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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 10, 2018 3:00am-3:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news — broadcasting to viewers in north america and around the globe. i'm reged ahmad. our top stories: the top executive in the huawei fraud case, meng wanzhou, seeks bail, saying she's innocent, unwell, and won't run away. britain's prime minister insists there will be a brexit vote in parliament on tuesday, despite her own supporters calling for a delay. a 26—year—old man appears in court in new zealand, charged with murdering a british backpacker on a round—the—world trip. and a special report from the us—mexican border, where cuts in legal migration have caused a surge in the illegal variety. it's here that the poverty of developing nations clashes with the wealth of the united states. hello and welcome.
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a top executive from the chinese technology giant huawei, who was arrested in canada more than a week ago, has requested bail. meng wanzhou was detained at the request of the united states, over accusations that she violated sanctions on iran. since then, the implications of her arrest have ricocheted around the world, and called into question efforts to end the trade war between china and the united states. james ransley has more. it's thought that telecom giant huawei's chief financial officer, meng wanzhou, is being held here in this canadian prison while she waits to find out if she's been granted bail. china's foreign ministry has summoned the us ambassador in beijing, demanding details of the detention and insisting that america withdraw ms meng's arrest warrant. the arrest happened as us president donald trump and china's leader, xi jinping, attempted to de—escalate a bitter trade war at the 620 summit last week. america's trade representative insists that ms meng's arrest won't have much of an impact on talks. it is totally separate
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from anything that i work on, or anything that the trade policy people in the administration work on. so for us, it's unrelated, it's criminal justice. the huawei executive is accused of violating us sanctions by selling telecom equipment to iran. she was taken into custody last week in vancouver, while changing planes. china's state media called the arrest... according to court documents, ms meng has long—standing ties to vancouver, dating back at least 15 years, as well as significant property holdings in the city. her family also sought leave to remain in vancouver if she was granted bail, with her husband saying he plans to bring the couple's daughter to vancouver to attend school during the trial. meng wanzhou's court hearing is due to resume on monday. james ransley, bbc news. lets get more implications for
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relations between china and the us. first of all, it this huawei arrest, do you think it is going to impact these are temps between the united states and china to try to resolve their differences? well, the arrest comes at a time when there is expectation from the market regarding trade truce, but at the very core, there are other things, potential issues, such as intellectual property theft, technology transfers that are not really addressed, and the 90 day timeline is quite ambitious. and i think going forward, having a strict deadline will not really resolve the issue. you talk about the 90 day
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deadline being ambitious, at the time it was announced, pinawa describing it as some sort of truce and we are now hearing some comments on the top us trade official, robert lighthizer, that said that the deadline, the 90 days won't be extended beyond that time. what do you think he means by that? extended beyond that time. what do you think he means by thanm extended beyond that time. what do you think he means by that? it means that the chinese would have to come with an offer to the united states, thatis with an offer to the united states, that is a lot more positive and forthcoming to the united states with regard to these non—goods related issues. right now, the state m e nts related issues. right now, the statements coming from donald trump and essentially targeted at trade deficits per se, but the fundamental mismatch of the us and chinese interest lie in these nontrade sort of nontariff areas, such as intellectual property issues, technology transfer issues. so
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robert lighthizer, is seeking to have really a nail down approach, and that 90 day timeline is not really essential as long as the us and china keep having this kind of a confrontational stance towards each other. sir what does that mean in terms of where we end up? what is going to happen? -- so does that mean. well, this is not an issue that can be resolved within 90 days, as the us and china will keep on struggling to reach an agreement and perhaps an agreement is not what they are actually looking for, but more of a strategy towards... planned fans against each other, so from the chinese perspective, it was very easily seen from the arrest and
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huawei, that the chinese were going very much proactively to defend their cause, and this proves that their cause, and this proves that the chinese will not back down, even in the 90 day negotiations, whatever theissues in the 90 day negotiations, whatever the issues at. but now with the huawei arrest, how motivated is china to even try and meet the us halfway? they will try to meet halfway? they will try to meet halfway and goods trade, because thatis halfway and goods trade, because that is one thing they can do, by buying american products, agricultural goods, but these issues regarding technology, it is in this special core of made in china 2025, which is china's special strategy towards economic development and xi jinping's strategy to make china a great nation and geopolitically, a much stronger nation in the world, and this is something that they cannot negotiate with. it is their
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priority. thank you very much. a crucial parliamentary vote on the deal for britain's exit from the european union will go ahead this week. that's according to the brexit secretary, stephen barclay. he said it was the only way to deliver what people had voted for. but there have been predictions of a heavy defeat for the government. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. is she seeking divine intervention? theresa may attended church in her constituency this morning. she's weathered many political storms, but she's still having to fight for her deal and for herjob. some ministers think the outlook is so bleak she should postpone this week's crucial commons vote, but the brexit secretary said it won't be called off. the vote is going ahead, and that's because it is a good deal, it's the only deal, and it's important that we don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good. we're moving to uncharted waters. yes, the prime minister is fighting for us and will continue in post, but the question for...
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sorry, can she stay on as prime minister if she loses? yes, absolutely. she can stay on as prime minister if she loses the vote? yes. the brexit secretary voted to leave the eu, but his better—known colleague was the face of the campaign. borisjohnson was asked in parliament this week what his big idea was now. well, today he revealed it — hold back some of the divorce bill until we get a better deal. unless they help us, then there is a risk of no deal, and to incentivise them further, we should say that we will delay the payment of at least half the 39... but calling a second... can i just finish this? at least half the 39 billion until they've done a free—trade deal by the end of 2020, and that is the way, i think, to put a bit of a tiger in the tank. so if he doesn't like theresa may's deal, would he like to replace her as conservative leader? i will give you an absolute categorical promise that i will continue to advocate what i think is the most sensible plan... you are going to stand against...
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i'm going to argue the most sensible plan to get out of this mess. the people's vote campaign believes the final say on brexit shouldn't be left to the politicians at all, and at a rally in east london, this labour shadow minister declared her support for a new referendum and wanted her party leadership to do the same. the promises made in 2016 are so far removed from the reality of the 585—page withdrawal agreement that it's time to take the brexit decision back to the people! the cabinet minister amber rudd has talked about the possibility of another referendum if theresa may's deal falls, and another government minister today says it looks increasingly likely. but mps have to vote for it, and the attitude of labour's leadership could be crucial, but they seem to be in no hurry to commit. we would push for a general election, and that we believe to be our absolute priority. all other options should be on the table, including the possibility of a popular vote, a referendum, later down the line.
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many mps are raining on the prime minister's parade, uniting against her deal, but deciding on an alternative is more complex. iain gave us this further update earlier. theresa may is staring defeat in the face, but downing street is insisting that tuesday's vote will indeed go ahead. but i have to tell you that very seniorfigures, even at this late stage, are still pressing for a postponement. what she intends to do is speak to some of her mps who still have very serious doubts about the arrangements for avoiding a hard border in ireland, the so—called backstop. she spoke to her irish counterpart, leo va radkar. now, downing street know that if she can allay those concerns, the rebellion will diminish significantly, but it's still difficult to see what of substance she can offer that can really make a difference.
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interestingly tonight, another development — jeremy corbyn, labour leader, also under the pressure. party leaders from across europe have delivered him this letter, calling on him explicitly to back a new referendum on what they call a people's voice, before britain leaves the european union. now, theresa may's said, if she loses this crucial vote here at westminster on tuesday, we're in uncharted waters. and i think she's right in this respect — the only certainty here at westminster is uncertainty. let's get some of the day's other news now. initial results from the snap general election in armenia suggest that the party of the acting prime minister, nikol pashinyan, has a clear lead. it's won at least 60% of the votes counted so far. mr pashinyan came to power in the south caucasus country in a peaceful revolution earlier this year. the deadline for detaining the former nissan chairman carlos ghosn runs out shortly. he's being held as part of an investigation into suspected financial misconduct. mr ghosn was arrested injapan last month and has been detained since then. he's accused of under—reporting his earnings for several years.
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the nissan board sacked him in november, but he remains chairman and chief executive of renault. saudi arabia says it will not extradite the two key suspects in the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi to turkey. last week, a turkish court issued arrests warrants for ahmad al—assiri, a senior intelligence official, and former royal adviser saud al-qahtani, saying they didn't believe the saudi authorities would take formal action against them. mr khashoggi was killed in the saudi consulate in istanbul in october. hundreds of thousands of homes in the south—east of the united states are without power after a weekend of heavy snowfall. a state of emergency has been declared in north carolina and virginia, parts of which reported nearly half a metre of snow. heavy snowfall caused problems for motorists and led to the cancellation of over 1500 flights. now, a 26—year—old man has appeared in court in new zealand charged with the murder of the british backpacker, grace millane, who went missing nine days ago. the man can't be named
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for legal reasons. ms millane, who was 22 and from essex, had been travelling round the world after graduating from university. the judge, evangelos thomas, told members of grace millane's family, who were in court, that he understood that their grief must be desperate. thejudge also saying that justice for grace, he hoped would be swift and fair. this 26—year—old man has been charged with her murder, he was dressed in a blue boiler suit when he made his appearance. he did not enter a plea, he didn't say anything, nodding only occasionally to the judge during this very brief hearing. he will be remanded in custody and's due back in court towards the end of january. now, thejudge in this case had offered to lift the suppression order on this suspects's identity, but the man's lawyer has made an appeal, so for legal reasons, we can't report his name. the investigation in the case is obviously
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ongoing. have we heard any more about that? well, over the weekend, the police searched a bit of bushland about 25 kilometres from the centre of auckland, where a body was found. the police say that their search for grace is over, there will be a formal identification process through a postmortem, and the police are at pains to point out that the investigation is continuing, a lot of work still needs to be done and, of course, fundamental questions need to be addressed — how and why did this young british women die? —— woman. she's been in new zealand travelling alone for about a fortnight, following a group tour in south america. this was supposed to have been the adventure of a lifetime, but tragically for grace millane's family from england, it has ended in the most horrible of circumstances. in the new zealand court system, is it unusual for an accused to have the name to be suppressed? it does happen, and what we've had
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now is that the judge was willing to lift the suppression order on the suspect‘s identity. the lawyer said that he would make an appeal to ensure that his client's identity remained a secret, so for the next 20 days, that suppression order will be in place. up until that time, it is against new zealand law to report the identity of this man. we do understand that he was living in the auckland hotel where grace millane was last seen at the start of december, and she was missing for about nine days before her body was found in hills to the west of auckland, and as we say, this is a police investigation that is continuing. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: putting the entire history of life on earth online — scientists plan to digitise millions of fossils hidden away in drawers for years.
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john lennon was shot at the entrance to the dakota building, in the centre of new york. there's been a crowd here, standing in more or less silent vigil, and the flowers have been piling up. the 14th ceasefire of this war ended at the walls of the old city of dubrovnik. this morning, witnesses said shells were landing every 20 seconds. people are celebrating the passing of a man they hold responsible for hundreds of deaths and oppression. elsewhere, people have been gathering to mourn his passing. imelda marcos, the widow of the former president of the philippines, has gone on trial in manila. she's facing seven charges of tax evasion. she pleaded not guilty. the prince and princess of wales are to separate.
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a statement from buckingham palace said the decision had been reached amicably. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: in her request for bail, the huawei executive detained in canada has said she is innocent of fraud charges and unwell and won't flee the country if freed. the british government is continuing to insist that a parliamentary vote on its brexit deal will go ahead, despite significant opposition from mps. the french president emmanuel macron will address the nation later, as he tries to bring four weeks of violent anti—government protests to an end. france has now had four weekends of demonstrations against fuel tax rises, high living costs, and other issues. about 125,000 protesters were on the streets on saturday, with more than 1700 arrested. lucy williamson is in paris.
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president macron is facing a couple of problems tonight. one is that if he tackled these protests a few weeks ago, he might have got away with simply cancelling the rise in fuel taxes. the trouble is, since then the movement has grown, and with it the movement's demands, and the second problem he faces is that it's also a very diverse movement. people havejoined it bringing all kinds of grievances, so satisfying all of them is going to be quite difficult, and a government spokesman today said he thought it might be an almost made—to—measure solution. so president macron‘s speech tomorrow is going to have to do quite a lot of things, and i think first and foremost he's going to want to convince people that he's really listening, that france's democratically—elected leaders feel responsible to those who are struggling and really hear what they're trying to say, and that is going to mean some financial concessions, whether it is bonuses for low paid workers or lifting taxes. the problem he's got is that he's got to do all of that while not looking weak and not rowing back on the reform programme he came
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to power to deliver. when donald trump entered the white house, just under two years ago, the number of illegal immigrants living in america was at its lowest level for almost a decade. more and more people were using legal means to enter the country. but the president's attempts to restrict legal migration may now be forcing others to sneak into the country. recently, thousands of central americans fleeing violence and poverty, started theirjourney to the us from the town of tapachula, southern mexico, travelling more than 2000 miles to the town of tijuana, on the border with the us. they're now camped out there, frustrated by tough new restrictions on asylum and willing to do anything to live in america, as james cook reports. charlotte is three years old. she's travelled 3000 miles from honduras, and the next few steps will shape her entire life. her mother is risking all to search for the promised land.
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"god willing, all the sacrifice will be worth it," she says. for a toddler, the scramble under the border must be terrifying. and for charlotte's grandmother, it's almost too much. now, the law says, this american agent must assess whether the family has credible fear of persecution or torture and, if so, let them in to consider a claim for asylum. at this border, powerful forces collide. it's here that the poverty of developing nations clashes with the wealth of the united states, and it's here too that the hopes of migrants come up against a president who insists he is putting america first. donald trump says the 10,000 caravan members camped out in tijuana endanger us lives and jobs.
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he's made it harderfor them to claim asylum legally, and he's still trying to build a great wall to keep them out. but the american dream has a powerful pull. translation: for me, the american dream is to live there, to work there, to support my family, and to live peacefully, which i couldn't do it my own country. last month, a handful of migrants breached the border. many more were driven back by us tear gas. the crossing was shut down on one of the busiest shopping days of the year, costing $5 million for businesses on the frontier. i think the people who live along the border understand the border very well. they understand how dynamic it is, how it's a shared economy. maybe for some people in other parts of the united states, they don't really understand that. a lot of cars are manufactured there and come here. it's just not possible to just draw a line and say
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we're going to close that. rachel is the baby of the migrant caravan — she joined it as 19 days old. her entire family was caught up in the chaos at the border. translation: we went to the border, and they threw gases at us, and also at my little girl. so after that, we decided to stay in mexico and just look for a job. so far, they've travelled as far as the atlantic ocean is wide, but they're no closer to knowing their fate. james cook, bbc news, tijuana, in northern mexico. now, how do you give fossils, a future? now, how do you give fossils a future? well, you put them online, and that's exactly what london's natural history museum and washington's smithsonian institution in the us, have set out to do. they're digitally recording millions of fossils in their collections, many of which have been hidden away in drawers for decades. 0ur science correspondent victoria gill, has the story. so, we're in our
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brachiopod collection. tucked into thousands of drawers, the entire history of life on earth. and there's dozens of things in every box, in every drawer. wow! yes, yes. there are a0 million fossils stored here at the smithsonian museum, and a team is carrying out the mammoth task of digitally recording every single one. we have drawers here in the collection that haven't been opened in decades. the data held within the museum drawers is trapped, and we are bringing that trapped data out into the light. we're mobilising it for research. photographing and logging the details of each specimen in this collection alone will take an estimated 50 years. but it is part of an effort by institutions around the world to create a global digital museum, where every piece of the fossil record can be studied online. the devastating fire at brazil's national museum this year
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destroyed knowledge that was amassed over two centuries, and was a stark reminder of the need to protect and log such scientifically valuable collections. this goes way beyond insuring this huge collection. it means that this triceratops skull, for example, could be in dozens of places at once, anywhere in the world, for any scientist to study. and with a very detailed digital scan and a 3d printer, researchers here at bristol university have been able to bring these dinosaurs into their lab. this model is great, because it allows us to kind of look in detail at the anatomy, and pick it up and hold it and turn it around. amazing. now, we can actually test ideas about how these animals actually functioned. the digital skulls can be given virtual stress tests to work out what the animals ate, how they moved, and so what their environment was like 150 million years ago. museums have gathered vast amounts of evidence of hundreds of millions of years of evolution. now, the challenge is to make sure it is shared and studied, not hidden away in the dark.
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victoria gill, bbc news in washington, dc. let's just show you the latest pictures we have from the argentine capital, buenos aires. thousands of river plate football fans have brought the city centre to a virtual standstill as they celebrate their team winning the copa libertadores, the biggest contest in south american club football. the game was actually played more than 10,000 kilometres away, in spain, where they beat their argentine rivals boca juniors 3—1 in extra time. the match was played at the bernabeu stadium in madrid after being postponed last month when boca's team bus was attacked by riverfans in buenos aires. you might remember when that happened. lots of people thrilled that their team on. lots more coming on. “—
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that their team on. lots more coming on. —— w011. hello. monday is looking pretty quiet for most of us on the weather front and, in fact, if you're wondering about the week ahead, it is not looking bad at all. it is going to turn progressively colder through the week but nothing dramatic happening on the weather front. so let's see what's happening then on monday. for many of us it is actually going to start off fairly bright, if not sunny. a touch of frost is on the way. certainly for scotland and northern parts of england. so here's the forecast then. through the early hours of monday morning, chilly north—westerly winds blowing in. not much cloud out there. just a couple of showers maybe here and there. here's that frost again across scotland and northern england. down into yorkshire as well, —1, —2 degrees but to the south of that it's closer to plus five for cardiff and for london. so it starts of bright if not sunny. sunny particularly in the east but very quickly this cloud you can see out west will be brought in by an increasing south—westerly breeze, so it will end up pretty cloudy if not grey across many of these western areas. the milder spot will be plymouth, 12 degrees. pretty balmy here compared to newcastle, only around 5 degrees celsius.
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then on tuesday, slightly less cold air. even quite mild air heads our way. you can see the south—westerly wind and the sort of tunnel of warmth all the way up into the north. with that also a couple of weather fronts. 0ne here which is actually not going to bring as much rain, even though you can see rain here. this is another weather front here which is basicallyjust a fair bit of cloud. so tuesday, across much of scotland, england and wales, probably staying fairly cloudy, with some sunshine poking through. here's the other weather front. it's not making much progress so it'll stay to the west of us, i think, so belfast should be dry on tuesday. and 12 degrees here. 12 for plymouth as well. then, on wednesday, we start to see a little bit of a change. the winds die down and, in fact, we start to develop an ever so slightly more easterly wind, that also means that the temperatures will start to dip. so i think for most of us it is down to single figures. sixes and sevens, that sort of thing. maybe just about scraping a 10 there in plymouth.
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the bigger picture shows where colder air is coming from on thursday. in fact, all the way from russia, across the baltic, southern scandinavia, the north sea. you can see that colder air ends up right across the uk. not desperately cold, but you will feel those temperatures dipping away as we go through the week. in fact, let's take a look at london. you can see on monday it's 10 degrees, by wednesday, it's eight, and on thursday and friday around five or six degrees. and at times pretty cloudy too so it will feel cold. bye— bye. this is bbc news. the headlines: a chinese technology executive whose detention in canada has caused protests from beijing has requested bail. the chief financial officer of huawei, meng wanzhou, was arrested at the request of the united states, which has accused her of fraud in violating american sanctions on iran. britain's prime minister, theresa may, has spoken to her counterpart and the president of the european council ahead of a planned parliamentary vote on her government's brexit deal. many mps from her own party have called for a delay, but she insists the vote will take place on tuesday. a 26—year—old man has been remanded
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in custody in new zealand charged with murdering a british backpacker. grace millane, who was 22, went missing more than a week ago. yesterday police found a body they believe to be hers, in woods on the outskirts of the city of auckland. now on bbc news, dateline london.
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