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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 12, 2018 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. our headlines today: a city in lockdown, a gunman on the run, after at least three people are killed and a dozen injured at a christmas market in strasbourg. mounting pressure on theresa may as the likelihood of a vote of confidence in her leadership by conservative mps grows. 16,000 jobs and hundreds of contracts on the line. interserve, which does everything from cleaning hospitals to building schools, says it won't become another carillion. drama in the champions league, as liverpool and tottenham make it through to the last 16 — just. this was the moment alisson saved his side at anfield. if napoli had scored, liverpool were out. a late draw in barcelona was enough for spurs. and we go behind the scenes of the bbc‘s adaptation of les miserables. there is lots of drama, but no singing, to the disappointment of some.
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i... ican i... i can sing, but no one else seems to. i thought, god, i... i can sing, but no one else seems to. ithought, god, at last they have discovered that i can sing. but they hadn't, no. further west, more clouded drizzle but it should ratten up for most. however this weekend there is snow in the forecast. i will have more in 15 minutes. it is wednesday 12 december. our top story: a huge manhunt is underway in strasbourg after a gunman opened fire at a christmas market, killing at least three people and injuring i2. the authorities have begun a terrorism investigation in the french city after an earlier police search uncovered a number of weapons at the suspect‘s home, including grenades. in a moment we will be joined by europe correspondent damian grammaticus in strasbourg. but first, eliza philippidis has this report. the city was on lockdown.
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these are the scenes just moments after the shooting — confusion, panic. the 29—year—old gunman opened fire using an automatic weapon. some people tried to help those who we re some people tried to help those who were shot. i saw a person with at least two holds in their head. we took into a restaurant and we tried took into a restaurant and we tried to 45 to resuscitate him. there were no ambulance services apparently able to enter the area, and after 45 minutes, we stopped resuscitation efforts because a doctor told us over the phone that it's senseless. as soon as it was safe, ambulance crews were sent in to collect the injured and take them to hospital. president emmanuel macron has been briefed in paris. the french interior minister put plans into action.
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translation: the government decided to switch to a state of emergency. with the set—up of reinforced controls at border crossings, and also at all of the christmas markets around france, to avoid similar events taking place. police said the suspected gunman was ona police said the suspected gunman was on a watchlist. questions will be raised about how to best protect the french people from attacks like these. eliza philippidis, bbc news. let's get the very latest now from our europe correspondent damian grammaticas, who is in the city. this is very much an ongoing situation. where are we at with it? it is, yes. so the search is ongoing for the individual identified by police. a 29—year—old man, they say, who was known to them, who was on
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the active list of potential terror suspect. now, the search was focusing on an area, neudorf, just near the centre. that has been going on, 350 odd personnel involved in that, police helicopters. there have been police locks around the centre of town. in the central area here, where the christmas market is, the confinement measures were lifted overnight. people who had been told to stay in doors were then leaving and heading back home. so that is slowly being restored. but meanwhile the police focus is on the search for this individual. thank you very much. we will keep you across that story as we have the latest developments. theresa may is fighting to save her brexit deal, and potentially her job, amid renewed claims conservative mps are close to forcing a vote of no confidence in her leadership. brexiteer conservatives say they are confident that they have reached the threshold of 48 letters needed to trigger a vote, but there has been no official confirmation. so what could happen now?
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well, in orderfor a leadership challenge to be launched, at least 15% of conservative mps need to submit a letter saying they no longer support the prime minister. if the 1922 committee chairman, sir graham brady, receives enough letters, a vote of confidence in theresa may via a secret ballot will be held. if she wins, herjob will be safe for another year. if she loses, the party will have to pick a new leader. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in downing street for us. iain, we have been here before. and the prime minister has been here before, and it is another difficult day here for her today. it is indeed, we should be absolutely clear about that. almost a month ago it was suggested there were enough letters to force a conference vote and it wasn't true then. what has
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changed? quite a few things. the fa ct changed? quite a few things. the fact she had to postpone this major vote on her deal, and secondly that we now have some of the older and more experienced eurosceptics coming out to bat against her, a former cabinet minister saying she had negotiated like a feeble supplicants, negotiated like a feeble supplica nts, not desperately. negotiated like a feeble supplicants, not desperately. he said he put in a letter of no confidence in her and the fact he has done will encourage other people as well. so her opponents are very confident they have the numbers, but as you say there is no official confirmation as yet as to whether thatis confirmation as yet as to whether that is the case. but the prime minister and others in downing street saying this is a terrible distraction from what she needs to do. she has been in belgium, in brussels, going to dublin to seek reassu ra nces brussels, going to dublin to seek reassurances in the important issue of the so—called backstop, avoiding a hard border in ireland, and they say if there is a leadership challenge during that time that will delay the whole process and
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undermine her in negotiations with the european union. thank you, for the european union. thank you, for the moment. another story, like strasbourg, which could potentially change while we're on air. we will be joined by the lord justice david gauke after 7:00am this morning. the body of british backpacker grace millane has been formally identified and returned to herfamily. the 22—year—old went missing from a hostel in auckland on i december. detectives in new zealand say are still piecing together exactly what happened to her and building a timeline of events. a 26—year—old man was charged earlier this week with her murder and will appear in court again next month. the crossbench peer lord lester has resigned from the house of lords. the 82—year—old was suspended by the liberal democrats earlier this year after being accused of sexual harassment 12 years ago. a party spokesman said lord lester had made the right decision. he denies all the allegations against him. debt charities are warning that some
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of the poorest families in the country will be left relying on food—banks over christmas because of universal credit. from today, all new benefit claimants will be signed up to the scheme. many people have complained about their payments being reduced because of sanctions imposed on them. 0ur reporter david rhodes has more. erin is one of over a million people already on universal credit. with christmas coming, this single mum says she doesn't know how she will buy her son a present. everyone keeps saying, well, your priority is to feed your son. but you've got to think, well, he's going to think he's been naughty if santa doesn't bring him presents on christmas morning. erin says she has experienced delays and anguish because of universal credit. when i've paid my bills and rent, i've got £26 in my wages left, so i use food banks a lot. if i've got no gas or electric, i've had to sleep at other people's houses, send my boy to someone
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else's house, so he has warmth and electric things. since 2016, the government has been rolling out universal credit to different parts of the country. from today, the rollout is complete. anyone making a new claim for one of the six benefits will automatically go on to universal credit. the idea is to simplify the system, combining six different benefits into one monthly, means—tested payment. welcome to christians against poverty, how can i help? charities say universal credit has pushed people into debt and poverty. in the last six months, we've seen a 30% rise in the number of people saying universal credit is the main cause of their debt. they are struggling with things like the rent, the council tax they haven't been able to pay. the number of people in work at the uk is now at record high, and the government says universal credit works for a vast majority of people, and nobody should go without money over christmas, because advance benefit payments are widely available.
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but, for claimants like erin, she thinks of december could be a long and uncertain month. david rhodes, bbc news, north yorkshire. scientists say the number of wild reindeer in the arctic has more than halved over the last 20 years, because of climate change. also known as caribou, their population has dropped from almost 5 million to around 2.1 million. the change is said to be largely due to the organism they feed on being swamped by taller plants as they take hold in the warmer climate. now, if you are a lifelong eastenders fan, we have some important news for you, because the sun is reporting that two of the soap opera's classic characters are making a comeback. lofty the barman and mary the punk are reportedly set to return to albert square after 30 years. they will be involved in a storyline with another walford original, dr harold legg. i explained to the team i have a special buzzer, and don't play it until i get the buzz out. do you
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remember them? i remember lofty. tom watt and linda davidson were part of the bbc soap's original line—up when it launched in 1985. tom, who played lofty, left the show to become a social worker, but returned to television as a sports reporter. i love finding out what people do after they have been on an iconic show like that. almost the entire original cast of eastenders has been back on the programme. get out of my pub! would you like to use the button? drum fill. it was an incredible night in the champions league. it was really tense in the
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end for both sides, but the news this morning was it was a great night for liverpool and tottenham fans. both clubs making it through to the last 16 of the champions league. mohamed salah scored liverpool's goal, and goalkeeper alisson pulled of a brilliant save in the dying seconds to ensure liverpool will be in monday's draw. and a 1—1 draw at barcelona means tottenham have also gone through to the final 16. it had looked like they were out at one stage, as they needed to match or better inter milan's result against psv eindhoven. but lucas moura proved the hero late on for spurs. it felt like a wind. —— win. and manchester city manager pep guardiola has praised sterling for his post on social media which pointed a finger towards the press and their coverage of young black players, and says racism is everywhere, following the alleged racial abuse of his forward raheem sterling in a game at chelsea. today is the third day of former 0lympic cyclist jessica varnish's employment tribunal against british cycling and uk sport. yesterday she told the tribunal that british cycling coaches would listen through the door
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during training camps, as an example of the body's extreme control over cyclists. that case is continuing. will you hang around for the papers? only if you keep your buzz out. don't touch my buzzer! drum fill. someone is playing silly huggers. let's take a look at today's papers. mrs may's whistle—stop tour of europe dominates many of the papers. the guardian claims her grip on power is slipping. the image shows her in the hague, berlin and brussels. it was quite a day yesterday. the times again shows angela merkel and the prime minister in berlin. it says cabinet ministers, who are due to meet this morning, will be pushing theresa may to prepare for a hard brexitjust hours before a likely vote on her future. the metro leads with a picture of strasbourg's christmas market, where a number of people were killed in a shooting last night. that is our lead story this morning.
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its main story reports on the prime minister's lukewarm welcome in europe. she got stuck in a car, she was unable to get out of the car. elsewhere, the daily star leads with the story of the two thieving vegas nuns who admitted stealing around £a00,000 from the school where they worked in california to feed their gambling habit. the sun pokes fun at the prime minister's expense. this is what happened on tuesday as she was set to meet angela merkel. i don't exactly know why that happened. the child lock was on? if you try and open it from the outside, that shouldn't be a problem. a posh car like that, she should have easier ways of getting out. she got there in the end. nina is here as well to look at the
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inside of the paper. do i win the competition? we never go to you first. very rarely. hurry up. very quick. historic forwomen's football, separating their sponsorship for women's football, and visa have sponsored women's football for the next seven years, it isa football for the next seven years, it is a long deal, it is a lot of cash and it provides a good way to measure in a corporate way how successful and how much it can grow over the next seven years by separating it away. quick enough? that was good. i have another one. after nina. good morning. christmas lights going up injohn lewis, sales are down 5%, and sainsbury's, prime market and tesco. they are linking it to the political climate —— primark. political shenanigans won't cancel christmas, but we are worried
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nation and it will result in cautious spending. it is putting up the lights? i can't confirm who it is. it looks like it is an apt abseiler. when they have a rope around it, how do they do that without a cherry pick? probably with a cherry picker. covered in hundreds of lights. how do they do that?” saw someone with a cherrypicker and thatis saw someone with a cherrypicker and that is how they must do it,. it took us about an hour. it looked absolutely horrific. when you see the spread of them when the dark comes and the lights are on. deodoro, i will only be five minutes. that everyone came to help. i have a story in the times from
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matthew said, i need my tin hat, he has written a piece about whipping horses and he says it must be banned. he goes on to argue about the wilfork of animals in the race. lots of people in racing say it is a safety issue —— welfare. it is safety issue —— welfare. it is safety for the jockeys. the horses don't feel any pain because of the adrenaline when they are racing. and also it is more about the sound rather than the feeling of the whip. he says why doesn't someone clever invent something that sounds like it is hitting them. it was banned in norway although there is not a massive industry, it has been successful. and there has been a review on this and we will speak more about this from the chief executive from the world horse... and whipping is something we will speak about. i wonder what he will say. one of the issues with horseracing and with lots of sports
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is trying to attract the next generation of fans. young people don't like watching it. it puts people off. yes, it is on the back ofa people off. yes, it is on the back of a survey which says young people don't like watching it.” of a survey which says young people don't like watching it. i think this will get you going this morning. me personally? just everybody. james bond has a drink problem and needs a psychiatric help according to researchers. hey? 007 is seen drinking 109 films spanning 1952 to 2015, which is in many. surely we have had more than 100 drinks. this study at the university of 0tago says he has a severe alcohol use disorder. what they have said, i have to read it, it is quite entertaining, researchers in the medicaljournal say that mi6 should bea medicaljournal say that mi6 should be a more responsible employer and referred him to work funded counselling. do they know it isn't real? i think they are aware.
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spinning a longer fantasy, real? i think they are aware. spinning a longerfantasy, if anyone has watched the films in detail, they sent him to rehab at some point. judi dench as m send him to dry out clinic at one point, so they are responsible. apparently he had six martinis on the private flight and that is enough to kill most people. and it would have seriously impaired his performance. no. the workplace culture, they say, needs to change and m shouldn't any longer offer bond drinks in workplace settings. so, james bond has a serious problem which needs addressing. it is a shame that has died out injournalism. addressing. it is a shame that has died out in journalism. drinking! at the end of a shift. nine o'clock in the end of a shift. nine o'clock in the morning, let's have vodka. that clear liquid is not water. thank you very much. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. what have you got for us? good morning. well, i have a lot
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for you this morning, because there isa for you this morning, because there is a lot going on in the weather for the next few days. in the east it is a chilly and frosty start. for many of us today it will be dry. although we are starting on a cloudy note with some drizzle, it will brighten up with some drizzle, it will brighten up through the day. high pressure is still very much in charge of the weather. effectively blocking the weather. effectively blocking the weather fronts to the west. this one making some progress. it is producing some rain. it won't move much further east than we are currently seeing. a bright start in the north—east of scotland and eastern england under the clear skies. that is where we have the frost and patchy mist and fog to watch out for. through the day things improve and brighten for england and parts of east wales. north east scotland favoured for some sunshine. you can see the weather front producing some rain. it will be windy today with exposure in the west, and tonight as well, western scotland, the irish sea coast, the west coast of wales. tonight there will be some clear
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skies as well, it will be at chilly nights with some frost around and the second or the front will start to show its hand, bringing rain in across the isles of scilly, devon, cornwall, south—west wales and northern ireland. as we had on through the course of thursday, thursday will be a windy day, it will be a bright day with some sunshine around, wintry showers on the coastline, snow on the hills, but it's going to feel cold in the wind. so we will have temperatures above freezing in the wind. it will feel about about freezing, just below. friday, another cold start to the day with frost around. we am looking at sunshine, variable amount of cloud and another weather front coming from the west, rejuvenating, producing some rain, again across the isles of scilly, devon, cornwall, parts of wales and northern ireland. i will stop the charts for a jiffy so i can point out the temperatures. we have fours,
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threes as the maximum, something higher to the west, but not much. we have cold air in place. this is an active weather front coming our way. as we go through friday evening overnight into saturday morning, and the band of rain pumped into this cold air, it is readily going to turn to snow. the timing could change, but this is what we think at the moment. so here is the pressure chart. introducing the rain, bumping into cold air. you can see the snowfall coming across northern ireland, wales, the south—west, snow flurries further east, but significant snow for scotland and northern england. 0n significant snow for scotland and northern england. on saturday morning you could wake up to some snow lying at lower levels in scotla nd snow lying at lower levels in scotland and northern england. through the course of the day we will start to see some rain coming in and the rain across england and wales could be problematic in the senseit wales could be problematic in the sense it might lead to some localised flooding. so lots going on with the weather. certainly sounds like it. waking up to snow for some people tomorrow. saturday. sorry.
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you're not listening. sorry. plenty more from carol throughout the programme. it's one of the biggest tests of our times — how are we going to pay for the care of our rapidly—ageing population, many of whom will have very complex needs? over the next two days, as part of our who cares series, we'll be exploring how other countries have tried to solve the problem, and ease the burden on elderly people and their families. today, graham satchell reports from germany, where everyone pays into an insurance scheme which is set aside just for care needs. 0ne one and up. two and up. three and up. fourand up. one and up. two and up. three and up. four and up. our care home in burleigh on and 91—year—old suzanne engleman is having physiotherapy. suzanne is here because she had a fall at home and broke her hip.” was in my bathroom and my knees
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failed. ijust broke down. speaks german. she pay for her room and food herself, but her care, 700 euros a month, is financed from a national insurance scheme. care is expensive. people cannot afford it themselves. they need these care insurances to finance it. like the uk, germany has an ageing population. the old care system here was means tested and run by local authorities, but in the early ‘90s germany change the funding. it goes like this. everybody pays 2.5%% of their salary into a central pot. it is shared. you pay half, your employer pays half. retired people pay the full amount. critically the new system gets rid of means testing. so care is given not on your ability to pay but solely on your ability to pay but solely on your need. the long—term care
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funding is centrally run, ring—fenced and largely popular.” have an old father. he is nearly 80. it isa have an old father. he is nearly 80. it is a good life for him. you pay now, you will have then if you are old, you will be sure that you will be taken old, you will be sure that you will be ta ken carol. old, you will be sure that you will be taken carol. everybody cares for anybody, that is ok. —— care of. be taken carol. everybody cares for anybody, that is ok. -- care of. you are happy with that? yes. can you show me some pictures of your husband? of course they can. probably the most successful part of the german system — it pays family members to care for their relatives at home. this woman paid helmet use the funds to look after her husband who'd was diagnosed with cancer. everybody who is paid with this fund, he has a right to take this money out to get support from the system. do you think you would have been able to look after your husband at home if you hadn't had money from the insurance scheme? it would be very difficult. really difficult.
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there are criticisms of the german system. the most common that the amount each person has to pay keeps going up. it will rise to 3% of someone's salary for example next year. back at the care home and frau engleman's recovery is going well.” wa nted engleman's recovery is going well.” wanted to learn and recover. and you're looking forward to going home? yes, i'm trying to pol pot i wa nt to home? yes, i'm trying to pol pot i want to go home. and when she does, susanne engleman will continue to be supported by the fund. the germans have been persuaded that to care for their elderly, they all need to pay. graham satchell, bbc news, berlin. tomorrow, our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes will be reporting from japan, which has the world's oldest population, with more than a quarter of its citizens over 65. it is really interesting to see how the other countries look after their
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elderly. we could learn a thing or two. yes, definitely. you're watching breakfast. let's have a look at the scene live in downing street now. a rather enormous christmas tree, speaking of christmas trees, it would be hard to get the bits and bobs. we'll be bringing you the latest from there all morning, as speculation mounts that the prime minister could face a no—confidence vote. there are differing claims coming out of westminster today, but we'll bring you all the news as it comes in. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. a man arrested near an entrance to the houses of parliament yesterday has been detained under the mental health act. police say the man, who's 29, was tasered after running towards officers. he is now being treated in hospital and the incident is not being treated as terrorism. the chairman of the grenfell
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tower public inquiry will confirm today that it won't begin public hearings into the root causes of the disaster until next autumn at the earliest. this is so lawyers can digest the vast amount of evidence already heard. phase one of the inquiry, which has concentrated solely on the circumstances on the night of the fire, will conclude later today. the founder of a club dedicated to getting girls in hackney playing football has been recognised for her work. katee hui set up hackney laces when she couldn't find a club for girls in her community who wanted to play football. she has now helped hundreds both on and off the pitch. i don't see myself as special. i just... the way that i look at it is i would hope that people in any community would see that, like, we should be active in our community. and if there is something you could
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fix, play a part of, or bring people together, why wouldn't you? let's take a look at the travel situation now. starting with the tubes there are minor delays on the bakerloo line currently but looking good elsewhere at the moment. this is the a13. the usual morning traffic there. you can see its building westbound from dagenham into barking. and problems too for those travelling northbound on the blackwall tunnel. it's slow on the southern approach from the woolwich road flyover. pentonville road remains closed eastbound from claremont square to islington high street for gas main work. and on the highway, westbound traffic is building through wapping towards tower hill. now, the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a rather cloudy start this morning, but gradually the cloud will start to break up and we will see some sunny spells developing. it is however going to feel rather chilly. now we have a south—easterly breeze. 0n feel rather chilly. now we have a south—easterly breeze. on that we could see one or two spots of light rain and drizzle to start with this
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morning. many places not seeing that at all. sunny spells developing. temperature today on the cool side between six and 90 degrees. 0vernight tonight still some patchy cloud, but that will break up. some lengthy clear spells. under the clear skies the temperature will drop down into low single figures celsius. we could see a little frost first thing on thursday morning. the minimum between one and three celsius. the south—easterly breeze will continue to strengthen. it is going to be quite a chilly breeze through the estate especially. 0n the thermometer temperature is saying six or seven celsius. factor in the south—easterly breeze, it is going to feel much more cold through the course of tomorrow. a chilly day for friday, but less of a breeze, so perhaps won't feel quite as raw as tomorrow. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to steph and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern.
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it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: we have had exclusive access to the set and stars of les mis, the epic new adaptation from the team behind war & peace. as nasa's longest—running mission goes interstellar, after 41 years, we will be asking what voyager 2 could reveal about this previously unexplored domain of space. and, after the modern family star sarah hyland admitted she was left contemplating suicide after two kidney transplants, we will be discussing the mental strain faced by transplant patients. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: a gunman is on the run after killing at least three people and wounding many more at a popular christmas market in strasbourg. police in the french city say they are treating the incident
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as a terror attack and that the suspect was already deemed a security risk. a number of weapons, including grenades, were found at his home earlier on tuesday after a police search. eyewitness peter fritz attended to one of the victims and spoke to the bbc earlier. his account contains some distressing details. well, i was witness to apparently the first incident that happened, and what happens was overheard two distinct noises, but i took them to be firecrackers. but when i turned around the corner, i did see one person on the ground with an apparent headshot wound, at least one, and his wife standing close by. he was a tourist from thailand, and we tried our best to resuscitate him. we applied cpr. we dragged him toa him. we applied cpr. we dragged him to a restaurant close by. i had helped from the medical people from germany, but it took more than 45 minutes for an ambulance to appear,
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maybe the ambulance's way was blocked as well because of security precautions. there is speculation that theresa may is on the brink of a leadership challenge, as anger grows over her handling of brexit negotiations. senior conservative mps have told the bbc that the chairman of the party's 1922 committee has now received 48 letters from backbenchers — enough to trigger a vote. 0ur political correspondent ben wright has this report. a warning — this film has flashing lights the prime minister, arriving back in downing street last night, in the dark about whether or not she faces an imminent vote of confidence in her leadership of the conservative party. mrs may had been in european capitals trying to find something to soften opposition to her brexit deal in westminster. but tory opposition seems to be hardening. the chief whip was also in number 10 late. the man who enforces discipline among tory mps knows the number of rebels will be critical. according to the rules,
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if 48 conservative mps submit letters to this man, sir graham brady, the chairman of the 1922 committee, a confidence vote must be triggered. and several sources, including a cabinet minister, have told the bbc they believe the 48 letters required for a vote have been submitted. will she please, at this late stage, put the backstop and all its horrors behind her? the former environment secretary 0wen paterson has added to the tally. downing street are playing down an imminent vote aginst mrs may, and another senior tory said the confidence vote would be a huge mistake. this is not what should be happening. it's a really important matter for the country, not just for the conservative party, but the country. to undermine a prime minister, at this stage, seems to me to be wholly wrong. she faces another difficult day with prime minister's questions, and a visit to ireland
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to meet the taoiseach, leo varadkar as she searches for something to shore up her standing in the tory party, and parliament. ben wright, bbc news. the body of british backpacker grace millane has been formally identified and returned to herfamily, who say that their whole world has been turned upside down. the 22—year—old went missing from a hostel in auckland on 1 december. detectives in new zealand say they are still piecing together exactly what happened to her, and building a timeline of events. a 26—year—old man was charged earlier this week with her murder and will appear in court again next month. the crossbench peer lord lester has resigned from the house of lords. the 82—year—old was suspended by the liberal democrats earlier this year, after being accused of sexual harassment 12 years ago. a party spokesman said lord lester had made the right decision. he denies all the allegations against him. debt charities are warning that some of the poorest families in the country will be left relying on food banks over christmas because of universal credit. from today, all new benefit claimants will be signed up to the scheme. many people already on universal
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credit have complained about their payments being reduced and delayed. the government says there is no reason for people to be without money over christmas, because advance benefit payments are available. sally is here with the sport. talking about money before christmas, and jurgen klopp says his goalkeeper is worth even more than he is paid. right at the end of the game, in really close quarters. of the champions league, and who other than mo salah to score the goal that would send last year's finalists through and secure second place in their group? jo lynskey has more. juba lesion in the champions league comes with a test of the heart rate, but liverpool and spurs have both found a way to keep their european
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beat going. it would always feel daunting for tottenham in the nou camp, even with lionel messi left on barcelona's bench. when this team rest their graters, though, new superstars just step forward. this is 21—year—old 0usmane dembele, running rings around spurs' optimism. a goal that punctured their plan but not spurs' belief. soon the agency to convert those chances increased, with news from italy. the north london mission was to match or better the result of internal alarm, so when they equalised against psv, spurs now had to score. it was an extra layer of tension that would finally bring out a clinical streak. and there is the goal they have been looking for, totte n ha m goal they have been looking for, tottenham hotspur. finish from a chris reed adsense burst through to the knockout. after three champions league games, they had just a single point. this was a night on the campaign where they turned it around. the enfield patchwork new
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liverpool's hopes were on a thread. they had to beat natalie 1—0 or by two clear goals. luckily, mo salah makes everything looks simple. their route through to the knockout came through the legs of the goalkeeper, but liverpool's own keeper made an equally important intervention, with this point blank save, alisson stopped last—minute heartbreak. this was not the vintage way liverpool usually do european nights, but one at least some supporters won't forget. so great news for both liverpool and spurs. they will both be in monday's last 16 draw. let's hearfrom both managers, starting with jurgen klopp. i'm still full of adrenaline. i could fill it in bottles — bottles again. so this game was just amazing. it was outstanding, unbelievable. the boys played... their whole heart on the pitch.
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i'm not sure of the right saying, but it's just — with each part of their body, they were in that game. i think they were fantastic. i think to celebrate our players inside, with the staff, with everyone, i think, from the club, was the first time that you feel something this special. the connection was amazing. now, we need to be clever in the way that we need to manage that energy that we create after tonight. peterborough are through to the third round of the fa cup, after beating bradford on penalties. bradford came back from 2—0 down and it ended up going to extra—time after the two sides drew 4—4. but peterborough just edged the bantams out, beating them 3—2 in a penalty shootout. peterborough will be away to middlesbrough in the third round. elsewhere in the fa cup, walsall won 1—0 at sunderland. it was this stunning long—range goal from liam kinsella at the start of the second half that helped walsall edge past their league one rivals. and newport will host leicester after beating wrexham 4—0. manchester city boss pep guardiola
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says racism is everywhere, and notjust in football, after raheem sterling spoke out about the alleged abuse he received at the weekend. sterling was back in training today ahead of city's champions league match against hoffenheim tomorrow. chelsea have suspended four supporters from attending matches while investigations continue into what happened at stamford bridge on saturday. you have to protect how equal we are, all together. so it's tough to understand, in the 21st century, still to be in that position, and to accept diversity, to be in a power position, and help us to be better. and everyone — we have to fight, strictly, for human rights, for everything, to make a better society for the future, for everyone. today is the third day of former 0lympic cyclist jessica varnish's employment tribunal against british cycling and uk sport.
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she is suing for wrongful dismissal and sexual discrimination after being dropped by gb in 2016. yesterday she told the tribunal that british cycling coaches would listen through the door during training camps, as an example of the body's extreme control over cyclists. rugby‘s world player of the year, johnny sexton, signed a new deal that means he will play for ireland and leinster for another three years. the fly—half, who had a two—year spell with racing metro in paris, was linked with with a lucrative return to the french capital. but it is looking more likely now that the 33—year—old will end his career in ireland. he could go on for quite sometime, couldn't he? we will go back to our top story, and a major developing story in strasbourg this morning. we now know that
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more than 350 officers are involved in the manhunt for a man who opened fire at the city's busy christmas markets, killing at least three people and leaving several others seriously injured. let's speak to local journalist bruno poussard now, who witnessed events unfold last night. can you tell us a bit about where you were when this happened and what you were when this happened and what you saw and heard? i went back to my apartment at the end of the night andi apartment at the end of the night and i was waiting with a friend of mine in my flat as we had dinner with other friends and my daughter as well, and a little bit before 8pm yesterday night, we heard one, two, three shots. at the time we didn't realise exactly what was going on, but we smelt something really weird, like powder, like we had never known before, and then there was a lot in
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a row, probably 20,30, before, and then there was a lot in a row, probably 20, 30, i before, and then there was a lot in a row, probably 20,30, i don't exactly know. and so we tried to look from the window, but we didn't go that close, because we were afraid, and we saw on the left—hand side soldiers hiding behind a wall, shooting on the other side, and on the right—hand side there was probably only one guy but we didn't exactly know what was going on, and it lasted two or three minutes. there was no words to really describe what happened. yes, and given what you did see and hear, however you feeling now? yes, i have... i haven't really been sleeping, to be honest. i am back on the street now. and yes, i am going to my office, and then there was also a shooting at the restaurant, so the streets are still close, as well. i had been working as a journalist last night and i was
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giving my security to one of the police officers, and... so what is it like they're now? you mean in the streets ? it like they're now? you mean in the streets? yes, and the atmosphere. yes, so there are a few streets like mine, so like the streets of my office, which are still locked, but otherwise people are starting to move again. it is not really... yes, it is still a little bit dark outside, but yes, people are starting to move. thank you so much for talking to us. really appreciate that. that is of course a developing story. if we have information we will bring it to you. we are on until 19 will bring it to you. we are on until19 am and will bring it to you. we are on until 19 am and i am sure the bbc news channel will carry that as well. —— 9:15am. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. there is lots going on
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with the weather. for the next few daysin with the weather. for the next few days in the west it will be particularly windy with exposure, western scotland, irish coast, and eastern parts of wales. today it is a cold start, particularly in eastern areas, where we've had clear skies at night, mist and fog, but you will start with some sunshine whereas the rest of the uk will be cloudy with some rain from the weak weather front, but it won't make much progress eastwards because it is being blocked by high pressure. the other one we will keep an eye on. as i mentioned, first thing, bright skies for eastern england, north—east scotland, lots of cloud for the rest of us, with the weak weather from producing for the rest of us, with the weak weatherfrom producing rain for western scotland, northern ireland, heading down into north—west england. through the day it is going to brighten up especially for england and east wales with some
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sunny spells coming through. temperature—wise, seven to about ten, so not too far off where they should be at this stage in december. as we head on through the evening and overnight you can see much more clea ra nce and overnight you can see much more clearance in the sky, so a cold night, with widespread frost and we will have the remnants of the weak weather front producing some splashes of rain. we also have the coming in, introducing rain across the isles of scilly, cornwall, into parts of wales and at times northern ireland as well. temperature is roughly four to about seven. we start on a sunny note, there will be areas of cloud and this weather front still advancing, bringing some rain with it, still windy in the west especially with exposure. but tomorrow it will be windy wherever you are, so these temperatures, six and seven, in the wind, they will feel much more cold than that. as we head on into friday, a frosty start
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for some, but we are also looking at afair bit for some, but we are also looking at a fair bit of sunshine. in the west, the weather front continues to advance, bringing some rain. so stopping the charts, look at the temperatures, three or four, stopping the charts, look at the temperatures, three orfour, no great shakes for december. through the evening, temperatures continue to drop, the rain starts to push in, it is readily going to turn to snow. so if you look at the pressure chart, here comes the rain, bumping into the cold air, so you can see where we have snow coming in across the west, significant snowfall particularly with height across scotla nd particularly with height across scotland and northern england. so on saturday morning some of us, not just scotland and northern england, will wake up to a dusting of snow, but for much — this is running again — for much of southern england and we re — for much of southern england and were any star you might have first thing in the morning won't last and will be replaced by rain, which could have problems for local
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flooding, but significant snowfall on the hills will be in scotland and northern england. so if you're travelling, bear that in mind. we we re travelling, bear that in mind. we were listening to that. potential snow on saturday, but only for some people in parts of scotland. bless you. it is so early in the morning. she has been taking notes. when we have a catch up, she will give me a test. are you coming to the christmas party? no, i'm not. did you get an invite? that is a good point, when is it? i will let you know. i will come down and treat you. see you later. i won't hold my breath for that one. i will be waiting for years for that to happen. you know me too well. so you later. that went well. are you coming to the party? no, i didn't getan coming to the party? no, i didn't get an invite. laughter. a lot of us hadn't heard about the company interserve before this week, but the fact the business is in trouble has got a lot
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of people worried with some saying it could become another carillion. it is one of those companies we might not have heard of, but 45,000 people work for them so it is huge. 0ne one of them you haven't heard of, which is intertwined in your life somehow, so 45,000 employees at i nte rse rve somehow, so 45,000 employees at interserve doing things like cleaning hospitals, providing meals at hospitals, building schools, they have a cleaning contract at the building we are sitting in now at the bbc. legalisation is like the bbc, the nhs, paid interserve to ta ke bbc, the nhs, paid interserve to takejobs off bbc, the nhs, paid interserve to take jobs off their hands. what has gone wrong with them? in providing the services, they have racked up a debt of £500 million. we already knew about this. over the weekend they have gone to their lenders and said, can we pay you less than we promised initially? that is worrying. it is the second time in a
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year that it has happened. the share price has hit. it was worth £1 last year, and that has dropped down to 12p. and overall the company is worth £70 million. it sounds like a lot of money, but it isn't when you consider the debt is £500 million. now there are questions from experts about whether or not interserve can survive. it is viable because it has been working for a number of years. what has been happening regardless of the corporate nature of these organisations is we have been pushing and pushing and pushing down the cost, and we have been cutting into fat and we have hit the bone, and that makes these organisations precarious, particularly the larger ones, because there is lots of things that they do. if one area of the business starts to struggle, it can have ramifications across the whole thing. competition for supply chains, all these things wrapped up in the contracts. when you're
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working with such fine margins it makes them susceptible market changes. sorry to get in there with a question about comparison with carillion because lots of people say it is another one of those. yes, i suppose it is inevitable, it is another big organisation which provides lots of government services. at the beginning of the year they went bust, leaving hospitals unfinished and wrote contracts unfinished because they couldn't manage their debt. at the moment interserve say we won't be carillion two, we are doing 0k, we have overspent on a couple of contracts, but actually the business model is strong and fundamentally we are doing 0k. the government has said they will fully support i nte rse rve said they will fully support interserve when it comes to their recovery plan and on monday they we re recovery plan and on monday they were awarded at £35 million contract with hospital in merthyr. as we heard from chris, there are bigger questions about the business model,
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with tiny margins, and how responsible government, are they covering who they are sending contracts too, because if it goes wrong there is a human side, we are talking about meals in hospitals, schools being built and 45,000 employees, so it's notjust a big business, there is a very human side as well. it is one we will both be following. we will, yeah. thank you. you must both be fans of le mis? yes, every word to every song. # can you hear that people seem?“ yes, every word to every song. # can you hear that people seem? if you start that... we will still be going. i would sing it at the christmas do if i was invited. you are invited! carol has not been snubbed, she has an invite every year. normally she will come. yes, eve ryo ne year. normally she will come. yes, everyone gets excited. we love carol. she can't be here this year. she is working. she is very busy.
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the nation needs her. it isn'tjust about us. carol has an invite. nina, you haven't been invited! laughter. especially threatening to sing. nina can do the entire le mis catalogue. now, if you're a fan of les miserables, you'll be excited to hear that a major new adaptation is coming to bbc one. but songless! amazing cast. don't expect me to watch it. laughter. it got a great cast, with big hollywood names including dominic west, david 0yelowo and lily collins. but one thing it doesn't have is singing! john maguire was given exclusive access to the cast and crew on location in belgium. it will only take a spark to set it off. in scale, in story and in star power, les miserables is an epic. the team that brought war and peace to the big screen has now turned its attention to victor hugo's mammoth novel and there is no singing! well,
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no, i always think i can sing. no one else seems to. i thought, god, at last they have discovered i can sing. but they hadn't, no, they said absolutely not we don't want you to sing. you probably can sing. well, to be perfectly frank, you know, because i thought the film, the recent musicalfilm because i thought the film, the recent musical film was great and i personally wouldn't go near that.” love singing and i have sung in a few films and icing at home all the time. you never catch me listening toa time. you never catch me listening to a song without singing. it is kind of annoying. much of the singing took place here in belgium. the main protagonist who transcends from prison rags to factory owning riches is played with much enjoyment by dominic west. the best job i've ever had. is it really? yeah, i think so. i've loved it. it has just been great, such... it is a brilliant story and everything i have, there is something incredibly
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interesting to get into, whether it is having a big fight with someone, rescuing a tiled, there is always something, it is a greatjob. rescuing a tiled, there is always something, it is a great job. men like us have only to make choices, to prey on society or to guard it. you chose the former, i chose the latter. and its nemesis is david 0yelowo, taking on the type of role he says would have previously been unavailable to black actors. you've got 12 months left to serve. i've never had the opportunity to be involved in something quite like this, you know, being british, growing up in the uk, of course i grew up growing up in the uk, of course i grew up on growing up in the uk, of course i grew up on period dramas, but, you know, up until recently, you know, wouldn't have had the opportunity to be in one. i mean, it is a wonderful thing for me to see both for myself and generally. no, 14. you're too young. he won't let you. but i am old enough to work with you. much of
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the justice and despair in 19th—century fronts that hugp's's allegory addresses is summed up by lily's character, who is 14.” allegory addresses is summed up by lily's character, who is 14. i was literally freezing and i was tired. but there was fun in that. everything i felt i but there was fun in that. everything ifelt i used. but there was fun in that. everything i felt i used. casting directors watching this who want more destitution in future roles. give me more destitution, more deaths. exactly, more against type. and for six weeks, audiences will be able to share in the struggles and the suffering of the dispossessed, les miserables. john mcguire, bbc news, brussels. les miserables will start on bbc one on sunday 30th december at 9pm. do you know what, i like a show without singing, i think it will be more dramatic. loads people will be saying, why is there no singing? i think you will enjoy it. it will be
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a christmas that one! it is. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. a man arrested near an entrance to the houses of parliament yesterday has been detained under the mental health act. police say the 29—year—old was tasered after running towards officers. he is now in hospital and the incident is not being treated as terrorism. a teenager killed in greenwich over the weekend has been named by police, aaron warren died after being stabbed on saturday evening. a 17—year—old who was arrested has been released. children who don't identify as heterosexual are likely to suffer from identify as heterosexual are likely to sufferfrom depression identify as heterosexual are likely to suffer from depression and self harm, according to a new study from university college london. one of the authors says it's concerning to see that the decline
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in mental health started when children were as young as 10 — and worsened through adolescence. they say early interventions may be useful to prevent and treat any challenges. the founder of a club dedicated to getting girls in hackney playing football has been recognised for her work. katee hui set up hackney laces when she couldn't find a club for girls in her community who wanted to play football. she has now helped hundreds both on and off the pitch. i don't see myself as special. i just... the way that i look at it is, i would hope that people in any community would see that, like, we should be active parts of our community. and if there is something you could fix, play a part of, or bring people together, why wouldn't you ? let's take a look at the travel situation now. starting with the tubes, there are minor delays on the bakerloo line currently but looking good elsewhere at the moment. this is the a13. the usual morning traffic there. you can see its building westbound from dagenham into barking. and problems too for those travelling northbound on the blackwall tunnel. it's slow on the southern approach from the woolwich road flyover. 0n the m25 anticlockwise there is a
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lane closure at junction 0n the m25 anticlockwise there is a lane closure atjunction 28 following a collision with delays back three miles through tojunction 29. pentonville road remains closed eastbound from claremont square to islington high street for gas main work. now, the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather cloudy start this morning, but gradually the cloud will start to break up and we will see some sunny spells developing. it is, however, going to feel rather chilly. now, we have a south—easterly breeze. on that we could see one or two spots of light rain and drizzle to start with this morning. many places not seeing that at all, though. sunny spells developing. temperatures today on the cool side, between six and nine celsius. now, overnight tonight, still some patchy cloud, but that will break up. some lengthy clear spells. and under the clear skies, the temperature will drop down into low—single—figures celsius. we could see a little frost first thing on thursday morning. the minimum between one and three celsius. now, that south—easterly breeze will continue to strengthen. it is going to be quite a chilly breeze through the east especially.
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0n the thermometer, temperatures saying six or seven celsius. but factor in the south—easterly breeze, it's going to feel much colder through the course of tomorrow. a chilly day for friday, but less of a breeze, so perhaps it won't feel quite as raw as tomorrow. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. welcome to breakfast. a city in lockdown, a gunman on the run, after at least three people are killed and a dozen injured at a christmas market in strasbourg. mounting pressure on theresa may, as the likelihood of a vote of no—confidence in her leadership by conservative mps grows. three profit warnings and counting. in may, the boss of dixons carphone said nobody was happy with how the retailer was doing.
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are things looking up? i will be looking at their latest results, and asking the man in charge. drama in the champions league as liverpool and tottenham make it through to the last 16 — just. this was the moment alisson saved his side at anfield. if napoli had scored, liverpool were out. a late draw in barcelona was enough for spurs. and we go behind the scenes of the bbc‘s adaptation of les miserables. there is lots of drama, but no singing, to the disappointment of some. well, no, i always think i can sing, but no—one else seems to. this morning we have a cold start to the day in the east, but some sunshine for you. for most it is cloudy with some drizzle. it will brighten up, with snow in the forecast for the weekend. i will have more in 15 minutes. it is wednesday 12 december. our top story: a manhunt is underway in strasbourg after a gunman opened fire at a christmas market, killing at least three people
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and injuring 12. the authorities have begun a terrorism investigation in the french city after an earlier police search uncovered a number of weapons at the suspect‘s home, including grenades. eliza philippidis has this report. the city was on lockdown. these are the scenes just moments after the shooting — confusion, panic. the 29—year—old gunman opened fire using an automatic weapon. some people tried to help those who were shot. and i saw a person with apparently two holes into their head lying on the bridge here. we tried resuscitation activities.
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we took him to a restaurant and we tried for 45 minutes to resuscitate him. there were no ambulance services apparently able to enter the area, and after 45 minutes, we stopped the resuscitation efforts, because a doctor told us over the phone that it's senseless. as soon as it was safe, ambulance crews were sent in to collect the injured and take them to hospital. president emmanuel macron has been briefed in paris. the french interior minister put plans into action. translation: the government decided to switch to a state of emergency, with the set—up of reinforced controls at border crossings, and also at all of the christmas markets around france, to avoid similar events taking place. police said the suspected gunman was on a watchlist. questions will now be raised about how to best protect the french people from attacks like these. eliza philippidis, bbc news. let's get the very latest now from our europe correspondent damian grammaticas, who is in the city.
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so they are still on the hunt for the gunman. what more do we know? they are, yes. what i can tell you is that those locked down measures, the confinement measures here in the old city centre, where everyone who was out last night at that christmas market, in bars and restaurants, we re market, in bars and restaurants, were told to stay in doors, those have now been lifted. so people have left those restaurants and bars. the city is waking up again and starting to get back to normal. but in a state of alert. authorities have told everyone to be vigilant. there are several 100 police on the streets, searching for this man. we know a little bit more about the sequence of events. he launched his attack about 8pm, and in the next 40 minutes or so there were twice exchanges of gunfire between him and police. it is thought he may have been injured in the left arm,
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because he jumped in been injured in the left arm, because hejumped in a taxi, escaped, and since then police have now been searching for him, and that man—hunt does now go on. now been searching for him, and that man-hunt does now go on. we will keep you up—to—date as we get more developments on that story. theresa may is fighting to save her brexit deal, and potentially her job, amid renewed claims conservative mps are close to forcing a vote of no—confidence in her leadership. brexiteer conservatives say they are confident that they have reached the threshold of 48 letters needed to trigger a vote, but there has been no official confirmation. so what could happen now? well, in orderfor a leadership challenge to be launched, at least 15% of conservative mps need to submit a letter saying they no longer support the prime minister. if the 1922 committee chairman, sir graham brady, receives enough letters, a vote of confidence in theresa may via a secret ballot will be held. if she wins, herjob will be safe for another year. if she loses, the party will have
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to pick a new leader. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in downing street for us. iain, we've been here before. it happened almost a month ago, didn't it? absolutely right. what happened then, of course, was an attempt to try and get the 48 letters of no confidence which would start to trigger the process of a leadership election, and her opponent in the conservative party failed to do so. what is different this time? 0bviously she has postponed a vote on the deal but in addition to that we are getting more seniorfigures saying addition to that we are getting more senior figures saying they have no confidence in her as well, including former cabinet minister 0wen paterson, who has denounced herfor being a feeble supplicant in negotiations with brussels and saying in effect he can't trust her word. that may encourage other people to put in their letters as
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well. and certainly inside downing street, as you can imagine, this news is not welcome. they are saying if there were to be a leadership contest, and they don't know, there is no official confirmation, if they were, that would undermine her effo rts were, that would undermine her efforts this week to try and renegotiate and get some of the assurances her mps want on this deal from brussels. in addition to that, they are suggesting that if they we re they are suggesting that if they were to be a new leader, they properly wouldn't be in place for six weeks, until the end ofjanuary, increasing the risk of no deal or indeed no brexit at all. that is effectively her message to people to try and dissuade them from —— from getting behind this move to oust her. and there are also rumours that potentially graham brady, the man who apparently might have these letters, has booked in to see her this afternoon, and she has also meant to be going to ireland today. shias, so she is facing jeremy
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corbyn at prime minister's questions, then going off to see her counterpart, the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, and crucially, arlene foster, the leader of the dup, who is propping her up in government. if she goes to those meeting she is hoping for some reassurance from them on the backstop, as it is called, to avoid a hard border in ireland, and to have these discussions later this week in brussels as well. the last thing she needs in the midst of all this is an attempt to remove her from office. and we will be putting those questions to the lord chancellor and secretary of state forjustice, david gauke, in a few moments on breakfast. the body of british backpacker grace millane has been formally identified and returned to herfamily, who say that their whole world has been turned upside down. the 22—year—old went missing from a hostel in auckland on 1 december. detectives in new zealand say are still piecing together exactly what happened to her, and building a timeline of events. a 26—year—old man was charged
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earlier this week with her murder and will appear in court again next month. debt charities are warning that some of the poorest families in the country will be left relying on food banks over christmas because of universal credit. from today, all new benefit claimants will be signed up to the scheme. many people already on universal credit have complained about their payments being reduced and delayed. the government says there is no reason for people to be without money over christmas, because advance benefit payments are available. scientists say the number of wild reindeer in the arctic has more than halved over the last 20 years, because of climate change. their population has dropped from almost 5 million to just over 2 million. the change is being blamed on rising temperatures, which affects the plants they eat. some herds have shrunk by more than 90%.
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now, if you are a lifelong eastenders fan, we have some important news for you. drum fill. you can't think eastenders without thinking that, the doof, doofs, doofs. and now it has broken. you shouldn't have tantrums when you get your own way. there is a reason why we are creating this madness. because the sun is reporting that two of the soap opera's classic characters are making a comeback. lofty the barman and mary the punk are reportedly set to return to albert square after 30 years. they will be involved in a storyline with another walford original, dr harold legg. tom watt and linda davidson were part of the bbc soap's original line—up when it launched in 1985.
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i think the entire original cast have been back in it at some stage. someone should work that out. tom, who played lofty, left the show to become a social worker, but returned to television as a sports reporter. i think ithinki i think i interviewed him when i first started off. plenty of information for you this morning. as we have been hearing this morning, theresa may could face an imminent no—confidence vote in her leadership. senior brexiteer mps say they believe they now have enough support to trigger the challenge, but there has been no official confirmation. we are joined now by the lord chancellor and secretary of state forjustice, david gauke, who voted to remain in the european union. really appreciate your time on the programme this morning. as you will understand, things are changing minute by minute and hour by hour. cani minute by minute and hour by hour. can i ask you first of all what do you know about the potential of these 48 letters being submitted?
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well, i haven't spoken to sir graham brady. there is a lot of speculation. it wouldn't surprise me if those letters have come in. it is disappointing, though, because the prime minister is doing exactly what she needs to do in going out, making the case. yesterday she was in the hague, she was in berlin, she was in brussels. today she is due to go to dublin. tomorrow she is due in brussels again. listening to what the concerns of members of parliament, trying to get the best deal, trying to ensure that we are ina deal, trying to ensure that we are in a position to leave the european union, reflecting the referendum result with a deal this march. and thatis result with a deal this march. and that is what she should be focusing on and being able to do, and i think it is very disappointing if it turns out there is a confidence vote. how much trouble is she in? do you think she can survive this? yes, i do. i think she is the right person to leave —— lead the country. she has
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the attention to detail, the willingness to work, just put all the effort in, to make sure that we get the right deal. that is exactly what she does, and i think the public recognise that she has worked tirelessly in recent months to deliver this deal. a lot of people said it was impossible to get a deal, and she has done that. she is listening to the concerns of members of parliament, trying to address those issues, address those concerns, and she needs to be able to get on and do that and not be undermined by what i think would be a self—indulgent process.” undermined by what i think would be a self-indulgent process. i wonder if this week's events have actually changed a few opinions, though, because it's hard to ignore the difference that cancelling that vote may have made, not only to brexiteers, but also to remainers as well, and we have a leader who said they would definitely not be a general election and then she called one, you have a leader who said they
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would definitely be a vote and then she cancelled the vote, and for those people who might have been watching and thinking here is a determined prime minister, those people may be watching and thinking there is a credibility issue here, and that is what has changed. well, what has happened this week is a lot of my parliamentary colleagues have said we have got concerns with a particular aspect of the withdrawal agreement and the deal, we want to address those concerns. the prime minister has listened to those concerns, and rather than pressing on with a vote without those concerns having been addressed, she said let's take some extra time, let's go out there, and as i say she is working incredibly hard this week as she has been for week after week after week, demonstrating the qualities we need in a prime minister. and the idea that we should remove her at this radical time in our country's history, you know, it is really vital what happens in the weeks ahead, that we remove a prime minister and say
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essentially we go through a process until, what, late january and early february where effectively we don't have a prime minister, would be an incredibly reckless thing to do. and, you know, i really think that would be a big mistake for the conservative party to go down that route. ask you what you genuinely think will happen, best case scenario, she can renegotiate this area around the backstop, she brings it back to parliament, then you feel that she can get the vote through? essentially that is the best case scenario for her and the conservative party, isn't it? the best case scenario for the country more importantly and the reality is that the choices for the country are narrowing if you like and it is largely between leaving without a deal, which i think would be economically disastrous, not proceeding with brexit at all, which i think would undermine our political trust and be bad for democracy, or, alternatively,
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delivering on this deal, and i think, as the argument is made, and as choices become clearer, i think that that process of the deal can succeed. but, you know, she's not going to be able to succeed if, rather than going out there, negotiating with her counterparts, she is having to deal with a confidence vote here. we will see whether that happens or not, but i think that is unwelcome and i think it would be seen by the public as being self—indulgent, especially if this reaction... if we actually had leadership election. i think at this point in our history, given the circumstances we are in, the challenges that the government faces, i really don't think that is a responsible course of action. you talk about public perception, just finally on this issue, lots of people watching this morning will be wondering what's going on in the conservative party at the moment. are you and others in the same position as you, are you looking at
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conservative party members and seeing the sharks circling around the prime minister and some people positioning themselves to potentially be the new leader and almost looking personally rather than thinking of the big picture, are those conversations going on in your party at the moment?” are those conversations going on in your party at the moment? i think it make an important point here, is that we all have to be motivated by the national interest. doing what is best for the country. so you do think that there are some? there are going to be honest differences of opinion on that and i am sure the vast majority of my colleagues are motivated by the national interest. that is what we all want to do. but i really do think that, you know, if you want the qualities of, motivated by the national interest, willingness to work tirelessly to that end, complete determination and courage, then theresa may is the prime minister that we need. and i really do feel that attempts to remove her at the moment don't
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reflect well on the conservative party. we are supposed to be the grown—ups and that is exactly how we should behave. thank you very much for that this morning. we will speak with iain duncan smith in one hour. if you have switched on this morning, it will be one of those days for theresa may. there are rumours about sirgraham days for theresa may. there are rumours about sir graham brady having an off letters to force a no—confidence vote and then if theresa may were to lose it, there would be a leadership election and she couldn't take part in that and david corkill is talking about that this morning while theresa may is at prime minister's questions, going to ireland for some meetings as well, so another one of those days when you have to keep your eyes everywhere. and no one knows what's going to happen. exactly. it is 7:18am and carol has the weather for us. you have said the word snow. i am panicking. bless you. you are quite right, there is no in the forecast overnight friday into saturday. today, first of all,
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though, fairly cloudy for most of us, starting in the east, it is a chilly start where we have had broken cloud by night, so frosty start for you. through the courts of the day, all of the cloud across england and east wales will be replaced by brighter skies. north—east scotland seeing some sunshine but fairly cloudy elsewhere. we have a weak weather front raped over the west of the uk. that is producing some light rain and also in the west with exposure in particular we are looking at very gusty winds touching gale force at times —— draped. now these other temperatures, seven to about ten, maybe 11, so roughly where they should be at this stage in december. through this evening and overnight under clear skies there will be more ofa under clear skies there will be more of a frost than we saw the night just gone. we still have the re m na nts of just gone. we still have the remnants of a weak weather front bringing showery outbreaks of rain and another front approaching bringing yet more rain. temperatures falling roughly between one and maybe about four, for some just a bit more under the cloud. tomorrow,
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then, we start on a chilly note with frost around. more sunshine tomorrow than we are looking at today. the weather front in the west bringing cloud and rain. tomorrow is going to be windier across—the—board cloud and rain. tomorrow is going to be windier across—the—boa rd than today. so although your thermometer might say six, seven or eight, if you're exposed to the windchill people feel much colder than that. it will feel closer to freezing or just above, or just it will feel closer to freezing or just above, orjust below, depending where you are. as we move from thursday into friday, again, we start on a nippy note, variable cloud, some sunshine, not as windy as it's going to be foremost on thursday, still windy out towards the west, though, and you can see the west, though, and you can see the weather fronts do with us, still producing some rain. now, these are the maximum temperatures during the afternoon, four to seven, so obviously into the evening and overnight those temperatures will drop further. so what's going to happen is, as steph was alluding too, as it comes in from the west, this weather front, and
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too, as it comes in from the west, this weatherfront, and bumped into the cold air, it will readily turned to snow and notjust on the hills. so if we look at that on the pressure chart, here it comes, you can see it is quite windy in the north and the west. so the snow will come in across south—west england, wales, northern ireland, north—west england, northern england generally and scotland and we have significant snow with height across scotland and northern england in particular. but as we go through saturday you can see it is a transient feature. it moves away and then we see some heavy rain coming in. so we have to make issues here. we could have transport problems with all of the snow across scotland. —— two issues. the snow that falls to lower—level is across the rest of england, wales and northern ireland will be replaced by some rain and that will be heavy enough to potentially have some standing water and localised flooding, so lots going on. keep in touch with the weather forecast this weekend. carol, just want to clear up weekend. carol, just want to clear up the christmas party, for clarity
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you were invited, let's get it straight, but you can't make it because you're working, is it true? yes, something else, matt is coming, though. that is something to look forward to. why are you smiling? we are looking forward to him. and you come mostly, carol, but we will miss you. i will see you next tuesday anyway, so that will be nice. there will be more drinks in the bar now.! laughter. graceful. see you later on. it's one of the biggest tests of our times — how are we going to pay for the care of our rapidly—ageing population, many of whom will have very complex needs? over the next two days as part of our who cares series, we'll be exploring how other countries have tried to solve the problem, and ease the burden on elderly people and their families. today, graham satchell reports from germany, where everyone pays into an insurance scheme which is set aside just for care needs. one, and up. two, and up.
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three, and up. four, and up. a care home in berlin, and 91—year—old susanne englemann is having physiotherapy. susanne is here because she had a fall at home and broke her hip. i was in my bathroom and my knees failed. ijust broke down. speaks german. frau englemann pays for her room and food herself, but her care, 700 euros a month, is financed from a national insurance scheme. care is expensive. people cannot afford it themselves. they need these care insurances to finance it. like the uk, germany has an ageing population. the old care system here was means tested and run by local authorities, but in the early ‘90s germany changed the funding. it goes like this — everybody pays 2.5% of their salary
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into a central pot. it's shared — you pay half, your employer pays half. retired people pay the full amount. critically, the new system gets rid of means testing. so care is given not on your ability to pay but solely on your need. the "flagger versicherung," or long—term care fund, is centrally run, ring—fenced and largely popular. i have an old father. he is nearly 80. it's a good life for him. you pay now, you will have then — if you're old, you will be sure that you will be taken care of. everybody cares for anybody, that's ok. you're happy with that? yes. heike, can you show me some pictures of your husband? of course i can. probably the most successful part of the german system — it pays family members to care for their relatives at home. heike schmidt used the funds to look
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after her husband who'd been diagnosed with cancer. everybody who has paid into this fund, he has the right to get money out to get support from the system. do you think you would have been able to look after your husband at home if you hadn't had money from the insurance scheme? it would be very difficult, very difficult. there are criticisms of the german system. the most common that the amount each person has to pay keeps going up. it'll rise to 3% of someone's salary, for example, next year. back at the care home, frau engleman's recovery is going well. i wanted to learn and recover. and you're looking forward to going home? yes, i'm trying — i want to go home. and when she does, susanne englemann will continue to be supported by the fund. the germans have been persuaded that, to care for their elderly, they all need to pay.
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graham satchell, bbc news, berlin. when you hear an individual story like that it puts it in perspective. it is fascinating to see how different countries do things which you always suspect we have done it this way and that is the way it is done. tomorrow, our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes will be reporting from japan, which has the world's oldest population, with more than a quarter of its citizens over 65. that is really another case study about how we could try and make some changes to the way we do things in this country. yes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. a man arrested near an entrance to the houses of parliament yesterday has been detained under the mental health act. police say the 29—year—old was tasered after running
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towards officers. he is now in hospital and the incident is not being treated as terrorism. a teenager killed in greenwich over the weekend has been named by police. 18—year—old aron warren died after being stabbed on saturday evening. a 17—year—old who was arrested has been released. children who don't identify as hetrosexual are more likely to sufferfrom depression and self—harm. that's according to a study by university college london which found the decline in mental health started when children were as young as 10 and worsened through adolescence. researchers say early interventions may be useful to prevent and treat any challenges. the founder of a club dedicated to getting girls in hackney playing football has been recognised for her work. katee hui set up hackney laces when she couldn't find a club for girls in her community who wanted to play football. she has now helped hundreds both on and off the pitch. i don't see myself as special.
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i just... the way that i look at it is, i would hope that people in any community would see that, like, we should be active parts of our community. and if there's something you could esaily fix, or play a part of, or bring people together, why wouldn't you? let's take a look at the travel situation now. starting with the tubes, there are minor delays on the bakerloo line currently but looking good elsewhere at the moment. 0n the roads, this is the northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. it's slow from the woolwich road flyover. in finchley, traffic on the north circular is slow westbound into the a1 at henly‘s corner. 0n the m25, anticlockwise traffric remains slow towards junction 28 for the a12 following a collision earlier. and pentonville road remains closed eastbound from claremont square to islington high street for gas main work. now, the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather cloudy start this morning, but gradually that cloud will start to break up and we'll see some sunny spells developing.
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it is, however, going to feel rather chilly. now, we have a south—easterly breeze. on that we could see one or two spots of light rain and drizzle to start with this morning. many places not seeing that at all, though. sunny spells developing. the temperature today on the cool side, between six and nine celsius. now, overnight tonight, still some patchy cloud, but again that will break up. some lengthy clear spells. and under the clearer skies, the temperature will drop down into low—single—figures celsius. we could see a little bit of frost first thing on thursday morning. the minimum between one and three celsius. now, that south—easterly breeze is going to continue to strengthen. it is going to be quite a chilly breeze through thursday especially. 0n the thermometer, temperatures saying six or seven celsius. but factor in the south—easterly breeze, it's going to feel much colder through the course of tomorrow. a chilly day for friday, but less of a breeze, so it perhaps won't feel quite as raw as tomorrow. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to steph and dan. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: a gunman is on the run after killing at least three people and wounding many more at a popular christmas market in strasbourg. police in the french city say they are treating the incident as a terror attack and that the suspect was already deemed a security risk. a number of weapons, including grenades, were found at his home yesterday after a police search. joining us now from the city is ben freeman, who was put on lockdown at a local bar for several hours during the incident. good morning to you. thank you very much forjoining us. can you tell us a bit about what happened?” much forjoining us. can you tell us a bit about what happened? i can tell you what i witnessed, which wasn't an awful lot. i had spent the
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day wandering around christmas market, and we wandered back to this bar around market, and we wandered back to this bararound 7:30pm, market, and we wandered back to this bar around 7:30pm, through the main city centre. and then at about 8pm i got a message from a friend saying that something had happened and that... to be careful, and about two minutes after that, the bar manager shouted that she was locking the bar down, the doors were going to be closed, and then ten minutes later she said that we all had to move upstairs, and close off all the lights. there was probably 60 or 70 of us all trooped upstairs in this bar, and that lasted until about 11pm last night. gosh, that must have been really scary. how did you feel, and did you get much information from anybody, from the police, or anybody? the bar manager
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told us she was in contact with police and it was the police who told her to get everyone upstairs and to make sure the doors were locked and things like that, and that nobody could leave. so she was giving updates as and when she got them, but as you can imagine, it was a little bit chaotic. we didn't really know what was happening outside, beyond what we could read. and then when you did leave, what was it like van? luckily, we had come back to a bar that was only probably 100m from where i lived, so it was a sort of happy accident, really, that we only had to walk around this corner and we were all back at home straightaway. but there we re back at home straightaway. but there were quite a few people around who had been let out from bars at that time. but there were enough people
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around that the police had deemed it safe enough to leave. i bet you were relieved when you got back to your home. thank you so much for talking to us on breakfast. we really appreciate that. ben freeman was involved in the attack in strasbourg last night in a locked down in the local bar. there is speculation that theresa may is on the brink of a leadership challenge, as anger grows over her handling of brexit negotiations. senior conservative mps have told the bbc that the chairman of the party's1922 committee has now received 48 letters from backbenchers — enough to trigger a vote. earlier we spoke to the justice secretary, david gauke, who told us he wouldn't be surprised if a leadership contest was called, but he would be disappointed. she's not going to be able to succeed if, rather than going out there, negotiating with her counterparts, she's having to deal with a confidence vote here. we'll see whether that
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happens or not, but i think that is unwelcome, and i think it would be seen by the public as being self—indulgent, especially if this — if we actually had leadership election. i think at this point in our history, given the circumstances we're in, the challenges that the government faces, i really don't think that is a responsible course of action. and just to let you know that 0wen paterson has been speaking on radio 4and he paterson has been speaking on radio 4 and he was asked about the letter he had sent in to sir graham brady, he had sent in to sir graham brady, he said he had handed it to sir graham brady, and it appeared they did not send the number over the 48 required, because if that had happened, sir graham brady would have announced that news straightaway. we will try and get across that for you, and if they are near that threshold, officially it is in the high 20s, but we don't know exactly the number and owen paterson has been speaking about
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that on the bbc. it is a story that is very much developing. the body of british backpacker grace millane has been formally identified and returned to herfamily, who say that their whole world has been turned upside down. the 22—year—old went missing from a hostel in auckland on 1 december. detectives in new zealand say are still piecing together exactly what happened to her, and building a timeline of events. a 26—year—old man was charged earlier this week with her murder and will appear in court again next month. debt charities are warning that some of the poorest families in the country will be left relying on food banks over christmas because of universal credit. from today, all new benefit claimants will be signed up to the scheme. many people already on universal credit have complained about their payments being reduced and delayed. the government says there is no reason for people to be without money over christmas, because advance benefit payments are available. that brings you up—to—date with the
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news. a great—grandmother in australia is thought to have become the world's oldest skydiver, at the grand age of 102. irene 0'shea, who firstjumped out of a plane to mark her 100th birthday, completed a 14,000—foot tandem dive to raise money for charity. she doesn't even look scared. pretty impressive, that. that is brilliant. it doesn't even look like it remotely bothered her. just a normal day's activity. one thing in the papers i wanted to pick up, as well. there has been some research done by university in new zealand, and they say that james bond university in new zealand, and they say thatjames bond has university in new zealand, and they say that james bond has a university in new zealand, and they say thatjames bond has a drinking problem. they look at all the drinks he has had over 24 films spanning 1952 to 2016, they say he has been
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drinking one hundreds of times in those films, and the report is that mi6 should be a more responsible employer by referring james bond to work counselling or psychiatric services. they also say that m should no longer offerjames bond drinks ina should no longer offerjames bond drinks in a workplace setting. so shaken but not slurred.” drinks in a workplace setting. so shaken but not slurred. i haven't got anything to give you, but well done. sally is here with the sport. and we are talking a lot about mo salah's goal, because it was hugely significant, but what about alisson's save at the end? and he hadn't been that all that for most of the game. he hadn't been troubled at all, to have that level of concentration and still be on it
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right at the end is really something. both liverpool and tottenham have made it to the last 16 of the champions league, and who other than mo salah to score the goal that would send last year's finalists through and secure second place in their group? jo lynskey has more. jubilation in the champions league comes with a test of the heart rate, but liverpool and spurs have both found a way to keep their european beat going. it would always feel daunting for tottenham in the nou camp, even with lionel messi left on barcelona's bench. when this team rest their greatest, though, new superstars just step forward. this is 21—year—old 0usmane dembele, running rings around spurs' optimism. a goal that punctured their plan, but not spurs' belief. soon the urgency to convert those chances increased, with news from italy. the north london mission was to match or better the result of inter milan, so when they equalised against psv, spurs now had to score. it was an extra layer of tension that would finally bring out their clinical streak. and there is the goal they have been looking for, tottenham hotspur. a finish from lucas moura had sent
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spurs through to the knockout. after three champions league games, they had just a single point. this was a night in the campaign where they turned it around. the anfield patchwork knew liverpool's hopes were on a thread. they had to beat napoli 1—0, or by two clear goals. luckily, mo salah makes everything look simple. their route through to the knockout came through the legs of the goalkeeper. but liverpool's own keeper made an equally important intervention. with this point—blank save, alisson stopped last—minute heartbreak. this was not the vintage way liverpool usually do european nights, but one at least some supporters won't forget. so great news for both liverpool and spurs. they will both be in monday's last—16 draw. lets hear from liverpool managerjurgen klopp.
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i'm still full of adrenaline. i could fill it in bottles — bottles again. so this game was just amazing. it was outstanding, unbelievable. the boys played... their whole heart on the pitch. i'm not sure of the right saying, but it's just — with each part of their body, they were in that game. is just about it from me, for a very special reason. sir graham brady needs to get to 48 letters, to trigger a no—confidence vote in theresa may, and we understand in the last few minutes it has been confirmed that threshold has been reached. let's go to our political
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correspondent in downing street. this is all happening in the last 60 seconds or so. what more can you tell us? this has been confirmed, a vote of no—confidence in the prime minister this evening. that has been confirmed by the only source that knows these things. 48 letters been reached. there will be the first phase in a leadership challenge against the prime minister tonight. a few minutes ago, five minutes ago, out of that door came the chief whip, having seen the prime minister this morning, he left in a car very quickly, didn't say anything at all, but clearly that news has now got through. the prime minister has been told, as far as i am aware, and she will now face this challenge. we have to be absolutely clear about this straightaway. when this happens, there is a vote of no—confidence in the prime minister, amongst all of the mp5. it takes 48 to trigger it, but 150 mps to vote for no—confidence in the prime minister, half of the parliamentary
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party, she is ousted. if she wins she will be safe for another year. if she loses, she will have to contest the leadership contest. so what happens next? what will happen is if she loses this vote she will have to step aside as prime minister wants a leadership contest is arranged. the field is an open to other candidates to join. a whole plethora of mps are interested in thejob. what will then happen is they go through a series of hustings, of meetings, putting their case to fellow mps. fellow mps will then with a list down to the final two. 0nce then with a list down to the final two. once they have reached the final two, the membership as a whole get to decide who the next conservative leader is. but of course, they are also deciding who the next prime minister is. we should bear in mind that downing street are saying today the conservative mps that if there is a
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leadership contest this will undermine the prime minister in negotiations with the european union, but also because there is no one clear candidate or successor, the whole process might have to be undertaken. if that is the case, it may not be completed until mid—or late january. we are meant to be leaving the european union on 29 march, so they are saying that would increase the risk of no deal or no exit. as far as we are concerned, it looks as though she is prepared to fight on but to warn them that they risk brexit itself if they try to oust her. just to clarify, because you are telling us earlier what a busy day the prime minister has, how does this affect things in terms of my ministers questions, the trips to ireland and a potential meeting she was due to have there? what happens with regards to those now? well, this is obviously breaking news which has been confirmed that 48 mps have sent in letters of no confidence in the prime minister, and that confidence vote will be taking place this evening. i
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imagine, buti taking place this evening. i imagine, but i don't know, that may well undermine her ability to travel to ireland and talk to the irish prime minister, leo varadkar. she can't duck prime minister's questions, she will have to take on a very potentially hostile house of commons, because jeremy corbyn a very potentially hostile house of commons, becausejeremy corbyn will be on the other side, criticising her, but also people on her own side, allegedly, who have been denouncing her and who want her removed from office. thank you very much for that this morning. that is the breaking news we can bring you on bbc breakfast this morning that the tory leadership contest has been triggered this morning. enough mps have now sent letters to trigger that, so there will now be a vote of confidence, a secret ballot that happens. as ian was saying, that will need 158 vote against theresa may in order to take the leadership from her. if she wins, she will of course stay as leader and can't be challenged again for a year. if she
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doesn't win, then there will be other potential leaders put forward, and theresa may will not be able to stand in that vote for that. and all of this on a day when there is prime minister's questions and theresa may was due to be going to ireland for a series of meetings to try and talk about negotiating the backstop arrangement with the eu. we will try and bring you the latest on it as we get it. this has literally broken in the last four or five minutes or so and it is unsure what the prime minister's schedule will look like for the rest of the day. we will try and clarify that and speak to a few more guests a little bit later on, we we re more guests a little bit later on, we were scheduled to speak to iain duncan smith just after 8am this morning. that is our breaking news on breakfast today, that they will bea on breakfast today, that they will be a leadership... there have been enough letters sent to sir graham brady, 48 letters, to trigger a leadership contest in the conservative party. convicted paedophile russell bishop was yesterday finally jailed for life for the murders of two schoolgirls 32 years ago. the so—called "babes in the wood" killer will serve a minimum of 36 years after being found guilty at a second trial on monday.
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bishop, who was aged 20 in 1986, killed nine—year—olds nicola fellows and karen hadaway in a woodland den in brighton. in a minute we will talk to the detective who took over investigating the case five years ago. detective superintendentjeff riley joins us now from our brighton studio. thank you so much for coming on to talk to us about this this morning. i will ask you about your personal views and those of the police in a moment. what was it like for you and those investigating the case for such a long time to see the reaction from families yesterday? it has been a truly fascinating case, you know. this is a case that has been ongoing for 32 years. we have been over the yea rs, for 32 years. we have been over the yea rs , we for 32 years. we have been over the yea rs, we have for 32 years. we have been over the years, we have done reviews, in 2012 we got a significant friendly breakthrough, we then started this new investigation, i met with families in 2013 and i said, look,
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we have something here, i think it's positive but you need to be patient. they have been patient and it was just wonderful to be in court yesterday and to see the reaction when russell bishop was finally sentenced. in terms of the police case against him, give us an idea how long it has been going on for and the steps are supposed to getting our where he will face life in jail. obviously the 1986 investigation ended a trial when he was found not guilty in 1987. the law back and didn't allow us to consider any kind of form of retrial. the law changed in 2005 when double jeopardy was brought in. we did a review in 2006 and we had more evidence. we have the 1990 fence he had committed at that stage. itjust fence he had committed at that stage. it just wasn't fence he had committed at that stage. itjust wasn't enough to take it back to the court of appeal under double jeopardy. you have it back to the court of appeal under doublejeopardy. you have to have new, compelling evidence that is reliable and we didn't think we had
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it at that stage. there are has been massive advances in dna over the last three or four years and as of the result in 2012 we then had a positive forensic link with russell bishop and that was key in the original investigation. it remained key in this one. and that one gave us key in this one. and that one gave us the springboard to start the reinvestigation, take the matter to the dvb, when the agreement to go to the dvb, when the agreement to go to the court of appeal and now he is rightly convicted for these dreadful crimes. there is an added element of this, he accused barrie fellows and he has had to deal with that for many years. yes, barry gave evidence. he was cross—examined on this at court. anybody who saw that cross—examination couldn't have failed to be moved by that reaction. he was strong, he was determined, he was dignified. he answered questions. russell bishop lasted one and a half hours and then he asked
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for a break and refuse to come back to the witness box. so that sums up the character of russell bishop i think. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. we have some breaking news this morning. the uk prime minister will face a vote of in her leadership, that vote will ta ke of in her leadership, that vote will take place this evening. there will bea take place this evening. there will be a secret ballot where her leadership will be in question. if she wins the ballot, she will stay as leader and it can't be challenged for another year. if she loses it, the party will be looking for a new leader. it does come down essentially to whether she can get the support of her party. if she doesn't get over 50% of the vote tonight, she is gone. yes. potentially it is a huge day not just for brexit going forward, but what happens to the conservative party and the direction over the next weeks and months as well so huge day ahead and we will have the
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letters from downing street with ian watson and we are speaking to iain duncan smith as well. also important is what's happening the weather. good morning. today we start off on a cool note in the east with a touch of frost for parts of eastern england. it is a cool start for the north—east of scotland. for the rest of us it is fairly cloudy and we have a weak weather front producing some rain in the west. through the course of the day it will brighten up across much of england and east wales. we will see some sunshine across parts of north—east scotland and the odd glimmerfor northern north—east scotland and the odd glimmer for northern ireland. another feature of the weather is the wind. very gusty wind for western scotland, the irish seacoast and also the west of wales. if you are travelling, bear that in mind. through this evening and overnight, under clear skies, temperatures fall away, we have a widespread frost, we
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have a weak weather front producing some splashes of rain in western scotla nd some splashes of rain in western scotland and then by the end of the night a new weather front is coming our way, introducing night a new weather front is coming ourway, introducing rain in night a new weather front is coming our way, introducing rain in the west. it will be windy and it will bea west. it will be windy and it will be a cold night. tomorrow morning, we are looking at a frosty start, sunny skies to start the day, variable amount of clout, the weather front still with us producing rain in the western extremities of the uk as well as you can see across parts of northern ireland. and then we are also looking at some sunshine. now, the other feature of the weather is some wind. it is going to be particularly windy with exposure in the west, so western scotland, irish seacoast line, west wales, but even inland if you are exposed to the wind these temperatures might be six or seven of the thermometer but in the wind it will be closer to freezing, just above orjust it will be closer to freezing, just above or just below. it will be closer to freezing, just above orjust below. as we head into friday it is a cold start with frost around. afair friday it is a cold start with frost around. a fair bit of sunshine, light wind, the weather front of the
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west. it will bring cloud with it and also some splashes of rain. temperatures on friday will be quite low. these are the maximum afternoon temperatures we are looking at. so what's going to happen overnight friday into saturday, obviously the temperature by night continues to fall. so, as this rain comes in from the west, moving eastwards, it comes into the cold air, then it will turn to snow and across parts of scotland and northern england we could see some significant snowfall. we will also see snow at low levels and not just in scotland and also northern england. so here it comes, you can see the snow falling in the south—west, wales, parts of the midlands, northern ireland, but it will be fairly transient for many. you might wake up to some snow but thenit you might wake up to some snow but then it will be replaced by rain through the day across england, wales and northern ireland and that rain could be heavy enough to create some issues with localised flooding. so the sequence running through
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again is the snow falling for some of us on saturday morning, we will wa ke of us on saturday morning, we will wake up to this covering of snow. of us on saturday morning, we will wake up to this covering of snowm sounds like it's going to be fairly troublesome. thank you very much. see you in a bit. breaking news this morning, we have been mentioning yesterday and overnight that the conservative party was on the threshold of getting 15% of the parliamentary party to ask for a vote of no—confidence in the leader theresa may and in the last 15 minutes it has been confirmed. sir graham brady has been confirmed. sir graham brady has confirmed he has received the 48 letters. so now they will be a vote of confidence in the prime minister, theresa may, which will take place tonight. a press release has been put out by sir graham brady which saysin put out by sir graham brady which says in accordance with the rules are says in accordance with the rules a re battle says in accordance with the rules are battle will be held between six and on wednesday in curricular in 14 in the house of commons, —— in
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committee room 14. and an announcement will be made as soon as possible in the evening. we will find out this evening whether theresa may will remain as leader of the conservative party. she needs to get at least 158 votes against her for her to be knocked off the leadership. so that is around 15%, isn't it? yellow. -- yes. if she manages to get through the vote, then she will remain as leader and her leadership cannot be challenged for another year after that. if she doesn't get through the ballot, and it is voted... if it is a vote of no—confidence against her, she will step down as leader and they will be looking for another one. at which point i am sure we will get lots of people who will position themselves to be part of it. in an election will take place for a new leader and she can't take place in that. hopefully we will speak with sir graham brady a little bit later in the programme. and iain duncan smith. and we will bring you up—to—date with any other news.
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there will be a vote of confidence in the prime minister, theresa may, taking place tonight, as steph has said, a secret ballot, and if 50% of members don't agree that she should be in then she is gone and that is the end of that. yes, so, there is a lot happening. we will be talking, getting reaction on this, we will go to ian watson and laura kuenssberg says sir liam brady will be heading to speak to us shortly, and iain duncan smith himself faced a vote of no confidence when he was leader, leader of the opposition, so we will be finding out exactly what he thinks of this. also, where does this leave us with the timing of things now, with brexit, ian watson has said brexit would essentially be put on hold if theresa may loses the leadership. a number of questions, yesterday she was in the hague, then berlin and brussels and today the
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plan was to a prime minister's questions and then fly to ireland for a series of meetings, but as ian watson has told us, the schedule might have changed, because of rumours early on that sir graham brady might have asked for a meeting with the prime minister this afternoon, and now we know that might have changed as well because the press release has come out and the press release has come out and the threshold has been met. so what we can tell you definitively today is that there will be the confidence vote which will take place in the commons tonight and if theresa may doesn't have the backing of 50% of her party, then she will be gone as leader of the conservatives. if she wins it, as we are saying, she has a guaranteed year in the job to try to bring through the things she was trying to do, renegotiating the deal with the eu, but it could change this evening, so as you can imagine, there is much for her and her party to consider over the next few hours. yes, we will bring that for you after 8am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news,
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i'm alice salfield. a teenage boy has been charged with murder after a 15—year—old was stabbed to death outside a chicken shop. jay hughes was found injured outside morley‘s in bellingham last month. a 17—year—old from penge, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was arrested on monday. a man arrested near an entrance to the houses of parliament yesterday has been detained under the mental health act. police say the 29—year—old was tasered after running towards officers. he is now in hospital and the incident is not being treated as terrorism. children who don't identify as hetrosexual are more likely to sufferfrom depression and self—harm. that's according to a study by university college london which found the decline in mental health started when children were as young as 10 and worsened through adolescence. researchers say early interventions may be useful to prevent and treat any challenges. the founder of a club dedicated to getting girls in hackney playing
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football has been named this year's bbc london's sport "unsung hero". katee hui set up hackney laces when she couldn't find a club for girls in her community. she has now helped hundreds both on and off the pitch. i don't see myself as special. i just... the way that i look at it is, i would hope that people in any community would see that, like, we should be active parts of our community. and if there's something you could esaily fix, or play a part of, or bring people together, why wouldn't you? let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes: there are still some minor delays on the bakerloo line at the moment. heading into palmers green, westbound traffic on the north circular is slow into green lanes from the a10. also problems too for those travelling northbound on the blackwall tunnel. it's slow on the southern approach from the woolwich road flyover. traffic on the m23 is down to two lanes southbound atjunction 9 for gatwick, with delays back towards the m25. and pentonville road remains closed
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eastbound from claremont square to islington high street for gas main work. now, the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather cloudy start this morning, but gradually that cloud will start to break up and we'll see some sunny spells developing. it is, however, going to feel rather chilly. now, we have a south—easterly breeze. on that we could see one or two spots of light rain and drizzle to start with this morning. many places not seeing that at all, though. those sunny spells developing. the temperature today on the cool side, between six and nine celsius. now, overnight tonight, still some patchy cloud, but again that will break up. some lengthy clear spells. and under the clearer skies, the temperature will drop down into low—single—figures celsius. we could see a little bit of frost first thing on thursday morning. the minimum between one and three celsius. now, that south—easterly breeze is going to continue to strengthen. it is going to be quite a chilly breeze through thursday especially. 0n the thermometer, temperatures saying six or seven celsius. but factor in the south—easterly breeze, it's going to feel much colder through the course of tomorrow. a chilly day for friday, but less of a breeze, so it perhaps won't feel quite as raw as tomorrow.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and steph mcgovern. 0ur headlines today. in the last 20 minutes, it's been confirmed theresa may is to face a leadership challenge after enough mps backed a vote of no confidence. a city on alert, a gunman on the run after at least three people are killed and a dozen injured at a christmas market in strasbourg. i'll be looking at the market reaction to this morning's announcement. drama in the champions league as liverpool and tottenham make it through to the last 16 — just! this was the moment alisson
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saved his side at anfield. if napoli had scored, liverpool were out. a late draw in barcelona was enough for spurs. it isa it is a cold and frosty started the day in the east eyebright one, for the rest of us, it is cloudy, brightening up for some but there is snow in the forecast for the weekend. more in 15 minutes. good morning. it hasjust gone good morning. it has just gone 8am. we are aware people are joining us all the time this morning. let's bring you the news that has broken injust the last few minutes now that the prime minister theresa may will face a vote of no confidence in her leadership. the threshold of 48 letters needed to trigger a vote has now been reached. we've had confirmation from sir graham brady, chair of the 1922 committee, in just the last few minutes. let's show you that letter now sent by graham brady. he said, "the threshold of 15% of the parliamentary party seeking a vote of confidence in the leader of the conservative party has been exceeded. in accordance with the rules, a ballot will be held between 1800 and 2000 on wednesday 12th december
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in committee room 14 of the house of commons. the votes will be counted immediately afterwards and an announcement will be made a soon as possible in the evening. arrangements for the announcement will be released later today. graham brady, i believe, making his way to college green, and he will be speaking to us shortly in the programme, and we will find out how many programme, and we will find out how ma ny letters programme, and we will find out how many letters he received and what happens next. let's get the very latest now from our political correspondent iain watson. he is outside downing street this morning. we knew at 6am there was potential for this to happen morning. we knew at 6am there was potentialfor this to happen but this change is an awful lot of what happens today and potentially what happens today and potentially what happens today and potentially what happens to the future of theresa may. run us through because many people will be switching on now. run
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us people will be switching on now. run us through what happens from this moment and in the next few hours for theresa may. this is absolutely huge, in12 hours, theresa may. this is absolutely huge, in 12 hours, we will find out if theresa may is still basically going to be prime minister, if she can continue to occupy number ten downing st. her fate can continue to occupy number ten downing st. herfate will can continue to occupy number ten downing st. her fate will be decided today. and the reason that is the case is because there is going to be the vote of no confidence amongst their own mps, between six and 8pm tonight. to give you an idea of the inner workings, i saw the chief whip come out at about 7:30am and i called graham brady who you are going to be talking to very soon and he can sadly threshold of 48 letters from mps had been reached, calling for a vote of no—confidence, 15% of the parliamentary party but in order for theresa may to be ousted, you need to get half of the parliamentary party, 158 mp5, a higher threshold. if her internal opponents failed to reach the threshold, failed to get 158, then
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she is safe for another year. she can decide when to leave, and she cannot be challenged again for another year which is after the brexit date. but the question is whether if there is an unofficial threshold, whether she would feel if 100 mp5 threshold, whether she would feel if 100 mps did not back her, whether it was time to step aside but we won't get the answer to that until after 8pm. if her opponents are successful, what happens then is that she is not allowed to take part in the subsequent leadership contest, the field is open to other candidates. there does not seem to bea candidates. there does not seem to be a clear successor so mps would whittle this down to the final two and then there would be a vote of the whole membership. what downing street are saying today is that the whole process could take towards until the end of january whole process could take towards until the end ofjanuary and it is worth asking graham brady about that. it could take until the end of january but we are supposed to be leaving the european union at the end of march which gives very little time for alternatives so they are saying the risk of no deal or no brexit would increase as a result of
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a leadership contest. that tends to suggest to me that she is at least in the early stages going to fight this and argue it is against the interests of the country for her to be ousted at this time. she's going to have to make a speech to conservative mps tonight before the vote and that will be the most important speech of her political career. you have spelt it out beautifully, how important a day this is for theresa may. do you think the time and the chronology you just mentioned, january and then what we know will happen at the end of march, do you think that might be what saves her from of march, do you think that might be what saves herfrom ludik —— losing the leadership tonight? that is right because what we definitely know is that very few people are impressed so far with the deal he negotiated with the european union, especially the issue of what is called the irish backstop, the way to avoid a hard border in ireland. 100 conservative mps told the bbc they would not support her in that vote. that is quite different from
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saying they want to oust her as prime minister because at the moment, she is going around european capitals, trying to get some more reassu ra nces capitals, trying to get some more reassurances she can bring back to backbenchers. some people are sceptical she will get the reassurance required but she is going to the european council tomorrow, she won't be ousted immediately as prime minister no matter the result tonight so she will still do that but downing street says this will undermine her ata street says this will undermine her at a crucial time in negotiations. those who want to get a brexit deal are am “— those who want to get a brexit deal are am —— are undermining their own vectors, that is the argument that will be put. —— own objectives. but some people who voted to remain think somebody else can do a better job in the negotiations or whether she has run out of road to some extent and that will be concentrating minds. also, this is politics is that although everybody talks about the national interest, don't forget there's a range of different people who would rather occu py different people who would rather occupy number ten downing street so while there might be public support of the prime minister, it is a secret ballot tonight and they might
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decide that they think it is time for her to go. we are not absolutely sure how the vote will go or whether she will think that even if she loses the support of 100 mp5, whether it is worth continuing then even though technically according to the rules she has the ability to do so. this all coming at a time when parliament normally slows down in the build—up to christmas! it is a huge vote for the conservative party today and for the nation. i am well aware that this has all been thrown at you this morning and things are changing by the minute, almost by the second at the moment. do we know what happens to the prime minister's day today? she had a huge day yesterday in the hake and in berlin and in brussels with these crucial meetings. today it is prime minister's questions and she is due to be in ireland but i imagine that
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ta kes to be in ireland but i imagine that takes priority over all of that now. 0ne takes priority over all of that now. one thing she can't avoid because she is prime minister is prime ministers questions. that will be an interesting spectacle in itself because obviously she will face criticism from the opposition, from jeremy corbyn but also she will be there in the knowledge that sitting behind her, allegedly on her own side, is at least 48 mps who want her gone and may be many more. as i say, the most difficult speech of her political career tonight ahead of that crucial confidence vote but prime minister's questions will not be easy either. lots of people talk about her being resilient and she will have to draw on those reservoirs of resilience today. i don't know about the leo varadkar meeting as yet but i would bet my bottom dollar that it will be postponed just as the vote was on her deal because it would be difficult to make a trip to dublin and address mps, to argue, to fight for your own job. and address mps, to argue, to fight for your ownjob. i and address mps, to argue, to fight foryour ownjob. i imagine that and address mps, to argue, to fight for your ownjob. i imagine that is off, and she can talk to him in any case at the european council in brussels if she is successful tonight. but inside there, they will be preparing a battle plan for the
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prime minister. much to think about. something tells me we will be back with you very shortly! don't go anywhere. just to reiterate, if you just tuned in, in the last few minutes, the challenge to theresa may's position, coming into question, after the required 48 letters have now been received did now have the no—confidence which will happen this evening. in the last few minutes, politicians have been tweeting their support for the prime minister. james brokenshire said "strongly support @theresa—may to continue as leader of @conservatives and prime minister. now is not the time for this distraction and even more uncertainty. we need to get behind the prime minister in the best interests of our country." jeremy hunt said, "i am backing @theresa—may tonight. being pm most difficultjob imaginable right now and the last thing the country needs is a damaging and long leadership contest. brexit was never going to be easy but she is the best person to make sure we actually leave the eu on march 29." that touches on what iain watson was
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staying in downing street that one of the things that may well be in her favour is the chronology because essentially, and we will hopefully speak to sir essentially, and we will hopefully speakto sirgraham essentially, and we will hopefully speak to sir graham brady shortly, it may well take until the end of january to sort this out and all of these negotiations are ongoing. the end of march is the deadline and is looming large. but this time tomorrow we will definitely know whether theresa may will remain as the leader of the conservative party. it is ten minutes past eight. another big story breaking overnight. a manhunt is under way in strasbourg after a gunman opened fire at a christmas market, killing at least three people and injuring 12. the authorities have begun a terrorism investigation in the french city after an earlier police search uncovered a number of weapons at the suspect‘s home, including grenades. let's get the very latest now from our europe correspondent damian grammaticas, who's in the city.
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iimagine it i imagine it has been a very busy night for the police. do we have any more information? yes, it was because they sealed off this old, historic central area of strasbourg when the attack happened at about eight p m last night. everyone who was here at the christmas market, thousands of people in bars and restau ra nts, thousands of people in bars and restaurants, were all confined inside ina restaurants, were all confined inside in a lockdown. that was lifted in the very early hours of the morning so people have gone back home from here so public transport is running again this morning. but we do have hundreds of security personnel, police and soldiers now, working in the city on the manhunt to try to find this individual, who is identified as a 29—year—old local man from strasbourg who exchanged via at least fight —— exchanged fire at least twice with security forces and it is thought he was wounded in
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the left before he jumped in a taxi disappeared. the hunt is continuing and people have been told to remain vigilant as they go about their business today. thank you for joining us. damian grammaticas in strasbourg this morning. we will continue to bring you any developments on the news that are the threshold of 48 letters which trigger the leadership challenge has been reached for theresa may. the vote will happen this evening between 6pm and 8pm. theresa may will be making a statement at 8:30am so we will bring you that. she will be live outside number ten, and she will give a statement on the vote, which will be happening this evening, the no—confidence vote, 48 letters calling for a contest were delivered to sir graham brady so the vote will happen tonight and we will have the result tonight and find out whether theresa may will remain leader. a huge day for the prime minister because as iain watson said earlier, if she does not get the support of 50% of the party, that's it, job over under the conservative
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party will be looking for a new leader and new prime minister. however, if she does get the support, she will remain as leader and they won't be able to challenge that for a year. hopefully we will hear from the that for a year. hopefully we will hearfrom the prime minister at 8:30am, live on bbc breakfast and we will still hopefully speak to iain duncan smith and we are chasing sir graham brady, the chairman of the 1922 committee, the man everyone has been looking out for the last 24 hours or so to see if the announcement would come. he has been getting the post. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning, lots going on for the next few days, windy in the west for the next few days especially with exposure and by the time we get overnight friday into saturday, some of us will see some snow. today, for many, a cloudy picture. in the east, first thing, where we have had clear skies by night, a touch of frost and brighter skies. they will extend across much of england, and eastern wales by the time we get into the afternoon. we also have a weak weather front
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draped across western scotland, parts of northern ireland. it might clip in north—west england and west wales. it is producing some fairly light rain but very windy here. temperatures as a result in double figures. for the rest of us, more or less where they should be at this stage in december. this evening and overnight under clear skies, more of a frost than the nightjust gone. we will also have a weak weather front in the west producing some rain but then another one comes in the south—west, introducing some heavy bursts of rain. it will be a cold night whichever way you look at it. through the course of tomorrow, we start off with variable cloud and we will see sunshine developing through the day. the weather front producing spots of rain across the channel islands and the isles of scilly and cornwall, and parts of wales for a time, northern ireland and the outer hebrides. still windy in the west but also in land. 0n hebrides. still windy in the west but also in land. on your thermometer, you might see six, seven or eight is a maximum temperature but in the wind, it will
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feel much colder, close to freezing possibly a bit less. that leads us into friday, which also starts off ona into friday, which also starts off on a cold and frosty note. there will be areas of cloud but equally areas of sunshine, wintry showers scooting up the coastline and then we have this rain still with us, petting up, if anything, towards the west. these are the maximum temperatures so we are looking at three orfour through temperatures so we are looking at three or four through the middle of the afternoon. by the time we get to the afternoon. by the time we get to the middle of the night, it will be much lower. what will happen over friday into saturday, is all of the rain will be pushing eastwards, bumping into the cold air and readily turning to snow, and not just on the hills. you can see that quite nicely in a pressure chart, still windy in the north—west, here comes the rain and the snow, ahead of that band of rain, significant snow on the heels of scotland and northern england but also some lying snow first thing on saturday morning at lower levels. transient snow that
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is across england and wales because we have got the next big lump of rain coming ourway, we have got the next big lump of rain coming our way, which could also prove to be problematic in that it may well lead to some localised flooding. lots going on with the weather at the moment. it is 8:16am. it is a movable feast for you this morning on bbc brea kfast, for you this morning on bbc breakfast, things are changing by the minute and the reason for this is at around about 7:40am, we had confirmation that sir graham brady, the chairman of the 1922 committee and the conservative party, the news we had been expecting, there were rumours overnight that there would bea rumours overnight that there would be a leadership challenge to theresa may, who is currently the prime minister but today could be the day where everything changes. we have had confirmation from sir graham brady, who says the threshold of 15% of the parliamentary party seeking a vote of confidence in the leader of the conservative party has been
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exceeded. because of this, in accordance with the rules, there will be a vote held, a secret vote held tonight between 6pm and 8pm in the house of commons. shortly after that, the votes will be counted and an announcement will be made as soon as possible this evening. so we will find out tonight whether theresa may will remain as leader. the secret ballot needs to get the support of more than 50% of the party in order to stay in the position and if she does not get that, she will have to leave as the leader and they will be looking for another one and then there is a lot of questions about what happens after that. we are talking about the man who has received all those letters of no confidence, sir graham brady. i think we can speak to him now. good morning. can you bring us up to speed with what is happening? i havejust read out your press release. what happens now? what happens now, given the threshold was reached during the course of yesterday, calling for a
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confidence vote to take place, it was then my responsibility to talk to the prime minister, which i did on the telephone last night, to consult her on how the process should be ordered and what the timetable for that might be. she was very keen that matters be resolved as quickly as is reasonably possible, which is very much in accordance with the party rules. we made the announcement early this morning. the prime minister will come and address conservative collea g u es come and address conservative colleagues at the 1922 committee meeting at 5pm and immediately after that meeting, a ballot will be held between 6pm and 8pm. then we will count as soon as we can and provide a result as soon as we can after that. 0bviously, a result as soon as we can after that. obviously, we have the intention of providing some clarity as quickly as is possible. can you explain again the number of
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votes the prime minister would need in order to stay as leader? it is a straightforward majority, 15% plus one is sufficient in the rules. it isa one is sufficient in the rules. it is a straightforward choice, either collea g u es is a straightforward choice, either colleagues say they have confidence in theresa may as leader of the conservative party or they don't have confidence in theresa may as leader of the conservative party and obviously, colleagues will be thinking that through during the course of the day. if she gets the backing of the party, what happens then? if she gets the backing of the party in this evening's vote, then there is a moratorium, no further vote of confidence can take place for a full 12 month period. you obviously spoke to the prime minister last night. what was her mood like? it is obviously a very stressful time for her at the moment. i don't want to be drawn in detail on a private conversation, but i think you can draw from the fa ct but i think you can draw from the fact that she was keen to move ahead
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swiftly, to resolve matters, you know, i think she was keen to get on with herjob and get on with the business of government and clearly, having massive speculation about whether or not there would be a confidence vote was unhelpful. also, having a protracted period between the announcement that a vote would ta ke the announcement that a vote would take place and the vote taking place would have been a very difficult time, not conducive to getting on with thejob. so i think it is entirely in keeping, i have to say, that she was keen to proceed swiftly and get matters resolved. if the prime minister does not get the backing of a majority of her party, there will then obviously be a leadership contest. what are the timelines for that? that i can't be quite so specific about. it is the
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case that if a leader of the party loses a confidence vote, we would then proceed to a leadership election, to choose a new leader of the party. the prime minister would remain prime minister in the meantime. but the timetable and the rules would have to be decided the 1922 executive committee and approved by the board of the conservative party. 0bviously, approved by the board of the conservative party. obviously, we would seek to settle that as quickly as possible should the need arise. parliamentary stages, where we try to whittle it down to two candidates can be conducted very quickly. but then conducting a postal ballot of members in the country inevitably would take a little longer. given the uncertainty we are in at the moment, with brexit, is this the right time for a leadership contest? you know, we heard david gauke saying earlier it is reckless to have a leadership contest are now. yeah, i mean, lots of my colleagues will quite rightly comment from
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their own perspective during the course of the day. i think in my position, now the process has been triggered, i've got to be scrupulously independent and neutral. i am the servant of my collea g u es neutral. i am the servant of my colleagues and the constitution of the conservative party. the rules as they are written require that a confidence vote now be held. we will do that as efficiently and smoothly and swiftly as we can and i... my principal responsibility is to make sure that process is scrupulously fairand sure that process is scrupulously fair and properly conducted.” appreciate your role in this but aren't you a bit embarrassed by the state of british politics at the moment? i may well come on your show on another occasion, on a day when i don't have an election or a ballot to run, when i could possibly expand on my own views about the state of british politics and i might have some sympathy with some of your
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observations, but today, i don't think it would be right for me to get drawn into that kind of commentary. i've got a very specific job to do. you know, i think the most important, the only important thing is i make sure it is done fairly and properly. sir graham brady, thank you for your time this morning. 0ther morning. other measures taken to try to prevent this, if there should have been signals that would have given signs of what he was may be thinking of doing. ship let's more uncertainty as the whole brexit
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process is concerned ? more uncertainty as the whole brexit process is concerned? yes, we were in brussels yesterday covering theresa may's visit, she was meeting eu leaders when we heard about this attack. we came here to cover this story in strasbourg and theresa may headed back to the uk. this morning, the news of the leadership challenge i think will be of concern for european leaders. they have spent more than a year negotiating with mrs may and her government, this brexit deal that is on the table, to work out the uk's exit from the eu. the concern will be this leadership challenge throws everything up in the air. the question will be if mrs may is ousted as leader, what happens to that agreement on the table. it is largely shaped by hair
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and that things she wanted to see, the red lines she had in that negotiation. what would happen if there were a different leader? they will be questions on the eu side they will not know for quite some time. in the meantime we are heading towards the deadline in march when the uk is due to leave the eu. that there needs to be, from the eu's point, an agreement in place to lock down all the legal and technical aspects of that. in the meantime, the eu has security, terrorism and migration on its agenda that it wa nts to migration on its agenda that it wants to be focusing on and it wants to get the brexit deal sorted out in time. i think this will be unwelcome news from the eu's point of view with all the other things it wants to focus its energies on doing. stage with us, you are watching bbc
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news where we are joined by viewers from the bbc news channel for our extended coverage of the news in the last hour that theresa may will be facing a leadership challenge. 48 members of her party have written to sirgraham members of her party have written to sir graham brady, the chairman of the 1922 to trigger that a vote of no—confidence. if she survives then no—confidence. if she survives then no one will be able to challenge her internally for a year and i think it isa internally for a year and i think it is a year internally for a year and i think it isa yearand internally for a year and i think it is a year and one day. if she were to go, if she were to lose or step down, there would be a leadership contest within her party. i think we we re contest within her party. i think we were going to go back to damien in strasberg. he went to strasberg following the shooting their last night. but in fact we are not. this is the scene live in downing street.
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live tv with breaking news, is not a lwa ys live tv with breaking news, is not always the easiest! we are expecting some sort of statement is obviously from downing street. i am told damien grammatical is is still there. you were in brussels yesterday, theresa may trying to get some sort of concession and rally support, but do we know what she was specifically asking european leaders to offer her to be able to try and avoid what is happening now in downing street to try to get her brexit deal through? what she said in brussels, what are we heard her say before we left was that she came out after her meetings with pe leaders and said she was seeking a legal reassurance or a legal commitment to ensure the most
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contentious measure in all the brexit agreements on the table, the measure to do with northern ireland and ways to ensure there are no new land border controls. she wants a commitment to ensure that would not be permanent if that ever came into force. that is because the big problem she has at home in parliament with her own mps and others, is that they do not like what they see in that withdrawal agreement because they think it locks the uk into arrangements with the eu, potentially in perpetuity and that is the measure she was trying to get changes made to. but the eu leaders' point of view was first of all, those measures had to be there to protect the peace process in ireland, but secondly, this text has been in the making for a year. it's taken a huge amount of
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negotiation and give and take on both sides to lock it down and they didn't want to reopen it. part of the reason for that as well, they have spent so much time and energy on this they want to get this deal through. their concern was theresa may coming back to brussels, touring european capitals and asking for new concessions, they would not want to be reopening it and opening up a whole new set of negotiations at this stage. the issue for eu leaders is to secure the withdrawal deal in time. they want it sorted out. now i think everything is on hold until we know the outcome of the leadership challenge in london. damien in strasberg, thank you very much. the british government in a state of more crisis, the leadership challenge will be held this evening at 6pm local time, 6pm until eight
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p:m.. 48 letters have been sent to sirgraham p:m.. 48 letters have been sent to sir graham brady, chairman of the 1922 committee as it is known here in great britain, the governing body of the tory party. 48 letters needed to trigger the no—confidence vote. she needs a majority of 158 to vote for her this evening to survive that. if she does survive that, then she would not be challenged for another year. you are looking at live pictures from downing street. the lector and has been put there. some very

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