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tv   The Papers  BBC News  December 8, 2018 11:30pm-11:45pm GMT

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hello. this is bbc news with martine croxall. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment — first the headlines. tear gas and rubber bullets have been used to break up crowds of anti—government protestors in paris. a hundred and twenty six people have been injured, including several police officers. the work and pensions secretary, amber rudd, has become the first government minister to openly discuss alternatives to the prime minister's brexit deal. meanwhile, another resignation for theresa may — the conservative mp will quince has quit the government — saying he "cannot support" the prime minister's withdrawal agreement. and in new zealand police are to charge a man with the murder of the 22—year—old british backpacker grace millane. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the author and journalist yasmin alibhai—brown and the economist ruth lea. many of tomorrow's front
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pages are already in — and almost all of them lead with brexit. let's begin with the sunday telegraph and the headline — "may losing grip as party is rocked by resignations" — the paper claims two members of the government are resigning over brexit and a cabinet minster is also considering whether to quit. and of course this all comes before the crucial vote in the commons on tuesday. or not. the sunday times — billing an exclusive — says the prime minister is planning to delay the vote. the paper claims she'll make the announcement tomorrow — to give her more time to go back to the eu and demand a better deal. the mail on sunday — "back me or get corbyn and no brexit" — says theresa may, in an interview with the paper — pleading to tory rebels to get on side. according to the independent — more than half of voters now want the uk to stay in the eu — as of this month, 52% of people polled favour remain. last one on brexit — the observer reports that a deep cabinet split has opened up over whether to hold a second referendum on the brexit deal.
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the paper also carries a photo of a riot officer at today's protests in paris, under the headline ‘a city in lockdown‘ — after another weekend of anti—government demonstrations turned violent. and in other news, the sunday mirror writes that one of the survivors of the salisbury novichok attacks — charlie rowley — fears the poison is slowly killing him. we start with the times. one of several leading brexit. make sure handbag brussels in frantic bid to save deal. it claims the prime minister will delay the vote, something she said she would not do. absolutely right. it will be absolutely interesting when she goes to brussels to try to handbag them to brussels to try to handbag them to concession she can get out of them. they have basically said, this
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is the deal, this is the withdrawal agreement, all 599 pages, and we are not opening it again. the contentious part of the withdrawal agreement is the backstop, the protocol on northern ireland. there two particular problems in that, one is that there is not a unilateral get out, if we get into it, so to speak, and the second is that it treats northern ireland different to great britain, which is why the dup is so hostile to it. the backstop is if we don't have the future relationship sorted out to want to after the transition, the truth is the backstop could click in and we may not be able to get out. big question, what sort of concessions can she get out of brussels? they have said this is the best you can get and we are not talking about this again. we have to remember, we are one nation. one nation versus 27. this idea that because we are brits, and i love it, it says in the first sentence, theresa may will
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seek to emulate margaret thatcher, because, you know, margaret thatcher did get some better concession. she got the rebate. she got the rebate. she played really well in europe. she played really well in europe. she was a pull european. she knew how to put them on side. was it the french prime minister, thought she was. . . french prime minister, thought she was... francois ms trad, he was assessed with her. the eyes of caligula, the amount of marilyn monroe —— francois mitterand. caligula, the amount of marilyn monroe -- francois mitterand. the poor old thing. we had mistresses and... never mind. really getting off the... and... never mind. really getting off the. .. she and... never mind. really getting off the... she did and... never mind. really getting off the. .. she did know how to win. she flirted with them. she flirted with them. she was a woman when she needed to be at the toughest man in the room when she needed to be. sadly, theresa may is about. and
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what should you be? she has to do it another way. i don't think she has a chance in hell. the mail on sunday, exclusive, pm's wake up call to tory rebels, back me or getjeremy corbyn and no brexit. how do we get that leap? i think it is a witness to save this overcalled a jeremy corbyn will come and take your lives away —— weakness. it is a sign of wea kness —— weakness. it is a sign of weakness when you at jack nicholls to the argument is if you don't back me, back the deal, herfuture is in jeopardy. jeremy corbyn might get in. he is now saying that all options have got to be... but he had not said that before. the labour position keeps changing. not said that before. the labour position keeps changinglj not said that before. the labour position keeps changing. i do not trustjeremy corbyn position keeps changing. i do not trust jeremy corbyn any position keeps changing. i do not trustjeremy corbyn any more than i trustjeremy corbyn any more than i trust theresa may. we have two mean politicians in this country who continually disappoint, let us put it like that. what is interesting is the comment —— two main politicians. they are the only ones that back
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theresa may's deal, the mail on sunday. i find that interesting, don't you? the mail has been wobbly for some time. meaning on my side. the remainers. it is a change of editor. this one is now, who is the editor. this one is now, who is the editor of the mail on sunday?m editor. this one is now, who is the editor of the mail on sunday? it was always remain. it is going to say, obviously the implication of this is that the labour party will trigger a no—confidence vote in the government and, presumably, when it. iwould not be so sure about that. if there isa not be so sure about that. if there is a no—confidence vote in the government i suspect the government would win, because the tories would surely vote for the government. they are not going to vote against them. and they think so with the dup. although he we are on the sunday telegraph, theresa may losing grip as party rocked by resignations. the one we have reported tonight is will quince. he has stepped down because
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he said he cannot support this withdrawal agreement. it has taken some time for him to decide that. so is he? but not to worry. this is the moment where they stand up and write is very moving letters. he is the lowest is very moving letters. he is the lowe st ru ng is very moving letters. he is the lowest rung of the ministerial ladder. it comes after cabinet ministers have resigned, boris johnson, david davis, dominic raack, they have gone. there are real problems. whether or not she is totally losing the grip, who knows? we are in such a state of confusion fiow. we are in such a state of confusion now. the interesting thing for this will be is graham brady, the chairman of the 1922 committee, gets his 48 signatures which would trigger a leadership... that is the thing. election. we talked about the labour party no—confidence but there is this other drama playing out, what is the tory party, who is going to be the leader, that split is
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going on as well. do they really wa nt going on as well. do they really want that kind of uproar at this point? there is enough to be dealing with. this is what is so shocking to me. there is no understanding of the needs of their own party, certainly no understanding of the needs of the country. they have upset and destabilise completely this democracy. it is unforgivable. destabilise completely this democracy. it is unforgivablelj think the negations, quite when to come have been unforgivable. but there you go. in a parliamentary democracy, for a lot of people, a referendum is incompatible with that. but we had the referendum and for democracy to be preserved, many people say, whether you like it or not, we have got to leave in some way. no. i think, not, we have got to leave in some way. no. ithink, as mrs margaret thatcher said, referendums were lovett bay demagogues and dictators. referendums are not your normal democratic process —— loved by. our
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democratic process —— loved by. our democratic processes, there is a lwa ys democratic processes, there is always change possible. and i think we need to have, now, i really do believe that the only way forward, whether we agree with it or not, is another set of questions about we leave without a deal or we stay. swiss, direct democracy. it has been a feature of the swiss constitution for many years. and i admire switzerland to pieces. for many years. and i admire switzerland to pieceslj for many years. and i admire switzerland to pieces. i don't. the observer, and a slip of a second referendum on brexit deal. a fresh national poll is the prime minister only chance. if they go for a second referendum, frankly i would be appalled by it, but we are where we are, but it would require legislation to go through the houses of parliament. the risk of withdrawl act, which is the current legislation, which says we leave on
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the 29th of march 2019. if they are in the business of going for a second referendum or in the business of delaying article 50, there would have to be this legislation. the problem is she appeals to the people. people still like theresa may a lot. she either has to get a kind of question about my deal, theresa may's deal, or some other questions. the big question, which he get the legislation through the parliament? no, she wouldn't. let us move away from brexit. it is too exciting, isn't it? it will be a fascinating debate.|j exciting, isn't it? it will be a fascinating debate. i am so tired of it. so taiyuan! using terribly energised. —— so tired. it. so taiyuan! using terribly energised. -- so tired. the sunday times first. russia are linked to two more uk killings. have you actually managed to read this? there is one copy that i have got. it is
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scotland yard. detectives. counter terrorism command. they have been looking into the salisbury poisonings, from the counter terrorism command. they are suggesting that others may have been targeted by russian killers. now, we don't know for sure, but it is entirely possible. they have formed. they have formed. speaking of which, an exclusive interview with charlie roughley, the survivor of the salisbury novichok taku inadvertently came into contact with this poison —— who inadvertently. and the damage he believes this... his girlfriend died. they found this sort of scent bottle with the novichok in it. and they picked it up novichok in it. and they picked it up in all innocence and, sadly, this poor man, the picture is absolutely tragic. back to the russians, they
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have formed. i'm sorry. tragic. back to the russians, they have formed. i'm sorrylj tragic. back to the russians, they have formed. i'm sorry. i know, i know. and why did we give refuge to so know. and why did we give refuge to so many rich russian oligarchs without asking the people, asking us what we thought of it? the clue is in the question, richard. —— rich. it talks about the damage he thinks it is doing to him. i think this couple were quite vulnerable anyway. difficult lives. they were. he said he was in a coma for days. so there must be an effect. according to this report he has had numerous strokes, has had meningitis and now needs a pacemaker. it is tragic. his life was in the balance. it was in hospitalfor was in the balance. it was in hospital for quite was in the balance. it was in hospitalfor quite a long was in the balance. it was in hospital for quite a long time. he says he cannot see properly. his
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girlfriend, she died quite quickly. dawn. it goes back to the other story about the russian links to other killings. because of the nature of the week these things are carried out, it is very difficult to know the —— to the actors are. carried out, it is very difficult to know the -- to the actors are. but there is an underworld here. i'm glad police are finally looking into it. how much we are told, how much the public is told, i don't know. it certainly has been a big thing that we have been so lax when it came to russian presence in london, particularly, and in other places. i think it was time, don't you think? we agree on everything. we have been very affable tonight. you have indeed. it is christmas. especially the second time around. that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you, seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers.
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and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you, yasmin and ruth. goodbye. are you humming? no. i'm hearing things. just tojoy of are you humming? no. i'm hearing things. just to joy of being here. we're finished now. you can go home. soi we're finished now. you can go home. so i can. yasmin, ruth, lovely to see you both. i think it's the cameras making squeaky noises. hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news.
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