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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 1, 2018 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11:00: theresa may has been defending her brexit plans, saying they're a good deal for the uk, despite another resignation from her government. passing this deal in the vote that ta kes pla ce passing this deal in the vote that takes place in the house of commons will take us to certainty for the future and the failure to do that would only lead to uncertainty and i think what people want, what i have been hearing here at the 620, is the importance of that certainty for the future. in paris, police say at least 80 people have been injured and more than 200 people arrested during violent protests over rising fuel prices. the former us president george bush senior dies at the age of 94. in tribute, his son george w bush, describes him as "a man of the highest character". the chairman of britain's biggest infrastructure project, the h52 rail programme, says he expects to be sacked in the coming days due to concerns over the performance of crossrail. a major earthquake has strikes the us state of alaska, causing people to run from buildings
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and briefly prompting a tsunami alert for coastal areas. and at 11:30, we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers — business journalistjohn crowley and anne ashworth, associate editor at the times. stay with us for that. good evening. theresa may has assured world leaders at the 620 summit in buenos aires that her eu withdrawal plan will be "a good deal for the global economy". but she's suffered a fresh blow after the resignation of another member of her government over brexit. the universities and science minister, sam 6yimah, says the prime minister's proposal is "a deal in name only" which would remove britain's voice
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and veto, and lead to it to being "hammered" in future negotiations with brussels. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg reports from buenos aires. how many times can she confront attacks from her own side? for theresa may the answer seems to be as many as it takes, defending her deal again. this deal the path of the uk to a brighter future, deal again. this deal the path of the uk to a brighterfuture, has been affirmed by the discussions i have had on trade over the past two days with friends and partners making clear that they are keen to sign and implement ambitious free—trade agreements with us as soon as possible. the number of posing your deal is going up rather than down. when will you accept that you are losing support? the next nine days are really important time for our country, allowing this deal to go ahead, path in this deal in the vote takes place in the house of commons, will take us to certainty for the future and the failure to do that would only lead to uncertainty.
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but there is real uncertainty about her, too, not that she will admit it. look, the race a lot more for me still to do, steve, not least delivering on brexit and being the prime minister that does take the united kingdom out of the european union. her predicament is one few other world leaders would want. her own party poised to reject domain policy. it goes without saying a great relationship. much more serious than friendly sporting rivalry with australia but a hand of friendship from him. he showed great resilience and great race —— determination to solve one of the biggest issues i think there is. new job? yet another minister has joined mps pledged to vote against, sam 6yimah was voted into government to bea 6yimah was voted into government to be a science minister but has quit as an almost apocalyptic warning about theresa may's brexit compromise. we are in for several yea rs of compromise. we are in for several years of negotiations and to the point at which we have leveraged in the eu has all of the control. and
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they will hammer out interest and cripple our country. and also i would like to take this opportunity to express my tribute... and while other leaders may want to help, they are worried too about what may happen next. japan asking for reassurance they will not be a no deal. and forget the ceremony here, at home, there is brutal argument going on. can the prime minister persuade more mps tobacco compromise with the eu? that imagines close economic ties but our own control of immigration. right now, it does not seem so. i think there is a majority andi seem so. i think there is a majority and i don't know what the size of it is but i think there was a majority against the deal that the government has put in trade and go for an theresa may has put forward and after that we are into unknown territory and a lot of negotiation will have to go on. all the prime minister has been here in this parallel universe number ten‘s be shaky at home. one senior tory told me even it feels right now like the rest at. number ten is wasting in
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criticism of its brexit compromise, it is almost impossible it will pass the commons, so of course ministers are privately discussing how to survive, if the vote were to fall —— waist deep. but for theresa may herself, it seems that with only one decision— to keep going almost whatever the cost. 0ne senior colleague told me she even gets her strengths from absorbing this kind of humiliation. thank you. she would never give in now but she leaves here braced for an enormous struggle, the government can try to pretend that failure is an option. laura kuenssberg, bbc news buenos aires. more than 200 people have been arrested in paris after violent protests around one of the city's most popular tourist attractions, the arc de triomphe. it's the third week of demonstrations originally sparked by rising fuel taxes that's become a wider movement of discontent with the government. hugh schofield reports. buk missile at the end of the day of
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violence in paris and still, it went on. the arc de triomphe, covered now in ansi macron graffiti, police fired water cannon to clear the crowd. and here in the gardens by the louvre, one protester is now in a coma after they tore down the metal grille. this evening the arc de triomphe is back under police control but there are still lots of protesters out there, still the tang of tear gas in the air. and in the streets around here, a trail of destruction, cars burned—out, shop windows smashed, bank windows smashed, corinthians are used to process but this has been with rare violence. all there were running battles between riot police and vest protesters. but how many of these we re protesters. but how many of these were actually agitators of the far right and the far left is one other question. they tore rock
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cobblestones to fling at police and satellites the cars and buildings. and amid the scenes of destruction, ordinary people who have come from across france to demonstrate peaceably, they didn't want the violence to divert attention from their central message which is that taxes in france have gone too far. translation: abraham lincoln said something important, he said the government should be of the people, by the people, for the people — for the people. our politicians should keep that in mind. they will not get anywhere till they put people first. translation: we have all had enough, it has been going on for so long and eventually you have to resist. there is no choice. who are you? we are the people, you do not have to look any further, not right, not left, we are simple people. the intensity of the violence has left front shop and leaves president macron with an urgent dilemma — .exe is piece or face down this protest of the people. —— does he and his.
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tributes have been paid to the former us president george h w bush, who's died at his home in texas. he was 94 and had been living with parkinson's disease. donald trump paid tribute, saying "president bush inspired generations of his fellow americans to public service," and president barack 0bama said "the us has lost a patriot and humble servant. " 0ur north america editorjon sopel looks back at his life. i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. america's 43 president circus on the 20th century most momentous times. so help me god. congratulations. the cold war ending, the bill in wall coming down, the soviet union collapsing, turmoil in the middle east and the first gulf war. yet by today's brutal standards, he seemed today's brutal standards, he seemed to embody a more noble sense of politics. rooted in duty, respects, and public service. the george
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kerber wauchope bush should reach the highest office in the land almost seemed predestined. he was born into a family of love, privilege and politics. his father was a us senator. 6eorge attended jail before volunteering to the navy in world war two. he was shot down over the pacific and his rescue remarkably caught on camera —— yale. peacetime took into texas where he made a fortune in the oil business. and then came the law of politics. wash scene was the last of america's cold war leaders and the demise of communism during this period was managed deftly as former soviet satellites embraced the values of democracy and freedom. but there we re democracy and freedom. but there were new uncertainties, notably iraq's surprise annexation of kuwait ini990. iraq's surprise annexation of kuwait in 1990. margaret thatcher told him to stand firm, apparently saying this is no time to go wobbly, 6eorge. he did not. this is no time to go wobbly, george. he did not. iraq will not be permitted to annex kuwait. and that is not a threat. it isn't a boast.
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it is just the way it is going to be. the 1992 election pitch the patrician push against the young, charismatic and hitherto little—known democratic 6overnor charismatic and hitherto little—known democratic governor of arkansas called bill clinton. his clear advocacy of a new vision for america swept him to victory. congratulations. within the decade there was another bush in the white house, 6eorge there was another bush in the white house, george w. two years ago his youngest son jeb on house, george w. two years ago his youngest sonjeb on donald trump the republican nomination for president. iam sick republican nomination for president. i am sick and tired of him going after my family. it was ugly. in turn, 6eorge after my family. it was ugly. in turn, george bush senior called donald trump blowha rd turn, george bush senior called donald trump blowhard and said later that he had voted to hillary clinton in the election. today, donald trump was gracious. he was a very fine man, i met him on numerous occasions and he was a high—quality man who truly loved his family, one thing that came through loud and clear he was very proud of his family. the one constant throughout his life was
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his wife barbara, though america over 70 years. she died in april. he said he was looking forward to being reunited with her. meanwhile, president trump and his chinese counterpart xijinping are holding their long—awaited meeting on trade at the end of the 620 summit in argentina. it's not clear whether they will be able to ease their countries' current trade dispute. 0ur north american editorjon sopel said he thinks the pair will agree to continue talks. what is happening now as we speak if they are sitting down for dinner, president xijinping they are sitting down for dinner, president xi jinping advisers and president xi jinping advisers and president xi jinping advisers and president trump's adviser and earlier in the wee president trump sounded negative with new sanctions interviewed — introduced injanuary, new tariffs, and could be catastrophic for the global economy and are they going into the meeting trump said he was hopeful that there could be a deal that would be great for the chinese people and breadth of the americans to sam 6yimah spoke warmly about his relationship with president xi so i don't know whether we are going to see sort of all—out
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warfare, a brief cessation of hostilities while talks go on whether it is going to be peace in our time. whether it is going to be peace in ourtime. i whether it is going to be peace in our time. i think it is going to be more towards that end of the scale that there will be some kind of breakthrough and they will agree to carry on talking and maybe these new ta riffs carry on talking and maybe these new tariffs will not be introduced but you don't know until the meeting is over when donald trump is in the chair. john sobel. sir terry morgan, the head of britain's most expensive rail project, hs2, has told bbc news he expects to be sacked afterjust four months in the job because of concerns about his performance. there's been speculation over his future after recent disclosures about costs and delays on hs2, and the other project he runs, building london's crossrail. our business correspondent joe miller has more. trains that will whizz between london and birmingham at 250 miles an hour. and eventually reach as far as leeds. that was the promise of hs2. when you have put eight years of your life... hs2. when you have put eight years of your life. .. and this
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hs2. when you have put eight years of your life... and this was the man anointed to make it happen. in august transport secretary chris 6rayling sung the praises of engineer sir terry morgan of the new chair of the £56 billion project. but this weekend sir terry learned from a newspaper report that he was soon to be dismissed. from a newspaper report that he was soon to be dismissedlj from a newspaper report that he was soon to be dismissed. i could only assume because i have not yet been told that because hs2 is such a critically important programme and with the sense of disappointment around the performance of crossrail, that it was considered to be too risky for a programme like hs2 to continue. in my role as chairman. sir terry was trusted to run london's vast crossrail project for almost a decade but after delays and almost a decade but after delays and a projected billion pounds in extra costs, he has fallen out of favour at westminster and at city hall. costs, he has fallen out of favour at westminster and at city haltm was only at the end of august that we we re was only at the end of august that we were told that the central section of crossrail wasn't going to open until the autumn of next year. we had also found out about
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significant cost overruns in the project as well. and really, that is hugely frustrating and hugely disappointing. hs2 is still officially on budget and on time but sir terry morgan is leaving hisjob with a warning — at this complex infrastructure project is facing problems which are soon to merge. the government and transport secretary chris 6rayling are already under pressure over chaos on the country's rail networks and with hs2, it is ultimately the and not sir terry morgan who are in the driving seat. joe miller, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: theresa may has been defending her brexit plans, saying they're a good deal for the uk, despite another resignation from her government. in paris, police say at least eighty people have been injured and more than 200 people arrested during violent protests over rising fuel prices. the former us president, george bush, sr, dies at the age of 94.
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in tribute, his son, george w bush, describes him as a man of the highest character. sport, and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh. the time for talking is almost over ahead of what tyson fury has called one of the ‘best comebacks of all time'. he is looking to become the wbc heavyweight champion of the world. standing in fury‘s way will be the undefeated deontay wilder in the early hours of tomorrow morning but there has been bad blood between the two in the build—up. former world champion evander holyfield feels fury may have successfully affected wilder's mindset. it's amazing that certain people get under your skin and it's amazing that certain people get underyourskin andi it's amazing that certain people get under your skin and i think tyson fury gets under your skin a little bit. it's what you do when you walk ina ring. bit. it's what you do when you walk in a ring. how do you use it? even when he fought the boy from cuba, he
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was able to overcome that because he said what he had to do. he focused and the guy got caught with a shot and the guy got caught with a shot and he proved something to the people. to the premier league and manchester united had to come from behind for a draw at relegation threatened southampton. they were 2—nil behind but recovered to take a point. however is that enough to satisfy managerjose mourinho and theirfans? adam wild has more. sometimes those on the sidelines are also those centrestage. while the expectations on jose also those centrestage. while the expectations onjose mourinho and mark hughes may differ, for the managers, the pressure is the same. southampton stand uncomfortably close to the brink. still from there, stuart armstrong have the perfect aim. there, stuart armstrong have the perfectaim. a there, stuart armstrong have the perfect aim. a stunning finish and a stunning start. thejose mourinho and those above them at manchester united, it was anything but. it appears some at united were struggling to watch and few saw this coming. cedric‘s free kick
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surprising it seems almost everyone. 2- nil surprising it seems almost everyone. 2— nil but this was game is still farfrom won. 2— nil but this was game is still far from won. lukaku with the finish. this was where the scoreline stayed. southampton watching from the wings, unable to fall. for both sides, the pressures remain. a quick look at the other day's results and it's a first home league win of the season for crystal palace. a 2—nil win over burnley at selhurst park. brighton won 2—1 at 10—man huddersfield. leicester city came past watford 2—0. javier hernandez scored twice in a comfortable 3—nil win for west ham over newcastle. afc wimbledon are through to the third round of the fa cup for the third season in a row after a 3—1win over non—league halifax. halifax started well but the visitors scored just before half time
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then ran away with it in the second half. anthony wordsworth curled in their second and joe pigott with the third when he hit home from 10 yards after halifax failed to clear a free kick. a 3—1 win to afc wimbledon. in the scottish premiership — the match between kilmarnock and hibernian was affected by the floodlights failing twice at rugby park. but killie went on to win 3—nil to move up to second. livingston scored for the first time in five games to beat motherwell 2—nil — they're now sixth place in the table.. hamilton came past 10—man st mirren by 3 goals to 1 — the win takes them 5 points clear of st mirren, who are second from bottom in the table. john higgins has hinted that he might retire from snooker, after losing to fellow scot alan mcmanus in the third round of the uk championship in york. the three—time champion led 5—3, but was far from his best and failed to make a single break over 50. mcmanus calmly came from behind to win the next three to take the match. higgins said the defeat was the wost he had everfelt in his career.
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that's all the sport for now. a series of aftershocks have rocked the us state of alaska after a devastating earthquake struck its biggest city damaging buildings and forcing people to run into the streets. the quake was centred about 7 miles north of the city of anchorage but there are no reports of any serious injuries. 0ur north america correspondent, james cook is in alaska. we are now very close to where these epicentre of this seven magnitude earthquake rattled arrest scott, and as you can see, they are working hard to try to clear away the damage. they're worried about this piece of road, because there have been many many aftershocks. they want to get this unstable ground removed as quickly as possible.
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there is a crack running along there as well as you can see, you can also see a small crack on the other side of the road, and they're concerned with more and more aftershocks, at alnmouth till late still lay in its victoria at alnmouth till late still lay in its victoria more than 500 so far, that this could potentially collapse at any moment. they're working fast to clear it, and that of course they're going to start the work on repairing and rebuilding puts up the road, this isn't the only place this is happened. quite a few areas around anchorage where there has been significant damage to infrastructure. 0n the whole, this place is held up very very well, and what was a really strong earthquake, and one that rattled alaskans who are used to earthquakes, there are thousands every year, they are pretty resilient year, and they are used to them but many people said they were quite frightened by this one which went on for a good long time. very severe, lots of shaking, it's quite remarkable that they have escaped to the extent that they have. one of the reasons for that though, is because the history of alaskan
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earthquakes, everyone talks about 1964, and then there was a 9.2 magnitude earthquake. that prompted alaskans to think about their building codes, the regulations, and clearly the work that they did then and in years since has paid off, because very few structures were destroyed by this quake. mexico's president elect andres manuel lopez 0brador has been sworn in as the countries new president in mexico city. mr lopez 0brador ran on an anti—corruption platform and his supporters are hoping he will implement policies to tackle the issue as well as combat the country's widespread poverty and inequality. international leaders from across the political spectrum attended the event more now on the death of former us president, george hw bush, who has died at the age of 94. mr bush served four years
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at the white house, leading america through a war with iraq and the collapse of the soviet union. he was beaten in the 1992 election by bill clinton. it certainly how to improve on the statement of the queen we listen to but his personal qualities were as others have said, he was a very kind and decent man, goes back to a different time in politics when just because you were of different parties, it didn't mean that you could get along and co—operate with things you thought could benefit the country. the other thing is on policy. 6eorge country. the other thing is on policy. george hw bush was one of our best foreign policy presidents. he understood the frantic alliance, managed the end of the cold war in a way that was beneficial to both east
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and west and then finally he assembled the coalition that resulted in desert storm and rejecting saddam hussein from kuwait. many, many good things on the foreign policy front to congratulate the president. were you in the white house —— you we re were you in the white house —— you were in the white house during 0peration were in the white house during operation desert storm. it was a controversial time in foreign policy, the start of what led to further exploits. how much was it linked to oil? no, i was not in the white house. i was close to a number of people in the white house and obviously we had a great interest in how the administration was going to handle that. you are correct, when you try to put together an international coalition of that scope that includes arab countries,
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that includes middle eastern countries, that includes the west, that includes some non—aligned countries. there was a lot of questions as to what exactly in the united states could do. there was a feeling that was a day to complete because the iraqis were already in kuwait. bush managed that coalition over a period of months, incredibly deftly, putting the united states in the west in a position that when we finally attacked, the whole world was what on our site. he knew exactly when to enter that conflict. it resulted in total victory. exactly when to enter that conflict. it resulted in total victorylj think you were involved in some of the election campaigns, won't you. what was he like to work with and his personal strengths?” what was he like to work with and his personal strengths? i think is persian or strengths. com he was the chairman of the republican national committee. that being said, he was
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a lwa ys committee. that being said, he was always open to new ideas. i remember travelling with him for trip in in 1980 when you firstjoin the ticket. a new pennsylvania very well. you just wonder pennsylvania primary. he was very just wonder pennsylvania primary. he was very interested in my take is to wear things were at that time which had been several months later. we talked a little bit about the steel industry which was still an issue, being in difficulty and exactly what you could say, maybe to try to win those votes. that was my contribution to the effort. let's catch up now with the weather. december one marks the start of
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meteorological winter and once there is some snow on the forecast in the week ahead, chiefly across scotland and later across parts of the northern nyngan, the most, we keep as atlantic influence we have at the moment through much of the week ahead. that's going to mean some fairly mild conditions. northern ireland, england and wales. continuing to the north of the central belt as it bumps into the colder across the highlands. those brisk south—westerly winds. where they could touch 40 miles an hour. a mild upturn across much of england and wales. 11 for northern ireland. another front of the southern parts of the uk. it is a blustery start
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across southern coastal counties. to the north of scotland, some outbreaks of rain. sinking is way further southwards. fine driver a good deal of sunshine. a breezy day that a mild day per england and wales. 10— 13 celsius to start the new week. where the rain in the snow will start to ease away along with a rain across south—east england. 0vernight into tuesday, we will see clearer skies, lighter winds and some cold conditions stretching across much of the uk. temperatures widely at or below freezing. the highlands could well get down to —5 or minus six celsius so widespread frost to start the day on tuesday. chris pendry initially but not belong. another system arriving. he
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slowly pushed his way on to —— it's slowly pushed his way on to —— it's slowly pushing its way to parts of wales and northern ireland. 6lad increasing. away from wales, south—west england. by the time we get to wednesday, we are back into the wet windy regime. turning drive from the west during the day. farmington spells of sunshine. still quite mild across england and wales, 9- 13 quite mild across england and wales, 9— 13 celsius, 5— 74 scotland. we get rid of one area of low pressure, a brief respite when the next one arrives has begun to thursday. squeezing the isobars so it's not just wet, it is also windy and the leading edge of this rain will see some snow across parts of scotland. perhaps even affecting the far north of england. an enquiry on its way eastwards. temperatures generally
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between seven and 12 celsius. as we go towards the end of the week on the weekend, initially being influenced by areas of low pressure, a strong north—westerly wind. this area of high pressure starting to build, a sign of things briefly through next weekend will start to turn a bit more settled. hello.
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this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines: theresa may has been defending her brexit plans, saying they're a good deal for the uk, despite another resignation from her government. in paris, police say at least 80 people have been injured and more than 200 people arrested during violent protests over rising fuel prices. the former us president george bush senior dies at the age of 94. in tribute, his son, george w bush, describes him as "a man of the highest character". the chairman of britain's biggest infrastructure project, the hs2 rail programme, says he expects to be sacked

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