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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 8, 2018 9:00am-10:00am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with tina daheley and charlie stayt. our headlines today... police in new zealand say a 26—year—old man will be charged with the murder of the british backpacker grace millane. amber rudd has become the first cabinet minister to openly suggest a plan b if theresa may's brexit deal is rejected by mps. paris in lockdown as security services brace for a fourth weekend of protests. this is the scene in the centre of the city, where demonstrators are beginning to gather. the protesters in the yellow tests there. a huge police presence on the streets of paris. we will bring you live updates through the programme this morning. the hand of rod earns west brom a controversial draw, in the west midlands derby in the championship, with aston villa up in arms over jay rodriguez's late goal. one of strictly‘s best
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ever contestants ever or overqualified for the show? the row over dance experience heats up ahead of tonight's semifinal. good morning. another windy day to come today. even windier tonight across parts of southern england. tomorrow it turns colder. all the details right here on breakfast. it's saturday 8 december. our top story... in the last half hour, police in new zealand have said they will charge a 26—year—old man with the murder of british backpacker grace millane. she was last seen at a hotel on 1 december. earlier this morning police said they hadn't found her body. more from our correspondent hywel griffith. fun—loving and family orientated, grace millane‘s parents say her disappearance one week ago was entirely out of character and extremely hard for them to take.
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today, they were given the worst possible news about their daughter. the evidence we have gathered to this point in the inquiry has established that this is a homicide. grace's family have been advised of this development, and they are devastated. a man is still being spoken to at this point. grace arrived in new zealand last month, and had been staying at a backpackers‘ hostel in auckland. she was last spotted on saturday night entering a hotel in the city with a male companion who the police say had been with her during the evening. detectives have released pictures of jewellery they believe grace had with her, a necklace and a distinctive pink watch are both missing from her possessions and could help them find her body. grace's father arrived in new zealand yesterday. when he spoke to the media, he was hopeful she could be found alive. while this has now become a murder investigation, officers have told the family they'll do everything possible
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to return her to them. hywel griffith, bbc news. earlier we spoke to tv nz reporter gill higgins, who is in auckland and explained how people there have reacted to the news. people are very emotional about the story. it's been really closely followed. this is a major news story here, as it would be in many places around the world. but new zealand is a small country, they really welcome visitors and they're absolutely horrified something like this has happened. a huge heartfelt response to david millane when he came on and spoke about his daughter and there was hope then, people hoped she would be found alive. it's a shock today on this lovely sunny saturday in new zealand that the news has come out that it's being treated as a homicide. six people have been killed and more than 100 injured, in a stampede at a nightclub in northern italy, officials say. the incident took place at around 1am,
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near the eastern coastal city of ancona. about 1000 people were at the lanterna azzurra club, for a concert by an italian rapper, when panic broke out — reportedly after pepper spray was used. firefighters say dozens of others were injured as they rushed for the exit. the work and pensions secretary amber rudd has told the bbc theresa may's brexit deal is the best and only option available for leaving the european union, although she admitted a plan b might be needed. we're joined now by our political correspondent matt cole. good morning. the significance of what amber rudd has been to him at the morning is theresa may has had a very ha rd the morning is theresa may has had a very hard line with all questions to do with what happens if she loses the vote and she says she is concentrating on winning the vote. amber rudd has taken a slightly different tack. yes, she has expanded the conversation. amber
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rudd the work and pensions secretary has become the first cabinet minister to dangle a potential plan b. this is if the big vote on theresa may's deal doesn't go the way of the prime minister on tuesday night as many people believe it won't. amber rudd lasting she will be backing a deal while she believes an appeal has flooded the one alternative in the days that followed might be the so—called norway plus option. this would be an arrangement like norway has with the eu, nota member arrangement like norway has with the eu, not a member but very much in the single market and having freedom of movement and some of the benefit elements of being part of the eu. so why has amber rudd mentioned this? this morning she told our colleagues on the radio four today programme that it was about winning people what might follow a no vote on tuesday. if the best deal we have the one the prime minister has put forward , the one the prime minister has put forward, the most of us are coalescing behind to try and deliver on the outcome of the referendum, and the political declaration and withdrawal agreement if they give
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the best comprise. i look ahead and see that after that if it doesn't get through, anything could happen, they could be all sorts of alternatives drawn up which is one of the reasons why we need to back the prime minister and the deal on tuesday. she does acknowledge that the idea is that she has maybe flooded, the norway plus option would potentially have some problems in itself, not being in the customs union with the european union as britain is as a member now and therefore the thorny question, the northern ireland border, as that would be resolved, keeping goods flowing over between it and the republic would not be covered by this deal so you would have to expand it in some way and find a solution. then there are plenty of brexiteers who would notjust stomach this as a potential solution. not least because brussels would still be making rules that britain would have to follow but having left the european union it wouldn't have a say around the table in brussels over others was. for the moment thank you. prosecutors in new york have asked a judge to impose a substantial
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prison sentence on president trump's former lawyer, michael cohen. mr cohen has admitted tax evasion, breaking election campaign spending rules and lying to congress. his legal team say he should be spared jail because he's cooperating with a separate investigation into possible russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign. paris is in virtual lockdown today, amid fears of a fourth—straight weekend of violence, from anti—government demonstrations. the "yellow vest" movement began as a protest about fuel tax rises — but has attracted wide ranging support. 90,000 police and riot officers have been deployed across france, while tourist sites, shops and restaurants in paris, will remain closed. we can take you to some of the live images from the streets of central paris this morning. 0ver images from the streets of central paris this morning. over the last few hours we have seen the numbers
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of protesters rising. the yellow vests you can see are distinctive the protesters a re vests you can see are distinctive the protesters are wearing. the numbers have been growing throughout the morning. the champs—elysees is the morning. the champs—elysees is the centre of the demonstrations, we know across the whole of france about 90,000 police have been deployed. 0ur correspondent is saying the atmosphere had been come so saying the atmosphere had been come so far, but there have been some suggestions that there have already been arrests, some of the news agencies reporting that. these are the live images showing a relatively calm situation at the moment. we will keep an eye on those for you throughout this morning. china has launched the first mission to land a robotic craft on the far side of the moon. a static lander and rover will touch down on the von karman crater — which is believed to be the oldest and largest impact feature on the moon. the mission will pave the way for the country to deliver samples of rock and soil to earth. those are the main stories. the time
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is nine minutes past nine. sport and weather coming up a little later on. it was a terrifying ordeal and a remarkable tale of survival. susie goodall was sailing alone in the golden globe round—the—world—race, when her yacht was crippled by a ferocious storm 2000 miles off the coast of chile. she was left stranded for days, but yesterday a cargo ship from hong kong came to her aid — as these dramatic pictures show. let's speak now to tracy edwards, who skippered the first all—female crew to win the whitbread round the world race. tracy, thank you forjoining us this morning. 0bviously amazing news that susie has been rescued. you are very familiar with what she has gone through because you are in a very similar situation. weirdly in the same place. tell us what happened. it isa same place. tell us what happened. it is a very dangerous part of the ocean. a lot of people have accidents there. we lost our mast
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2000 miles from cape horn. probably a little further south than susie was but in very similar situations. a series of low pressure is hammered us, big waves and lots of breeze. for us to were two things that could happen, the blood could complete go over which meant that would have been dead for us but we lost the mast. give us a sense of what she would have been going through, also the key differences you were with other people, she was on her own. absolutely. when i heard the distress call from her and i thought she sounded, i could hear the tremor in her voice but she was so composed, i was not that composed andl composed, i was not that composed and i had ten other people with it. she would have gone through a series of motions. what strikes you first when you lose the mast down there is how do so today is because when you are moving forward you are racing, you don't really notice the danger you don't really notice the danger you are in, but when you have lost
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you are in, but when you have lost you must everything stops and everything then is focused on survival. the waves seem bigger and it seems darker at night. you look your mortality very squarely in the face. but you have to get on with it and save yourself and that is what she did. she was fourth in the race at the time. i think the youngest competitor. she was knocked unconscious initially. the whole story is extraordinary. she has been rescued. that is amazing. but mentally i suppose that is the biggest challenge, that your mental resilience dealing with a situation like that. absolutely. doug paulley and physically 0k, she will have been mentally prepared during the storm for the fact that something might happen. you go through a series of promotions. the first thing that sticks in the survival. you have to look after yourself and save yourself. then the realisation takes in that you are in mortal
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dangerand takes in that you are in mortal danger and that is the point you really have to dig deep and find something within yourself which i think most of us do have, most of us not tested to that extreme, you find that don't hang onto it and you keep going. the things you experience now is the joy of rescue is one thing and an incredible rescue by this chinese cargo ship, but on board now she will be going to the process of frustration and she will be so gutted that she had done 157 days and was in fourth place and would have been in third probably by now, so have been in third probably by now, so that will be now kicking in, and mixture of emotions. and what happens next, because it will take two weeks to get her to chile. people watching might be thinking if this is so dangerous why do it in the first place? well, yes, it can be dangerous, there is a risk, but i
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think there is a risk to a lot of things. why do we race around the world ? we things. why do we race around the world? we do it because it is the challenge, it is the ultimate, pitting yourself against nature. it is the way you find out what you're made of and sailing is terrifying and exhilarating. it can be dangerous. you are trying to minimise the risk of that danger to the smallest amount. you are in control most of the time but nature sometimes throw something at you and there is nothing you can do about it. tracey, thank you for speaking to us this morning. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. this weather watcher picture sums up today. some glimmers of brightness but some dark clouds overhead. there will be more
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showers. it will be windy through today particularly in england and wales. when slighter tomorrow. sunnier but also chillier. this swirl of cloud linked to an area of low pressure pulling way. north—westerly winds. the morning showers fading for a time in southern scotland and parts are essential and a stunning. more in northern ireland, wales and the first pushing back east through the day. some lengthier burst in parts of scotla nd day. some lengthier burst in parts of scotland and northern england. gaps in the showers in this out. some parts of central scotland shelter from the breeze. some parts of central scotland shelterfrom the breeze. you might stay dry and sunny. 50 or 60 mph gusts over today. close to gale force throughout. temperatures up a bit on yesterday. clear skies across southern and central scotland. southern scotland and northern ireland tonight further showers to
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begin but they fade. england and wales the showers keep going. this is where we will see the strongest winds. 50 or 60 or 70 mph tonight. temperatures keeping at nine celsius. ledger winds for the north and clearer skies, cold, celsius. ledger winds for the north and clearerskies, cold, could celsius. ledger winds for the north and clearer skies, cold, could be a touch of frost tomorrow morning. first thing tomorrow morning the tsongas winds in the south in around the channel islands. link to some showers working set. as that clear as we open the doors to northerly winds. cold today. early morning that insurers and several clear. some showers returning to northern ireland and wales. mainly of rain. showers in northern scotland, sleet and snow, not just showers in northern scotland, sleet and snow, notjust over the hills. a chillier day. single figures. more of you will see longer spells of sunshine. northerly winds but they will be later as well. ledger winds
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to go through sunday night into monday. clear skies. to go through sunday night into monday. clearskies. cold. parts of scotla nd monday. clearskies. cold. parts of scotland and eastern england will see the coldest air. temperatures close to below freezing. the blues on the chart our teachers are below freezing. further south and west not that chilly. temperatures held here in mid single figures for some. with cold and east minder are in the west. sets a re cold and east minder are in the west. sets are suppressed it. it looks like mile they will win from the atlantic. cold air will dry to hold on because the mild air pushes through, they might be a little snow over the hills. updated through all that the rhetoric. thank you. a terminally ill man — with motor neurone disease — has described the ban on assisted dying as "medieval", saying he feels "cheated by the system". last week, 68—year—old noel conway was refused permission by the supreme court to hear his appeal. a terminally ill man — with motor neurone disease —
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0ur medical correspondent fergus walsh has been speaking to him at his home near shrewsbury. noel conway is keeping mentally active, composing short stories on his computer. physically he needs round—the—clock support from his wife carol and carers. he argues the ban on assisted dying contravenes his human rights, but the supreme court has refused to hear his appeal. i am bitterly disappointed. i am bewildered. i feel as though i have been cheated. it is a poor day for the british justice. noel conway is almost completely dependent on a ventilator to help him breathe and is getting progressively weaker. so what does he see as his options now? for me to have my ventilator removed at some stage. it would be a terrible experience
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for my wife and family, not knowing whether i could hear them, not knowing how long it would take before i expired. it provides a completely different experience and opportunity of end of life, whereby i would be in control of that and i could say now i wish to end my life. i would not be semiconscious. what would you say to people who while they may have very great sympathy for you will say that the law is there to protect the vulnerable, and it should be maintained as it is because otherwise a right to die could be turned into a duty to die and people might feel pressured ?
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i would agree that the weak and vulnerable clearly do need protection from any abuse. but i think that is there. when you have two doctors who have to test you, that you are mentally sound, you are terminally ill. plus a high court judge to oversee that. mps rejected proposals for assisted dying in 2015. the supreme court has refused to hear your appeal. where does the campaign for assisted dying go now? i think it goes back to parliament, to be honest. i'm appealing to mps to listen. 100 million people around the world can avail themselves of a dignified and humane ending to their life.
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at the moment we can't in this country. we are governed it would appear by a medieval mindset. noel conway knows his legal challenge to the ban on assisted dying is over. but he says he will continue campaign for control over when and how he dies. that is noel conway's situation. 0ur guest this morning is paul horrocks. it isa guest this morning is paul horrocks. it is a very personal thing and he ex presses it is a very personal thing and he expresses it so well, the sense that that decision for him is not his to make ultimately and it is difficult. it sums up what an emotional and dramatic situation this is, people
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who want to be dues when the time is right for them to make a decision about that and the lure, we have talked about it for years and we go round and round in circles and we have seen documentaries were people go to sweden or switzerland i should say, and yet my own view is that if you are able and of sound mind and you are able and of sound mind and you make that choice, you should be able to make that choice. whether we start with the papers? facebook. this is an accusation of secrecy behind facebook that could threaten out behind facebook that could threaten our democracy. this is no like delegation because it comes from robert hannigan who was the boss of gchq in cheltenham, the listening post. he says we really don't know
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who was behind facebook accounts and thatis who was behind facebook accounts and that is a threat to democracy without better and fuller legislations. he is saying we need more transparency, openness from facebook. it has been criticised re ce ntly by facebook. it has been criticised recently by the government's culture committee over allegations about use of data. there is a long—standing argument about regulation facebook and is it really a tech giant acid says or is a publisher? is that government and should be governed by the same rules that govern other media companies, broadcasters etc and it currently is not. which they have resisted. and what robert hannigan are saying the reason they resist it is because there is huge amounts of money at stake and they present themselves as a floppy community builder, but really what they are saying is this is a very hard—headed advertising business. you will pick up but some on the
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problems, we knew it by the 02 problem? my wife was. there are 30 odd million people who were affected by the outage. and they had to make eye co nta ct by the outage. and they had to make eye contact with other people on the commute to work! there was bound to be demand for compensation because it was such a widespread failure. there is a very complicated formula published by 02 which gives different tariffs and band saw compensation, they will pay, but some campaigners are saying when you look at the small print you might get as little as 87p or you might get as little as 87p or you might get £2. campaigners are getting what we should have is a standard the if your phone is out of operation for a certain period of time, there should bea certain period of time, there should be a standard £10 raid and we would know where we stand because people will not be able to work out the
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storyjust will not be able to work out the story just how will not be able to work out the storyjust how much they are entitled to undersupply it is a complicated? they two days credit in compensation but that be different... depending on how much you use your phone, appears monthly, but it caused huge havoc. a software problem. abbie got a thing going on here about people being cut up? either by communications or more conventional? —— off. either by communications or more conventional? -- off. there have been people late for work because they couldn't get the train. spare a thought for the people near preston in lancashire who were cut off for a full week, every single train service, i think they should be 34 each day between the 19th and 23rd of november, they were cancelled by northern. people in the village are saying they must be one of the worst served in the country because people had pay docked or have even lost
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their jobs had pay docked or have even lost theirjobs because every train was axed. northern rail apologised and said the worst of the disruption was over. it'll be over now but that week was pretty bad! they said they we re week was pretty bad! they said they were affected by a shortage of trains across a network after wheels up trains across a network after wheels up to 10% of its fleet were damaged by leaves on the line. . classic. the wheels were damaged by the leaves on the line. on a serious note it's pretty hard people losing theirjobs over something they have no control over. exactly. it has been one of the stories of the year. the number of people disrupted by portering services. we have to get better. it has got to improve. to cheer yourself up you need a big box of chocolates! coming up to christmas, here is the dilemma on christmas, here is the dilemma on christmas day, christmas lunch, round good chocolates, do you stick
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your hand straight in and grab anyone or do you have a good route around for your favourite, it might be the green of the purple. you do but coming you put it back in. which have done as survey of some of the top sweet manufacturers and found that some of the favourites like the green one or green triangle with the purple one, there are less of them so there is less of our favourites going into some of the... jew they know which was the favourites the reason why is the know which is the reason why is the know which is the favourite, it would be the reason i keep at it on the christmas table... would you like to share with us without mentioning the brands, if you are presented with a
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big, what... the curragh mall with the log shape, long and thin, ..m you are presented do you go in looking for that one? supposing there were three in the gym, would you take them all in one go?m there were three in the gym, would you take them all in one go? if the kids weren't looking i probably would. you have admitted that now. they have to change of tactics. i'm quite keen on that one as well. there are always... the strawberry ones are sickly, after all the mince pies and bidding. thank you, on that note, it texas rather nicely, at ten o'clock matt takes over, do you look
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or take the ones, do you sleep away the ones you like most, what is the policy? i always did the mad on the table, take the ones i like for myself and put them back. chatting to give dennis is a guest today, the favourites always go first. why dear favourites always go first. why dear favourites always go first. why dear favourites always run out first, because you eat them! it is the obvious thing. we will be talking about chocolate is a little later on. for now talk about food heaven and hell, what is your food heaven? salmon. what about help? jellied meat, aspic, anything with clear jelly around it. picnics? i love a
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scotch egg but in a scotch egg i always remove the. . just the deep—fried bit you like. always remove the. . just the deep—fried bit you likelj always remove the. . just the deep-fried bit you like. i suppose it is, we will find out, but the wii is take the gap. we have two chefs making there debut, nick, what have you got your? it is quite a sweet spot, it is... delicious. good to have you here, what are you doing?|j have you here, what are you doing?” have you here, what are you doing?” have side dishes, steamed carrots with yoghurt and honey and cinnamon, a different take on the roasted carrot, brussels sprouts, you need them! a little bit different, roasted and served with black garlic, seeds, the list. chestnuts
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and mushrooms roasted together and sprinkled, very different. very night. 0llie, you have been on the booze all week. i have been sipping withjudicious moderation. at 30 of rather breezy white wines all singing in harmony. then forget what you get is down to you, go to the website for voting details and we'll see you at ten. thank you. see you then. stay with us, headlines coming. if hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. here's a summary of this morning's main news. in the last few moments, police in new zeland have said they will charge a 26—year—old man with the murder of british backpacker grace millane. she was last seen at a hotel on 1st december. earlier this morning auckland police said they have not found her body, but they released images of a silver necklace and pink watch, which are missing from her luggage in the hope that it will help them find her. is
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at least six people, most of them teenagers, have been crushed to death in stampede at a nightclub in northern italy, italian media are reporting. the incident took place at around 1am, near the eastern coastal city of ancona. about a thousand people were at the "lanterna azzurra" club, for a concert by an italian rapper, when panic broke out — reportedly after pepper spray was used. firefighters say dozens of others were injured as they rushed for the exit. paris is in virtual lockdown today, amid fears of a fourth straight weekend of violence, from anti—government demonstrations. the "yellow vest" movement began as a protest about fuel tax rises — but has attracted wide ranging support. 90,000 police and riot officers have been deployed across france. we can now speak to our paris correspondent hugh schofield. he for the last two or three errors,
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would you like? so far pretty good and calm, there is an awful lot of people milling around as you can see. the tactics are very different from last week, protesters have been allowed onto the champs—elysees and are moving up and down and one senses that at some point maybe there is going to be some confrontation, we have heard a few bangs further up the street, the first smell of tear gas has been wafting down. so there have been scuffles a nd wafting down. so there have been scuffles and confrontations with riot police further up there. that may be where it kicks off again now. i would say so far we have not seen anything like the kind of full—scale street fighting that we had either at this time a week ago, but it is early every will have to see how things will develop. in the preparations are key, 90,000
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riot police have been deployed and it is extraordinary that in paris museums are shut, the eiffel tower shut, the paris st germain football game has been postponed. it isa game has been postponed. it is a very eerie situation, the champs—elysees two weeks before christmas should be filled shoppers, but this morning it is completely empty, all the shops, every shop is boarded up. no one is prepared to risk having their windows smashed again. so the city and locked people have been told the stay at home, but the central bit is absolutely deserted. apart from the thousands of yellow vest protesters who have arrived, most of them are pretty good humour. i have not seen any of what we saw last week which was the groups of people that were identifiably from the far right and far left movements who wanted to kick things off and take on the
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police, i dare say there are some out there but it is a slightly different atmosphere. it is noisy but relatively good—humoured. thank you very much. hugh in paris. the work and pensions secretary, amber rudd, has become the first government minister to openly back an alternative brexit strategy. ms rudd told the bbc that the prime minister's deal is the best on offer, but she is looking at alternative options, if mps reject the proposal in the commons on tuesday. the best deal we have is the one the prime minister has put forward, the one that most of zarco letting behind in order to try and deliver on outcome of the referendum. i think that is the best cover my. what i have done is look ahead and see that after that if it does not get through, anything could happen. there could be all sorts of alternatives that could be thrown up which is one of the reasons why we have to back the prime minister in
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the deal on tuesday. those are the main stories this morning. lydgate in sport. the dust has hardly settled on the big fight last weekend, the draw between tyson fury and dion take wilder, but it seems they will get the chance to go again, and the sequel could be in may next year. this is because the world boxing council have said it was such a good fight, one of the best heavyweight contests in several years, that even though wilder should have the mandate of the contest next against dominik basil he can defend his belt against surely again. it could be a las vegas in may. it isa las vegas in may. it is a commercial decision. it is a commercial decision. it is a commercial decision. it is showbiz. talking of controversy there were certainly some in the championship football last night. a brilliant goal from anwar, el ghazi put aston villa ahead, against their west midlands rivals west brom, and it looked to be the winner until a stoppage time equalier,
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which clearly came off the hand ofjay rodriguez. he threw himself at the ball. but admitted afterwards it had hit his arm, no var in the championship of course. it finished 2—all, villa were furious. the manchester city manager pep guardiola, says they will not be banned, from the champions league — but if they were, they'd deal with it. allegations have been made that they found a way to get around financial fair play rules, the regulations put in place by uefa to stop clubs from spending beyond their means. but guardiola says senior figures at city, have assured him there is nothing to worry about. we will not be banned. that is what i think. i chatted with my chairman and ceo and the extent to me. if it happens because they decide that they be well accepted to move forward. manchester city are away to chelsea, this evening, before that liverpool could go top, if they win at bournemouth.
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while there's a huge match in scotland, where celtic can take over at the top again if they can beat current leaders kilmarnock. england have suffered a real blow, before the draw, has even taken place for next year's women's world cup. arsenal midfielder, jordan nobbs, has ruptured a knee ligament, so she'll miss the tournament in june. manager phil neville described his vice—ca ptain, as "invaluable". the draw takes place in paris at five o'clock this evening, with scotland also in the hat. it's live on bbc two. there was an all, or nothing game, in the hockey world cup in india yesterday — and it went england's way. they beat ireland 4—2, knocking them out of the competition in the process. and as patrick gearey reports, it could make for an awkward christmas, for one family in particular. the gleghorne brothers, paul and mark, born two years apart in antrim, northern ireland. both played hockey for the local club. both still play hockey for different nations. mark represents england, paul, ireland. only one could stay in the world cup. mark's england side had the tougher task. they needed to win. it was 1—1 in the third quarter when liam ansell smashed them ahead. it was some twist of fate for him.
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he'd only been drafted into the squad late on. there were stories everywhere. ten of ireland's squad had to take leave to be at the tournament. and yet, within a minute, shane 0'donoghue steered them level. as it stood, they were going through. it didn't stand for long. another minute later and in a flash, england were back ahead. james gall‘s goal was crucial. now ireland had to chase this. paul gleghorne overstretched, yellow card. the final seconds of his world cup spent watching his brother score for england. international sport at its most personal. patrick gearey, bbc news. defending champion ronnie 0'sullivan, is two wins away from a record seventh uk championship title. he takes on tom ford in the semi—finals, after beating martin 0'donnell 6—1 — though 0'suliivan said it took him a while to settle into the match. i wasjust a bit on edge, you know, just trying to feel my way into it, and it's never good because you got to try and impose yourself as much as you can.
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that's probably a really good match for me because i had to play some safety and be patient. sometimes i'm not taking my match form immediately onto the match table, i'm finding my feet. i know my game's there, it's nice to just get it right from the off, you know? every year thousands of owners dream of lifting the silver trophy, and being champions of the world, of dog agility. the 12 remaining teams are in training for their world cup, the grand final at the london international horse show at olympia later this month and i've been to a training camp in kent to see how hard it can be. the race is on to be top dog for 2018, and while it may look like the dogs are doing all the work here — tearing around the 260m course at over 30mph — this is a team sport, with the owner's fitness, voice commands and hand signals crucial to success. it's all over in less than a minute, but it's such high—intensity, the energy required by the dog and owner. dog agility competitions have
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been going since 1978, and have now become so widespread that 48 nations from around the world compete. the world cup at olympia is one of the highlights of the dog calendar. it's our fa cup final. 0lympia, with all the hype and the people, and the noise and the excitement, it's great to be there, and to actually win it is just something else. the 12 finalists competing at olympia this month have spent all year beating off thousands of other owner—and—dog teams to reach this point. i like to be as fit as i can to keep up with my dogs. sam's not the most naturally motivated dog, and yeah, so to get the quickest time out of him, i need to be as fit as i can. 0k, go, run, run, post... amongst the favourites will again be shannon. she reached her first 0lympia final when she was just ten. when you actually run, and you're so focused, you hear nothing, because it's literallyjust you and your dog on that course.
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you hear nothing going on in the background. i'm probably not the fittest person, definitely not the skinniest out there, but i do really try. a decade later, shannon has managed to get every dog she's trained to the final. well, the athletes are in fine physical condition, raring to go. i think the same can be said about the owners too. and for this breakfast 0lympia warmup race, well, i'm missing just one thing, a dog. after a battle, my former lab, lurcher, is no longer with us. i've still got a fancy lead. and actually i have persuaded a former 0lympia champion to come out of retirement. first of all, a quick recce of the course without my dog partner, making notes and working out my signals. i never realised there were so many different signals with your hands, your arms, your leg positions. yeah, so the dog then comes down this. this arm comes across my chest, so the dog then only sees this hand. it's a bit like dancing, isn't it? yeah, it's a bit strictly. i'm truly honoured because indiana is the only dog to have one at olympia two years running.
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can she do the same with a complete novice? indie, 0k. indie, 0k! 0ver, over... not the greatest starts. i was in the doghouse for confusing my dog partner with all the wrong signals and body positioning. you've got to be thinking ahead and keep working in front of them, all the while telling them in advance what's happening. i did have more success with a different dog maybe more my size. my trousers! but i was starting to take it personally. even my attempts to demonstrate just fell on floppy ears. not the weave, not the weave! over here! up, up! i did eventually get around with that first dog, indiana, but it had taken over four minutes. it was obvious that to succeed, i needed to start right at the beginning and work towards the finals in maybe a few years' time. the slow road to success. i confused those pure dogs with my hand
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signals. everyone is sending in pictures of their dog. here is our favourite, chewy and his pal. he had something to say about it, chewy. it looks like him and his pal and jumping. at the moment i spoil it. look out should we react. we obviously don't have enough earth. did you pause the shop? all, pause the short! i wonder if chewy is watching chewy. that was my doggie would not be interested in telly whatsoever. 0ur producer's dog, she said it will prick it gears up on an advert featuring dogs comes on.
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thank you. a last look at the weather. a very good morning, weekend of two halves. there will be some sunshine around but the scene from our weather watcher in lancaster shows that awesome showers around. one of those into the afternoon and a pretty windy day in store, offering london wales especially. but tomorrow lighter winds and fewer showers, a bit more sunshine and it will feel chillier as i'm sure you know. the showers are driven by the swirl of cloud, which is now moving off into norway. but westerly winds have brought the showers so far. a lalla na have brought the showers so far. a lallana showers, have brought the showers so far. a lalla na showers, across have brought the showers so far. a lallana showers, across much of england and southern scotland but they get going again. they will push their way eastwards into the afternoon. cant guarantee you will stay dry if you're a point ahead of christmas shopping. longer spells of rain in south—west scotland and the far north of england. sunshine between the showers but whenever you are between the showers but whenever you a re pretty blustery
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between the showers but whenever you are pretty blustery out there. winds falling lighter across northern scotland. the wind is still at 50 mph in one or two spots. temperatures today be tiny bit on yesterday's values, factor in the wind. showers keep going until evening. the showers in northern ireland and southern scotland, fewer in number but keep on going across england and will especially in the west. rattling through on a strong win tonight. 50 or 60 or 70 mph in the southern and western coast. you could get a disturbed nights sleep and that could cause disruption into tomorrow morning. the temperatures you don't follow way too much, a chilly night further north. then the cold air comes in properly for all on sunday. the isobars are tightly packed to the south, so the strongest of the wind clear out into france. the wings for lighter but with them coming from a more northerly direction into sunday it will get cold but also sunnier. part
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of the midlands will clear through and wales and northern ireland will see more rain showers later on. for many of you, sunday is predominantly dry them quite a few of you com pletely dry them quite a few of you completely dry. a lot more sunshine around but if you need colder temperatures single figures one comfort is that the wind will not be quite as strong. into sunday night it does mean more of you are likely to see a frost, particularly across parts of scotland and eastern england. we see blues on the temperature chart which is where the air temperature dropped below freezing, with temperatures in eastern england and one or 2 degrees there could be a frost for the monday morning commute here. we have milderair monday morning commute here. we have milder air trying to push in off the atla ntic milder air trying to push in off the atlantic and into next week it'll be a battle between cold air in the east, mild airbrushing in the atlantic. the mild there will also win but in getting there we could actually see charlie and tina a bit of snow over the hills. we will keep you updated your breakfast. enjoy your day. in france, a massive security
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operation is underway in preparation for more anti—government protests this weekend. 90,000 police officers will be on duty, with armoured vehicles deployed in paris. fears of a repeat of last week's violence on the streets, has led to shops and some major tourist attractions on the champs—elysees to close. we can speak now to journalist stefan de vries, who is in paris. let's go to some of the live images. this is the very centre of paris from early this morning, you have seen the yellow vest protesters gathering and our pictures are catching one or two of what appear to be flash points were wrote a blocked off. the last half hour or so you can see it there very clearly, tear gas has been used. police are confirming that. this is a shot from higher up, the factory. we were talking to hugh schofield and he said that generally the
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atmosphere has been 0k, tense but 0k, atmosphere has been 0k, tense but ok, but as you can see, there have been a couple of areas where there have been flash points. we saw a moment ago one of the protesters going rate up to those police barricades, always in this situation as well you get many photographers gadding around. so we stay with some of those images for a moment and we can go to a journalist who lives in paris as well. stephan very good morning to you. we're looking at some of those images this morning. what are you hearing in terms of the numbers involved and what is happening? so far it has been calm in the streets of paris, it looks like everybody stayed at home, a lot of shops and banks and restaurants are closed with wooden panels in front of their signs to protect themselves. i am front of their signs to protect themselves. iam now front of their signs to protect themselves. i am now right near the plaster la bastille, this is one of the hotspots of the demonstrations.
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it is almost impossible to penetrate to the square, there are very heavily armed riot police all around the square. i have seen some yellow vests walking around here, trying to find a place where they can demonstrate but so far in this part of the city, it is pretty calm. do you get a sense as we look into some of the wider images of those, what looks like confrontation point where the police are barricading the roads, and the yellow vested protesters gathering in what look like pretty large numbers, do you get the sense that the police have a different approach to today's activity than they did in the past? they do, because of course last weekend the situation got completely out of hand. the police were not able to contain the demonstrators and saw this change in strategy this weekend, over 8000 police officers have been deployed. there are also 12 armoured vehicles stationed on the streets of paris and that is a first since the second world war
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that paris sees armoured vehicles in its streets. the police officers have the order to engage in direct physical contact which was not the case during previous demonstrations, so the police are adapting their strategy. whether it will be sufficient we will see the end of today of course. and presumably president macron who dropped many of his policies was hoping that would be enough to mean that possibly not many people would turn out on the streets. yes indeed but it was not enough, the difficulty is also that these yellow vests are not organised, they have very different demands going from the extreme right to the extreme left, so it is very ha rd to the extreme left, so it is very hard for the government to negotiate but the government given at the beginning of this week uncertain issues, the yellow vest immediately responded, this is not enough, and now because they feel that they have the momentum, that the government listens to them, they want to go further and what is now being asked is simply the resignation of emmanuel macron because emmanuel
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macron according to the yellow vests is now the problem, so it is not about fuel prices at all, it is about fuel prices at all, it is about emmanuel macron and his government it has to leave and that is what is now being touted in the streets of paris. as you're speaking there, we're looking at some of the live images that we're looking at, it does appear that the police are moving in amongst some of the protesters and it looked a moment ago as though there were —— as though they were making arrests and taking a much more proactive approach. it is hard to work out what is going on. already as we speak there are more than 300 people who have been arrested already in paris alone. ensures that the police are arresting people preventative way, if you look suspicious on if you way, if you look suspicious on if y°u pay way, if you look suspicious on if you pay suspicious without doing anything you can also be present —— arrested which was not the case last week so we are only at around 11 o'clock local time and already 300 arrests in the city of paris alone. thank you very much for your time.
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of course the bbc will keep you up—to—date on the news channel about any development as they unfold. the stage is set for the strictly semi—final tonight. the sequins are on standby and the routines are ready — but there's another row about dance experience. despite receiving high scores from thejudges, singer ashley roberts, has found herself in the dance off twice. viewers suggest that her complex performances with "the pusseycat dolls" — give her an edge over the other contestants. let's take a look at her in action. we arejoined by we are joined by christina. you are going to the list of all the co ntesta nts a nd it going to the list of all the contestants and it is important to point out that there are a number of people in the semifinal and so we are doing them justice today. it is are doing them justice today. it is a competition in which people start at different levels. of course like any competition. it is not someone's fault that they have had some experience previously. think it is quite unfairto experience previously. think it is
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quite unfair to buy that ashley because i'm sure fay also has an extensive background in the performing arts. ashley is a professional dancer in a different style tha n professional dancer in a different style than ballroom and latin. however i'm sure it is challenging for to do a lot of things. everyone is at different stage but you can't say that she should not be in the conversation. at the end of the day it isa conversation. at the end of the day it is a job and she took it because she got to be amazing for her to join -- she got to be amazing for her to join —— to learn a new skill. i would never say no to anyjewel—like is whether it is dancing or ice—skating. skidding in general. you will be trained by a professional. how can you pass on this opportunity? it is an amazing opportunity. people and i think she should not do they're talking about fairness and i think with her, this is not a new argument. we have had this with alexandra burke, denise van out on. people are saying that the fact that she was a pussycat doll and former dancer —— more aid out of any sign of it gives her
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unfair advantage but it is ballroom dancing. it is a different style of dancing. it is a different style of dancing and people can vote for whoever they want to vote, at the end of the day you pick up the phone and vote for the person you would like to win and be in the final. at the end of the day the public have the end of the day the public have the upper hand in all of this i believe. ian is here with us. where do you sit on this issue of how good our people before they start on whether it is relevant? it is releva nt whether it is relevant? it is relevant because obviously if you have had some bad experiences really helps a lot on the show. it is not the first time, i mean every year we have people with experience and no experience, we have had people with no experience when, the wonderful chris hollins, look at chris, he would not say he won equal to ball trophy. sometimes it can go against you because let's say if you have done a lot of ballet it is very
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difficult to do bob and that when you have such a big turnout because you have such a big turnout because you have such a big turnout because you have to have your feet more parallel. so you can roll for your feet. so there are a lot of disadvantages as well. it is more about people's perception of how much dancing somerby has done as to whether they don't want to vote for them because they feel as though they have the upper hand. he's absolutely right. even if you have had experience does not been your necessarily going to win.” had experience does not been your necessarily going to win. i dance withjohn necessarily going to win. i dance with john barrowman necessarily going to win. i dance withjohn barrowman and the christmas special in 2012 and eve ryo ne christmas special in 2012 and everyone said he will be amazing because he is a trained dancer, john said after a week of training, and a quick step, he said it is the ha rd est quick step, he said it is the hardest thing he had ever done. and he felt very uncomfortable. it was very unusual for him to hold the frame. it is one thing to do it yourself and do it with another person, so you go with different disappoints. 0f person, so you go with different disappoints. of course you understand how to hold your body. but that is about it. because you have to still go through a lot of
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training to understand the principle of latin. can we have your predictions? i really support joe, i think he is the real dealfor the show, he is a very unusual booking for the bbc because he is a youtube, he is not a tv personality, and also doing the performing arts, so he is a m doing the performing arts, so he is a joy to watch and he gives every single beat 1000% and you can see how much it means to him. you are not involved in the show right now so what are you doing? i'm doing pa nto so what are you doing? i'm doing panto in so what are you doing? i'm doing pa nto in st so what are you doing? i'm doing panto in st helens. in tinkerbell! i'm flying instead of dancing. given that you are links to the show, what are you allowed to say?” that you are links to the show, what are you allowed to say? i have to be totally impartial, i am critiquing them every week on it takes to every wednesday. but i think they are all doing phenomenal and literally anybody could win it. i do really believe that. lovely to see you. i
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like the handkerchief in the pocket there, very dapper. hasn't gone unnoticed. thank you. that's all from us. roger and victoria will be here on bbc one tomorrow from six. enjoy the rest of your weekend. goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines... police in new zealand are to charge a 26—year—old man with the murder of british backpacker grace millane, who went missing in auckland last week. sadly the evidence we have gathered has established this is a homicide. police are firing tear gas on the streets of paris as anti—government protestors clash with officers in a fourth weekend of demonstrations. this is the scene live. the yellow vest protesters gather despite the government announcing they are suspending the fuel tax increase. many tourist sites have been closed.
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