will mean to the economy, whether we can afford it or not. me story in the mirror here, talk us through this.” it or not. me story in the mirror here, talk us through this. i love this story, who, in attention because essentially it is a chemistry teacher in cambridge who wanted to film a video of himself lighting a metal powder called thermite, it normally ignite quickly but doesn't explode but apparently there was some rain in the atmosphere and it caused this to be atmosphere and it caused this to be a bigger explosion than expected. he told the police, don't worry, it was not a told the police, don't worry, it was nota bomb, told the police, don't worry, it was not a bomb, just me during a chemistry experiment. he was filming it for students. his daughter said he was trying to inspire his students to get excited... right back they would have been! at the
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space centre, we put explosions in the family talk because catches attention and get people excited. we use hydrogen balloons, we talk about rocket fuel, how rockets work and that gets people excited. they can see the power in science.” that gets people excited. they can see the power in science. i was at the science museum watching one of those experiments and the kids loved it. do kids and still have, in science classes, can you have a bunsen burner on the desk?” science classes, can you have a bunsen burner on the desk? i think you still can. you could when i was there, but that was a while ago! and there, but that was a while ago! and there was a story, the express loves a weather story and they have already gone to town on snowdon pictures. louise hasjust officially said it isn't happening. next week. well, yeah, weather is
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unpredictable. the headline is, it is warmer than greece this weekend. athens has a cold front and we have temperatures that are relatively mild this weekend. they say london could be 15 degrees but then perhaps snow in the northern parts, over hills. mostly on high ground. people might say their result was nick higham. but whether we will have snowed like last year. that had a big impact in trying to trying to get to work and with visitors coming, no one came because it was too racy, so a lot of questions. be careful around those explosions. thanks. it is 9:28am. until ten o'clock, saturday kitchen will take over. what is on the menu? we're
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waiting for our special guests. we will literally never give him up, thatis will literally never give him up, that is a clue... it is rick astley! he is rolling over from radio two and will be here to face them to heaven or food hell. fresh from hong kong, lovely to see you. very fresh! you look it. dream that i am doing a pasta dish, r nebo and ricotta. tom parker bowles, you are doing something around christmas? christmas sausage rolls. we look forward to that. ollie is our landlord. i have gone to italy for angela and i am looking forward to rick astley. heaven looks like steak
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and hell is bree, black pudding, artichoke. to vote for rick astley's food heaven or food hell, go online. a very nice man. i was going to say something else but i won't... we will never give up. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. coming up before ten, louise will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the former american president, george bush senior, has died aged 94. he served in the oval office between 1989 and 1993, succeeding ronald reagan, before losing out to bill clinton. he made a fortune in the oil business in texas and also
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became head of the cia. in april, he was admitted to a hospital intensive care unit with an infection, a week after the death of his wife barbara. his son, george w. bush, who also became president, released this statement a short time ago. he described his father as a man of the highest character and said he was the best dad any son or daughter could ask for. president trump has paid tribute this morning, he said his example lived on and would "continue to stir future americans to pursue a greater cause". the former american president barack obama has also paid tribute, he said america had "lost a patriot and humble serva nt". in the last hour, sirjohn major has his own personal tribute, saying that above all else, george bush senior was a family man and, for him, the american people were part of that family. he said in a statement that he felt "privileged to have worked with him, and even more privileged that he became a lifelong friend. he was, quite simply, one of the most deep down decent people i have ever known." he added that in public office george bush served as he lived, with compassion, courage,
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dignity and grace. theresa may has suffered another major blow to her hopes of winning the backing of mps for her brexit deal after another cabinet resignation. the universities and science minister sam gyimah, who voted to remain in the eu referendum, has announced he's quitting his job in protest at the prime minister's withdrawal agreement. in the last half hour mrjee—mar told breakfast he felt he had no choice but to step down. i have resigned because this is the biggest vote i will have to bolton as an mp. after taking a long time to look at the details of the proposal, i came to the conclusion it was not in the national interest. the reason for this is that there is actually no deal at all, it is a
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deal in name only. what we have in front of us is the wish list we have agreed with the eu that we would like to negotiate over the next two to four years. so we will leave the eu, surrender our forests, to four years. so we will leave the eu, surrender ourforests, our veto and ourfault. eu, surrender ourforests, our veto and our fault. we eu, surrender ourforests, our veto and ourfault. we will eu, surrender ourforests, our veto and our fault. we will have eu, surrender ourforests, our veto and ourfault. we will have known where the rich and will be negotiating against 27 countries each of whom will have significant interest. they set the rules and the other suv and they decide who will win. our interests will be battered. we will come out of that process is crippled by the eu and that is not in the national interest. sam gyimah speaking to as a little earlier on. sam gyimah speaking to as a little earlier on. meanwhile the prime minister is meeting other world leaders at the g20 summit in argentina, where she urged the saudi crown prince to hold the murderers of jamal khashoggi to account. later today, president trump will meet president xi jinping of china at the summit to discuss the trade war between their two countries.
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a series of aftershocks have rocked the us state of alaska after a devastating earthquake struck its biggest city, damaging buildings and forcing people to run into the streets. the quake was centred about seven miles north of the city of anchorage. it sent residents scurrying for cover and briefly triggered a tsunami warning for coastal areas. there are no reports of serious injuries. the fbi has launched an investigation after the records of 500 million customers of the hotel group marriott international were involved in a data breach. the hotel chain said the guest reservation database of its starwood division had been attacked, exposing the personal data of customers, including some payment card numbers. starwood's hotel brands include w hotels, sheraton, le meridien and four points by sheraton. the former first lady michelle obama's memoir becoming has become the best—selling book released this year in the us just 15 days after publication. the book reveals difficulties in her marriage and criticises president trump, writing that she can "never forgive" him for suggesting that her husband wasn't born in the us and so wasn't a legitimate american president.
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those are the main stories this morning. there is a big fight going on tonight. yes. at 4am our time. you have to stay up to see whether tyson fury can come back from a title short which many people never thought they would see. he could go all the way and win the belt again. so much has happened in his life since he beat wladimir klitschko. here is with a chance. he says he will enjoy it. it is a huge moment in his career. absolutely. his story transcends the boundaries of sport. he has so many people interested. tyson fury says he can't
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remember a bigger comeback ever, someone coming from further away, than he's come from...28 stone and battling depression during his 30 months out of the sport now down to 18 stone, he steps into the ring tonight, 3 stone heavier than his opponent, deontay wilder. . .the american's wbc heavweight crown, is the prize, if fury‘s comeback ends in victory. adie adadoyan reports from los angeles. tyson fury attempting to do what he does best and that is to get under the skin of his opponent. unlike their last face—off which ended in a melee, this time he could not penetrate the facade of the masked champion. talk is cheap. tomorrow is time. actions speak louder than words. so tomorrow i will show everything, release everything that is inside of me. i guess you can't wait? i cannot wait. nor can fury, he believes the win will be one of the greatest comebacks of all time having overcome issues with mental health, alcohol and drug problems.
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noone went up to 28 stone, lost that weight. nobody has suffered with the problems i have suffered. it ranks with the best comebacks of all time. three years ago he stunned the boxing world with a surprise win against wladimir klitschko in his own backyard. what chance of a similar upset? this matchup has the great and the good of the sport intrigued. with this bronze bomber, he is loud, he is big. he is the only big man in america right now that is taking on the british. it is a great fight, it is a great matchup. he is more of a puncher, right—handed. when it comes to tyson fury, he's obviously a mover, he is tall and a different style than a puncher, use more of a boxer. and this is where it is all going to happen, the staples centre, home of the la lakers, the hard court and the hoops have been replaced by the ropes and the canvas.
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deontay wilder and tyson fury‘s date with destinyjust a few hours away. the stakes will be high. he then they'd get a chance that fighting anthonyjoshua, should they'd get a chance that fighting anthony joshua, should he they'd get a chance that fighting anthonyjoshua, should he win. it'll be understandable if cardiff city manager neil warnock has a bit of a sore head this morning. today is his 70th birthday, and last night his side, came from behind to beat wolves 2—1. junior hoilett‘s second half stunner, the perfect present for his manager. it's the welsh side's, third premier league win of the season, and moves them out of the relegation zone until this evening at least. i will sleep well tonight. i mean, you know, i'm not getting any younger, as you know, and moments like this you've got to treasure. that's why i'm in the game. ijust love — when the whistle goes and you see your family out there, and fans, it's an amazing feeling. and it will be an extra special day, bearing in mind this result. yes, all the kids there, i'm really pleased.
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it will be a nice steady night. if we had lost tonight, it would not be anywhere near as good as it's going to be. non league side solihull moors, will be in the third round draw of the fa cup for the first time, after they held league one blackpool to a goalless draw. a record crowd, at their damson park ground, saw solihull find the net in the first half, but alex gudger‘s goal, was disallowed because darren carter was ruled offside, during the corner kick. in rugby union's premiership, exeter chiefs have lost, for the first time this season. the league leaders were beaten, 28—26 by harlequins. quins were in front for most of the match, withjoe marchant crossing the line late on, to secure a bonus point and seal the win. it's exeter‘s first defeat away from home since february. netball — england beat uganda 65—53, in their second test at the copperbox and with it, the series with a game to spare. the roses started much stronger and never looked back,
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despite a late rally from uganda. george fisher scored the final goal, to take the series. game three is on sunday. cycling — great britain won gold, in the women's team pursuit, on the opening day of the, track cycling world cup, in berlin. the team of laura kenny, katie archibald, emily nelson and emily kay came, from a long way down in the final to beat australia, for their second successive win. elsewhere, the men's team sprint won silver. that's just about it. trying to protect the forecast for tonight's big fight, it is split down the middle, reading the pundits. most people say deontay wilder will start as the favourite but you cannot rule out tyson fury. can i state the obvious, for a boxing promoter, the names of the two fighters are an absolute dream. wilder and a few
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day, you could not make it up.” absolute dream. wilder and a few day, you could not make it up. i had not thought of that. they are like cartoon character names. mike tyson, perhaps that is why he's called mike. i was thinking, you have developed a quest and perhaps you we re developed a quest and perhaps you were telling us which way the fight was going to go. it is going tyson fury at the moment. perhaps it is going wild. was there an incident?” must‘ve put on my headphones and got excited. perhaps it was that game of real tennis with the that did it. perhaps i should try and calm it down. it is our last look at your here this morning. on that note...
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ya, that is more like you. did you see the dust come off there. steady. serious work now. this week the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, warned of a plunging pound and a shrinking economy if britain leaves the eu with no deal in march. his worst case scenario was that house prices could fall by as much as 30 per cent. so what does this mean for first time buyers looking to get on the property ladder, or retirees wanting to sell up? let's try and get some clarity from economics commentator, grace blakeley. thanks forjoining us. looking at house prices, paint the picture of the current picture. at the moment, across the country, house price
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growth is stagnant. it is around 1% this year, much lower than previous yea rs. this year, much lower than previous years. it suggests we are reaching their peak of the house price cycle. in london, prices have started to fall. prices are more affected by international investment. either way, it looks like a lot of that might be to do with households putting off purchases because of uncertainty regarding brexit but it looks like every ten to 15 years we have a time in the business cycle with a fall in demand in that looks like it is on the horizon. so if prices drop, that is good news if you're buying houses for the first time, in theory. yes, in theory. the trouble we have in the uk is that housing is so central to the economy. that is a potential that the drop in house prices will have a
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significant impact in terms of demand for goods and services which affects the whole economy. if you think about it, we have had ten yea rs of think about it, we have had ten years of wage stagnation. they are the same level they read in 2007 which is unprecedented and yet house prices have continued to rise and the economy has continued to grow, a lot of that is driven by debts against the rising value of their home, in the assumption news prices will increase. when that eventually turns, there is potential of going into negative equity and people will stop borrowing to fund consumption. that could lead to a wider contraction of the market. there are a lot of people who will have paid off the mortgage and hoping to sell their home, perhaps to those retiring, it could be hard for them if prices fall? yes. these are not
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predictions, they are scenarios. the bank of england, for reasons relating to the stability of the banking system, has to model the worst possible scenario. it is like predicting the weather. you cannot account for everything that could happen. what does happen after brexit will be determined as much by government policy, whether the government policy, whether the government decides to sit boost spending, what the bank of england does, the assumption it might raise interest rates which looks odds —— insane to watch —— to most observers. there is the potential it could affect people who have a lot of equity or wealth stored in their homes. the idea that house prices will fall by 30 to 35% looks like an extreme scenario will fall by 30 to 35% looks like an extreme scenario to most people. some people love figures and statistics but it is harder to judge
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how people are feeling. that then feeds into what they spend. there is a lwa ys feeds into what they spend. there is always a moment when you do not know what are the sentiments of people which leads them to spend not spend. that is a good point. a lot of emphasis from economists has emphasis from economists has emphasis on gdp growth, that sort of thing without paying attention to how those impact on different parts of the economy in different regions in different types of households. over the last ten years, we have seen a over the last ten years, we have seen a decoupling between people's experience of the economy and gdp figures. i mentioned wage stagnation. growth in the region —— regions being slower than in london. it is similar with house prices. house prices in london is strongly affected by international investment. foreign capital inflow
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into uk housing have boosted prices by 30% since the 1990s, that could impact london a lot but looking into those top wine figures, there is much more complexity and diversions that set under those, reflecting the different experience of people across the country. -- top line figures. thank you very much. the weather is complex and diverse. i think we're better at predicting it however. probably. certainly with louise. it is just as depressing here at the moment. i am listening to stagnant wages and i cannot chew you up. it is miserable outside. we have seen heavy rain accompanied by gusts of wind. the heavy rain will continue to go eastwards. this is the story in the last couple of
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hours across the south coast, through the midlands and wales, already pushing into us east anglia. the heaviest of the rain in northern england and northern ireland, that will continue to move east. a scattering of showers in north—west scotla nd scattering of showers in north—west scotland and eastern scotland will see a bit of brightness. that will continue. the next couple of hours, drier weather through scotland's, rain moving eastwards across england, wales and northern ireland. slow improvement as we go through the afternoon. brighter skies but quite mild with the wind from the south—west. chilly on eastern scotla nd south—west. chilly on eastern scotland but you could have sunshine to compensate. we keep the clear skies in scotland for a while but more wet weather to come. some of the rain heavy moving through southern england and then low pressure will just southern england and then low pressure willjust hover southern england and then low pressure will just hover across scotla nd pressure will just hover across scotland from much of the day. it
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will slowly drift northwards but it will slowly drift northwards but it will bring wet weather across scotla nd will bring wet weather across scotland and northern ireland for tomorrow. then it will be a breezy affair behind it. generally up to sunday, we start off with rain in northern ireland and southers scotland, drifting north. bright and breezy to the south but still mild. i will be back tomorrow. thank you very much. so many tributes pouring in today for george bush senior. let's talk now about why he was such an influential politician. we can speak now to greg swenson from republicans overseas. good morning, thank you for your time this morning. it is very interesting reading tributes when a significant person dies. one theme which comes through from former
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presidents, from john major here, is the notion of how humble he was regardless of the position he ended up regardless of the position he ended up having in american society. yes, i would agree with that. it is the sign of the great man and great statesman when you're in a powerful position. not only when president but as vice president and ambassador to the united nations in china, head of the cia. he has an unbelievable story and jetty was very humble, truly a gentleman. that was a testa m e nt to truly a gentleman. that was a testament to him and his generation. —— and yet he was very humble. he was one of the great generation. let us talk about his personal situation, it is an important moment politically to mark the death of former president but his family were so former president but his family were so important to them. his wife barbara played a large role in american life. yes, if you think
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about when they were in the white house for 12 years and later, during the years of his son's administration, and even prior to thatis, administration, and even prior to that is, i mentioned he was an ambassador, senator and congressmen and successful businessman. he was also an 18—year—old fighter pilot in the pacific and actually crashed on one of his missions. it is a fantastic story. even though he was from a privileged background, he was very dedicated and felt an obligation to serve his country. it isa obligation to serve his country. it is a testament to him and his generation. do you think it will be inevitable that people will, if you think about how politics was and who the people were then, as compared, i am not talking about individuals but the atmosphere around politics now and how different the times are. yes, before the reagan
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administration, you can consider george bush sr as more of a north—east politician, a more modern politician, a sort of rockefeller republican. he was much more more did it even though he represented texas, he was really a new england, born and bred in connecticut and went to yale. he will be remembered more as a moderate and a gentleman as opposed to being on the hard right. he was very loyal to ronald reagan, it even know reagan was more right—wing and is more of a conservative. he was very loyal to president reagan. he demonstrated absolute strength during his time as president during the gulf war. he also oversaw a peaceful transition when the berlin wall came down in the soviet union broke up so it is
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really a great story. thank you for sharing your thoughts with us. thank you. so many reactions coming in but something we wanted to show you, this is a wonderful letter that was written by george bush sr which he left for bill clinton in january 1993 on his first day in office and it said this. when i walked into this office just now i felt the same sense of wonder and respect that i felt ten years ago. i know you will feel that too. i wish you both feel great happiness here. i neverfelt the london is some presidents have described. there will be tough times, made more difficult by criticism he may not think is fair. iam not criticism he may not think is fair. i am not good to give advice but do not let the critics discourage your push you off course. you will be president when you read this note, i wish you well and i wish your family
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well. your success now is our country's success. i am rooting hard for you. good luck, country's success. i am rooting hard foryou. good luck, george. that country's success. i am rooting hard for you. good luck, george. that is handwritten as you can see there. a lot of coverage on programme this morning. if you were not aware, 5am this morning the death of george bush sr at the age of 94. yes. yes. more than 5,500 trees are to be planted to help revitalise the site of a huge moorland fire that burned for 41 days during the hot and dry summer. the blaze at winter hill in lancashire broke out injune and ripped through seven square miles of land. we are joined by the man helping bring life back to the moorland. it was an unprecedented scale of
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damage. it was a very big area. one of our reporters was there for days covering it. tell us about the damage done by it. the skills it was a big thing but part of it was how hot it got. as it swept across the hill, it burned really hot so it got into the peat. part of the vegetation was completely burnt off. that is basically destroying all that. a real challenge, how do you help a place like that cover, what is the plan? firstly, we get to know the scale of it and find out how much damage and where the issues are. the areas which burned really
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hot, we have not had the grass come back. in some places, the grass came back. in some places, the grass came back quickly after the fire in certain areas. but with it burned really ha rd, certain areas. but with it burned really hard, it did not come back so we are looking at putting vegetation on the to stop soil eroding. stop the carbon eroding in being released. also on the edge, the woodland has come up which forms pa rt woodland has come up which forms part of the habitat on the site. the fire burnt the trees so we are looking to repla nt fire burnt the trees so we are looking to replant those using our volunteers. it is getting the vegetation back and the trees back and taking away some of the stuff that happened during the fire. how long will it take to make a difference? the grass grows back quite quickly but some of the slower staff will ta ke quite quickly but some of the slower staff will take a couple of years to get going so probably a couple of
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yea rs. to get going so probably a couple of years. to get the diversity back, the aegis change, you get older and younger bits of heather and back and ta ke younger bits of heather and back and take up to 20 years. it has stalled at certain points. are people able to go there, is it cordoned off? at certain points. are people able to go there, is it cordoned offlm is open access again, the woodland trust is investing a lot in new facilities on the site to encourage people to go and enjoy the wildness. there are 12 areas which are hot spots where that is no public access. “— spots where that is no public access. —— one or two areas. so people can go and start to see the wildlife returning. over 5000 trees, cani wildlife returning. over 5000 trees, can i ask a daft question, what stage at the trees that that you're planting? they are baby trees, less than one—year—old. the smaller tree
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plant, the better chance it has a growing. we plan to young trees and regard them because rabbits and deer will eat them. that will grow up through a guard an emmy take that away. fascinating, thank you very much. —— and we take that away. that's it from breakfast. but ben and sally will be here tomorrow from six. enjoy the rest of your weekend. goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines at 10am... the former us president george bush senior has died aged 94. his son george w bush described him as a man of the highest character. he served as the 41st us president between 1989 and 1993, his term was defined by the cold war and his victory in the first iraq war against saddam hussein. aggression is defeated, the war is
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over! another resignation over brexit. the universities and science minister, sam gyimah, resigns calling the prime minister's plan "naive". the deal on the table from the pm is a deal in name only, only pick issues have been kicked down the road, so we are in for several years of negotiations at the point
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