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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 19, 2018 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning — this is breakfast with dan walker. this morning in a special programme we examine the challenges faced by families living with special needs. all this year we've been shining a light on the quality of life and care available for millions across the uk we're at the langdon down museum of learning disability to speak to those affected, those working to tackle the problem and we'll speak to the minister responsible for care in england. also in the news this morning: a plan for immigration after brexit — the government says it will prioritise skills not nationality. a warning for the food industry as researchers find levels of salt in processed meats and ready meals are too high. cash in hand or plastic fantastic? millions of us risk being left behind if society who's going to take on,
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one of the biggestjobs in football, it's mourinho out at manchester united, and could it be, solskjaer in? quite breezy, the weather, but i will have more coming up. good morning, it's wednesday 19th december. today we're bringing you a special edition of breakfast from the beautiful normansfield theatre, which is part of the langdon down museum of learning disability. for the last 18 months, breakfast has uncovered some of the challenges faced by families living with special needs. we've heard many of your moving and powerful stories, and the uphill struggle you've faced to access support. today, we'll catch up with some of the families who have featured on breakfast. first though, we have an exclusive
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look at a report by the down‘s we have some technical issues at the moment. we are having to talk a lot, as dan was saying, they are shying a light on issues of light and quality of life on people in care from around the —— the uk. dan is that the langdon down museum of learning disability which works very closely with those who are tackling the problem. lots of reports rapper date. we can get back to dan. we've kicked them out for you. thank you for that. 2 minutes in, oui’ thank you for that. 2 minutes in, our 1st technical problem. thank you very much. the last 18 months, some
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really powerful stories. people really powerful stories. people really face an uphill struggle. the level of care, the level of support they want their loved ones. we got loads to begin today. we start with the down syndrome association, which suggests funding cuts have led to failings in the level of care, support and provision for people living with down‘s. our disability news correspondent nikki fox has more. christian bertoni lives in his own place near his mum and dad. he's able to live as independently as possible in supported living. he has down‘s syndrome and learning disabilities and requires 24—hour care. to pay for this, christian receives money from his local council. after a care review in april, 2017, the family were told christian's night—time support would be withdrawn — replaced, for a trial period, with voice—controlled assistive technology.
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but he struggles to hear and communicate. he became withdrawn, he obviously was very anxious about all of these bits of equipment that he didn't understand what they were for. the staff themselves got very worried about his well—being and his mental health. christian is not alone. according to a survey of more than 1,200 down‘s syndrome association members, 28% said they were concerned about the level of overnight support, whereas 43% of carers said their adult child needed and assessment. there are all kinds of practices going on, cutting packages without consultation, making decisions about what's right for individuals without consulting them or theirfamilies. the government says it's given local authorities £3.6 billion to social care funding this year, and will set out plans in 2019 to reform adult social care.
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it took the family more than year, but christian's night—time support was finally reinstated. devon county council admitted that it had not listened enough to the views of the family, who said the approach would not work for their son. nikki fox, bbc news. it gives you an idea of some of the challenges. we'll look in detail across the programme at the challenges faced by those with special needs. that includes everything from support at school, employment and well—being to life expectancy. we'll hearfrom decision makers, as well as those on the front line, who work tirelessly to provide the best possible care. all that is coming up on breakfast this morning, but for now, back to naga for the rest of the day's news. we are in teddington this morning at
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the langdon down museum. i never knew teddington could look so good. it looks great debt. plans for how the uk's immigration system will work after brexit will be published by the government today. the home secretary, sajid javid is proposing a new system, which he says will be built around people's skills, rather than whether or not they come from an eu country. the new rules will mark an end to the rights of eu citizens to live and work in britain ‘without‘ restrictions. the government is promising a new visa route for skilled migrants from the eu and beyond. and after brexit there'll be no limit on how many ‘highly—skilled' workers can enter the country. let's get more on this from our political correspondentjonathan blake. good to see you. these plans have been a long time coming, haven't they, with lots of confused numbers around them. yes, that's right. for
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months now, we've been told the government would at some point make it clear how immigration policy would work after the uk leads the eu. it was 1st due back in the summer eu. it was 1st due back in the summer but now we have the details and number ten has been cleared. as far as they are concerned, a lot of people voted to leave the eu based on the issue of immigration and wrap in negotiations with brussels, the prime minister has stuck to 1 of her so—called red lines and that is the free movement of people that comes with membership of the eu will end after breaks it. now we have the details of the plan. how's it going to work? as you mentioned, highly skilled workers coming to the uk, getting visas to stay and work you so getting visas to stay and work you so engineers, software developers, doctors, jobs like that. there will be no cap on the number of those visas issued and another slightly more contentious point is the amount of money is what people will get. it is thought to be around £30,000.
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some concern that will put off the numbers required. to help sectors like healthcare and agriculture. 0f course, if you have anything, please get in touch. we did hear the prime minister and her cabinet were ramping things up no deal it. —— for a ramping things up no deal it. —— for 3110 ramping things up no deal it. —— for a no deal breaks it. today the european commission will publish details later of how the eu will respond. legislation will be published today to provide continuity in some key sectors like airports and banking, to try to avoid any disruptions caused by the uk leaving the uk without a deal. meanwhile, business groups are urging politicians to prevent britian leaving the european union without a deal, saying with 100 days to go until brexit there is not enough time for some companies to make contingency plans.
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five of the uk's leading business groups, representing hundreds of thousands of firms, issued a joint statement saying they were "watching in horror" as westminster infighting left key questions about the uk's plans for brexit unresolved. there is still too much salt in foods such as sausages and ready—meals, according to a report out today. public health england says that while breakfast cereals, baked beans and pizza manufacturers have managed to bring down salt levels, there was still a long way to go with many processed meats. here's our health correspondent, smitha mundasad. the meal on many of our minds. but perhaps something we are less likely to think about, the amount of salt involved. the report found overall, meat products do not meet the average salt targets set the 2017. many ready meals fell short of the mark as well. as did some meat free burgers and sausages. but there has
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been progress, with the levels down in many breads, pasteur, and brea kfast in many breads, pasteur, and breakfast cereals and in general, supermarket own brands had more success supermarket own brands had more success in slashing salt and many big brand manufacturers. 0n success in slashing salt and many big brand manufacturers. on average, we are eating too much salt. as a population, 8g we are eating too much salt. as a population, 8 g of salt a day and the maximum should be no more than 6. too much salt increases the risk of having high blood pressure and it increases the risk of heart disease and stroke which are things we all wa nt to and stroke which are things we all want to avoid. lowering the amount of salt in the nationposmac diet is a project going on to some 12 years with successive voluntary targets. some campaigners will question whether enough is being done to make sure the levels fall fast enough. smitha mundasad, bbc news. an italian bridge that collapsed in the summer, killing more than a0 people, is set to be rebuilt. the new genoa bridge
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will cost £180 million to build, and is expected to be completed within 12 months. the italian architect, renzo piano, will oversea the construction. in the past he's designed buildings like the shard in london, and the new york times headquarters. but looking at the departure ofjose mourinho. leaving with his hotel bill of £6,000. he has been there for months. a huge bill. the amount is spent on players. —— £600,000. £400,000,000 on is spent on players. —— £600,000. £a00,000,000 on 11 is spent on players. —— £600,000. £400,000,000 on 11 players. it was the lack of young players, academy players coming through. the other
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side. there is 1, isn't there? in the sense that you look at his record in terms of incentive terms, its 2nd. and also if you look at the restrictions, being able to buy the players he wanted. and also he won 2 trophies. but it's what happened this season. as was seen in the past, there is this the season syndrome, where he loses the dressing, whatever happens. long—term into the job, dressing, whatever happens. long—term into thejob, we have a lot to talk about, i know we have indeed. there is that picture. look at pictures of him leaving the in manchester. so the pressure finally told jose mourinho sacked by manchester united, here he is leaving the hotel in manchester that he'd called home for 2 and a half years. the club have made their worst start to a season in 28 years.
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so who's going to replace him? in the short term at least it looks like it'll be this man — former striker 0le gunner solskjaer. united appear to have accidentally confirmed him as caretaker boss until the end of the season. away from old trafford holders manchester city are through to the semi—finals of the league cup after beating leicester on penalties. league one side burton albion join them after beating championship side middlesbrough. there was hamilton says he chose the wrong words after insulting his hometown. he described stevenage as a slum during sports personality of the year. i grow up near stevenage andi the year. i grow up near stevenage and i would never call it a slum. was the context? he was talking about how the guy from the streets is made good. but he says he chose the wrong words. apologies from lewis hamilton to all those people in stevenage. selling the virtues of steve na g e in stevenage. selling the virtues of stevenage as we go through the morning. thanks very much. it was rainy yesterday, raining a lot yesterday. good morning, carol. various showers in the forecast.
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today will be a morning of sunshine and showers. there is. the showers will be in the south and the west but currently we have some moving from the west to the east as well. this is yesterdayposmac rain, under all of this cloud that nag was talking about and this is a weak weather front crossing us at the moment, taking the showers west — east. —— naga. it is quite a damp start across england, wales, northern ireland and western scotland. for the rest of us, largely dry. the 1st band of showers moves away into the north sea but more showers come into the west and parts of the south and some of those could be heavy and also bunbury. yesterday was very windy. —— thundery. today will be windy but nowhere near as much as yesterday. the other thing about today is temperatures are going to slip a little bit compared to what we had yesterday. today we are looking at
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sevens and eights and up to nines or tens as we push further south. through this evening and overnight, some of the showers will continue to travel from the west towards the eats, —— east. quite a cloudy night. the further north you are, we could have averages slip down to around 1 01’ have averages slip down to around 1 or 2. generally, staying have averages slip down to around 1 or2. generally, staying in have averages slip down to around 1 or 2. generally, staying in roughly mid — single figures to around 7 or 8. tomorrow we start off on a cloudy note. low pressure that has been driving our weather for the next few days —— last few days still with us. the was rotating around it coming in across western areas. looking at it in more detail, we can see that we started off on a dry note. some sunshine to start the day. in fact, tomorrow, more sunshine around tomorrow, more sunshine around tomorrow rush for most of us than today. all of the showers packing in across northern ireland, parts of scotland, northern england and also wales. temperature wise, similar to
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what we were looking at on wednesday. ten, 11 or possibly 12. the winds would have fallen much lighter on the 1st day. 0vernight thursday and into friday, the weather front coming up from the south—west. —— lighter than on the thursday. it is coming up through northern ireland, england and continuing to journey into scotland. behind it, a fair bit of sunshine. still looking at values of 11 or 12. 7or8 still looking at values of 11 or 12. 7 or 8 further north. we could see some early—morning fog here. that leaves after the weekend. saturday looks like being the drive today with a mixture of and showers. sunday, looking at showers merging together belonged at —— longer periods of rain. christmas, things are looking average on christmas eve and christmas day. no substantial snow on the horizon. we might see some on the scottish mountains, naga. no snow at christmas? do you want to
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do it again? may be on the scottish hills, that's how it stands at the moment. we listened so intently to everything that you said. what was your mate ‘s death doing? reading the paper. i was admiring your style. —— steph. iwas admiring the paper. i was admiring your style. —— steph. i was admiring your leopard went. you up an on trend. it is the print we have all been wearing this year and you have been leading it, carol. iwas admiring your sense of smile. you are a snow leopard, carol. you know what? if you keep something long enough, it will come back into fashion. carol, you said it, not me. see you later. let's take a look at the front pages. the times reports that reforms to social care will be a "likely casualty"
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of a no—deal brexit. and the paper adds up jose mourinho's bill for living in a manchester hotel for 2.5 years: £500,000. the manager was sacked from manchester united yesterday. the metro also leads with brexit — and what the army's possible role could be in the event of a no deal. that's after the defence minister gavin williamson told mps yesterday that 3,500 troops were ‘at readiness' to be deployed. the paper also shows a picture of the duchess of sussex visiting a care home. and away from brexit — the express says excessively salty foods are causing 4,000 deaths a year. an expert told the paper that previously successful strategies for cutting salt in food products need a "resuscitation". and the presenter holly willoughby is shown preparing for the new series of dancing on ice. let's take a look at today's papers. what have you got there, steph? apart from leopardprint. this story
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i picked out is all about the christmas party, you know, the work christmas party, you know, the work christmas party, you know, the work christmas party and it is at the event article about what you should and shouldn't do. we have had hours, haven't we? everyone was very well—behaved. haven't we? everyone was very well-behaved. what a shame. the hr department should be savvy on what on offer in terms of the free alcohol, don't give the employees too much, boo. and if there are any employees and susceptible to bad behaviour, mike, pull them aside and remind them of the rules. what? you andi remind them of the rules. what? you and i went to the naughty corner at 1 party and because our own mischief. we were dancing, that's not naughty. he is the best find that a party. you know what i'm
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talking about! there is a reindeer top 20. what to leave out for the reindeer. a quick word on anyone else? the paper that no spurs found wants to see. —— spurs fan. according to the back page of the times, he was interviewed yesterday by the press. he didn't totally rule it out. focusing on the currentjob. but it is a big, big club. he is a big fan of jose but it is a big, big club. he is a big fan ofjose mourinho. this would be short—term but maybe something sorted out next summer. it was very respect. he wishes him well.|j sorted out next summer. it was very respect. he wishes him well. i was going to say, paul pogba, there was a tweet that we understand was put
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out, a standard by his sponsors. it was the timing not —— just unfortunate. it was "captioned this". don't forget the kl. -- kale. also pizza is on the list. do not feed any reindeer pizza. just me. today we're bringing you a special edition of breakfast. there is a gap here because dan is shining a light on the quality of people —— the quality of care for people —— the quality of care for people with learning disabilities. dan is in teddington looking at how children are supported during their education. we are in the norman ‘s film theatre today. as naga said. we are 300
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miles away from hampton court, nine miles away from hampton court, nine miles away from central london and 50 centimetres away from jayne mccubbin. good morning. you have been looking at special education over the last 18 months or so. looking at the figures, it shows you how big an issue it is. in england, over1 million how big an issue it is. in england, over 1 million pupils how big an issue it is. in england, over1 million pupils with special needs and disabilities are in school, in education. are vast majority of those are taught in mainstream schools. i suppose the headline factor coming out of that is that those people account for half of those —— half of those are excluded. you have been looking at this and the response from families and viewers has been incredible. you say that me and the team that have led this but actually it's the families. the response we have had has driven this along at every step of the way. families told us at the start of the year, nobody seems to
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have noticed. we are thinking. we decided to shine a light. what we've done over the course of the year is look from cradle to grave across the life of people with special educational needs and the support that they get or don't get. it's really great being here today because what the founder of this place, it was all about looking at what people could do and help them reach their potential, not what they couldn't do. let's start at the beginning of our story, looking at the support kids are meant to be getting to help them flourish. in very many cases, aren't. i have had to fight and fight and fight and keep on fighting. i have had to fight and fight and fight and keep on fightingm i have had to fight and fight and fight and keep on fighting. it has taken fight and keep on fighting. it has ta ken every fight and keep on fighting. it has taken every fibre in my body to fight for what my daughter needs and is legally entitled to. lim i was on suicide watch three times in the la st suicide watch three times in the last six years. —— i was on suicide watch. exhausted to care for a
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child, with no support for sub i was suicidal. 13396 rise has been seen in schools that are not being inclusive. we have too many ratings. why is it not important enough to have basically rating? it flows through everything that a school does. we have learnt that is third of councils said they can't afford to pay. a third of local authorities telling you they cannot meet their obligations is a significant sum will stop it might not be a majority but it is a huge number. hello. services are overstretched, being reduced. rising referrals, long waits. an enquiry into the support provided to children and young people with special educational needs has been launched. allan your programme has been looking at this
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exact issue. what we are announcing todayis exact issue. what we are announcing today is important. it is revenue funding, a quarterof today is important. it is revenue funding, a quarter of £1 billion. all of this matters because the evidence is clear. get support quite early and it is life changing. to eat! the turnaround is beyond what i could imagine. i've got my little girl back, she is so happy. it gives you an idea about some of the people we have seen. so many families getting in touch already. let me tell you what's changed. that was just a small sample of the stuff we have looked at. at the start of this year, the start we spoke about looked like this. a record number of tribunal is going to court, people fighting for the rights of their kids. in four out of five cases,
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families were winning that fight will stop there were pockets of areas where neath went being met. —— that fight. there were pockets. at the end of the gear, we see at 20% rise in tribunal is, a new record high. nine out of ten cases, families are winning it. 0fsted described it as a national scandal. today we have just heard that court papers have been filed against the secretary of state and the chancellor to try and challenge this underfunding. the authorities say they are listening, as you have just heard. ministers have promised a third of £1 billion. there are some positive changes. yes but the biggest change, i think, are positive changes. yes but the biggest change, ithink, are people like these who are trying to drive us like these who are trying to drive us forward to make a positive change. that is why we have invited so change. that is why we have invited so many down this morning. your mates. leno thank you very much for coming. we would be speaking to all of our guests later. send us through
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your comments. we will be speaking to the care minister at ten past eight this morning. as we speak to our guest, we will get some resolutions to some of the questions you have. get in touch. i will remind you of the hash tag again, bbcsend. my favourite quote is that they have four children, all with special needs. they put the fund in dysfunctional. —— funk. we will see when headlines in a few minutes time. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. three people have been arrested after a man was shot dead in north london. police were called to stjoseph‘s road in edmonton at around 9.15 last night
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and the man was declared dead at the scene just under an hour later. the mayor says he's likely to raise council tax by the maximum amount he is allowed next year to help pay for policing. it would be the second year in a row sadiq khan has opted for the biggest rise available to him. the mayor says he feels "let down" by the government's police settlement. extra seats will be made available on greater anglia trains into london as first class is ended on the majority of services from 2020. —— finding love using mobile phone apps has increased ‘diversity‘ in dating in the capital — with more of us willing to meet people from a different background. that's according to one dating historian who's told bbc london playing the numbers game leads to more success than using niche apps which promise to filter users. one of the newest, toffee, is exclusively for those who went to private school. it's very tempting to go for a niche app because it sounds like it will save you all this annoying, degrading labour but my research suggests that they just
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degrading labour but my research suggests that theyjust don't degrading labour but my research suggests that they just don't work. you have to go through the juror asked to get to what you want. you have to do it, not a third party. 0ne have to do it, not a third party. one of the interesting things that has changed with the rise of these secretary is rising people interested in dating people of a different class and race. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. but the 0verground is part suspended between seven sisters and cheshunt and seven sisters to enfield town and severe delays between liverpool street and seven sisters due to a derailed freight train. 0n the roads. traffic is building on the a13 into town from the goresbrook interchange in dagenham. in leyton: lea bridge road has temporary traffic lights for water mains work at the junction with markhouse road. now the weather with kate kinsella. is quite a damp that mild start this
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morning. we had showers overnight last night with heavy ones nick sing. they will continue to the first part of this morning at least. —— mixed in. something drierand brighter later. we have bright —— blustery westerly wind. later on as those showers clear, we will see decent spells of sunshine. temperatures somewhere between nine and 10 celsius. 0vernight tonight, the cloud will increase and we will see further showers moving in, potentially across—the—board. temperatures were drop too far. another reasonably mild night. minimum between five and seven. that breeze stays quite windy as we head into thursday. similar conditions, showers in the morning, drier in the afternoon. similarfor friday showers in the morning, drier in the afternoon. similar for friday and saturday. it is not until sunday that we start to see things change little. turning a little bit milder temperatures up at 1a celsius but with that, it does turn a little
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wetter. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back to the breakfast team. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, and dan will have more on our special coverage examining the challenges faced by families living with special needs. first here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the down's syndrome association says adults with the condition are becoming increasingly lonely, depressed and unhealthy as a result of poor care. a survey of more than 12—hundred people revealed that a lack of support is leading to low levels of social activity and education. the government says it has given local authorities 3.6 billion pounds to fund social care this year, and will set out plans to reform the system next year. the home secretary will today publish the government's long—awaited plans for how the uk's immigration system will operate after brexit.
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sajid javid is proposing a new system, which he says will be built around people's skills, rather than whether or not they come from an eu country. the new rules will mark an end to the rights of eu citizens to live and work in britain without restrictions. meanwhile business groups are urging politicians to prevent britian leaving the european union without a deal, saying that with only 100 days to go until brexit, there is not enough time for some companies to make contingency plans. five of the uk's leading business groups, representing hundreds of thousands of firms, issued a joint statement saying they were "watching in horror" as westminster infighting left key questions about the uk's plans for brexit unresolved. we heard yesterday that the prime minister and her cabinet discussed "ramping—up" preparations for a no—deal brexit — today the european commission will publish details later of the measures it will take. efforts to bring down to the amount of salt in the food
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we eat have had mixed results, according to a report out today. public health england said that while manufacturers have succeeded in reducing salt in many products such as breakfast cereals and cakes, there's still too much in processed meats and ready meals. universities in england have been warned they risk undermining their reputations by giving too many students top degrees. the regulator, the office for students, says nearly eight out of ten degrees awarded last year were either first class or upper—second — an increase of more than 10 per cent overjust six years. ‘universities uk', which represents 136 universities, says steps are already being taken to tackle so—called "grade inflation". the inventor elon musk will unveil his latest project today, a test tunnel for underground transport in los angeles. his idea is for the system to transport passengers and vehicles on autonomously driven platforms called "skates." the two mile stretch of tunnel, which can be viewed today, has cost ten million dollars to build. t'is the season to have a good cry —
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because according to a new radio times poll the nation's favourite christmas film is the classic tear—jerker it's a wonderful life. the 19116 drama starred james stewart, who is helped on christmas eve by his guardian angel clarence. the film, also starring donna read, beat the richard curtis rom—com love actually, and the will ferrell comedy elf to the top spot. your thoughts on that? in our house, it has to be elf. diehard is another 1. and a christmas carol. diehard is a great christmas film. national lampoons christmas vacation. i haven't seen that in a while. it has scrooge. but scrooge. it's a great 1. so after months of sulking,
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rows and poor performances jose has gone. this is him leaving the hotel in manchester that he's called home for his two and a half years, as united manager. he leaves having precided over their worst start to a season in 28 years. ultimately he's the 1 who has to get the best that players. place at the look at them. you have to look at them. have i given everything for
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them. have i given everything for the sure to do. the players will come of the breach —— off the pigeons into themselves, no. if you read the papers, you would think he was the nurse —— the worst manager. 2nd behind sir alex ferguson. early on in his managerial career, it is this season which has really taken it. and a lot of talk about whether the younger players have fought in terms of attention. and have the right respect. they did come 2nd. as to who is next, united appeared to have let the cat out of the bag. this post on the official manchester united website looks to confirm that former striker, 0le gunnar solskjaer, will take over as caretaker manager until the end of the season. he's currently boss of the norwegian side molde, but they're on a winter break and don't start their new season until march. so a caretaker boss for now,
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but who's in the running after nearly 5 years, there is a lot of rumour about what happened. the decision here, i cannot answer. being married to a spurs fan, it has started. there is a long way to go. away from the comings
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and goings at old trafford — manchester city are through to the semi—finals of the league cup. they needed penalties to beat leicester, and it didn't start well — shocker from raheem sterling. leicester were even worse from the penalty spot though, leaving 0leksander zinchenko, to send the holders through. and what a result for league 0ne side burton albion — through to the semi—finals for the first time in their history after beating championship side middlesbrough. jake hesketh the hero with the only goal of the game. and lewis hamilton says he chose the wrong words after insulting his hometown. he described stevenage, as a slum during sports personality of the year and got plenty of criticism — including from the local council. but hamilton says he just made a mistake. lewis hamilton says he chose the wrong words after insulting his hometown. he described stevenage as a swan. he got plenty of criticism including from the local council at hamilton says he made a mistake. here is what lewis was saying.
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please, if you have any feelings about a mistake i made onstage, don't bother with it. it's thing of energy you don't need to hold. i'm super proud of growth come from. i hope you know that i represent the best we can. nobody is perfect. particularly when you are in the front of the crowd. the long journey that should have in life. i didn't mean anything by it. god bless you. have a great day. apologies to all in stevenage. lots of parks. it's what i remember growing up. i'd are lots of green spaces. it's very difficult, inc isn't it. he's come a long way. growing up in stevenage. ,
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that's what he was saying, it was the journey. can ask your question? with manchester united in new boss, how and healthy is it to have known in place straight away, like a permanent manager. they are so far off it. 11 points behind. theyjust wa nt off it. 11 points behind. theyjust want stability. losing that way in liverpool, west ham, they need to change. maybe the top targets are going to be harder to get. they need the whole of the summer to do a deal. to put a former player like solskjaer in charge. he plays for the great sir alex. you can understand why. your cash person or
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a card a card person? card. an terrible. convenient. it says a lot, doesn't it. do you always carry cash or have you gone contactless? a new report says society's moves away from cash risks leaving some people behind. steph is here. what's the truth here steph — is cash going out of fashion? iama i am a mixture of both. and that is the problem, why this review has happened. there are still lots of people who'd do use cash. if you look at the figures, it used to be the case that years ago, you would worry about shops taking cards so you'd walk into a shop saying, are they going to ashley take my card but we seem to have gone full circle where you get shops which don't take cash any more so people go in with cash any more so people go in with cash and not cards or whatever device they might be using. that becomes a problem in them. . given
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our assembly options. how far we've actually being a time when we don't have cash being accepted any more. to give it a stats on that, in 2007, 61% of payments meant we made, we are using so—called real money. fast forward a decade and you can see. it's going down. that is not all happening tomorrow. keating that is quite conservative figure. if you think it's hard, and they are saying it's going to take another 15. feels like with technology, it is exponential. there has been research done into this. they have done lots of analysis. it will go down quite considerably. questions about how
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real that is. 1 of the issues about all this is why they are worried. someone who uses cash that things, not always. there are a lot of people out there who might be left behind by this revelation. for example, it's mainly young people the use things without contact and it is the old people left behind. 1 in5of it is the old people left behind. 1 in 5 of the population still think that cash is necessary. but they are worried about sleepwalking into a society where people are left behind because the people the use cash the most. they are disadvantaged. they need cash to their own independence. that is abusive, 1 of the examples. they talk about people in rural communities as well with technology has not caught up some respects. people want tight budgets in need cash will stop what they don't want
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is thrust to leave all people behind. where we rush with technology to make life easier for lots of people. and it is this thing, we can't help but it is the cisco faster than us with this. we spoke to1 cisco faster than us with this. we spoke to 1 business to doesn't take cash any more because they said it was down to 7% of their sales sever them, it felt like it wasn't necessary more. but this is what the owner had to say. if you earn less than £10,000 a year, you are more than £10,000 a year, you are more than likely to be dependent on cash and that is because you be worried about a direct debit when you just don't have enough money in your account we might be paid in cash and not be confident that the money is there to pay bills and for all those people, digital doesn't yet work for them. that is the lady from the cash
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review there. there was a question this was funded by the people are actually run the cash machine service. and of course they want people to store use cash. but there are people who say it's about choice. 0n the 1 we talked about checks. some people, that is what they use. i had to go rummaging, cheque—book. and looked at it, years ago. i couldn't even tell you where my cheque—book was. some people, thatis my cheque—book was. some people, that is what they pay. it's about choice. and that's the fundamental crux of all this. we shouldn'tjust thinkjust crux of all this. we shouldn'tjust think just because crux of all this. we shouldn'tjust thinkjust because some of us want technology and we prefer it that way that cash stops completely. technology and we prefer it that way that cash stops completelylj technology and we prefer it that way that cash stops completely. i went shopping yesterday. just took a card because i thought, i know what i'm getting. i knew! because i thought, i know what i'm getting. i knew i was getting a lot.
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ididn't getting. i knew i was getting a lot. i didn't have a coin. did they give it to you? yes but i had to give it back. thank you very much. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. reni yesterday but i think that it was reni yesterday. it was very wet and windy yesterday that very mild as well. some places reached 13 degrees which is good for this time of year. today, sunny spells and showers will stop quite a few showers will stop quite a few showers at the moment that eventually most of them will be confined to the south and the west. this is the cloud that brought yesterday pav brain. yesterday's heavy rain. she is living to east
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anglia. you can see where you have showers, western scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, wales and south—west england and also the isles of city. if you catch a shower, it could be heavy and thundery. nothing like we could see —— like we saw yesterday. division are also down on what we saw yesterday in scotland, not an island and northern england, seven or eight. the rest, up to 11 maybe 12. you can see how the showers move inland and continue to push towards the east some breaks. these are our temperatures in towns and cities. some patchy mist and fog could come in. low pressure has been driving
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our weather and it will continue to do so as we go through tomorrow as well. you can see that the showers are coming around it in from the west. we lose the overnight showers from the south—east. a fair bit of sunshine. we lose the fog in the north still, a plethora of showers coming in clipping north wales, moving across north england and some of them getting over in the collection of the wash. cabbages not too dissimilar than what we are looking at today. then let us go into friday. well, overnight thursday into friday —— temperatures. the showers will move north—east. whether all, a fair bit of sunshine, not as windy and temperatures up to about 12. we have different programme this
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morning. we are looking at some of their challenges faced by people living across the uk. today we have come to this beautiful place. it is the normans filled theatre. ———— normansfield. it is intending to. about nine miles away from london. we have been shining a light from is ——on some of the questions faced by pa rents. ——on some of the questions faced by parents. i want to tell you about the guy that founded this place. he was doctorjohn langdon down and he was doctorjohn langdon down and he was a victorian position and humanitarian. he saw in society and real issue faced by people with learning difficulties and asked why we are a sync data extending them to an asylum. surely we can educate them, surely we can help and support them. —— why are we sending them. 150 yea rs them. —— why are we sending them. 150 years on, i suppose this morning, we are looking at the legacy and some of those families looking after their loved ones and
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facing those challenges which he first identified 150 years ago. we brought some of those families he had to be with us today on bbc brea kfast had to be with us today on bbc breakfast and as you can see, jane is in breakfast and as you can see, jane isina breakfast and as you can see, jane is in a mess. come and meet some of these families. dana andalusia had taken their local authorities to judicial review will stop to court, to fight for the support your daughter. she is getting that support. what difference has it made? i'm so pleased, it is making a lot of difference. you are left wondering what would have been if she had had this support much earlier in life? she would have been flying, yes. you will never know. you are waiting for the results of your judicial you are waiting for the results of yourjudicial review. alessio, you are representing families in surrey. —— alexa. all of the families are starting to follow what you have
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done. throughout the country, devon, dorset, west sussex, dorset, people are looking at what their local authorities are doing. amanda, is anybody listening? annemarie, as a solicitor, you have filed court papers against the secretary of state for education and against the chancellor to take them to judicial review. tell us more. we are arguing that the current level of underfunding is unlawful. also in relation to the budget in 2018. we are asking the court to declare that it is unlawful with the aim of increasing funding rarity so needed. families in bristol. this is what
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watkins. scott, you work for the charity seeability. scott, tell me, when you went to special school, what did your teacher tell you? remake my teacher told me i would never get a job, i would never live independently and would never have a family. --my teacher told me. and now today i have family, i have a job and i've just taken a promotion. and i live independently in a 3—bedroom house and my mum believed in me. fantastic! you keep up the good work. he is advising government. jane is keeping our guests government. jane is keeping our gu ests well government. jane is keeping our guests well fed and watered. i think we are now 300th cup of tea. let me introduce some more guest. tv presenters, a vocal coach. vic goddard, head of the passmore
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academy, a mainstream school which has a higher than average sent intake. —— send. you have four children aged between nine and 24. i love your quote from earlier this year, you put the funk in dysfunctional. what challenges have you faced in terms of your children? must have challenges. i think one of the things we are finding more and more is that you have schools that are more is that you have schools that a re really more is that you have schools that are really dedicated and then hugely ambitious schools which just wanted to call the right boxes and what it does is set parents and schools against one another and we don't wa nt against one another and we don't want that. we want to be working with our schools so we can provide the best provision for our children. we wa nt the best provision for our children. we want to work with them but you can't do that with budget cuts and that's the problem. if you cut the budget, the children that suffer the most are the children. there has
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been a £350 million package to support children with special needs. also to provide it in mainstream areas. the money does make a difference but did think that families, some who are here this morning with us, we'll see that change? dan, if i set morning with us, we'll see that change? dan, if! set you give me £100 and i will give you back 20, i think you would be 80 down. 0k, they have taken over 1.6 million out of the schools budget so to promise to put 350 million back in, well, that's fine but it's a drop in the ocean. it won't even take the system back to where it was and it needs to be better. and what challenges to you face? how do you break the mould, vic? from an institution
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point of view? this shouldn't be a marginalised issue and it should be an issue thought all parents of all children. if we are not hunting correctly to meet the needs of our most vulnerable, i'm going to make sure i do so i need to do it paper to issue. this is not a send issue. it is all children. what is the money mean on the street? is it going to actually reach the children in the schools? we have had lots of announcements of funding over the few years and they haven't always been truthful. the head of 0fsted recently described this as a national scandal. the think they will be a change in inspections, for special educational needs? this needs to be a recognition of context. my school is inclusive, we have a different level, a different type of challenge. as long as it's recognised and as long as somebody
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walks through the door to judge me and says i can see the battle you have got and i can see what you are trying to achieve and i will recognise it, more people will be in courage to be inclusive. until that incentive is there, it won't happen. 0n incentive is there, it won't happen. on that, you have the head of 0fsted on this programme. they were asked what they were going to do to address the fact it was a national scandal and there was no answer. the fa ct scandal and there was no answer. the fact that the matter is that until special needs provision is taken into account with 0fsted classifications, nothing will be done. schools like vic's where they have great special needs provision, they are marked down and that badge of honour that said excellent app, outstanding, whatever, your school won't get that. it won't get at very reason that it won't ——it is providing the services that are needed. they are set up to fail. if you are at an excellent school, you are cut from send provision. you
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might have seen it a few weeks ago, nathan met the queen. but show what happens and carry, you can describe it. nathan is doing what he has been told to do which is, if you are feeling stressed and want to hit out, walk away. —— a critical stock that's exactly what he does. and your kids are amazing. here he is, meeting the queen. there he goes. he is walking away. i thought that quite a lot. just want to crawl away. that is a magnificent thing. bbc send is the hash tag. we will put in the points you have been mentioning at ten past eight this morning. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. three people have been arrested after a man was shot dead in north london. police were called to stjoseph‘s road in edmonton at around 9.15 last night. the man was declared dead at the scene. the mayor says he's likely to raise council tax by the maximum amount he is allowed next year to help pay for policing. it would be the second year in a row sadiq khan has opted for the biggest rise available to him. the mayor says he feels "let down" by the government's police settlement. finding love using mobile phone apps has increased ‘diversity‘ in dating in the capital — with more of us willing to meet people from a different background. that's according to one dating historian who's told bbc london playing the numbers game leads to more success than using niche apps which promise to filter users. one of the newest — toffee — is exclusively for those who went
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to private school. it's very tempting to go for a niche app because it sounds like it will save you all this annoying, degrading labour but my research suggests that they just don't work. you have to go through the dross to get to what you want. you have to do it, not a third party. one of the interesting things that has changed with the rise of these apps is rising people interested in dating people of a different class and race. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. but the 0verground is part suspended between seven sisters — and cheshunt and enfield town. there are severe delays between liverpool street and seven sisters due to a derailed freight train. 0n the roads: traffic is building on the a13 into town from the goresbrook interchange in dagenham.
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king's cross road is closed northbound between between frederick stret and great percy street for burst water main repairs. in leyton: lea bridge road has temporary traffic lights for water mains work at the junction with markhouse road. finally in kingston vale: there temporary traffic lights by dorich house museum because of road works. now the weather with kate kinsella. is quite a damp but mild start this morning. we had showers overnight last night with heavy ones mixed in. they will continue to the first part of this morning at least. something drier and brighter later. we have blustery westerly wind. later on as those showers clear, we will see decent spells of sunshine. temperatures somewhere between nine and 10 celsius. 0vernight tonight, the cloud will increase and we will see further showers moving in, potentially across—the—board. temperatures won't drop too far. another reasonably mild night. minimum between five and seven. that breeze stays quite windy as we head
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into thursday. similar conditions, showers in the morning, drier through the afternoon. similar for friday and saturday. it is not until sunday that we start to see things change little. turning a little bit milder with temperatures up at 14 celsius but with that, it does turn a little wetter. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back to the breakfast team. bye for now. good mornng — this is breakfast with dan walker. this morning in a special programme we examine the challenges faced by families living with special needs. all this year we've been shining a light on the quality of life and care available for millions across the uk. we're at the langdon down museum of learning disability to speak to those affected, those working to tackle the problem and we'll speak to the minister
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responsible for care in england. also in the news this morning — a plan for immigration after brexit — the government says it will prioritise skills not nationality. a warning for the food industry as researchers find levels of salt in processed—meats and ready—meals are too high. when loyalty doesn't pay. we know that customers who stick with one company can often get charged more. in the next few minutes we'll be finding out what the regulator's going to do about it. who's going to take on, one of the biggestjobs in football, it's mourinho out at manchester united, and could it be, solskjaer in? today's event of sunshine and showers. were more in 15 minutes. good morning, it's wednesday 19th december. today we're bringing you a special edition of breakfast
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from the beautiful normansfield theatre, which is part of the langdon down museum of learning disability. for the last 18 months, breakfast has uncovered some of the challenges faced by families living with special needs. we've heard many of your moving and powerful stories, and the uphill struggle you've faced to access support. today, we'll catch up with some of the families who have featured on breakfast. but had a huge response from families living with some of these challenges and we have heard incredible stories, moving accounts, powerful tails on families facing an uphill struggle to try and get the ca re uphill struggle to try and get the care they feel they need. we will be talking about that. we are going to start with an exclusive report from the down's syndrome association.
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they are looking at funding. how those funding cuts of into failings in care and support and in provision. this report comes from our disability news correspondent nikki fox. christian lives in his own place near his mum and dad. he's able to live as independently as possible in supported living. he has down's syndrome and learning disabilities and requires 24—hour care. to pay for this, christian receives money from his local council. after a care review in april, 2017, the family were told christian's night—time support would be withdrawn — replaced, for a trial period, with voice—controlled assistive technology. but he struggles to hear and communicate. he became withdrawn, he obviously was very anxious about all of these bits of equipment that he didn't understand what they were for. the staff themselves got very worried about his well—being and his mental health. christian is not alone. according to a survey of more than 1,200 down's syndrome association members, 28% said they were concerned about the level
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of overnight support, whereas 43% of carers said their adult child needed and assessment. there are all kinds of practices going on, cutting packages without consultation, making decisions about what's right for individuals without consulting them or theirfamilies. the government says it's given local authorities £3.6 billion to social care funding this year, and will set out plans in 2019 to reform adult social care. it took the family more than year, but christian's night—time support was finally reinstated. devon county council admitted that it had not listened enough to the views of the family, who said the approach would not work for their son. nikki fox, bbc news. this morning we are getting so many
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responses from families and viewers are struggling with their own special needs. also, we will be looking quality of life over the next few minutes as well. want to read 1 comments sent in. rachel said there is a real misconception —— misconception that as soon as a child gets diagnosis, they are showered with support. you have to fight hard for everything your child needs, even with the health, education and care plan, there is not the understanding for my boy. thank you to that. do keep those coming. the hash tag this morning is #bbcsend. we will be looking at quality of life which is a huge issue. keep those comments coming in. we will be based it out the morning and there is much more news as well. plans for how the uk's immigration system will work ‘after‘ brexit
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will be published by the government today. the home secretary, sajid javid is proposing a new system, which he says will be built around people's skills, rather than whether or not they come from an eu country. the new rules will mark an end to the rights of eu citizens to live and work in britain without restrictions. the government is promising a new visa route for skilled migrants from the eu and beyond. (am!) and after brexit there'll be no limit on how many —— and after brexit there'll be no limit on how many highly—skilled workers can enter the country. let's get more on this from our political correspondent jonathan blake — these plans have been a long time coming from the government haven't they? the numbers around these seem to be switching. some of them certainly. there have been many months where the government has promised at some point it will come forward the plan how immigration will work after britain leaves the eu because think back to the referendum campaign, it
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was such a sensitive issue and perhaps the reason why many voted to leave the eu to the prime minister has been clear at every turn that after brexit, free movement of which of course comes with mentorship of the eu will come to an end. what will the system be that replaces that? on high skilled workers coming to the uk, engineers, doctors, jobs like that, that will go. there will be no limit on a number that can come here. this might more contentious issue is the limited amount of money that people are able to learn. suggest, that target the government has of getting immigration down, there is a commitment to keep it below the hundreds of thousands. this new system will be phased in from 2000 we are talking to caroline nokes later, the immigration minister and will find out what is being proposed. business groups are urging
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politicians to prevent britian leaving the european union without a deal, saying that with only 100 days to go until brexit, there is not enough time for some companies to make contingency plans. five of the uk's leading business groups, representing hundreds of thousands of firms, issued a joint statement saying they were "watching in horror" as westminster infighting left key questions about the uk's plans for brexit unresolved. (pres) meanwhile the european commission will publish details for brexit unresolved. meanwhile the european commission will publish details later of the measures it will take in case of a no—deal brexit. it will publish laws to provide stability in some key sectors like airports and banking, in an effort to avoid disruption. lets get more details from our reporter gavin lee. if there are not clear plans in place, what will happen? there are many areas of security and transport and particularly our transport, something the eu has been working on
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for several weeks. contingency planning, particularly at the airport, which is1 harsh reality. there are all sorts of things. they court the 1—stop security system we have all sorts of pilots licences, aviation systems, safety, things like that. what is going on at the moment is the eu is trying to make sure this stays at least in a temporary period of 9 months. particularly amsterdam airport. they call it a hub uk airport. 2.5 million passengers arrive or leave here each year. more than any other airport in europe. this is why cheaply they want to make sure for passengers they are not suddenly having problems and the warning is the customs, it takes to it he sectors to get through for passengers. they say that will potentially double in the event of no deal. the eu are preparing for a worst, which they says no deal that
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they are hoping they can a deal or, some say, no brexit at all. very timely, considering people are getting way to see family. efforts to bring down to the amount of salt in the food we eat have had mixed results, according to a report out today. public health england said that while manufacturers have succeeded in reducing salt in many products such as breakfast cereals and cakes, there's still too much in processed meats and ready meals. universities in england have been warned they risk undermining their reputations by giving too many students top degrees. (tx 00v) the regulator, the office for students, 0ur —— the regulator, the office for students, 0ur says nearly eight out of ten degrees awarded last year were either first class or upper—second — an increase of more than 10 per cent overjust six years. universities uk, which represents
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136 universities, says steps are already being taken to tackle so—called grade inflation. study has concluded that 8,000,000 people still use bank notes and coins and could create problems for those in debt or in rural areas. last year, debit cards overtook cash as the ukposmac most popular payment method. the shocking treatment of people with the most severe and challenging behaviour has prompted the government to push for people with learning disabilities to be treated in the community instead of in hospitals. this morning, dan is in teddington, discussing ways to improve care for some of the most vulnerable people. dan. good morning to you. and it's quite early still in the morning, just gone 7 o'clock but thank you so much to the many of you were getting into contact with us this morning. we are shining a light on issues facing people with special needs, some of theissues people with special needs, some of
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the issues they face, putting questions and comments to the care minister in about! hour. ijust wa nted minister in about! hour. ijust wanted to read you some of the comments we have been getting this morning. veronica got in touch with us. morning. veronica got in touch with us. she said parents of children with special needs are exhausted, biting on a daily basis. parents in small towns like us, we've had to get together to form a group to support each other because we don't get that support from elsewhere. jesus was talking, more action. kelly, my 3rd child, is an extremely high functioning autistic, managing socially. i've asked several times to him to be referred and tested for autism. they say he is fine. no support available for families like us, none at all. i have no idea where to turn. please keep those comments coming in. it's heartbreaking to listen to that.
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people feel they been patronised and as victims. education is a good thing. the need to be some figures. there are currently over 2300 special needs patients in hospitals in england. almost 60% of been there for more than 2 years. the cell —— the health secretary matt hancock told this programme he was to reduce the number of people living in cells by 1/3. jane mccubbin has been looking at the impact isolation can have both on health and well—being. for 18 months, we tried to shine a light on assessment in treatment units. i see him crying. and that he will scream, mummy, no go, mummy, no go. to shine a light on the people sometimes locked away the years. 16
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yea rs, sometimes locked away the years. 16 years, that is a life sentence. and then we heard bethanie singh. ministers listened. the last 22 months, her treatment has been to lock her in a cell. how can we in 2018 have a situation like that? it's horrible, and i'm pledged and committed to dealing with it. in 2015, the government promised homes not hospital. while overall numbers inside have barely budged, today, there are twice as many young people in these units than they were 3 yea rs in these units than they were 3 years ago. i'm joined now by rebecca hilsenrath, chief executive at the equality and human rights commission and also byjeremy, who we just heard injayne's report. jeremy, do you have an update on betha ny‘s situation? she is pretty much unchanged from
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when we last spoke. she has been moved out of the seclusion fell. —— cell. they have cut new hatches. she is still secluded. it's horrific. give us an idea of the toll. wei sun doesn't have friends. christian was too scared. after seeing how we were struggling, he couldn't have friends around as well. again, because of how we were struggling. if we have
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had bad, not only would best be different. 0ur had bad, not only would best be different. our son would be so different. our son would be so different as well. you can see on your face different as well. you can see on yourface and different as well. you can see on your face and the way you are talking about this, the difficulty is supposed to you and as a family. give us an idea of how this is in humans write more. —— human rights law. people are falling behind society and that's across all outcomes, education, health, housing, work, the lot. it is important that something is done now to stop that gap widening. bethany has had a human rights. kids with these disabilities and autism have set the same rights. it is not to be locked up with hatches, not to receive full and inhumane treatment. what is the prospect of change?
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given that i'm delighted we are taking this case. i'm delighted because people believe me. the ability to raise awareness is incredibly important. we need the government to listen. we have made strong recommendations to government about the need for a kovatseff package, adequate resources, a care path that starts at a young age and goes into adult care. we will also talking about the importance of not just an adequate resource but resource at the right time, before crisis, early interventions to ensure we don't get to this place. what question do we want to put to them? why doesn't he take their three quarters of £1 million and put
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it into early intervention? to stop young people getting to a crisis point. it could do so much more. at the early stage. how is he going to change that system ? the early stage. how is he going to change that system? so many of our families and guests nodding along. it is great we are here. this is exactly what he saw. he wanted to ca re exactly what he saw. he wanted to care and educate and help families living what you were living through now but 150 years ago. as jayne mccubbin was saying, a can—do attitude and we can't do that. people spending a life in asylum. you want bethany to live the best life she can live today. people have lost sight of what my daughter can do. she is a case number, she is a problem. not a human being. the good news is we are talking about this
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this morning. bbcsend is the number one trend in the uk this morning. hopefully, i know there is a difference between talking about it and making a different and making a change and that's what we are trying to encourage, to change the conversation a little bit and the changes you are talking about, that might happen down the line. thank you for your time this morning. you canjoin in. you for your time this morning. you can join in. bbcsend you for your time this morning. you canjoin in. bbcsend is the hash tag. we want your questions, comments and we will be talking to the care minister live on bbc brea kfast. the care minister live on bbc breakfast. we do have other things to do as well and one of those, very important, the weather. that is find out what is happening in the rest of the uk. time now for the weather with carol. a lot of rain yesterday which has cleared off. looking at a day of sunshine and showers. some are merging to give longer spells of rain. a lot will become confined to the south and west. this is yesterday's rain. also a week when a front moving from the west to the
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east and more rain coming front moving from the west to the eastand more rain coming in front moving from the west to the east and more rain coming in from the west generally. this morning, a lot of dry weather around despite all those showers. showers continuing across central and southern england, getting around east anglia and the south—east. clearing later on so it will dry up. a lot of showers across western scotland, parts of northern ireland, western england, wales, south—west england, the channel islands and the re m na nts of england, the channel islands and the remnants of this morning post and showers in the south—east. in between them, bright and shiny spells. —— this morning's showers. neither will it be as mild or windy this morning. today, seven or eight. heading on through this morning and overnight. moving into the direction of the north sea. some spells in between of sun. temperatures will be lower. enhanced showers meaning to
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heavier showers will be coming our way into the north—west by the time we get to tomorrow morning. that is because low pressure has been dominating our weather for the last wee while. it is still in the west, edging closer, taking the showers in across northern ireland, western scotla nd across northern ireland, western scotland and northern england. we lose the showers in the morning from the south—east. a lot of dry weather. a fair bit of sunshine. a breezy day tomorrow as opposed to windy one and in the sunshine, it won't feel too bad. the early morning mist and fog is clearing as the showery rain comes in and the temperature range sinks to about 12. 0vernight thursday and into friday, a band of rain will sweep in. moving north—east. ahead of it, some clear skies for a time. sunshine in the south. highs of 11 or 12. you know how we like everything to
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flow in this programme. we make things to connect. you have ruined the next bit because i was hoping for slow because i'm interviewing the great, great, great granddaughter of charles dickens. a christmas carol after your carol's carols and you have given me nothing to talk about in the link to that. i blame you. you can say it is a green christmas instead of a white one. all take that! that i will take that. charles dickens's literary classic ‘a christmas carol', has stood the test of time, with more than 20 film adaptations to its credit. to celebrate the 175th anniversary of its publication, the writer's great—great—great granddaughter lucinda dickens hawksley will read from the first edition of the book at a special event. we can speak to her now. thank you forjoining us from our london studio this morning. what i
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would like to know because we all know it's a time as christmas story, when was the first time you heard it and who told it to you? is a hard one to remember. i'vejust and who told it to you? is a hard one to remember. i've just always been aware of it. i remember all through my childhood knowing about it and seeing film adaptations. it is one of the stories always been in my life. itches weaves through life. what you think makes it so timeless? "it what you think makes it so timeless? ——it really doesn't weave through life. t think went into the thinking behind the story? i think what makes every generation reacts to it in their own way is the fact that dickens wrote it from the heart. when he wrote the christmas carol, he had originally started off thinking of writing a pamphlet about a government report into child pulled —— child poverty. they realised —— then he realised it wouldn't spoke to many people. the christmas carol was written about child poverty. the main characters are the two children that appear
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with the second christmas ghost. basically if children are left in ignorance and deprivation, they will grow up to be the dangerous adults of society. that was the crucial message that dickens was trying to get across in 1843, at the start of what was known as the hungry 40s. lucinda, we are looking at some lovely to sketches. tell us about what these mean at the moment. the original sketches are byjohn leach who was a friend of charles dickens. dickens had to pay money to be able to use these in his book. his publishers thought that an idea about a book about christmas was a weird one and they didn't think that people would like them and didn't have the confidence to agree to pay for these very expensive hand coloured illustrations but that dickens, they were the crucial element to go with his writing. john leach went on to become a famous
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cartoonist but what these illustrations have become is stood as test of time. —— stood the test of time. it gives us an insight into how dickens is imagining his characters at the time. today you are unavailing recently rediscovered portrait of your great, great, great grandfather. this is a poor chip that was painted in 1843, the same yearin that was painted in 1843, the same year in which dickens was writing at christmas carol. the last time it was exhibited in this country was in 1844, 174 years ago. it been com pletely lost 1844, 174 years ago. it been completely lost for all of those yea rs. completely lost for all of those years. nobody knew where it was and it was completely coincidentally in their 175th anniversary year of a christmas carol, it was rediscovered this year in a box ofjunk. in a sale in south africa. the person who bought it didn't know what he was really buying. he bought a box of trinkets and children's toys for the equivalent of £27. it is currently on display at the gallery in pall
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mall. they try to raise funds for the dickens museum to buy it and bring home and it shows what he looked like at the age of 31 when he was writing a christmas carol and the eyes in the sport that are so intense. they really show it was an important moment in his life, quite a difficult time am personally, financially, it was a hard time. he was just a financially, it was a hard time. he wasjust a burning financially, it was a hard time. he was just a burning with this zeal to make a difference in the world. good luck with the unveiling, thank you for the history lesson as well. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. three people have been arrested after a man was shot dead in north london. police were called to
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stjoseph's road in edmonton at around 9.15 last night and the man was declared dead at the scene just under an hour later. the mayor says he's likely to raise council tax by the maximum amount he is allowed next year to help pay for policing. it would be the second year in a row sadiq khan has opted for the biggest rise available to him. the mayor says he feels "let down" by the government's police settlement. finding love using mobile phone apps has increased ‘diversity‘ in dating in the capital — with more of us willing to meet people from a different background. that's according to one dating historian who's told bbc london playing the numbers game leads to more success than using niche apps which promise to filter users. one of the newest — toffee — is exclusively for those who went to private school. it's very tempting to go for a niche
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app because it sounds like it will save you all this annoying, degrading labour but my research suggests that they just don't work. you have to go through the dross to get to what you want. you have to do it, not a third party. one of the very interesting things that has changed with the rise of apps people's willingness and interest in dating people of a different class and race. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. but the 0verground is part suspended between seven sisters — and cheshunt and enfield town. 0n the roads: multi vehicle collision. king's cross road is closed northbound between between frederick stret and great percy street for burst water main repairs. in leyton: lea bridge road has temporary traffic lights for water mains work at the junction with markhouse road. now the weather with kate kinsella.
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good morning. it's quite a damp but mild start this morning. we had quite a few showers overnight last night with heavy ones mixed in. they will continue for the first part of this morning at least. then turning a bit drier and brighter later. we have blustery south—westerly wind. that's going to help push those showers through. later on as those showers clear, we will see decent spells of sunshine. temperatures somewhere between nine and 10 celsius. 0vernight tonight, the cloud will start to increase and we will see further showers moving in, potentially across—the—board. temperatures won't drop too far. another reasonably mild night. minimum between five and seven. that breeze stays quite windy as we head into thursday. similar conditions, showers in the morning, drier through the afternoon. again, similarfor friday and saturday. it's not until sunday that we start to see things change little. turning a little bit milder with temperatures up at 14 celsius but with that, it does turn a little wetter.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back to the breakfast team. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the down's syndrome association says adults with the condition are becoming increasingly lonely, depressed and unhealthy as a result of poor care. a survey of more than 1,200 people revealed that a lack of support is leading to low levels of social activity and education. the government says it has given local authorities £3.6 billion pounds to fund social care this year, and will set out plans to reform the system next year. the home secretary will today publish the government's long—awaited plans for how the uk's immigration system will operate after brexit. sajid javid is proposing a new system, which he says will be built around people's skills, rather than whether or not they come from an eu country. the new rules will mark an end
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to the rights of eu citizens to live and work in britain without restrictions. business groups are urging politicians to prevent britian leaving the european union without a deal, saying that with only 100 days to go until brexit, there is not enough time for some companies to make contingency plans. (tx 00v) five of the uk's leading business groups, five of the uk's leading business groups, representing hundreds of thousands of firms, issued a joint statement saying they were "watching in horror" as westminster infighting left key questions about the uk's plans for brexit unresolved. universities in england have been warned they risk undermining their reputations by giving too many students top degrees. step is looking at quality programmes when it comes to mobile phones. still it would switch. the competition and market authority has done a big investigation into 5 areas, by particular markets. they
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found that people are being exploited in things like mobile phone contracts, broadband contracts, household insurance and other financial services as well. they say that millions of people have been affected by this and they list a number of different practices which they have seen as part of their investigation. they say things like continual stock price rises each year. costly exit fees when you try to leave, time consuming and difficult process is to actually cancel your contract or to switch providers. and in things like requiring customers to auto renew or not giving them sufficient time when the contract is about to be rolled over. they are saying all of this is really exploitative of the customers who are being loyal to those companies. they are saying now that in particular, honourable people are most affected by this. setting out recommendations. to be people 6 months in order to be able to change
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this. i'll be telling a bit more about what those recommendations are. companies will say, we are giving the opportunities. in choosing to say. what they are saying is, those ways to leave a really difficult and it should change. carol is going to have the weather. now we will talk to mike. i'm not sure how much loyalty has been shown tojose—maria nero. —— how much loyalty is being shown to jose mourinho. you need to build a dynasty. there has to be young players coming through, lasting success is although players coming through, lasting success is althouthose mourinho, needed 2 in 2 cups early on 1 of their worst starts. he is paid the
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price. i don't think there is enough development of youth coming through. they had to act. after months of sulking and poor performances, jose—maria nero has paid the price. this is him leaving the hotel in manchester that he is called home for 2.5 years and he leaves having spent £400,000,000 on players. as to who is next, united appear to have the cat out of the bag regarding a short—term replacement. as to who's next, well united appear to have let the cat out of the bag. this post on the official manchester united website looks to confirm that former striker, 0le gunnar solskjaer, will take over as caretaker manager until the end of the season. he's currently boss of the norwegian side molde, who finished 2nd in the season that recently ended, and their new season starts in march. so a caretaker boss for now, but who's in the running in the long term?
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there's already a favourite, and it's this man...the tottenham boss mauricio, pochettino. his spurs play the kind of football that united fans crave and he has a good track record, of developing young players. but — he's yet to win a trophy in english football. it's not my business what happens in another club. and they want to send my best wishes to jose. another club. and they want to send my best wishes tojose. there is a lot of room that happens here. i cannot answer. this type of question because the type of rumour happen in that business, in football. spurs face arsenal tonight, in the league cup quarter—finals..talking of which, manchester city are now through to the semi—finals. they needed penalties to beat leicester, and it didn't start well — shocker from raheem sterling. leicester were even worse from the penalty spot though, leaving 0leksander zinchenko, to send the holders through. and what a result for league 0ne side burton albion — through to the semi—finals
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for the first time in their history after beating championship side middlesbrough. jake hesketh the hero with the only goal of the game. and lewis hamilton, says he chose the wrong words after insulting his hometown. he described stevenage, as a slum during sports personality of the year and got plenty of criticism — including from the local council. but hamilton says he just made a mistake. (tx sor) the shares —— mac i didn't know you grow up in stevenage. it was a great town. riding my bike and everything. think you so much. the government's publishing
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its long—awaited plans for how the uk's immigration system will operate after brexit. the home secretary sajid javid says the new rules will be built around people's skills, rather than whether or not they come from an eu country. immigration minister caroline nokes joins us now from westminster. what is happening in terms of skill levels, having people coming based on skill. we take advice from the independent migration advisory committee. they have determined that we should slightly reduce the skill level so we are bringing in a levels we re level so we are bringing in a levels were as previously under the tier 2 system, people who had a degree level qualification but what we are making sure we do is have a system that enables the brightest and the best to come here, attracting talent from around the globe whilst same time reflecting the needs of our economy. okay, what about the amount of money that people need to prove
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in order to come over here. £30,000 minimum? independent advice we received sedition of the assault of £30,000 but this was pre— match the start of a conversation with industry and regional developed administrations and across the uk. we wa nt administrations and across the uk. we want to take advice from business. understand what their needs are. and those people who are on the shortage occupation list. already coming in with a lower starting group salary than £30,000. it's right that we should be able to reflect we have shortages in our economy and to attract those people with the skills that we obviously need. i suggest to you that £30,000 isa need. i suggest to you that £30,000 is a big step away from realistic salaries when you look at industries such as hospitality, care homes, agriculture, construction where salaries of £30,000 are rare but you need a large number of those people
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in those industries and they are coming from abroad, outside the uk. how are you go to reassure those businesses that they won't be shortstaffed ? businesses that they won't be shortstaffed? 1st and foremost, we wa nt to shortstaffed? 1st and foremost, we want to work with those businesses to fill the spots. we are going to bring in measures that will enable business to continue to attract some temporary workers and it's important that we don't do this is 1 sudden movement, we have consultation with business and transitional arrangements so over a period of time, temporary workers will be able to come in but it is important we have done brilliantly in this government to get employment up and unemployment weigh down. we gather is more to do. continuing to attract into thejob is more to do. continuing to attract into the job market and make sure our young people have the skills that they need to fill some of the rules that are currently vacant. as brilliantly as you think you've
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done, businesses are unsure about what happens in the event of a no deal brexit. we are hearing plans about immigration which is largely flagged, almost a campaign promise. you are going to bring immigration down. short—term contracts, an industry where we need a lot of relatively unskilled workers and you are only going to guarantee short—term contracts. this is still have no continuity when it comes to forward planning. we are focused on making sure business brings in high skilled people. what about the construction workers in the fruit pickers, those people who have lower medical skills in terms of nursing ca re medical skills in terms of nursing care homes, the hospitality industry. we haven't got the people here to fill those jobs. as you will have heard way back in the autumn, we are introducing a pilot scheme for horticultural workers. i spent my summer for horticultural workers. i spent my summer talking to the soft fruit
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industry about the needs they have so we've already listened to industry and reflected back at this white paper is the start of a conversation. we will spend the next year making sure we are engaged with business and understand where there are particular needs and act upon it. it's really important. this is our 1st chance in a generation for the uk to control of its own borders away from free movement and it's crucial we do that but do it hand—in—hand with business, listening to their concerns and making sure we get salary on skill levels right. caroline nokes, please rebuff what i'm about to say. saying what many small businesses will be thinking. you've been in this programme and said we as a government have done brilliantly. 0ver government have done brilliantly. over the next year, we will provide continuity and have a pilot scheme. this doesn't sound like you have any firm plans that small businesses can rely on. it's a specific scheme that
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horticulture. if you let me finish, i will give you the whole answer. we are bringing in a system which will enable us to attract skills from around the globe. this is a new immigration system from 2021, giving business time to plan but we have also said we are absolutely going to lift skilled workers, find ways to them to access temporary staff that they need them but we want their focus to be on making sure we are putting young british people into the vacancies they have and it's absolutely right that the government should be focused on the skills of our own workforce and making sure they are in employment. you know as well as i do, we are at a 40 year high in employment and we have done enormous work on getting youth employment down but there is more to do. that's why we are working hand in hand with the department of education to make sure going forward we get this absolutely right. thank you to talk to us this morning. we know you're standing out in the
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rain, we appreciate that. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. there is a lot to say, naga road. —— naga fools that a lot of the showers could be confined. this is yesterday's rain moving away. a line of showers, some heavy, moving from the west to the east. there is a lot of dry weather around today. a fair bit of sunshine. showers continuing to eventually move away that continuing in the west. parts of the south. some of their showers could be thundery. it will be temperature wise down a couple of degrees.
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today, more likely to be nine or ten. coming further south, today, more likely to be nine or ten. coming furthersouth, looking at ten or 12. through this evening and overnight, we can see how the showers push inland kidding into eastern areas. the windfalls lighter and we will see clear spells developing. it will fill chillier than these divisions are suggesting with the clear spells will stop it's hardly a heat wave. —— chris bell. it's hardly a heat wave. —— clear spells. tomorrow, too, we will see a lot of dry weather. i take it out, you have lots and lots to talk about. this is all about loyalty. we are talking about switching. we're talking about the so—called loyalty penalty. an investigation has found that
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customers are being exploited when they stay with providers and it's costing them £4 billion a year in total. they stopped it andrea. —— lets talk to andrea. what we found is that if consumers stay with the same providers for quite sometime, they end up paying more than consumers that engage with the market and potentially switch providers. what we re potentially switch providers. what were the practices? some of them are simply lack of transparency. commune —— customers stay and don't understand that and —— that they are paying more. a lot of insurance companies offer low introductory
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prices and then raise their prices. the difference between what you pay and what you could pay if you switch become significant. what you found from your investigation is proof that it from your investigation is proof thatitis from your investigation is proof that it is difficult to switch and if that's the case, how has this been allowed to happen?m if that's the case, how has this been allowed to happen? it varies by market. we are going to take our legal powers seriously. it's been worked out this is costing customers around £11 million every day. what are you going to do about it? there are you going to do about it? there area number of are you going to do about it? there are a number of in —— existing investigations. we are looking into
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mobile, broadband, insurance mode —— mortgages. we have 0fcom for telecoms. they are currently active in these markets. looking at some of these practices. there will be some changes. we have lodged today and other investigation into antivirus softwa re other investigation into antivirus software companies because that's another sector where we are seeing some practices we think are potentially problematic and we are looking across a number of other sectors and launching possibly a number of other sectors in the next few months. a lot of investigations, a lot of looking into things. when a consumer seeing a a lot of looking into things. when a consumer seeing a difference? jelena these investigations are formal processes . these investigations are formal processes. “— these investigations are formal processes. —— these investigations. the decisions by regulators will force companies to change the way they behave. a number of the investigations, the changes will come in the next few months. you
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have given a deadline of six months. what do you expect to be seen done by then? what we're is accepting accountability this issue across the economy. we are going to publish and update all the various investigations into each set is to make sure that there is swift progress. bank you for your time. -- thank you. big news for those millions of people who are affected. we're continuing our series about special educational needs on breakfast this morning. it's prompted so many personal and powerful stories — many of you have been in touch with tales of your struggles — but also sharing messages of hope and success. dan is in teddington catching up with some people we've met before. welcome to the beautiful theatre
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pa rt welcome to the beautiful theatre part of the langdon down museum. in teddington. hampton court palace. 0nly teddington. hampton court palace. only three miles away from where we are this morning. thank you for all of your messages, we are getting hundreds and hundreds. doctorjohn london down and set this up because he looked at society and saw people struggling with learning difficulties and said why are we putting these people into silence? surely we can care for them, surely we can educate them. —— asylums. today we are looking at the legacy of that and talking to so many families living with these things now, living with special needs. today really facing some of the frustration of tried to get the care of the education and the support that they need in their lives. i wa nt to that they need in their lives. i want to mention. you have some families here. nick knoll says being
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in contact and he says they built their programme with people with special needs. they could build 999. the key with what nick is saying is that when you listen to the family is, when you are willing to say, ok, the money needs to be spent here and here. when you listen and the changes made, this difference it makes is immeasurable. that's the key. if you fix the problem downstream, you don't end up with people in crisis upstream. except when it down here, avoid the crisis. we have heard a lot about the dark stuff with bethany. let talk about the flipside. all of your children have been written off as challenging in the past. all of your children have been in the eight teus. —— tell
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me what life is like for matthew. have been in the eight teus. —— tell me what life is like for matthewm couldn't be more different. from the moment matthew left the atu, he was no longer forcibly inject dead or forcibly restrained. he is out in the community every day, he is having structured learning, a highly structured day. he is backing his fort ball. —— football. he is on a quest to visit every football ground in the whole of the uk. we've done about 75 already. years living life. he has a voluntaryjob in his local foot ball he has a voluntaryjob in his local football team. he is supported but he runs the halftime games. it's possible. it's not rocket science. let me introduce leo. you are in the film at the top of the hour weeping to us. two weeks ago, steve came out. what does good support look
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like? exactly what he is having right now. an amazing team of carers who are extremely dedicated and kind and loving. there are those bad ones. i'm not saying, it's only two weeks. he is finding his feet and having challenging behaviours obviously. also the amount of antipsychotic medication, they are not helping him. having that support. he has his own home. this is what we need. that's what care, if not rocket science. let me introduce claire. i will summarise the bad debt. your boy was in winter bon vue and then in atlas care, two
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of the worst the great trials in history. —— neglect trials. a nurse wasn't struck off for a smashing his teeth out the band a few weeks ago, they change their mind and said he wasn't allowed to work and she told me ben has a voice now.|j wasn't allowed to work and she told me ben has a voice now. i felt he was a very me ben has a voice now. i felt he was a very different hearing. it did a lot of good for the family, to be honest. he is doing fantastically well now. every month is a change. he has a dog, he is in his own home. he has a dog, he is in his own home. he is out in the community, shakes everyone's hand. wants to help old ladies. part of the community. yes and getting better and better. it is possible and he has fantastic terrace, a fantastic provider. come with me over here, i want to inje ducie ten eyewitness news ball —— paul's garratt —— i want to
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introduce you. tell me where you are and how important it is we get this right. i came out of the unit, iron married and my wife —— i am married. iwork for a charity and i do care, treatment and reviews. it's possible, isn't it? it is possible. have a good life. we will chat to you all later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. three people have been arrested
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after a man was shot dead in north london. police were called to stjoseph's road in edmonton at around 9.15 last night. the man was declared dead at the scene. the mayor says he's likely to raise council tax by the maximum amount he is allowed next year — to help pay for policing. it would be the second year in a row sadiq khan has opted for the biggest rise available to him. there are calls for more to be done to help the capital's unemployed find work with the london ambulance service. it's one of the recommendations of a report by the london assembly to cope with growing demand. this year the service dealt with almost two million emergency calls from across london. finding love using mobile phone apps has increased ‘diversity‘ in dating in the capital — with people more willing to date those from a different background. that's according to one dating historian who's told bbc london playing the numbers game leads to more success than using niche apps which filter users.
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one of the newest — toffee — is exclusively for those who went to private school. it's very tempting to go for a niche app because it sounds like it will save you all this annoying, degrading labour but my research suggests that they just don't work. you have to go through the dross to get to what you want. you have to do it, not a third party. one of the very interesting things that has changed with the rise of apps people's willingness and interest in dating people of a different class and race. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. but the 0verground is part suspended between seven sisters — and cheshunt and enfield town. 0n the roads: there's been a multi—vehicle collision on the m25 anti—clockwise near junction 11 for chertsey. there queues back to junction 12. finally, king's cross road is closed northbound between frederick street and great percy street for burst water main repairs.
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now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's quite a damp but mild start this morning. we had quite a few showers overnight last night with heavy ones mixed in. they will continue for the first part of this morning at least. then turning a bit drier and brighter later. we have blustery south—westerly wind. that's going to help push those showers through. later on as those showers clear, we will see decent spells of sunshine. temperatures somewhere between nine and 10 celsius. 0vernight tonight, the cloud will start to increase and we will see further showers moving in, potentially across—the—board. temperatures won't drop too far. another reasonably mild night. minimum between five and seven. that breeze stays quite windy as we head into thursday. similar conditions, showers in the morning, drier through the afternoon. again, similarfor friday and saturday. it's not until sunday that we start to see things change little. turning a little bit milder with temperatures up at 14 celsius but with that, it does turn a little wetter.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. bye for now. good mornng this is breakfast with dan walker. this morning in a special programme, we examine the challenges faced by families living with special needs. we are live in teddington, just outside london. all this year we've been shining a light on the quality of life and care available for millions across the uk. we're at the langdon down museum of learning disability to speak to those affected, those working to tackle the problem and we'll speak to the minister responsible for care in england. it isa it is a beautiful place. we will put
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to their many questions and comments you've send to us. also in the news this morning a plan for immigration after brexit — the government says it will prioritise skills not nationality. it doesn't pay to be loyal. millions of customers are being exploited when they stay with providers for things like mobile phone contracts, broadband and insurance. that's according to the regulator. i'll have the details. who's going to take over one of the biggestjobs in football? it's mourinho out at manchester united, and could it be, solskjaer in, for the short term at least? a day of sunshine and showers for most of us although through the day, most of us although through the day, most showers becoming confined to the south and the west. more details in15 the south and the west. more details in 15 minutes. good morning, it's wednesday 19th december. today we're bringing you a special edition of breakfast from the beautiful normansfield theatre, which is part of the langdon down museum of learning disability. this will set up in 1868 by a
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victorian physician who saw the need for caring for people with learning difficulties in victorian society and thought we can do better. it's not about what we can't do but what we can do and he didn't want to see children and adults living in a silence. he thought we can care and educate these people and love these people. 150 years on we have been joined by some families living with special needs. thank you so much for being part of our programme. we have been talking to them and will continue to do so. thank you for the many of you who have gotten in contact with us and some of the questions you have been raising we will put to the care minister in about ten minutes' time. some of the stories we have heard have been very frustrated, some families who can't find the care they have been desperate for, they are moving and they are powerful. we've heard many of your moving and powerful stories, and the uphill struggle you've faced to access support.
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first though, we have an exclusive look at a report by the down's syndrome association, which suggests funding cuts have led to failings in the level of care, support and provision for people living with down's. 0ur disability news correspondent nikki fox has more. christian eastwood lives in his own place, near his mum and dad. he's able to live as independently as possible, in supported living. he has down syndrome and learning disabilities and requires 24—hour care. to pay for this, christian receives money from his local council. after a care review in april 2017, the family were told christian's night—time support would be withdrawn, replaced, for a trial period, with voice—controlled assistive technology. but he struggles to hear and communicate. he became withdrawn. he, obviously, was very anxious about all these bits of equipment that he didn't understand what they were for. the staff themselves got very worried about his well—being and his mental health. christian is not alone. according to a survey of more than 1,200 down syndrome
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association members, 28% said they were concerned about the level of overnight support. whereas 43% of carers said their adult child needed an assessment. there are all kinds of practices going on. cutting packages without consultation, making decisions about what's right for individuals without consulting them or their families. the government says it's given local authorities £3.6 billion to social care funding this year and will set out plans in 2019 to reform adult social care. it took the family more than a year, but christian's night—time support was finally reinstated. devon county council admitted that it had not listened enough to the views of the family, who said the approach would not work for their son. nicky fox, bbc news. we are looking at all sorts of issues this morning, education,
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quality of life and life expectancy and we are getting comments on a huge range of topics was tom sue says my daughter has cerebral palsy and is severely physically disabled and is severely physically disabled and we had to fight hard throughout her entire life, it has paid off, she started her doctorate at nottingham university in october and is living independently in her own flat. she is so proud of her. brilliant story. martin is a single pa rent brilliant story. martin is a single parent with a child of acute and complex difficulties, he faces a daily struggle to get the financial support the government claims is available. i am a full—time carer but unable to work full—time. we know money can make a difference but we are aware this morning this is not an easy fix. maybe we need to look at the entire way we are doing this. one person said what is the point about talking about this if you are not speaking to the people making decisions? we are speaking to the people who can make changes because the care minister, caroline dinenage will be live on breakfast inafew dinenage will be live on breakfast in a few minutes' time. come back to
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us for that and keep sending those comments in. thanks, dan. plans for how the uk's immigration system will work ‘after‘ brexit will be published by the government today. the home secretary, sajid javid, is proposing a new system, which he says will be built around people's skills, rather than whether or not they come from an eu country. the new rules will mark an end to the rights of eu citizens to live and work in britain "without" restrictions. the government is promising a new visa route for skilled migrants from the eu and beyond. and after brexit, there'll be no limit on how many "highly—skilled" workers can enter the country. let's get more on this from our political correspondent jonathan blake. these plans have been a long time coming from the government haven't they? it comesjust it comes just after it comesjust after our it comes just after our programming but lots of numbers to get through and see what is clear. good morning. for months, the government has been promising to come forward with its plan. for how immigration works after britain leaves the eu. as the
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prime minister promised many times, freedom of movement comes to an end with that. as you say, there will be a new system of visas so the cap on highly skilled workers so, doctors and engineers will be lifted. but there's been a bit of a row between downing street and the treasury in terms of what the minimum salary should be for those workers coming to the uk to live and to work. we understand it will be set at around £30,000. the government will confirm the details later, but there are fears that will lead to not enough people coming to fill the jobs available. the immigration minister, caroline noakes, available. the immigration minister, caroline noa kes, was available. the immigration minister, caroline noakes, was on the programme earlier and you asked her about that figure. this is the start of a conversation with industry and the regional devolved administrations and across the uk. we want to take advice from business, understand what their needs are and those people who are on the shortage occupation lists, which already exist already come in
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with a lower starting salary than £30,000. it is right we should be able to reflect on where we have shortages in our economy and continue to attract those people with the skills we obviously need. the government suggesting there will bea the government suggesting there will be a degree of flexibility. labour have criticised the government saying it will be based on income rather than skills. there is no commitment to get it down to the tens of thousands, specifically, that was in the conservative party ma nifesto that was in the conservative party manifesto but it contains a specific commitment to get immigration below hundreds of thousands. ok, thank you. i think that announcement is around 9:45am, we will get clearer numbers. business groups are urging politicians to prevent britain leaving the european union without a deal, saying that with only 100 days to go until brexit, there is not enough time for some companies to make contingency plans. five of the uk's leading business groups, representing hundreds of thousands of firms, issued a joint statement saying they were "watching in horror" as westminster infighting left key questions about the uk's plans for brexit unresolved.
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meanwhile, the european commission will publish details later of the measures it will take in case of a no—deal brexit. it will publish laws to provide stability in some key sectors like airports and banking, in an effort to avoid disruption. millions are being ripped off by shoddy practices that mean they're overpaying for broadband, insurance, mobile phones and even mortgages. that's the damning finding of the competition regulator this morning. steph's got more on this. you have asked the cma how it can stop it. this is a huge investigation, looking into key markets where they think there is a problem with loyalty. if you stay loyal to a company, in some cases, customers are being exploited by those companies. they up playing paying more. —— they end up paying more. the stealth price rises.
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companies making it difficult for people to leave contracts, potential exit fees and even just switching. we keep talking about switching being so much easier now but what they found is evidence that, in some industries, it isn't. therefore, this is affecting millions of people. it has been worked out that the cost is something like £11 million a day extra that we are paying for things, because we're being loyal to particular providers. there are some out there who are treating their customers well and giving them discounts if they are loyal, but this research is saying there is a big problem and they want to do something about it. the competitions and markets authority, the regulator about competition, will work with other regulators to try and crack down on this —— they will work with the other regulators. they are giving a six—month deadline to the other regulators and government to get real change for customers. what that might look like we don't know but the whole point, it should be a lot easier and people
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shouldn't have to pay more each year if they are being loyal. unless the prices generally are going up. but they are saying that is not the case, exploitation is happening. we have come at this a lot on brea kfast. have come at this a lot on breakfast. in six months, we will be talking to the regulator again. hopefully, there will be some difference but you never know with these things. what life might look like in six months and six days! christmas! you are already dressed for it! i am dressed like a christmas present. everyone's gift to life, thanks very much. over the last 18 months, we've reported on the tireless campaigning of families living with children with learning difficulties — including those being held in so—called assessment and treatment units, which have been described as "appalling" by the national autistic society. dan is in teddington to find out what's being done about it. good morning. it is a rather remarkable building but you are with
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some rather remarkable people? we are. a lot of love for steph's magnificent shirt by the way. we are looking at the challenges, good morning to you at home, of living with special needs and the challenges some of those families face. we are part of the langdon down museum of learning disabilities in teddington, ten miles from central london and from parliament. 0ne central london and from parliament. one of the things people have said this morning amongst the hundreds and thousands of comments about the challenges many families face across the uk is that it won't make a difference until people in parliament to listen. can you put those questions and some of our comments to the ministers and those who make decisions? i am delighted to say we are joined live by the ca re to say we are joined live by the care minister, caroline dinenage, thank you for coming on breakfast and talking to us. there are many things to sell that many of our viewers and our guests in this theatre know this is not easy to fix but one thing that really comes
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across is the frustration of thousands and thousands of people, watching this programme this morning, particularly things like education, quality of life. they can't see a way out and they can't ca re can't see a way out and they can't care for their loved ones because there are funding issues and many other issues related. what is your message to the many people notjust here this morning, but to the thousands watching and caring about theirfamily this thousands watching and caring about their family this morning? firstly, good morning and i am sorry i can't be with you in person, i desperately wa nted be with you in person, i desperately wanted to be. i hope this will be second best, down the line talking to you. i totally get it. it is so brilliant that the bbc are shining a light on this. as care minister, i don't get out much. people always wa nt to don't get out much. people always want to talk about health, but actually, care is one of the most fundamental things that we can do for our population. nobody should feel that they are disadvantaged by our health system, by our care
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system, schools, and society. because they have a learning disability or autism all because they are caring for somebody who does. that's what i'm seeking to change. that's why i've been up and down the country meeting people, talking to people. it's not a quick fix, as you say. money will help but money isn't everything. what we really need is a culture change about how we approach people and make sure everybody has the same opportunities in life, the same life chances and quality services. that sounds amazing but some of the specific issues we have talked about this morning, what you say sounds great, but the families we have been speaking to face an uphill struggle every single day to find that level of care which they need, notjust they want, but they need for their families. let's look at a secure unit beds, that is something the government have promised to close between 35% and 50% of those beds by march 2019. how on earth are you going to meet that target in a few months, you are way off? we are, we
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are on 20%. it's not about getting people out of those units for the sake of it, i have always said, adding toa sake of it, i have always said, adding to a community where there are robust services. —— and getting them to communities. making sure those services are robust and making sure they are in place otherwise people will just go sure they are in place otherwise people willjust go straight back in. 2096 people willjust go straight back in. 20% fewer are there. let's not get down the wrong track, it's really important to recognise that for some people, those are a really important service and an important place. parents have written to me, saying they are being castigated in the media, these units, and other places, but they saved my child's life. for some people, they are absolutely important and urgent. caroline, iam absolutely important and urgent. caroline, i am sure many of our viewers would agree with you on that point. we have limited time, i am trying to get as many questions as i
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can. i know you know aboutjeremy‘s case and his daughter bethany who has been in this atu. and she has beenin has been in this atu. and she has been ina has been in this atu. and she has been in a secure unit for many years and trying to find a way out. for jeremy and his life, he wanted to say, take the three quarters of £1 million that it is costing to keep bethany in that a secure unit and use that on early intervention. why can't we do things like that not just for bethany but many other people living in that situation?” com pletely people living in that situation?” completely agree, 100%. the nhs long term plan will be coming out soon and for the first time ever, learning disability and autism are one of the key clinical priorities and that has never happened before. that is a great step forward. it will talk about transforming care but also things like community provision, early intervention and how we stop people ending up in these units will necessarily because in so many cases, they tell a story ofa in so many cases, they tell a story of a missed opportunity early on ——
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make these units unnecessarily. where the right support and help wasn't put in place at the right time. the other things that come across this morning and the messages that we have got today, there is a real feeling and frustration that money is being spent in the wrong places. look at the social care issue, paid for by local councils who have had their budgets halved since 2010. there is a separate pot of money for social care and hospital care is dealt with by the nhs. until those two are married together, people who are challenged by living with special needs and other things like dementia, there is not enough money in the pot to make the difference, which is why families watching this this morning are probably tearing their hair out, thinking what you are saying is magnificent, but that is not what they are seeing daily. as they are trying to find the best ca re as they are trying to find the best care for their loved ones.” as they are trying to find the best care for their loved ones. i totally get that. i know that money has been under a huge amount of pressure in
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recent yea rs. under a huge amount of pressure in recent years. more recently, we have been putting a lot more money into social care. £3.6 billion this year. local councils will have access to. we have said the nhs long—term plan is getting up to £20 billion a year extra by 2022. the money is now going in but what you say is very important. it's about those budgets being pooled in the best interests of the individual and the person being at the centre of the decision—making and the different organisations notjealously guarding their own budgets and not putting that person's well—being and their needs first. that's a culture change we need to aspire to. that's why, when the nhs long—term plan and the aduu when the nhs long—term plan and the adult social care green paper come out shortly, the fact that those two are coming out near to each other and need to interact with each other in the same way that when we care for people, we need to make sure that the money and the services wrap
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around those individuals as well. we appreciate your time, we could have you on for about 15 more minutes and we will get as many questions from those with us. that is caroline dinenage, the care ministerfor england. thank you forjoining us. the systems in wales and northern ireland for send our changing. there isa ireland for send our changing. there is a different system for special educational needs. a quarter of children in scotland have additional support needs and it is broad in scotland, looking at things like bereavement, bullying, health and disability. caroline dinenage looks after things in england. jane, i know there is a bit of nodding and head shaking going on with our brea kfast head shaking going on with our breakfast guests. let's get some reaction. quite a lot of head shaking on this table. i want to chat to paul. caroline said let's not castigate atus because there is a place for them. you said, yeah, if
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you are in there for six months, as they are meant to be designed for, but that's not the reality? no. there are units where people are undercriminal there are units where people are under criminaljustice who there are units where people are under criminal justice who have there are units where people are under criminaljustice who have been there for quite a long time. with criminal justice, there for quite a long time. with criminaljustice, they are not going to get out. a lot of people saying they are like prisons. they feel like prisons. they feel their crime is to have a learning disability or autism. yeah. people in our report early on, tony, he has been in an atu and he has been approved to go out into a community. 18 years and they are still wrangling over the cash to make that happen. you are not about castigating atus, you just wa nt not about castigating atus, you just want them to be used properly? mainly. we need a special team to get them working. to make it all work. jeremy, caroline said this has a lwa ys work. jeremy, caroline said this has always been about investing in
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community services. have you seen any evidence that they are out there? no. what must happen is there must be a joined up approach to this, health, social care and education and it must be at a ministerial department level. the tripartite failure that is occurring at the moment... it has got to be cohesive with a joined up approach. she said there has got to be a culture change, do you think the government is leading that culture change? no, we are and that has got to be changed. do you agree? i do. i believe that i don't know what planet caroline dinenage lives on but it has been eight years since winterbourne view and the social ca re winterbourne view and the social care system is broken. we are going to leave it there. lots of people in agreement with you. more from us later. now for the weather. a real mishmash of weather today.
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showers moving through and some to come. some will be heavy and fun to read, it will be dry for some of us and sunny. —— heavy and thundery. longer spells of rain, thunder and lightning this morning. showers across central and southern england will continue to push away with that weather front into the north sea. connected to this area of low pressure, a second connected to this area of low pressure, a second weather front is coming our way enhancing these showers we are seeing the west. still quite a blustery day, not as windy as yesterday. in between those showers, there will be dry conditions, bright weather, sunny spells but the showers will continue on and off through the day across the western parts of the south. far north of scotland seeing sunshine. we hit 13 in the north—west highlands. today is likely to be seven. northern ireland and northern england, showers at times and the further east, the better of sunshine. heavy showers for wales
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and south—west england, clearance of showers in the south—east and east anglia and the midlands will see some sunshine. temperatures further south roundabout 7—9, but not outside the realms of possibility ten or 11. this evening and overnight, we will continue with showers moving from the west towards the east and quite a lot of cloud around but where it breaks it will be chilly. patchy mist and fog forming across parts of scotland. these are the kinds of temperatures you can expect in towns and cities. lower than that in rural areas. tomorrow, the dregs of the showers clearing the south—east but with low pressure close by, more showers coming in across northern ireland, scotland, northern england and north wales. you can see some clipping the likes of the isles of scilly, the channel islands and cornwall. temperatures are very similar tomorrow to what we are looking at today. thursday and friday, band of rain sweeping up from the
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south—west, moving north—east through the day, resting across northern ireland, northern england and moving across southern and central scotland. lots of cloud ahead of it but a pleasant enough day across the north—east and some sunshine further south, temperatures are starting to climb slowly. saturday, some showers across northern ireland, scotland and may bea northern ireland, scotland and may be a bit of winteriness on the hills but a lot of dry weather, not much ofa but a lot of dry weather, not much of a breeze. saturday looking like the driest day of the weekend. temperatures climbing up 12, maybe 13 and we could see things change with rain coming our way on christmas eve and christmas day. at the moment, temperatures where they should be at this stage in december. white christmas? more likely on the hills and mountains of scotland. you say that every year, that is your fudge! you are more likely to have a white christmas... snow! snow
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in early easter than christmas because winter has had time to take hold and the air is cold. it is a nice fantasy to have a white christmas. i am always up for a fa ntasy christmas. i am always up for a fantasy about a white christmas. thank you. the uk risks "sleepwalking" into becoming a cashless society — with millions of people disadvantaged as a result, a study has concluded. researchers found that eight million people still depend on using banknotes and coins, and a cash—free world would create problems for those in debt, or living in rural areas. here's our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz. 0ur coffee foresight but not for cash. is a growing number of business who have eliminated it entirely. 0ne business who have eliminated it entirely. one of the reasons on display here, this london coffee bar had to close temporarily because burglars broke in looking banknotes. not far off, the place where the cash you spend in shops is recycled, a sorting centre run by g4 s, busy for christmas but it is an industry
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which will have to slimmed down. cash was used for 64% of payments ten yea rs cash was used for 64% of payments ten years ago, now it's 34% and it's likely to plummet to just 16% in ten yea rs' likely to plummet to just 16% in ten years' time. £50,000 in this brick of... 3.5 million in this cage. if we use less cash, we will use less of this sort of processing and it will affect the quality of life of millions of people who still depend on cash, notjust millions of people who still depend on cash, not just for convenience, but out of necessity. there are people who are elderly who rely on a neighbour to do their shopping for them and don't want to hand over a cashless card but the biggest indicator of being dependent on cash is poverty. if you earn less than £10,000 a year, you are 15 times more likely to be dependent on cash. some countries force shops to accept cash in order to protect users. that's not the case here, but today's study says we're not ready today's study says we're not ready to do without our notes and coins. gompertz, bbc news. we are talking
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aboutjose mourinho gompertz, bbc news. we are talking about jose mourinho after the gompertz, bbc news. we are talking aboutjose mourinho after the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. see you soon. todayis today is going to be much quieter for many of us. the wind will be lighter and there are lengthy sunny spells, some affecting... these will tend to clear away out into the north sea and for many it will be dry with any showers confined to southern and western coastal areas as we go through this afternoon. as mentioned, the winds will be lighter, not a strong or gusty as yesterday. still coming from the
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south—western direction. a little lower than yesterday. through this evening on tonight. still showers moving into mainly western areas but they could drift across england and wales through the night to night, some clear spells going into thursday morning. temperatures down to six, 7 degrees in the south, perhaps down to two, four in the far north of scotland, maybe a touch of frost on thursday morning. sunshine for many, showers confined to northern ireland and scotland, northern parts of england, quite a few showers moving in on the westerly wind and temperatures up to 8-11, westerly wind and temperatures up to 8—11, fairly similar to today. friday, a weather system pushing in from the south—west, strengthening wind, starting to bring in less cold out, milder conditions and southern areas, the rain will move north
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fairly quickly, so for much of the day, there will be sunny spells. rain edging north into southern scotla nd rain edging north into southern scotland and across to northern ireland, the far north of scotland staying dry, and dry weather in the south. 0ver staying dry, and dry weather in the south. over the weekend, staying dry, and dry weather in the south. 0verthe weekend, largely staying dry, and dry weather in the south. over the weekend, largely dry on saturday, more rain on sunday. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. to raise, or not to raise? as the federal reserve deliberates a hike in interest rates, president trump steps in with another warning. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday. mr trump warns the fed not to raise rates yet again —
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despite unemployment reaching a 49—year low. we a 49—year low. will have the details. also in the programme... a 49—year low.
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