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tv   BBC News at 9  BBC News  December 17, 2018 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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you're watching bbc news at 9, with me, annita mcveigh. —— rachel schofield. the headlines: theresa may will tell mps that holding another brexit referendum will "break faith with the british people". work and pensions secretary amber rudd says parliament should consider all options. we need to find out where the will of parliament is, where the majority of mps will vote in parliament and nothing should be off the table — we should consider all options. workplace reforms set to be introduced by the govenrment which will make agency workers and those on zero—hours contracts better protected and made more aware of their rights. the online fashion retailer asos has issued a profit warning, after what it says was "unprecedented" discounting and "the weakest growth in online clothing sales in recent years". a hotel in hull has cancelled a christmas day booking by a homeless charity for 28 people with nowhere else to stay. and welsh cyclist geraint thomas says he takes "great pride" in winning this year's
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sport's personality of the year. the team sky rider became only the third britain ever to win the tour de france. good morning — and welcome to the bbc news at 9. theresa may will set out her opposition to another brexit referendum today, warning mps that it would cause "irreparable damage to the integrity of our politics". two of the prime minister's senior allies have denied reports over the weekend they'd been discussing the possibility of holding another vote. but others have been publicly asking that she puts brexit back into the hands of the commons, and looks at a series of options to break the deadlock. the prime minister will say that another referendum on the eu would "break faith with the british
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people", but this morning work and pensions secretary amber rudd said that the government "should consider all options". at 3.30 today, the prime minister will address the commons about the recent brussels summit, and will come under pressure to name the date for a vote on the deal. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. postponing a vote she would have lost, facing a confidence vote to oust her, and then an eu summit — long on drama and confrontation, but short on breakthroughs. at least the prime minister found someone willing to play ball over the weekend. and, yes, she is still trying to get her brexit plan through parliament, but many are now publicly discussing other options and talking down the ones they don't like. supposing we had another referendum, supposing the remain side won it by 52—48, but it was on a lower turnout? entirely possible. let me tell you that
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if there is another referendum, which i don't think there will be, people like me will be immediately demanding it's best of three. where does that end up? yesterday, two of the prime minister's closest allies denied they were toying with another public vote. her chief of staff said he wasn't planning one, and her deputy said he's long thought it was a bad idea and would be divisive. but those hoping for another referendum, say it might eventually be the only option. if parliament is gridlocked and there's no way of resolving the impasse and no consensus can be met in parliament, then how else do you resolve this other than referring it back to the people? the stage is set, then, for the coming parliamentary drama. the prime minister will be back here this afternoon. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. our assistant political editor has been following events and joins us now from westminster. another busy day ahead? it will be
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another difficult day, i suspect, for theresa may when she appears before mps in the commons this afternoon because every time she has had to make a statement, she has had a real bruising, predominantly from her own back benches. the message from mrs mae this afternoon i think will be more of the same, namely she is determined to press on with plan a, trying to get concessions from the eu, in the hope that will convince mps to back her brexit deal. what is striking as we are now seeing an upsurge in mps beginning to move to possible plan bs, based on the likelihood of mrs may's deal going down in flames. we have had a lot of chat about possibly another referendum, which mrs may will try and quash today, saying how it would be divisive and wouldn't solve anything. we are also seeing cabinet ministers now coming forward and
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saying, look, if mrs may deal goes down, we will have to look at some other way of resolving it. one idea which seems to be gaining traction is this suggestion you have a sort of series of votes on different brexit outcomes. so you could have votes on no deal, a managed no deal, the norway option, another referendum, in an attempt to try and see where there would be a parliamentary majority. and that seems to be an idea which cabinet ministers are looking to press upon mrs may does not have a listen to the business secretary this morning. i think we should have a deal. the deal the prime minister has proposed has been, as you know, has been broadly backed by british business. i think that needs to go to parliament. what i would say to my fellow mps in parliament, it's one thing to find criticisms of the deal, and everyone can do that, but i think we have a responsibility now
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to come together, to make sure that we say what we want, rather than what we don't want. yesterday we saw liam fox, one of the cabinet brexiteers, saying yes, he could be relaxed about a free vote on a series of options and then from the other wing of the party this morning, amber rudd comedy work and pensions secretary also suggesting she would be sympathetic to the idea. morning. do you agree with liam fox when he says he's not opposed to mps being given a free vote on the prime minister's deal? my first point is that we need to get the withdrawal agreement through parliament. that has my full support and i hope the prime minister will get the amendments, the changes, that some of my colleagues seek. after that, we need to find out where the will of parliament is, where the majority of mps will vote in parliament and nothing should be off the table. we should consider all options. so the government is in listening mode — what other options are being considered now? my main point is, let's try to get this through, but let's think about how we test the will of parliament, to find out where the majority is.
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that, after all, is what people expect us to do. thank you very much. the difficulty with these sort of multi—option votes is what tends to happen is mps just vote against what they don't like and nothing gets approved. when tony blair first tried to use this to work out what the sort of majority view was in the house of lords reform i think they had seven options on the table. every single one got voted down. so it is fraught and there are those in the cabinet who seemed unsympathetic towards the idea. have a listen to the international development secretary, penny mordaunt. do you agree with your cabinet colleagues robert buckland and liam fox that you are not opposed to a free vote? i think the prime minister is absolutely right to rule out a second referendum. we asked the people to decide, they decided. they've put their faith in us and we mustn't let them down. we have to deliver on brexit and that means we
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can't come up with something else in parliament. we have to deliver on that result, thank you. would you say the government's been listening, though, to other options? so, where are we now? bluntly, we are waiting for mrs may to bring back her dealfor that are waiting for mrs may to bring back her deal for that so—called meaningful vote. labour say they have some parliamentary wheeze up their sleeves, which means they could potentially force mrs may told the vote before christmas. not quite clear how they would do that and certainly the sort of game plan from number ten is to leave the vote until sometime in january, once they've had a chance to go back to they've had a chance to go back to the eu and try to secure those crucial concessions. when it comes to other parties, headlines over the weekend about labour and the fact there is dissent there are about votes of confidence in the prime
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minister and votes of confidence in the prime ministerand timing votes of confidence in the prime minister and timing thereof? huge pressure in labour ranks forjeremy corbyn to bite the bullet and put down a no—confidence motion. something he has been strenuously resisting, in part because as people believe at the moment they wouldn't win it. they think easier to win it is when mrs may comes back, puts a vote down and it loses and in the chaotic aftermath they might have a better chance. but there is, in the eyes of many labour folk, another reason why mr corbyn is holding back, in that if he put down a confidence motion and it was lost, then the only remaining option for mr corbyn would be to back another referendum, because he would have tried a no—confidence vote, he would have told mrs may to go back to brussels, she is a ready done that. there's not much else he could do. in other words he'd be forced into the corner and having to back another referendum, which he is
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anxious to avoid. good to speak to, norman, thank you. new laws to better protect agency workers and people on zero—hours contracts will be set out by the government today. the business secretary, greg clark, says the reforms are the biggest upgrade to workers' rights in more than a generation. it will guarantee that employees are informed of their pay and eligibility for maternity, paternity and sick leave on the first day at a newjob. the tuc say the rules won't shift the balance of power in the gig economy. the secretary for business, energy and industrial strategy, greg clark, spoke to bbc breakfast a little earlier about the terms of the proposed workers' rights reform package. it's a hugely ambitious package. it's come from an independent report that a man called matthew taylor, who spent a long time with a very comprehensive study of what the, the protections that workers have in the uk, where we are and where it should go. one of the things that he said is that, as he put it,
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the british model works. we've got very high levels of employment, record highs. we've got very low levels of unemployment, but what he recommended, and we accept, is that now there is the opportunity to improve the quality of that work. to have a target to improve the wages at work, improve the protections that people have, so that we can turn that success into increasing opportunities for people in work. greg clark there on bbc breakfast. online clothing company asos has issued a profit warning after "unprecedented" fashion discounting hit its trading in november. the firm said weak consumer confidence and economic uncertainty had led to "the weakest growth in online clothing sales in recent years". sector analysis shows a significant decline in consumer confidence in the run up to christmas, and today asos shares fell 35% in early trading.
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elsewhere, the fashion and home furnishings retailer laura ashley is to close around a0 of its uk stores, as it plans to expand in china. with me is our economics correspondent dharshini david. we knew the high street was having a tough time but now online is a trickle into that realm? a devastating blow we received this morning. last week we had warnings for the likes of prime alchemy house of fraser, saying it has been a bad month for the high itself in november. over the weekend, month for the high itself in november. overthe weekend, more figures showing fewer of us visited the shop than the same weekend last year. now we get this morning from asos. it had been the darling of the fashion scene, that big online retailer, that success story we couldn't get enough of. originally known as as seen on tv. now it says it had very bad november sales and
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had to slash prices to keep up with its competitors and that doesn't seem to have worked. this morning, shares across the board are suffering as a result, because investors are saying, if asos can't make this pay, who can? this is devastating news, notjust for retailers. we could see more warnings over the course of the week, but also for the economy as a whole. consumer spending makes up the majority of our economy, so bad news if that crutch is not looking quite so stable. don't forget, we still have a week to go until christmas, there is still time! for last—minute bargain hunters, they are very canny so last—minute bargain hunters, they are very canny so maybe last—minute bargain hunters, they are very canny so maybe consumers are very canny so maybe consumers are playing the waiting game, hoping if they hold off a bit longer, they will get even bigger discounts. but nail—biting times of retailers. we could see a few big names in big trouble. on the other hand, a statement was put out this morning by boohoo to say they are trading co mforta bly. by boohoo to say they are trading comfortably. what is actually mean?
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yes, boohoo is that retailer, you click on it and they get it to you quickly and at a very low price and they seem to have captured that part they seem to have captured that part the market. that is looking relatively stable. but as we say, these are quite early times. november isn't christmas on its own. talking to retailers, they make as much as four out of £10 over the christmas and new year period, so these are crucial weeks indeed. they have some big red payments coming up over christmas as well, so don't think we are not going to see profit warnings coming out, even ahead of christmas was that they are hoping it will not be festive season over before it's begun, but i'm afraid to say i think we will be having this conversation a few more times. say i think we will be having this conversation a few more timeslj know you will be monitoring it all for us. thank you. the headlines on bbc news... theresa may will say that holding a second brexit referendum will break faith with the british people and damage the inegrity of our politics. agency workers and those on zero hours contracts will be given further protections in a package
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of government work place reforms. online fashion retailer asos has issued a profit warning after what it says was "the weakest growth in online clothing sales in recent years". good morning. coming up in sport, liverpool at the top of the premier league again after beating manchester united at anfield last night. rangers are back at the top of the table in the scottish premiership, and lester's hopes of reaching the champions cup knockout stages are all but over after defeat by racing 92. all of that and more in halfan by racing 92. all of that and more in half an hour. more from sally to come a little later. this week marks the busiest winter week for britain's aiports. on friday, heathrow will hit its peak, as the airport will see over 100,000 passengers flying out —
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at a rate of 100 per minute. our correspondent ben thompson is at heathrow airport now and has more for us. ben, it's the busiest winter week of the year — what's the picture there now? good morning. welcome to the departures lounge at terminal two at heathrow. those numbers pretty staggering. on friday alone, 250,000 people will pass through here, as that great getaway for christmas gets under way for is that they are already gearing up for it, they plan this all year round to try make it as smooth as possible. there are some top tips to make sure you can get through the airport quickly and safely and get to where you want to go. the man with them is simon calder. good morning. it is that time of year when things get busy. let's talk about heathrow, very busy this week but also around the rest of the country. on friday there will be 100 people a minute passing
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through heathrow. the uk's busiest airport. it will also be the busiest day of the festive season at birmingham, manchester, glasgow, edinburgh and belfast international. for the busiest day at stansted, gatwick and bristol, we have to wait until next sunday, the 23rd. luton, the 28th of december is its busiest. that's the big new year getaway, people coming back after the holidays because that how do we make it easier? we got news to those rules on liquids and laptops that you might be carrying different things at christmas? it's all about security and how you can make your journey smoother and speed up the whole process for everybody else. it's really thinking about the stuff you are taking through as cabin baggage. you can forget about snow globes and brandy butter, they are classed as liquids and will go straight in the bin. but also, worry about christmas crackers, or preferably don't take them at all. while some airlines will let you ta ke while some airlines will let you take them on board an aircraft, and some airports will let you take them
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through security, there is no general rule, so you need to check with your airline and with your airport before you do that. let's talk christmas presents. many relatives will be taking wrapped parcels through security to take them where they are going. that is a big no—no? them where they are going. that is a big no-no? it is. i used to working security at gatwick airport. the numberof security at gatwick airport. the number of presents i have had to unwrap because unfortunately, sometimes you have to do a hand search and look inside to see what it is and that means all the beautiful wrapping you've spent years on doing is alljust torn apart, i'm sorry to say the step don't wrap your presents and take them through as hand luggage. you can check them into your hold baggage or you can just can check them into your hold baggage or you canjust wait until you get to your destination. that is the picture in the airports, and now i'm not going to curse it but the weather is looking good. we don't really have anything to worry about as far as snow and ice is concerned but industrial action could spoil it? yes, as you rightly say, the weather is looking pretty benign,
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keeping fingers crossed, in the busiest week of the winter. but virgin atlantic pilots belonging to the professional pilots union, about 300 of them, about a third of virgin's pilots, voted to strike from the 22nd until the 25th, christmas day, in a dispute over union recognition. the airline originally said we were pretty sure we will get everyone where they are going but now they are saying, taking out a court injunction against the pilots in order to persuade them to work. if that doesn't work, they will be outlining their contingency plans later today. they are saying if you are flying on virgin atlantic it will probably be fine but make sure the airline has all your contact details. are brief words on the roads and railways? all your contact details. are brief words on the roads and railway57m will get tougher anti—affair as the week goes on. friday i think will be worst between about 11 in the morning and four in the afternoon. it will be peak—time that you really don't want to be going on the m25, a mile or so from here, and then the
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railways, they will be busy, but it can be thursday, friday. once you get into saturday, you start colliding with the engineering works. if you are travelling anywhere from sunday onwards, whether it is a long or short journey, well worth checking because things will be in some disarray until the new year. as always, very nice to see you, simon. thank you, and good luck with your christmas travel. words you don't want to hear, bus replacement service and engineering works but there are some over the holidays. do check and make sure you can over the holidays. do check and make sure you can get to where you want to go on time. some top tips from simon in terms of getting through the airport there, making sure you can get through smoothly, quickly and most of all, safely. thank you, news you can use. thank you. you're watching bbc news. a five—year—old boy has become the third person to die following a house fire in nottinghamshire. the boy's mother and eight—year—old sister were also killed in the blaze in the village of collingham yesterday. the children's father remains in a serious condition. ben ando reports. the cause of the fire that tore through this family home
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in the village of collingham, near newark in nottinghamshire, remains under investigation. justine collison, aged 33, her daughter isabella, who was eight, and her son harvey, aged five, were all killed, while gavin collison, on the right, is now fighting for his life in hospital. the only other survivor was mrs collison‘s mother, who was helped out uninjured. on social media, tributes were paid, including this one to mrs collison, here in an raf uniform, sitting on the left. while this woman worked with her at a nearby school. she was lovely, could not meet a nicer woman. she was always smiling and adored her children and her husband. over the weekend, prayers were said for those who died and for those who survived, and the local church will remain open during the day between now and christmas day for those wishing to pray or leave messages of condolence. ben ando, bbc news. the co—founder of the popular app hq trivia, colin kroll,
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has been found dead in his apartment in new york after an apparent drug overdose. the 3a—year—old, who also co—founded the video platform vine, was found by police on sunday morning after his girlfriend reportedly asked them to check on him. for the first time in 52 years it won't cost you a penny to cross either of the severn bridges as toll charges have been scrapped from this morning. it's thought that scrapping the toll will benefit communiters, businesses and the welsh economy by around one hundred million pounds a year. some drivers will save up to £1400 a year. our reporter tomos morgan is there for us. properly moving too fast to see if they are smiling but good news for those travelling over the bridges? because it matter exactly. many
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people crossing this morning are people crossing this morning are people who regularly make this trip every day for work purposes. a huge queue of traffic for that first influx of vehicles at 6:30am this morning. half a influx of vehicles at 6:30am this morning. halfa million influx of vehicles at 6:30am this morning. half a million vehicles cross over the bridges into wales per month, so a huge saving for those people who are doing so. as you mentioned, a huge boost for business as well, not having to pay the £20 fee they would do every time they cross over into wales. but there is one possible downside. government figures have shown that by getting rid of the tolls, it will increase traffic by around 20—23% and some people worry that that will have a knock—on effect and it might negate, the queueing might negate the fact they don't have to pay for the fact they don't have to pay for the tolls. the local areas, of course, monmouthshire, will be hoping this will create a huge boost to the businesses there. there is an expectation that house prices in the
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local vicinity might go up because of this. in terms of business, it's hoped people from the south—west of england and south—west wales will be able to commute more and business integration will be a lot bigger because this financial barrier, this huge blockade that was before, has now gone. talk is through the economics of this. we had in the introduction that by scrapping the toll there is expected to be an economic boost to the area but what about the loss of revenue, money that would normally be coming in through these tolls? yes. the bridges have now been paid off. they came into public ownership earlier this year. the decision was made that they weren't going to carry on paying the fees. there will be fees to be paid on the upkeep but that will come out of government funds now. i think the hub will come from the local businesses and the businesses using, that will use the bridge more often now, because i
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think there was an expectation of some businesses that actually it was putting off trade between the south areas of the country. now that has gone, they will hope that will actually boost the local economy and more money into pockets and although the government won't have the money from the tolls to put into the p, from the tolls to put into the upkeep, the boost to the local economy will go into their pockets as well further down the line. thank you very much indeed. a fifth victim has died following tuesday's shooting at a christmas market in the french city of strasbourg. an official at the prosecutors office in paris said the victim was a polish national. a memorial took place last night in the city to remember those who lost their lives. up up to 28 homeless people in hull due to stay in a hotel at christmas have nowhere to sleep after the hotel cancelled the booking. the man who
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booked the rooms posted on facebook that he was absolutely gutted and very angry, saying it is discrimination and they now need a miracle. the royal hotel in hull has told us they don't want to comment. in a moment the weather but first let's here's victoria derbyshire with what she's got coming up in her programme at 10. good morning, 15 activists cut through the perimeter fence at sta nsted through the perimeter fence at stansted airport through the perimeter fence at sta nsted airport and through the perimeter fence at stansted airport and lock themselves around a plane that was scheduled to fly from a uk detention centre to parts of africa. last week, they we re parts of africa. last week, they were found guilty of offences that carry a maximum sentence were found guilty of offences that carry a maximum sentence of life in prison. they say the legislation used to convict them is extreme and threatens the right to peaceful protest. we will talk to nine of the 15 in theirfirst protest. we will talk to nine of the 15 in their first broadcast interview. that is after 10am this morning. also, they hotel in hull that has cancelled christmas for the homeless. a charity had booked and
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paid for hotel rooms for around 28 homeless people but without explanation, the hotel cancelled them. if you are a hotel owner in and around hull and can help, get in touch with the programme. join us from 10am on bbc two, bbc news and online. now it's time for a look at the weather. good morning. a chilly start to the day but for many of us today, looking at a dry day with some sunny spells. the cloud we have across parts of scotland and northern england continuing to thin and break and you can see the extent of the dry weather. later, a weather front coming into the west will introduce some thick cloud, some patchy light rain and the wind will strengthen, touching gale force through the afternoon in western scotland. gusting to gale force across irish sea. the wind will pick up across the south western approaches as we go through the evening and
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overnight. this band of heavy and persistent rain starts to work its way in from the west but it will not bea way in from the west but it will not be a cold day tomorrow that a cloudy one, with this rain and wind. it will be a mild day for is that where we have lying snow in scotland, that will likely melt and with the rain, there is a real risk of some localised flooding. as the rain pushes out in northern ireland, it will brighten up there with a few showers and highs of around 12. hello, this is bbc news with rachel schofield. the headlines... theresa may will tell mps that holding another brexit referendum will "break faith with the british people". work and pensions secretary amber rudd says parliament should consider all options. we need to find out for the will of parliament is, nothing is off the table, we should consider all options. workplace reforms set to be introduced by the govenrment
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will make agency workers and those on zero—hours contracts better protected and made more aware of their rights online fashion retailer asos has issued a profit warning after what it says was "unprecedented" discounting and "the weakest growth in online clothing sales in recent years". a hotel in hull has cancelled a christmas day booking by a homeless charity for 28 people with nowhere else to stay. and welsh cyclist geraint thomas says he takes "great pride" in winning this year's sport's personality of the year. the team sky rider became only the third britain ever to win the tour de france. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. back to brexit and the prime minister will later today set out her opposition to a so called people's vote, saying that british people would no longer have faith in politicians. today the business secretary has joined calls for parliament to find a common ground and to agree a way forward as he explained to our
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political correspondent iain watson. i think we need to have a feel rather than no deal, it's one of the reasons why businesses, large and small cap mac the prime minister's but clearly, the vote was not put because the prime minister felt wasn't a majority in parliament. when it comes back and is voted on, if that was still the case i think there is a responsibility on parliament, not just to there is a responsibility on parliament, notjust to save what it doesn't want, it's easy to be a critic, but actually to take responsibility and to consider what parliament would vote for because in my view, we need to have a deal that allows us to continue to trade with the european union, without frictions and without tariffs, after the 29th of march. and almost no one would think that the consequences of
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crashing out without a deal or acceptable. if that is the view of the vast majority of the house of commons, as i believe it is, the house of commons should vote for a deed that it finds acceptable. when it comes to looking at the options i think amber rudd has said this morning all options should be on the table. what about a referendum, what she has been arguing for as well quite publicly, as an option, norway plus, those would be options? parliament should come to a view. i have supported the prime minister's need as her business is, i think it isa need as her business is, i think it is a deal that works for business. at, you know, parliament is entitled to consider the alternatives. it might be that in so doing, actually the benefits of the deal that has been negotiated might become more apparent when compared to the alternatives. but one way or another i think parliament needs to grasp the nettle, if it doesn't want to
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see no deal and doesn't want to have the consequences of the chaos of a disorderly brexit, then it has the chance to prevent that and i hope it will. the could be a situation when the deal is voted down and there's no natural majority for any other option either. under those circumstances having another referendum shouldn't be completely ruled out, should it? parliament needs to consider that, the prime minister has always been clear, then she brought back the deal, it's there, available, it allows us to continue to trade but she has also said the alternatives are very unpalatable. i think she put it, it is no deal or no brexit and so, i think for parliament to consider all of the janitors and to vote for a deal that things to an end the uncertainty that we have had for over two years uncertainty that we have had for over two yea rs now, uncertainty that we have had for over two years now, allows business not only to be confident about the
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future but actually to take some of the huge opportunities, and talking about brexit we would be talking about brexit we would be talking about some of the massive opportunities there are. one of the most exciting times for the world economies with technology sweeping the world in which britain is often a leader. we want to ride that wave but it requires having the certainty of knowing that are trading relationship with our biggest trading partner is assured. the business secretary there. let's have a look at some of the most popular stories on the bbc website this morning. we can see hotel councils homeless people is christmas day bickering. 14 people is christmas day bickering. 1a rooms booked in the hotel in rome by the raise the roof hominis project, 1a twin rooms at the royal hotel in hull, the organiser of the charity was looking forward to
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treating these people to a night in the hotel for christmas, but the booking has been unexpectedly cancelled, an employee at the hotel said no one was available for comment. clearly the charity very upset. a twitter user said she be bray happy to contact the hotel and urge them to reconsider. unclear what has happened but clearly a great deal of anger and concern. another one, one of the two new stories in number for. another one, one of the two new stories in numberfor. the massive carbon dioxide emitter you may not know about, you get the close straightaway, cement is the most widely used man—made material in existence but also apparently, one of those that has a massive carbon footprint. the source it says of about 8% of the world's carbon dioxide emissions. what's interesting picking up some of the
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pictures, we think about concrete and cement as being modern inventions, we have a picture of birmingham which has some of those concrete structures which we think of sometimes has not the prettiest but you carry on through the article, some lovely pictures of the campion in rome, going back over the history, actually cement and concrete had been in use for so long that about four are number of years in syria and jordan. one of those surprise stories. 2018 has been a difficult year for the salisbury. following the chemical weapons poisoning of the skripals in march visitor numbers fell as large parts of the city were closed off for decontamination. despite that, the salisbury playhouse is enjoying record ticket sales for its pantomime, so much so they have had to extend the run by another week. the cast and crew are delighted at the resilience of the city. with every show being sold out at
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the minute, it's so loud, children screaming and laughing and that's what we want. i think people are going to want to let her down and enjoy themselves and panto is the perfect opportunity for that. it's nice that we can and what has been a difficult year hopefully on a big high. it has been a bad year but it's bringing people back together, back to the town centre, to the playhouse, bringing families back and realising things happen but we cannot stay back, we have to come together and move forward. cannot stay back, we have to come together and move forwardlj cannot stay back, we have to come together and move forward. i think the pantomime is such a vibrant escapism for everybody, it's a really lovely opportunity to go, switch off and have fun and enjoy some silliness and that's what we wa nt some silliness and that's what we want people to do, not worry about the reality of the real world. some good news at last for salisbury
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which has had such a difficult year. now let's have a look at some of the most popular videos on the bbc website this morning. look away now if you are of a nervous disposition and do not like flying. storm deirdre causing all sorts of habit. we can show you, some of the planes that tried to land and had to abort, they were battling crosswind gusts of 33 knots, some very skilled pilots coming in to land and having to perform a so—called go around miniver, all part of standard landing procedure. you go round again. an austrian airline are doing the same thing, he comes in, thinks about it and then he thinks better of it, but pleased to tell you a did all land safely. these pilots know what they are doing.
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following geraint thomas' win on the bbc sports personality of the year last night, fellow cyclists and athletes were quick to praise the welshman for his success... british cycling sent their congragulations to the 32 year old who became the third british cyclist to win the tour de france, saying ‘what a year, here's to the next‘ sir chris hoy who dashed up from london yesterday afternoon to the ceremony said "it was well worth the sprint" and that he was proud of his friend. even the labour leader found time to congratulate geraint thomas, calling him an ‘inspiration on two wheels and a worthy winner‘. more on that in sport in just a moment. that‘s it for today‘s morning briefing. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. here‘s sally nugent. good morning. tour de france winner geraint thomas won bbc sports personality of the year last night and i was given the chance to go behind the scenes with the year‘s biggest sports stars. this is it, folks.
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welcome to sports personality 2018. we are going to rub shoulders with some sporting royalty tonight. the world cup itself was such a whirlwind. there were so many emotions flying about. so on trend! i always like to promise you lots of exclusive backstage access, let‘s hope she‘s in and let‘s hope she is ready to answer the door. it‘s only dina asher—smith. are you ready for us? i am, come in. thank you so much. it is going to be an absolutely incredible night. it is obviously so nice to celebrate everyone‘s sporting achievements. # three lions on a shirt...# as you can here, the excitement is all around, this theatre is crazy. i‘ve actually never known the atmosphere to be like this, and i am about to take my seat. # it‘s coming
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# football‘s coming home...# gareth southgate, congratulations on an incredible evening and an incredible year. people were kind of denying they cared about international football because they didn‘t want to get hurt any more, but the most pleasing aspect of the summer to me was that we took everybody on a journey that really reconnected the team and brought pride back to our supporters. the 2018 team of the year is england netball team. it's exciting for netball and to get the recognition, and hopefully the sport just keeps growing. that memory of that moment and the entire game is just something that will be with me and the rest of the squad for ever, and it is so special for it to be celebrated like this and for women‘s sport to be in the headlines. please, let's welcome the 2018 helen rollason award winner, the extraordinary billy monger. congratulations, billy. yeah, thank you so much. you were so composed on the stage.
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did you have any idea about what you are going to say? i had an idea about what i was going to say. unfortunately, i got cut off a little bit early when i was going to... yeah, you got cut off. this is your moment. when they stopped you, what where you going to say about your mum and dad? i was going to say how strong they were for me at the right time, because like my dad said in the vt, he doesn‘t really say it often but he blamed himself quite a lot for my accident because he was the one who got me into racing. i was going to do it anyway, so i was just going to basically thank them for being so influential in my life because without them, i would be nothing. 2018 sports personality of the year is geraint thomas! cheering it has been 22 years now i have been riding a bike and 12 years as a professional, and the ninth tour de france and nothing went wrong. there was no bad luck.
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which is unusual for you. yeah, yeah. no punches and no crashes oranything, and then, yeah, to end up winning the tour, and standing on the champs—elysees, i‘m still kind of pinching myself. it has been a whirlwind since, it is so crazy. don‘t drop it now. i‘ve won sports personality, everybody! see you! what a night that was! also in sport... liverpool are back at the top of the premier league after their 3—1 win over manchester united at anfield. xherdan shaqiri came off the bench and scored twice to consignjose mourinho‘s side to another defeat. they‘re now 19 points behind liverpool in the table... fantastic game. the whole 93, 95 minutes wasjust, we were in charge of the game and dominated it and they came up, we had to stay in the game, so we did, and second halfjust do it and do it,
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be kind of annoying, do it and do it, and then xherdan shaqiri came on and scored these two goals, it was just brilliant. rangers have gone back to the top of the table in the scottish premiership, after a narrow 1—0 win over hamilton academical at ibrox. let‘s look at the goal from yesterday. that was the goal that took them there. leicester‘s hopes of reaching the champions cup knockout stages are all but over after they were beaten by racing 92. leicester‘s disappointing season continues. the tigers have now lost eight successive games for the first time since 1975. racing remain unbeaten after a bonus—point win. well, it‘s no surprise that last nights sports personality awards are dominating social media this morning. helen housby, who scored the dramatic last second point to give england netball
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the commonwealth gold, says that she is dreaming right now after winning both team of the year and greatest sporting moment of the year. tracey neville pays tribute to all who have helped and supported them throughout an "amazing year". and we can‘t miss this one out... spoty winner geraint thomas describes his end of night celebration with both paula radcliffe and steve cram! i think he posted that at about 6:30am at the morning. he was doing really well! let‘s have a look at some of this morning‘s back pages. it‘s super shaqiri in the daily telegraph after he came off the bench to score twice as liverpool beat manchester united. it‘s also the lead story in the guardian sport as they report on pressure mounting on united managerjose mourinho and the daily mail have a picture
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of geraint thomas doing his rather surprised speech after he beat lewis hamilton and harry kane to win sports personality of the year. coming up on the bbc today, you can follow live updates on the bbc sport website as the draw for the last 16 of the champions league takes place later this morning. expected to start around 11am. checking with us, it may start a little bit late. all four english sides are through. manchester city as group winners, while liverpool, manchester united and tottenham were all runners—up. that‘s all the sport for now. more from the bbc sport centre at 11:15. sally, thank you. it‘sjust sally, thank you. it‘s just after 9:45am. the headlines on bbc news... theresa may will say that holding a second brexit referendum will break faith with the british people and damage the inegrity of our politics... agency workers and those on zero hours contracts will be given further protections in a package of government work place reforms...
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online fashion retailer asos has issued a profit warning after what it says was "the weakest growth in online clothing sales in recent years". and a quick update on the market numbers. donations to chester zoo following a large fire over the weekend have now reached more than 120 thousand pounds. the number of animals killed in saturday‘s blaze at the monsoon forest habitat still remains unknown. bosses at the site, which has now reopened, have praised the hard work of keepers and thanked the public for their support. juliette phillips reports. chester zoo has described it as one of the toughest days in its history
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and you can see why. the fire that ripped through the monsoon forest building is now being put out but the damage caused is still being keenly felt. monsoon forest at chester zoo is a complex environment with stick insects to snails to fish to frogs, some of the small animals have very sadly perished but what we‘re have very sadly perished but what we‘ re really have very sadly perished but what we‘re really happy with is that we managed to save all of the large mammals. sue workers rescued animals including endangered some action aids by getting them into outdoor enclosures. they worked with the fire service whose investigations into the barrister —— the fire are progressing. we are confident we know where the fire started and we are confident it was accidental. we are confident it was accidental. we are trying to determine the exact cause of that. the building itself was built three years ago as part of the £40 million project. it‘s the largest indoor zoo exhibit in the uk. the fire meant part of the suit
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was closed off but that did not seem to put off visitors. we wanted to come even more to support everyone. ijust hope they can rebuild and carry on doing what they do. it's a really difficult situation but at least, you know, we can still come to the zoo. the fundraising page set up to the zoo. the fundraising page set up by to the zoo. the fundraising page set up by the suit reached £50,000 target within hours, the rebuild here will take some time. investigations into the cause of the fire are continuing. juliet phillips, bbc news. from today, the directors of firms which make unsolicited phone calls can be fined as much as half a million pounds, under new rules. previously, only the business making the calls was liable and some directors had escaped penalties by declaring bankruptcy and setting up a new firm. joe miller reports. many of which are scams, claiming to
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be from bt and top talks. after some delay, the government is strengthening the law to tackle the menace. until now only businesses could be fined for nuisance calls and text. many bosses if the penalty ijust and text. many bosses if the penalty i just declaring bankruptcy and opening up under a different name. now they could be held personally responsible to the tune of up to half £1 billion. last yearjust a couple of dozen companies were fined but the data watchdog hopes these new measures will lead to more convictions. complaints about nuisance marketing have fallen recently but with almost 4 billion calls and texts still being made each year the government. the people behind them know they too are on the line. joe miller, bbc news. vladimir putin has called for his government to take
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charge of rap music — after a series of concerts were cancelled across russia. the president admits it would be impossible to ban the music outright — so says the state should play a greater role in controlling it. tim allman has more. this is husky, one of russia‘s most popular rappers. in his songs he has marked and criticised the authorities. he recently spent time in jail after staging authorities. he recently spent time injail after staging an authorities. he recently spent time in jail after staging an impromptu performance and one of his concerts was cancelled. one likely to be a fun, vladimir putin, who it seems has a beef with the entire rap industry. speaking at a meeting of his councilfor industry. speaking at a meeting of his council for culture and art he said rap rested upon three pillars... but he admitted it is impossible to
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stop it it should be taken over and navigated in a particular way. of course the russian state has a contentious relationship with popular music. a protest group is among those who have fallen foul of the authorities. this is probably the sort of thing you have in mind when you think of russian music. a military band accompanying a marshalled parade. it's accompanying a marshalled parade. it‘s not clear how the russian government might take control of rap music. but if this police choir is anything to go by, the possibilities are endless! some breaking news from the office
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for national statistics concerning student loans, they‘d made a ruling that the lad to £1 billion to the govan deficit, student loans and england are to be reclassified as public spending because essentially a large part of the outstanding loa ns a large part of the outstanding loans will be paid off by the taxpayer in 30 years time when graduates finished making repayments. around half of students don‘t ever repay all of the loans because they don‘t reach the threshold in their earnings. the office for national statistics singh student loans in england will add 12 billion pounds to the government desk at the set. hunting for honey in the wild is one of the oldest traditions in rural nepal — and it‘s also an extremely dangerous one. the hunters have to make a difficult and trickyjourney to the beehives which hang from the rocks high in the mountains. a bbc team travelled to the remote lum—joong district of nepal to find out why so many villagers are willing to risk their lives to collect the honey. now it‘s time for a look at the weather.
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here‘s simon king. thank . some sunshine across the uk at the moment. decent start, many of us clear skies at the moment, walk out the further west you go. into the atlantic, this swirl of cloud, a weather system gradually moving its way towards the uk. the cloud always increasing across western areas, with that, patchy rain moving its way through northern ireland, eventually some rain pushing into the west of scotland, perhaps wales and the south—west of england. as a general rule of thumb, the further east you are, the drier it is with sunshine. temperatures here, 7—9d, compared to 11—12 the further west you are. the wind strengthening all the time, overnight tonight some deals around the western areas,
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especially windy in northern ireland, heavy rain moving in by the early hours of tomorrow, causing some issues, edging eastwards, clearing skies following. stay mild in the west. heavy rain in the west badly moving eastwards, you can see by the dark blue, quite heavy for a time throughout tuesday. for northern ireland, the west of scotland, things brightening up, some sunshine here in the afternoon. temperatures earlier similar to today, 8—11d. as we go through the rest of the week, low pressure in charge of the weather. keeps things relatively unsettled, the rain moving its way into the north sea, we are left with a fairly unsettled south—westerly wind bringing in showers, mainly across southern coastal counties, around irish sea coasts, into scotland and northern ireland, quite a blustery day on wednesday, some dry weather and sunny spells throughout the day.
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those temperatures fairly similar to today and tomorrow, 7—11d. for the rest of the wii, high—pressure dominating, ringing in some showers with sunny spells and blustery conditions. goodbye. hello, it‘s monday, it‘s 10 o‘clock, i‘m victoria derbyshire. good morning. in their first broadcast interview, we‘ll talk to some of the so—called stansted 15, who face jail sentences after they were convicted of cutting through the airport‘s perimeter fence and locking themselves to a plane that was about to fly people from uk detention centres to africa. most of them are here this morning. they say the legislation used to convict them is over the top and threatens the right to peaceful protest. some homeless people in hull who had been due to stay in a hotel over christmas, have had their booking cancelled — by the hotel. we‘ll talk to the man who paid for the rooms who says he‘s "gutted" and fears he now won‘t be able to find anywhere for them to sleep. and the prime minister, theresa may will tell mps this
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afternoon that holding another referendum on the eu would "break faith with the british people", and not get us anywhere anyway. here‘s her business secretary.
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