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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 15, 2018 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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amazing experience. the judges have selected their viennese waltz for faye and giovanni. the former steps singer has also, of course, danced in the past. with every strictly series there has always been a mix of abilities, absolutely, but it is an entertainment show at the end of the day, and i think it has been really lovely to see everybody's individualjourney, and it has been amazing to be part of a brilliant series. this evening, all the finalists will be hoping for this kind of reaction from the judges, and more importantly, the public, because it is they who will be deciding who will lift this year's glitterball trophy. we will speak to a strictly super fan who says after tonight, their life is
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ruined for another year! good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: "brexit is in danger of getting stuck" — that's the warning from a senior cabinet minister who urges mps from all parties to come together. crucial talks to tackle global warming continue through the night as officials from 200 countries struggle to agree a deal. good morning. some extremely dangerous weather is forecast today.
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there are met office amber warning is out for freezing rain. that is extremely rare here in the uk but it causes widespread and treacherous lack ice. there are also warnings for heavy snow and blizzards because of storm deirdre which is also bringing in severe gales. more in 15 minutes —— treacherous black ice. a british sailor, rescued after her boat capsized during a round the world race, says she would do it all again in a heartbeat. crazy high five living, in scotland... livingston score five in just 1a minutes to thrash hearts late in the game, and there was a red card too. it's saturday the 15th december. after one of the most turbulent political weeks in decades, this morning there is a call for mps from all parties to work together to achieve brexit. the work and pensions secretary amber rudd — who is a close ally of the prime minister — says our exit from the eu is "in danger of getting stuck". writing in the daily mail she says it's time for politicians to "abandon outrage and accusations".
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let's speak to our political correspondent tom barton, who's in central london this morning. is this amber rudd acting as a potential leader, saying what she really thinks, or is it amber rudd warming us up on behalf of downing street? it is difficult to know for sure but we know that after a week in which a lot has happened, but very little has changed, we still know the prime minister does not have the support that she needs to get the deal, as it stands, through parliament. that is accepted by amber rudd this morning. the cabinet minister, a close ally of the prime minister saying that brexit is in danger of getting stuck. she is
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still publicly backing the prime minister's deal but she also says the government needs to reach out gci’oss the government needs to reach out across party lines to try and build across party lines to try and build a consensus around a deal that parliament can support. saying that parliament can support. saying that parliament needs to abandon outrage and accusation, and attempt to forge and accusation, and attempt to forge a consensus. but this morning, on the today programme we had foreign secretaryjeremy the today programme we had foreign secretary jeremy hunt, another cabinet minister, saying that he believes a version of the prime minister's deal can be approved by parliament. he says after the prime minister's failure to get concessions at the eu summit this week, he says that the eu needs to step up and help out the prime minister saying that if they do not, eu leaders cannot be sure that parliament would stop a no—deal brexit. that is something he says the uk government does not want and
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he also says that european leaders knew not want —— do not want that either. tom barton, thank you. tom, with his scarf and gloves on there. because we are expecting freezing conditions. freezing rain is expected to bring treacherous conditions to parts of the uk this weekend as storm deirdre hits on one of the busiest shopping weekends of the year. the met office has issued amber warnings for some areas. helen's here to tell us more. it is because of the freezing rain, you will take us through which areas are affected in a few minutes but why should we be worried? widespread freezing rain is very rare in this country. it happens widely in the usa but it is one of those severe weather phenomenon is which happens very quickly. it causes extremely dangerous conditions with widespread black ice. i will explain some of the dynamics here. these weatherfronts come in on top of the ones we have already had. snow floaters down
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through the atmosphere and turns into rain as temperatures are slightly above freezing in the upper atmosphere but then they come back into the colder air we have at the bottom so it freezes again but stays as rain. when the water droplets hit frozen surfaces they spread out, a lot of water droplets spreading out and it happens so quickly that if you are out walking or driving, it becomes extremely dangerous, slick like black ice because you cannot see it. that is why there is so much concern. we have a battle ground gci’oss concern. we have a battle ground across the uk, we had cold air or week, weaker weather fronts trying to come in but it took the momentum of storm deirdre to eventually move the colder air away but it is in that. more details later. helen, thank you. negotiations at a climate change conference in poland have
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continued through the night with nearly 200 nations trying to agree on how best to tackle rising temperatures around the world. progress has been made, but there are problems over the question of compensating poorer countries for the damage caused by global warming. scientists have warned the global temperature rise must be kept below one point five degrees by the end of this century to avoid the worst impact. campaigners are urging the government to stop plans to issue prison officers with a synthetic pepper spray to help tackle violence in jails. the prison reform trust says that during trials the spray — known as pava — was used unsafely and inappropriately. but the prison service says lessons have been learnt form the pilot and there'll be clear rules on how the sprays should be used. thousands of police are preparing for a fifth consecutive weekend of protests by the so called yellow—vest movement. shops were looted, cars were set alight and windows were broken in paris last weekend. the unrest was sparked by rises in fuel taxes but has grown into demonstrations against president macron‘s administration.
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a british sailor who was rescued after her boat capsized during a solo round—the—world race has said she would do it again "in a heartbeat." susie goodall was rescued after she got into trouble 2,000 miles west of cape horn. yesterday, she finally arrived back in chile where she was reunited with her mother and brother. ben ando reports. back on dry land and an emotional welcome from her family for susie goodall, the british sailor rescued from the southern ocean after the mast of her racing yacht was torn off in a ferocious storm. after 157 days alone at sea, and a very emotional week to follow, i was fighting back the tears as i stepped off the ship and saw my mum and oldest brother. my whole family have been my rock from day one of this whole journey, way back three years ago when i signed up to this golden globe race. i've put them through a lot and i know i have a lot of making up to do.
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she'd set sail injune. at 29, the youngest competitor in the gruelling golden globe round—the—world race. she'd reached fourth position in the standings after rounding cape horn when, ten days ago, disaster. buffeted by huge waves, thousands of miles from land, the mast of her yacht snapped, and as it rolled end over end, she was briefly knocked unconscious. after drifting for two days, she was picked up by a chinese freighter. it was a delicate operation because her yacht, dhl starlight, was unable to power itself, the giant 40,000—ton ship had to gently manoeuvre itself alongside for her to be winched aboard. sailing away from dhl starlight was heartbreaking. she stood up valiantly to all that the elements had thrown at her and looked after me to the last moment. her race this time is done. but susie goodall said, even knowing what's in store in the dangerous seas of the southern ocean, if she was asked whether she would do it again, she would say yes in a heartbeat.
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ben ando, bbc news. you expected her to be delighted to be on dry land but that's the last place she wants to be. she wants to be out there sailing. she's a sportswoman, that's she does. new york is a city famous for its bright lights, but the big apple has never seen anything quite like this. it's hosting its first ever chinese lantern festival. more than 3,000 hand—made lanterns were shipped to the us from china for the spectacular event. some of the displays are up to 30 feet high. lantern festivals are an ancient tradition in the far east and have been around for 2,000 years. ican imagine i can imagine by next christmas we will be doing more of that here. something smaller scale in edinburgh
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but that looks like a new trend to me. we have been to a few with the weather. matt and carol have seen them. stunning. helen will keep us up—to—date with the weather, amber weather warnings across the country. mike is keeping us up—to—date with the sport. what a week it's been for british politics. we've seen a crucial vote delayed, a challenge to the prime minister's leadership, and a victorious theresa may promising to still deliver the brexit people voted for. yesterday, the pm was back in brussels trying to get the assurances she needs for mps to back her deal. let's take a look back at the week that was in westminster. does this house want to deliver brexit? no! is the vote definitely, 100%, going to happen? yes. if we
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went ahead and held the vote tomorrow, the deal would be rejected bya tomorrow, the deal would be rejected by a significant party so we will defer the vote tomorrow. the government has lost control of events and is in complete disarray. other mps will think carefully about whether theresa may is the right person to lead us. a ballot will be held between six o'clock and eight o'clock. the parliamentary party does have confidence. cheering iam i am pleased to have received the backing of my colleagues. here is oui’ backing of my colleagues. here is our renewed mission. delivering the brexit that people voted for. i had a robust discussion withjean—claude juncker, i think that is the sort of
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discussion you are able to have when you have developed a working relationship and you work well together. we were not dancing. she fought, andl together. we were not dancing. she fought, and i did criticise her by saying yesterday night, the british people was nervous. we have to bring down the temperature. a week is a long time in politics. blimey, that's just five days! joining us now from central london is the former bbc political correspondentjohn sergeant, and political documentary maker michael cockerell. good morning to both of you. john, you were there, in the days of margaret thatcher's final moments, famously caught on camera. we saw
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you that time when you were pushed out the way as you did your live report, margaret thatcher came down the steps to tell the world she was going to fight on. does part of you wish you were outside downing street this week, reporting on theresa may's battles. it does come a bit. it is such an extraordinary story. the thatcher story was amazing but this has so much complexity. at least with margaret thatcher we would know whether she would survive 01’ would know whether she would survive or not but with this, she is definitely going to go, she is definitely going to go, she is definitely going to stay. it is so confusing. michael, you have made documentaries behind the scenes at downing street going back decades. imagine being a fly on the wall, but they have let cameras then? that's they have let cameras then? that's the last thing they want, it was interesting you said earlier on about taking the political temperature. in america, they banned the song baby it's cold outside, but that's what they are thinking at
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this moment. it is extraordinary, i've never seen a prime minister with the whole combination of a cabinet split three ways, and not even having a majority among her own backbenchers. and an extraordinary and complex situation where we haven't seen anything yet when it comes to the future trade arrangements, if we ever do, it will be miles more complicated than the backstop. a backwater of the united kingdom? be careful. i will talk to you afterwards. tell him off. i will. when you're talking about this whole situation, the difference with margaret thatcher's final days, with social media and the news channel, that only adds to the pace of what we're talking about. is that very different now compared with 30 years ago? it is different and the problem is that theresa may gives the
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impression that she is genuinely exhausted. she looks all right and keeps going, but the actual possibility of her making a fresh argument, or moving to a new position, it seems to be so difficult for her. i am not surprised. she wakes up every morning and she must think, where am i. morning and she must think, where am i, whatam i doing, and she morning and she must think, where am i, what am i doing, and she repeats the mantra. everyone else is seeing, it will not work, you cannot get this deal through and she does not seem able to phrase an answer to that in front of the 27 other european leaders. they looked on scans, what do you intend to do, what would you like to do. that is where the nebulous phrase comes in, it is the word of the week.|j where the nebulous phrase comes in, it is the word of the week. i bet it is the most looked up word on internet yesterday. from the negotiations that were happening yesterday, pa rt of negotiations that were happening yesterday, part of the confusion is we do not know where this is heading. in the days of margaret
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thatcher it was, will she survive or not and will the poll tax get ditched. this is so many permutations, we do not know which direction it will go in. the flow chart in the times this week went on to the third page. there are at least nine different scenarios we can come up least nine different scenarios we can come up with. if you ask each memberof the can come up with. if you ask each member of the cabinet you would probably have 23 different scenarios and they are all plotting together and they are all plotting together and against each other without knowing how they are going to get any of them through. the one thing that seems certain is that the deal which she has not had the meaningful vote on, if she had been meaningful vote on, if she had been meaningful vote at any stage soon, unless she comes up vote at any stage soon, unless she comes up with some miraculous thing from the eu which they are not going to give her, she will not get it through. everything depends on the timing and pushing it further back to next year. she would like the real choice the commons would have
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to make, either heard deal or no deal, then she still has a chance of winning, because it is so horrific for many people that there should be a for many people that there should be 3110 for many people that there should be a no deal. that is what she is hoping for but everyone realises this is the plan, this is what she is trying to do, and that makes it so is trying to do, and that makes it so difficult for her. she cannot see, we will just leave so difficult for her. she cannot see, we willjust leave it and we will get an agreement. people do not believe it. the problem is the lack of trust, and the problem is all on her. they are always referred to mrs may's deal, they do not see the government dealer the government agreement, it is her and that makes so agreement, it is her and that makes so vulnerable. although she gets the confidence, a large number of mps against her. she is constantly being told, it is your deal, it is what you're doing, implying all the time that we would think of another deal if it was not for you and we would doa if it was not for you and we would do a different thing. that is where
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iam do a different thing. that is where i am convinced that this is not going to stick together in the coming weeks. in the next week, i think we will get a denoument. because it is so called you will struggle to run away from this question. what is going to happen next? how does this end? michael. michael first. i cannot see how it ends without something miraculous happening. she has played it all the time, my deal or no deal. as if it is not the government's deal. she said in the house last week, my deal or no deal, it is not only my deal, it is the best deal, but there is no other deal, and jeremy corbyn, it is the best deal, but there is no other deal, andjeremy corbyn, in it is the best deal, but there is no other deal, and jeremy corbyn, in a rare moment of socratic thinking, he said, if there is no other deal, it is obviously the worst deal as well,
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and she was a little thrown by that. she is often thrown. that is the problem. we are moving to a stage where you cannot see anything happening unless she goes. the options involving heard the whole time seemed to have run out now. it is very difficult. if someone was brought in, at least they could see, this is my proposal, we will do this, and if they became leader on that basis, the new cabinet would have to form around that and there would be a sense of direction, but at the moment, the deadlock is not just in parliament but everywhere. it is doing enormous damage to the country. we will have to leave it there. interesting to hear your insights. thank you forjoining us ona insights. thank you forjoining us on a cold morning. thank you for your insights and experience. if anyone is experienced about standing outside in the cold, it is john sergeant. if you are standing outside you will be cold today. it
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is helen seeing it, not me. have a go at her. good morning, it isa have a go at her. good morning, it is a cold day, and we have had cold weather all week. when we finally get the atlantic air, with the momentum to get rid of it, we get the wintry problems. the atmosphere is finely balanced, we will have widespread freezing rain, very unusual in this country. we have amber weather warnings from the met office for potentially dangerous conditions with the freezing rain. rain falling on frozen surfaces, and almost instantaneously roads and pavements will become treacherously slippery. significant snow around as well, particularly over the hills but not just the well, particularly over the hills but notjust the hills either. this is the battle ground, the cold air is the battle ground, the cold air is still with us but this is storm deirdre, bringing wet and windy weather across the west of the country. the snow and the freezing
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rain yet to arrive but it will do in the next few hours. this cold air is sitting there are still as the male bear associated with storm deirdre comes on top of that, we will have problems. —— milder air. comes on top of that, we will have problems. —— milderair. another amber warning from the met office for highland scotland, up to a0 centimetres of snow throughout today and tonight, blowing around in potentially severe gale force winds. it is stormy out there as well, stormy winds in western areas already, and it is wet year, so even though we will not see much snow, we could have rain falling which will cause issues and it will only be around four celsius. add on the winds and it will probably feel colder. potentially we could have
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freezing rain. it could cause black ice whately and then back to snow. all the time the strong winds buffeting those around on the roads, and significant amounts of snow across highland scotland. even at lower levels we could see significant amounts of snow. it seems we're getting all our winter weather and wendy. it will be nastier on the roads. a busy day in the run—up to christmas so stay tuned to local bbc radio. the details of the weather warnings on oui’ details of the weather warnings on our website, strong winds and the snow will continue into this evening and overnight. it looks treacherous this evening and overnight. the freezing rain turning back to snow, persisting across parts of northern england and scotland. elsewhere it will be very chilly. the rain that has fallen and is likely to turn to ice if it is still around. sunday is a quieter day. the snow, the strong
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winds abating in the north, sunshine and showers, but significant showers in the south on top of today's rain. lots to keep our back to you. you will be as busy as laura kuenssberg over the next few days. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's time now for a look at the newspapers. anne longfield, who is the children's commissioner for england, is here to tell us what's caught her eye. good morning to you. good morning. let's start with this story, as children's commissioner this is a subject close to your heart. children's safety online. this is the mail today. we all know how many hours kids are online and we know that quite young ones are on youtube as well for long periods of time, in touch with each other. i have been spending lots of time pressing and pushing and criticising technology
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companies to be more responsible. i wa nt companies to be more responsible. i want them to have a duty of care so iam want them to have a duty of care so i am pleased to see that youtube have said they have taken down 8 million videos over the last three months which have child safety problems in them. twitter have said they have also closed accounts. they have lots more to do because literally millions are coming on every minute. kids pretty much have a free reign over that but lots of kids will be opening their christmas crackers in a few days' time and it will be full of more technology, so it isa will be full of more technology, so it is a real issue. you have been talking about this before, you sat over the air talking about this before, you sat overthe airand talking about this before, you sat over the air and spoke about this. what are the powers you have? over the air and spoke about this. what are the powers you have ?|j over the air and spoke about this. what are the powers you have? i have got powers to gather data from public bodies. this is an interesting one. when this was established, only 15 years ago, i can gather data on children from hospitals, government, all over the place. i cannot do it for technology
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companies because they are not public bodies. and private companies? yes, but they have a place in our lives no ridges in the public sphere. how willing are they to give you the information? they have not sent me any information when i have asked. it isjust have not sent me any information when i have asked. it is just a have not sent me any information when i have asked. it isjust a new way to define what public means. there has been a change of tone, they are doing something is, clearly something like this is good pr, however, it is an ongoing thing, and i would love the duty of care, the government to look seriously at it for technology companies, because they have such a powerful role in oui’ they have such a powerful role in our lives. you deal with one problem and another one pops up. yes, and the kids are the ones finding these things first. they are ahead of us. what else? strictly is an lots of the papers today. we have the final and the four couples. two things, i
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am one of the strictly fan so i am looking forward to half past six tonight. i really like the fact that serious dance is meaningful to this generation. when i grew up and watched strictly ballroom, i thought it was very much past times, who knew we would know so much about the american smooth, tango, swivel heels and the rest of it? what is a fla cco ? and the rest of it? what is a flacco? who knows? it washes over me. we have been talking about technology. everyone in the family is normally on a different device but people are sitting down together for this, millions as a family watching. that is great. stacey dooley is the favourite. other dancers have been listed as the favourite. it is open at the moment, who knows what could happen. we will
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talk to a strictly super fan later, someone talk to a strictly super fan later, someone who is worried what they are going to do with their life after tonight. do you fit into that category? not quite and you can ask them what that move was. we are and to christmas cards. it is that time of year. i have done half of mine. we have got christmas cards from both the royals and politicians this week in the papers. it is decoding what that means. the duke and duchess of sussex have a hollywood leg. there they are. we have got the cambridges with country casual. we have gotjeremy corbyn's cat in front of a big fire and ed miliband with his stone. these are all around the strong pr element and the like but in america, families will often put photos and christmas cards, and
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it isa put photos and christmas cards, and it is a bit ofa put photos and christmas cards, and it is a bit of a man thing, you'll like it or do not like it. i have never got round to it. maybe i will do it one year, but i have never got round to it. i liked getting it from other people, because you can see what they look like this year. other people, because you can see what they look like this yeahm does tell a lot. they have had a bad year. generosity at christmas, come on. i would like to see theresa may's. it is a child from her constituency. they have done it. she a lwa ys constituency. they have done it. she always goes for a simple one. that is all we have got time for. have a lovely christmas. thank you. let's talk about what is coming before us. if you want to make food to get ready for strictly, matt tebbutt might have some ideas. good morning. good morning. are you. what is a glitterball trophy? what do you mean? do you not watch
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strictly? they are fighting for a big thing. i see. am strictly? they are fighting for a big thing. isee. am i strictly? they are fighting for a big thing. i see. am i the only person who does not watch strictly in this country? i might be. let's not dwell on that. we have lots of dishes that are good enough for the strictly crew. our special guest todayis strictly crew. our special guest today is the wonderful nigel favours. or, no it isn't. he is not here yet but he will be later. he will be easier to talk about pantomime and he will be easier to talk about pantomime anti—war faces food heaven or food talk about pantomime anti—war faces food heaven orfood health. that will involve hammond meringue. we've also got three great chefs. what is on the menu? we have made a dish with eggplant and it will have barbecue and tahini sauce. delicious. we have also got carl clarke. what are you doing? i am doing half fried chicken with a spicy instant noodle seasoning, with
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relish. we also have ed hughes, pulling pints. not literally. do you have some nice beers? lovely, oatmeal stout and a classic belgian double. what nigel gets is down to you at home so go to the website for avoiding details and we will see you at ten. you will be getting an invitation from strictly. at ten. you will be getting an invitation from strictlylj at ten. you will be getting an invitation from strictly. i was not pushing for one. i really was not. you will start watching now. nobody wa nts to you will start watching now. nobody wants to see me dancing. that's it, it's done now. to vote for matt, dial... the headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and john kay. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. after one of the most turbulent political weeks in decades, this morning there is a call for mps
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from all parties to work together to achieve brexit. the work and pensions secretary amber rudd says our exit from the eu is "in danger of getting stuck". the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt has told the bbc this morning that it was still possible to get reassurances from the eu that could win support from mps for theresa may's deal. at a rally in london last night, the former ukip leader nigel farage, said he thought a second referendum was now the most likely outcome. she is not leading the nation. we are actually becoming more divided on the subject then perhaps we were 2.5 years ago. that is why i think a second referendum gets closer.|j hate the thought of it but i will spend every minute getting ready for it. negotiations at a climate change conference in poland have continued through the night with nearly 200 nations trying to agree on how best to tackle rising temperatures around the world. progress has been made, but there are problems over the question of compensating poorer
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countries for the damage caused by global warming. scientists have warned the global temperature rise must be kept below 1.5 degrees by the end of this century to avoid the worst impact. campaigners are urging the government to stop plans to issue prison officers with a synthetic pepper spray to help tackle violence in jails. the prison reform trust says that during trials the spray — known as pava — was used unsafely and inappropriately. but the prison service says lessons have been learnt form the pilot and there'll be clear rules on how the sprays should be used. thousands of police are preparing for a fifth consecutive weekend of protests by the so called yellow—vest movement. shops were looted, cars were set alight and windows were broken in paris last weekend. the unrest was sparked by rises in fuel taxes but has grown into demonstrations against president macron's administration. a british sailor who was rescued after her boat capsized during a solo round—the—world race
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has said she would do it again "in a heartbeat." susie goodall was rescued after she got into trouble 2,000 miles west of cape horn. yesterday, she finally arrived back in chile where she was reunited with her mother and brother. those are the main stories this morning. commuters in the us state of new jersey couldn't believe their eyes when cash started blowing across a main road. how far would you go to get your hands—on free money? look at these guys. this guy and others began to run into oncoming traffic to pick up money that had been spilt out a van. but police have warned people they'll have to return the money and are investigating several road traffic accidents linked to the incident. you have been warned! we will give
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you some weather warnings in a bit. there is some dreadful weather coming in. freezing rain. but there are some really nice christmas jumpers to go with it. we now know that pep guardiola, the manchester city, went to the shop and bought it himself. tricky for him today, they lost last weekend against chelsea for the first time in the league. it's an unusual feeling for pep guadiola, as he helps his team get over a rare defeat last weekend at chelsea — they have slipped to second in the premier league. and this lunchtime will be hoping to have striker sergio aguero back for their match against everton. he could be fit again after missing the last four games with a groin injury. his manager is also keen to make sure his players don't get distracted in the coming weeks, notjust by his christmas jumper, but all of the festive trimmings. of course now christmas time is here, and the people,
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you know, are in holidays, the kids are out of the school, at home, and families come back at home and have the tendency to enjoy the christmas times. it's the toughest part of the season in terms of the opponent results and so on. so it's hard to be focused, keep focused. sergio aguero has gone frosty with frosty with his hair. could the use of the whip be banned in horse racing within the next few years? well the bbc‘s frank keogh understands that senior figures are preparing for that, possibility, with tougher penalties in big races, likely to be introduced to improve public image of race horses‘ welfare. a new penalty structure for over using the whip, will be announced next month, no suggestion of that in these pictures from bangor—on—dee yesterday. but paul struthers, from the professionaljockeys association says "it won't make a blind bit of difference to horse welfare". there will be at least four british fighters going for gold tomorrow at the taekwondo world
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grand slam in china. and there could yet be even more... double olympic champion jade jones was the first to make it through beating croatia's marija stetic by golden point... all the action is being streamed live on the bbc sport website and red button. justin rose is on course to finish, the year as world number one. he needs to finish in the top 12, at the indonesian masters. it's been really difficult in the wind today, for the third rounds for all the players, and rose finished the day one under par — but overall that's still nine under and he's well placed in fourth overall. so well inside where he needs to be, a shots clear indeed of those that can stop him being in the top 12. later this morning, england's hockey players take on belgium in the semi final of the men's world cup. they're hoping to reach their first final since 1986. speaking to us from his hotel in india, phil roper says the team are feeling confident.
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obviously, our tournament started a little slower than we would have wa nted little slower than we would have wanted but in the last three games we have grown into it, having beaten some really tough opponents in ireland, new zealand, and the champions argentina. we are feeling good and excited to get going. antonio felix da costa will start on pole for today's first formula e race of the season. two of the practice sessions had to be cancelled because of rain in saudi arabia, but qualifying went ahead on time when the weather had cleared. race coverage starts on the bbc sport website and red button at 11:a5. the sound of silence on those cars is amazing. this next story is an inspirational one — i've been to meet an 8a—year—old grandmother who's hoping to change the lives of people like her, who have multiple sclerosis. glen mills has been using a wheelchair for 20 years — but when she gets into a wind tunnel — she is an extremely graceful skydiver. i went along to see what she could teach me. ready for take—off...
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8a—year—old glen mills has spent over two decades in a wheelchair because of multiple sclerosis, and other health problems, but all that changes when she puts on her skydiving suit and throws caution to the wind. before i was fairly sedentary in my chair, and there were so few things that i could do. and the minute i sat in there and felt the wind on my face, that was such a great feeling of freedom. it's changed my life completely. glen has now completed over six hours flying time in the wind tunnel, and says it helped her to such an extent physically and mentally. you can see how independent she's become in here. but she says, as a result, she's now got movement back in her knees and legs once again. it's better than any medication
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because you get such a high. it's almost like euphoria for me when i get in there. i'm reliant on nobody. i can get movement out of my knee, i can turn both knees and get in and out of the chair. glen then watched me struggling to match her grace and movement as i battled to keep my position and line in the driving upward wind. it's thought it's having to control your body shape in such conditions is what helped glen, and why the ms society hope others follow her example and get more active now. i think glen's an inspiration, she's amazing. back in the day, doctors would advise people with ms not to exercise because they thought then it made ms worse. actually we now know the opposite is true. it can be as effective as taking a treatment. it doesn't have to be skydiving, it could be something as gentle as a bit of gardening, but it all helps. the exact science between glen's
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regeneration isn't fully clear, and every case is different, but she's taken inspiration as well from the british athletes training around her. al hudson lost his legs in an explosion while serving in the army but has gone on to compete in world championships, and is the first para athlete to get a silver medal in an able—bodied event. from being in that restricted kind of environment on the ground to suddenly being without any restrictions is just an amazing feeling for me. it's like breaking out of prison almost and being in this completely free environment. i just absolutely love it. the skies are also opening up in a more extreme way for glen thanks to virtual reality goggles and the chance to join a team wingsuit flying. the wind told me what to do, it took me where i wanted to. i love it. i'm just going to keep going until they have to take me out feet first! there she goes, leading the way. the
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ms society have a active together programme so anyone ms society have a active together programme so anyone with ms and find something for them. i could talk to glenn all day, i wonder where she is flying today? mike, thank you. it is cold today and there is the issue of freezing rain. helen is going to tell us all about it and where could be affected. good morning. freezing rain, widespread freezing rain in the uk is very unusual because you need all of the elements lined up for it to happen. it is basically rain or snow to start with and then it melts in
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warmer parts of the atmosphere. it comes back down to where we are and it is cold at our level of the atmosphere so it freezes again but it stays as rain. it is called super cold water. it spreads out, every little raindrop, and forms instant ice. that's why the risk of freezing rain means extremely dangerous travel conditions. it happens quickly. you could be walking or driving and it becomes black ice and is very dangerous. the met office have an amberwarning, is very dangerous. the met office have an amber warning, if it comes off and it is looking likely, it will cause a lot of disruption and there is an amber warning full snow. we have stormed deirdre cumming, this cold airfrom we have stormed deirdre cumming, this cold air from the continent needs across the uk a week and up until now we have had weak weather fronts —— we have storm deirdre coming. as the rain comes down, that is where we see these wintry problems. we are already seeing some snow in areas. it looks like the
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snow in areas. it looks like the snow risk will come into parts of the central lowlands of scotland. these are the two amber warning is and where we think it is most likely to cause severe disruption but either side of that, because it is finely balanced, there are risks elsewhere with freezing rain and snow because it is so cold. one area where there is going to be rain as wales and the southwest. some snow in the welsh mountains but the rain, coupled with severe gale falls winds, could cause some local flooding. rainfall amounts of 25 to 15 millimetres. it is uninsured two. it could cause flooding. —— it is about one inch or two. it is going to feel very cold and then you have all of this potential widespread disruption because of the snow and ice. in scotland, it will be significant amounts of snow building up, possibly double over the high
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hills. blowing around means blizzards. we have a lot of severe weather in just one day, happening today and overnight. if you have travel plans today or you are getting out and about mistake tuned to your local radios. these conditions are extremely dangerous with widespread black ice. through the evening and overnight, it tapers out. the heavy rain clears out the way. that is snow, the freezing rain is likely to turn back to snow. it persists here and particularly in scotland. it is marginally milder in the west but in the east it will be cold enough for things to freeze. in contrast, sunday is a much quieter day weather wise. there will still be showers. quite lengthy showers into the afternoon, pushing into
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england and wales, we have snow over the hills of scotland but temperatures are up on today. thank you. good advice. how we care for older people is a complicated issue, made more difficult in europe by falling birth rates, meaning that there are fewer young people paying taxes to fund much—needed care. so can we learn anything from other countries? japan has the world's oldest population and our tokyo correspondent, rupert wingfield hayes, has been to see what they do, as part of our "who cares?" series. music plays. deep in the mountains, two hours north of tokyo, nanmoku is now the oldest town in japan. once a week the andos drive their mobile shop up into these valleys. at each street corner they turn the music up and wait for their customers. music plays. the young have all left for the city. now only the old remain.
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for them, the andos‘ mobile shop is a lifeline. so you're like a social service, checking on everybody each week? translation: i think the village would be more deserted without us coming here. these villages are what we call shopping refugee. translation: we all like the people here. we have known them for over 30 years. we want to do what we can to help them. all over ruraljapan there are more and more places like this where the vast majority of the population are in their 60s or older. by the middle of the century, more than a0% of japan's total population are going to be old age pensioners. no other country in the world has ever experienced that before. it's notjust a question of how they are going to pay to look after all these old people,
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it's who is going to do the caring. japan has a well—funded care system. everyone over a0 must pay into it. that pays for people like this woman. today, she and her colleagues are going door to door checking on pensioners. but this system is already under huge strain, and the reason is dementia. in another neighbourhood, they are checking on a 90—year—old man. a year ago his wife was diagnosed with dementia. now she needs almost constant care. translation: sometimes she waits outside the front door until late at night. she thinks our children are coming to collect her. i try to persuade her to come in, but she refuses. there are already 5 million people injapan suffering with dementia.
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by 2025 that will rise to 7 million. where japan goes the rest of the world will soon follow. but even here no one is sure how it is going to work. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in gunma, centraljapan. fascinating how that played out. fascinating. do we know of strictly has hit japan? it must be, it is everywhere. it is a global phenomenon. we need a drum roll. after three months of show—stopping routines, sequins and spray tans, tonight sees the final of this year's strictly come dancing. but which of the four finalists will waltz their way to victory? our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba has been to meet them. tonight's four celebrities taking to the dance floor. so, how are they feeling ahead of the final?
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excited. prepared. excited. they will be performing three routines, a show dance, a favourite and one picked by thejudges. for stacey and kevin, it will be their leaderboard topping foxtrot from week four. journalist and documentary maker stacey says she is thankful to have got this far. i suppose the overriding emotion is, this sounds really cheesy, but sort of gratitude. you are so delighted to still be involved in the competition and it has just been amazing. it has not been particularly poignant or gut wrenching, it has just been an amazing celebration. forjoe and dianne, thejudges have picked their paso doble. youtube starjoe says the public response has been
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amazing. i struggle with most dances on the show because i do not pick things up very quickly, so each week has been a new struggle, but it is that support, it is those messages of support, the videos that are sent in, videos of the youngsters trying to copy your dances and redo your routines from the week before, that is what it is all about and that is what gets you through the week. for ashley and pasha, thejudges' pick is their salsa. some viewers have said the pop star's background has given her an advantage. ashley is not so sure. i did have dance when i was younger, it was a completely different style and it has been over 20 years since i trained, so listen, i absolutely love that i got asked to be here, and i am so grateful i have gotten to learn latin and ballroom, and it has been an amazing experience.
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the judges have selected their viennese waltz for faye and giovanni. the former steps singer has also, of course, danced in the past. with every strictly series there has always been a mix of abilities, absolutely, but it is an entertainment show at the end of the day, and i think it has been really lovely to see everybody's individualjourney, and it has been amazing to be part of a brilliant series. this evening, all the finalists will be hoping for this kind of reaction from the judges, and more importantly, the public, because it is they who will be deciding who will lift this year's glitterball trophy. it is allup
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it is all up to us. let's get some predictions for tonight's final. we have tv critic caroline frost from london, and in the studio with us is strictly superfan wendy bryant. ido i do not think super fan i do not think superfan does it justice. explain to us just how big a deal this night is in your life? tonight is my last little bit of being in the strictly bubble for the last 12 or 15 weeks. i watch anything related to strictly. tonight it is going to be good, but it is the last show so it will be sad and it is bittersweet. you do not just watch sad and it is bittersweet. you do notjust watch it, your record the show and you watch it again?|j notjust watch it, your record the show and you watch it again? i watch it again and the results show and it ta kes two it again and the results show and it takes two on bbc two every night during the week. you are going to have more free time after tonight?
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it is always a little bit sad. you get used to it. have you not had a social life on saturday night? i tell people not to ring me because i will not answer. last week i went to assure and i felt so guilty going to show when i should have been in front of the television. how does this year compared? you have watched all of them. such a standard, from so all of them. such a standard, from so early on, from week two, week three, everybody up their game. some yea rs three, everybody up their game. some years you can see people that are not going to make the last few weeks but this has been a real gem of a series. caroline, what do you think? there is lots of debate. is it too close to call for the four filers. we have a 2—tier arrangement, the people'sfavourite, joe sugg and stacey and then the more expert, it is almost like a metaphor for something, we have faye tozer and ashley roberts, who are perhaps technically superior but they have
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not caught the imagination in the way that stacey and joe have succeeded in doing. it has become a cliche, the journey, succeeded in doing. it has become a cliche, thejourney, that is succeeded in doing. it has become a cliche, the journey, that is what the viewers buy into. it is a combination of technical skill, the emerging transformation, the confidence, and as we have seen with stacey and joe, the enthusiasm to put themselves into it completely week after week and see them develop as dancers and tell that story. it is about connecting with the audience, both at home and in the ballroom. wendy, who will you be voting for? or do you feel so guilty voting for? or do you feel so guilty voting against anyone you vote for all of them? i want faye and giovanni to win. why? they have such a connection on the dance floor. their viennese waltz was stunning. i think it could be any of the four.|j
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guess it depends on the kind of fa ncy of guess it depends on the kind of fancy of god. for someone like josiah, an internet sensation with millions of followers on youtube, young people are probably likely to vote and that will give him a good chance. i think it will, vote and that will give him a good chance. ithink it will, because some viewers will vote on the dance but some will vote on the personalities so i think he has a good chance of winning. it is interesting, looking at the demographic of who watches and to strictly appeals to? yes, ultimately, joe has succeeded. the bbc took a risk putting a youtube star on screen but he has brought in those younger viewers and they have tuned in every week and voted for him, and they have got them all the way to the final, so he has that massive fan base, but so does stacey and toa massive fan base, but so does stacey and to a lesser extent the other two. it will be interesting to see, it is close to call. lots of people
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will rememberfrom it is close to call. lots of people will remember from this series the headlines about the kiss in the dark streets quite early on in the run. did that affect the feeling of strictly, the family show, the feel—good factor? strictly, the family show, the feel-good factor? did that damage it? it was a challenge and they were fortunate it happened early on so it has not come to define the series. there has been a chance for others here is to emerge but they did the right thing, the staid professional and the judgesjudged right thing, the staid professional and the judges judged them right thing, the staid professional and the judgesjudged them according to their merit on the night, and it was probably quite fortunate that they left when they did. tell us what today looks like for you? you're going to ——? i will go home, football this afternoon, then straight to a tv. how do you prepare a? straight to a tv. how do you prepare a ? surrounded straight to a tv. how do you prepare a? surrounded by the remote control, foot? i am going to a friend's so we will have something to eat and watch it and not be disturbed. do you have
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special nibbles and drinks? i do not have a routine as such. is your friend allowed to speak to you? shias into it as well, so she will sit there and watch it with her husband. lovely. you enjoy that. iam husband. lovely. you enjoy that. i am worried about you tomorrow. how are you going to deal with it? caroline, thank you as well. good luck. enjoy tonight. that is it from us on luck. enjoy tonight. that is it from us on brexit —— and that is it from us on us on brexit —— and that is it from us on breakfast. be mindful of the weather. be careful. this is bbc news. the headlines at 10: the work and pensions secretary urges mps from all parties to forge a consensus over brexit — warning it's in danger of ‘getting stuck‘. crucial talks to tackle global warming continue through the night as officials from 200 countries struggle to agree a deal. protesters gather in paris for more anti—government
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demonstrations — as president macron hopes recent concessions will limit their numbers. campaigners urge the government to stop plans to issue prison officers with pepper spray to help tackle violence in jails. and the travel show is in the lake district meeting the volunteers who are helping to protect and preserve the national park.
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