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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 3, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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the main stories this morning: china makes history with the landing of a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon. a prophet warning from apple panics investors. a sharp rise in online sales for next over the christmas period. two people are arrested in manchester on suspicion of helping migrants cross the english channel into the uk. the curious case of the north korean ambassador to italy who has gone missing, according to south korea's spying agency. pep guardiola's manchester city prepares to take onjuergen klopp‘s at liverpool tonight in the biggest game of the premier league. good morning. china has made history
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by successfully landing a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon. the chang'e—li spacecraft touched down early this morning. in the unexplored south pole—aitken basin — making it the first probe to land on the hemisphere of the moon that always faces away from earth. the unmanned probe is carrying instruments that will explore the region's geology, and carry out biological experiments. our beijing correspondent john sudworth says china had kept news of the mission quiet. very little in the way of a preview, almost a media blackout ahead of this landing attempt. we know the spacecraft was launched in early december, we knew that this planned mission was under way but almost everything we've known about the actual landing attempt and the likely window has come from observers outside china looking at the orbit around the moon — the craft has
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been in an elliptical orbit pattern the last few days, at its closest pointjust 15 kilometres above the landing site so it looked imminent but nothing in chinese media, which gives you a sense of notjust the science, the scientific importance of this mission but also the political and propaganda importance of success. lets speak to the deputy executive director of the title back the royal astronomical society. how exciting is it for you to get the sense we are exploring a new part of the moon? it is a really exciting day, despite the complete lack of media anticipation in china, to see that first picture from the portion of
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the moon we have never been to before, the two fits of it you cannot see from the earth, is really exciting. in concrete terms, why is this area of the moon of such special interest? it is notjust that it special interest? it is notjust thatitis special interest? it is notjust that it is invisible from the earth, it is that it is really very different. you can't say that about many planets and means but it is true. if you look at the full moon in the night sky, you see the dark splodges, the moon sees, which are really the result of big impacts, and on the other side of the mean the crust is much thicker and it looks like a different world. it is pockmarked with craters all over the surface, no smooth regions. there has always been an interest in understanding the differences between the twomac sides. it is a very different place. the chinese have been reasonably secretive about their mission but what would you
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expect them to be looking at and hoping for them to explore? they have a rover which will hopefully be exploring the area in more detail. they will be attempting a radio astronomy experiment, because if you we re astronomy experiment, because if you were to try to detect signals from the distant universe, it is a good place to do it on the far side of the moon because you have the whole mass of the moon between the equipment and the earth so you don't have earth signals interfering. as farasi have earth signals interfering. as faras i can have earth signals interfering. as far as i can see they are going on to do more of this. they plan a sample return mission in the future as well. it is interesting watching the chinese space exploration develop, because in some ways they have been quite late to the space race, but now they seem to be ready to throw quite a lot at it. yes. they have been a commercial player in space for a long time. they have put satellites into space and apart from the us and russia they are the
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only country to put astronauts into space. i would only country to put astronauts into space. iwould not only country to put astronauts into space. i would not say necessarily that other space agencies should feel particularly threatened by this. it is quite a collaborative business. the europeans do well and british astronomers do well through membership of the european space agency. hopefully it will remain a collaborative effort. thank you. apple has shocked investors after warning economic weakness in china will damage sales. the last three months of 2018 had reduced profit. it said it had not expected the massive slowdown in china. earlier i spoke to slowdown in china.
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our business presenter dominic 0'connell. i started by asking him to put apple's profit warning into context. this is the first time in 15 years it's had two warn about its trading, people are used to itsjuggernaut trading in one direction. the news was broken last night in a letter to shareholders and it was said in the last three months of last year revenue will come in $5 billion less than expected. that is about $81; billion rather than $89 billion. he gave a whole bunch of reasons but mainly the slowdown in china, and he mentioned the trump trade war with china is one of the things. apple has faced a lot of criticism at being a bit late to wake up to the reality of this because if you look at the share price, last year we were talking about it being the first ever company to have a $1 trillion market capitalisation, it's come up by a quarter in the last few months of last year it's down to 750 billion so shareholders new that actually apple's trade was weakening and it seems the company has been a bit late to say
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this was the reality of the trading position. they have said this is the chinese slowdown which has contributed to this, some commentators say are they making china a bit of a scapegoat, is there more at play? there is no doubt china is the biggest market for mobile phones, iphones have slipped right back, it was second but is now about fourth or fifth. it faces a lot of domestic competition. but iphones are expensive, the most expensive on the market generally and the chinese consumer, this is evidence the chinese consumer is feeling quite pinched, retail sales are quite low in china, a part of widerfears that the chinese economy is starting to slow down and that has been what has been happening in the world stock markets where people are worried about world economic growth as a whole slowing down and china leading the way into that. will we see a change in apple's strategy, the iphone was a huge cash cow, saturated and handsets are expensive, people are not buying them in quite the same way, they have diversified with the watch,
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will we see more change? attention was drawn to the fact that the services part of the business, itunes and add—on sales they can provide grew by 10% last year so that's growing really quickly but a lot of investors think about apple as innovation, days of steve jobs and new products, but that does not seem to be much sign of that at the moment. i think that is the big challenge for them going forward. we've heard lots of bad news from the high street recently, but there's been a bit of a positive update from next today. the retailer reported a rise in sales over the crucial christmas period, thanks to a big boost from online. but shops sales fell again. announcing its results, the chief executive said the uk consumer is not ina executive said the uk consumer is not in a bad place. here is the ceo
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ofa not in a bad place. here is the ceo of a retail marketing agency. is this talk of the death of the high street a little premature given these good figures from next?m could be. a lot of us left shopping until the very last minute because christmas was on a tuesday. the figures from john lewis yesterday and next today show that it was the last two weeks of december that made the difference. interesting that they are saying a lot of the sales we re they are saying a lot of the sales were online. absolutely. their mix of sales is changing. these will be a huge story for a lot of retailers this christmas. a strong performance online with quite a few performers. the interesting about the next results is they are full sails, so their margin will be strong. they have twea ked their margin will be strong. they have tweaked their profit guidelines because online sales are expensive
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to deliver. we will have a very chequered picture overall, i think, with some real winners but some big losers, too. we are expecting more results to come but we have a sense of who is doing well and who is not. people who suffered through last year and made profit warnings will have had a tricky christmas. you can see it as a shopper if you have been out and seen a lot of discounting, it is likely those retailers are struggling. the areas we cut back on was gifting people outside our immediate friends and family, so businesses that rely a lot on that like debenhams, the sales will tell us like debenhams, the sales will tell us quite a big story. those who were struggling anyway will have had a tough christmas, but we will still see one 01’ tough christmas, but we will still see one or two tough christmas, but we will still see one 01’ two winners. tough christmas, but we will still see one or two winners. what about the ongoing strategy into 2019 of some of these retailers, given perhaps the increasing focus of
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online? most retailers are looking again at what their high street footprint needs to be for the future. next have made a few relationships with restaurants and third parties to make their shops more interesting and lots of other retailers are following suit and working out how many stores they need on the high street. whilst online sales are good, their retail proposition and the high street is important. you are likely to go into shops and look at products and then maybe order them online. it is about the future of, what do shops look like on the high street? thank you. a british man and an iranian national have been arrested in manchester on suspicion of arranging the illegal movement of migrants across the english channel. the home secretary sajid javid has asked for the royal navy to help deal with the crossings. more than 200 people have reached the uk in small boats since november. 0ur correspondent ben ando has more. a major incident is how
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the home secretary, sajid javid, has described the increase in numbers of those crossing the english channel in small boats. he went to dover to see the work being done by the border force and was taken on board one of its patrol boats. though in the last 48 hours, there have been no more reports of migrant crossings. most of those attempting the journey from france are aiming at the 200 or so miles of kent coastline. patrolling this is a hugejob. mrjavid has recalled two more border force boats from the mediterranean where they've been assisting, and now wants the royal navy tojoin in. in a statement, the ministry of defence confirmed it's ready to help out. one source is quoted as saying that the offshore patrol vessel hms mersey is available and ready to be deployed in the channel. but is this a crisis orjust a drop in the ocean? in the last two months of 2018, 239 people reached the uk by boat. but every three and a half days, the same number arrive using other
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means like hiding in lorries. and in other european countries, the totals are far higher anyway — germany is receiving roughly 540 asylum seekers every day. meanwhile in manchester, two people, an iranian aged 33, and a british man, aged 2a, have been arrested by the national crime agency on suspicion of arranging the illegal movement of migrants across the english channel. ben ando, bbc news. let's get the latest on this note — our correspondent is at dover for us this morning. very little information so far about the arrests. yes, there have been to make significant updates in the last 24 make significant updates in the last 2a hours on this issue. 0ne make significant updates in the last 2a hours on this issue. one of them those two arrests that the national crime agency confirmed last night. won a 33—year—old iranian national, the other a 24—year—old british man,
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both arrested on suspicion of arranging the illegal movement of people across the english channel into the uk. the national crime agency has also said that because the investigation is ongoing, they won't be commenting any further. the other significant update is the revelation that the home secretary has written to gavin williamson, the defence secretary, requesting the use of the royal navy to patrol the channel. reports this morning that perhaps hms mercy, and of patrol vessel, will be making the journey here to kent to help. that has not been found by the ministry of defence, but it has said in a statement, we stand ready to assist the home office with the response to migrant crossings. if this were to happen it would represent a significant to step up in terms of the response to this issue. it would come after sajid javid announced
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last week that two border force that is currently deployed in the mediterranean would be making their way back to patrol the channel along with the cutter he was on it yesterday. it has been about 2k hours since sajid javid made those comments about genuine asylum seekers, questioning whether some of the people making their way across the people making their way across the channel are genuine asylum seekers and why they haven't sought asylu m seekers and why they haven't sought asylum in the first safe country that they arrived in. those comments have prompted a backlash from opposition mps and the likes of the refugee council and amnesty international. but these foreign secretaryjeremy international. but these foreign secretary jeremy hunt international. but these foreign secretaryjeremy hunt has been questioned about those on a trip to malaysia. he did not say outright that he agreed with sajid javid but he said that the proud tradition britain has of granting asylum is not to be abused. it has been a quiet few days here. we have seen
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239 people since november making their way across the channel into their way across the channel into the uk but that appears to have quite didn't —— quietened down. we are not aware of any boats in the last few days. that might be down to the weather. it has been colder and windier and the water has been more choppy. but clearly this is a serious issue according to the government and that is why they are considering dyfed continuing to put resources into this. thank you. the headlines: china says it has successfully landed a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon, the first attempt at such a landing. apple issues eight £4 billion profit warning. the cheque —— and there has
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been a decline in trading at next stores. a top of the table showdown in the premier league manchester city against liverpool could be the title race's decisive moment. city may be third for the moment butjurgen klopp says they're still the best team in the world. meanwhile it's four in a row for 0le gunnar solskjaer and manchester united. they beat newcastle 2—0. and on his 50th birthday, michael schumacher‘s family say he is in the very best of hands as he continues his recovery from a skiing accident over five years ago. i'll be back with more on those stories at half past eleven. the amount of electricity we are using is at its lowest level since the 1980s. using is at its lowest level since the 19805. it using is at its lowest level since the 1980s. it means power generation in the uk has fallen, according to an onlinejournal. install a low—energy led bulb,
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and you're having a negligible effect on cutting the carbon emissions that are overheating the planet. butjoin with millions of other people to change your bulbs, and with a collective twist of the wrist, you're making a significant dent in the uk's demand for energy. the same can be said for appliances like vacuum cleaners and washing machines, forced by eu product standards to do the same job whilst using less power. but the role of energy efficiency gets little publicity. meanwhile, the role of renewables in cutting uk carbon emissions is well known. last year, wind and solar power generated a third of the uk's electricity. that's a record. but the report says efficiency measures coupled with other factors have contributed slightly more than renewables towards reducing carbon emissions. and what's more, making gadgets more efficient upsets no—one but the manufacturers. roger harrabin, bbc news. joining me to discuss this is the
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chief executive for the association for the conservation of energy. has significant are these figures in showing how we conserve energy? significant are these figures in showing how we conserve energy7m is really important that people pay attention to these. i had not see these figures before but they are not a surprise. for a decade or more energy efficiency has been doing its thing quietly in the background and delivering savings. it is good now to see it is getting the attention it deserves. some people have described it as the cinderella of the energy discussion because it is a small gesture is on a small scale but by a lot of people, and that makes it a big deal. exactly and sometimes people think, there is no point me doing my little bit, but this report shows that is not the case. people doing things like
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installing energy saving light bulbs makes a big difference. how much has carbon been reduced cumulatively?” think you can say energy efficiency has probably delivered more carbon reduction than anything else. when you look at the electricity reductions, there is more electricity avoided than there is electricity avoided than there is electricity generated by renewables. we tend to think of it as light bulbs and soothers and fridges and so bulbs and soothers and fridges and so on, but that is at the home owner level. —— matt light bulbs and vacuums and fridges. but how much are the big companies doing their bit? there is a lot of new technology and industry. but there is always lots more that we can do. there is potential for 25 is always lots more that we can do. there is potentialfor 25 or 30% more that would make sense. how would we do that and how would we encourage people to do that? we need more attention from government,
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little incentives to say to people, if you are improving your home, think about putting energy efficiency in there as well. it might cost a little extra did start with but it will pay for itself and you will be more comfortable and happier. it is worth it. that is the carrot, i guess. happier. it is worth it. that is the carrot, iguess. is happier. it is worth it. that is the carrot, i guess. is there a stick for industry? do you mean the government needs to do more in terms of legislation? legislation and encouragement. we have seen legislation talent meaning that more products have to be more efficient. we have a target for government to reduce its energy use. i would like to see that more widespread as well. we need to do this and if everybody does the dough in it together it works. thank you. uk manufacturers are facing the biggest worker shortage in 30 years, amid uncertainty over brexit that's according to the british chambers of commerce. a survey says firms are being squeezed by labour
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shortages, rising prices, and a slowdown in sales. four out of five employers in manufacturing, and almost as many in the service sector, are struggling to find the right workers. a man found guilty of killing a woman in a speedboat crash has been told he can appeal against his conviction, even though he's still on the run. jack shepherd was jailed for six years, in his absence, for the manslaughter of 24—year—old charlotte brown during a date on the river thames in 2015. ms brown's parents will meet the home secretary later this month to discuss efforts to trace jack shepherd. military grade equipment deployed at gatwick to stop drones disrupting flights has been withdrawn. the army was called in to try to protect the airport after more than 1,000 flights were affected by drone sightings between 19th and 21st december. a ministry of defence spokesman said the armed forces were ready to assist if they were needed again. a senior north korean diplomat
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in italy is reportedly seeking asylum in a third country. south korea's spy agency has confirmed thatjo song gil, the north's deputy ambassador rome, has disappeared. mrjo is reported to be the son or son in law of high—ranking officials in the north. high profile defections are rare as the consequences for their family still living in north korea are thought to be severe. let's get more from our correspondent in the south korean capital. jo song-gil has disappeared, according to a spy agency who was briefing congressmen earlier today. that is all that we know, and they have not seen or heard from him since late november, just before his post was due to end. it comes amid reports from a seoul —
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based newspaper which said that he had been seeking asylum, had asked for protection from the italian authorities and may be willing to defect. when it comes to defectors, as you mentioned, high—profile defections are rare and the consequences forfamily defections are rare and the consequences for family members in north korea can be severe and that is because north korea takes a very dim view of these defections. in fa ct, dim view of these defections. in fact, state media has in the past accused the uk and the united states of orchestrating these defections to undermine the government. so when it comes to any family left in north korea, some defectors have told us that theirfamilies korea, some defectors have told us that their families were rounded up, taken to gulag is all prisons, so it can be quite risky. we have heard from the last high—profile defector, he was the deputy ambassador in
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london and he left in 2015 and he said thatjo song—gil was the son and son—in—law of other dell at officials and he may have on the korean leader's nuclear plans. these are the words of a former defector so are the words of a former defector so it is difficult for us to verify. the trial of 11 people accused of being involved in the murder of khasoggi has begun. the murder took place at the beginning of october and here we are three months on and
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already the trial is under way. 11 suspects but we don't know a great deal more than that. we don't know what the charges are all the names of those who have been charged, but the prosecution has asked for the death penalty for five of them. we know that the court has asked the turkish authorities to provide evidence that they have collected on this case. we know that the turks asked for the accused to be extradited to turkey and tried there but it became very quickly obvious that the saudi arabians were not going to go down that route. so we have this extraordinary trial beginning to unfold today. saudi arabia came under a huge amount of pressure on this issue. you mentioned they moved fast but some people said they moved fast because they found some people who conveniently they are putting on trial and it may not actually be related to what happened. the whole
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thing has been colossally damaging for saudi arabia, and the sheer shocking circumstances of the liquidation of khashoggi in the kingdom's consulate in istanbul, then be budged to cover the saudis insisted that he had left the consulate quite well, safely, and they were worried about his whereabouts. then we were told he died ina whereabouts. then we were told he died in a fist fight. the whole story did not come out, though, because we still don't know the whereabouts of his remains, shockingly. this has led to extraordinary criticism and scrutiny of saudi arabia of some of its closest western allies, the likes of britain and america, very colourful figures in the american senate condemning the crown prince personally, the suspicion that he was somehow involved. the saudis have insisted that he was in no way
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involved and that this was the work of rogue agents who were acting without authority. i know he will continue to monitor this for us. thank you. let's get a look at the weather. it is very cloudy out there for many of us. some of our weather watchers have sent us photos of blue skies, though. that is in norfolk at the moment. a bit of sunshine there and also for the east of scotland. a beat towards the south west of england as well. but for most of us it is cloudy and will stay cloudy into the afternoon. maximum temperatures struggling between three and 6 degrees for many. perhaps less cold in northern ireland and the west of scotland, eight or 9 degrees here. tonight we are keeping off the cloud. where you
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do get some breaks in the cloud, thatis do get some breaks in the cloud, that is where temperatures will go below zero, so there could be patchy frost. a bit of fog around first thing tomorrow. for tomorrow it is more of the same. eight few clear breaks but for most of us fairly tidy by the afternoon. highs offourto of us fairly tidy by the afternoon. highs of four to 7 degrees. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: china makes history by successfully landing a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon. the touchdown of the un—crude probe has been seen asa of the un—crude probe has been seen as a major milestone in space exploration. if 4 billion morning from apple has panicked investors and the tech giant says it is pink off guard by china's slowing economy. next has reported a sharp
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rise in sales but trading at a store has declined. two people are arrested in manchester on suspicion of helping migrants cross the channel and the uk illegally. north korean ambassador to italy has gone missing according to itself career‘s spy missing according to itself career‘s spy agency. it follows unconfirmed reports that he sought asylum from an unidentified western countries. here is your sport. it's quite simply the biggest game of the season so far. tonight, manchester city face liverpool and the result could go a long way to deciding who lifts the premier league trophy at the end of the season. joe lynskey has the details. in great title rivalries there are matches that turn the course a season. the end of 2018 has seen liverpool grasp control.
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tonight they go to manchester city trying to pull away at the top. these are two modern managers with their own kind of mind games. the build—up to one of the premier league's great matches has seen them compliment each other. you have to be full of desire, angry again, all that stuff like in all the other games we have to be that. but with the knowledge that the opponent is, for me, still the best team in the world. that's how it is. in that moment for me they're best team of europe in the way they play and consistency, and they control all the details in the game. it is strange to play this kind of game because when i am more calm and more relaxed i know that players are going to try the performance they can do. but this city team have switched and stuttered through december. they slept through an unexpected defeat against crystal palace and leicester while liverpool's surge through the winter has been spectacular. eight straight wins, scoring 23 goals. victory tonight would put them ten
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points in front but this club have waited 29 years for a title so it's never straightforward. liverpool haven't been in this position for a long time now. so for them, is it another stepping stone towards the title? for manchester city if they win the game suddenly it's blown wide open again. i think if they go ten points clear though i don't see them dropping that many points and i think they will control the league from then on. after tonight there is still 17 games to go but two of football's great inventors know what momentum can create. these are the matches that can change the mood and perhaps the direction of this season's trophy. manchester united continued their briliant start under caretaker boss 0le gunnar solskjaer. they made it four wins from four beating newcastle 2—0 at stjames park. romelu lukaku scoring united's first after newcastle keeper
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marcus rashford added a second. which means only sir matt busby has made a better start to managerial life at united than solskjaer. that will be in the books but is nothing i am thinking of. i'm just an king of the next game. —— i am just thinking of the next game. of course, when we win for we can go onto the next four and think about them. elsewhere burnley have made it back to back wins after coming from behind to beat huddersfield in the big game at the bottom. ashley barnes getting the winner late on. both sides ended the match with 10 men. huddersfield are now eight points from safety. elsewhere bournemouth and watford drew 3 all, chelsea were held to a goalless draw at home to southampton. crystal palace were 2—0 winners at wolves whilst west ham came from two goals down
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to draw with brighton. on his 50th birthday, michael schumacher‘s family say that he is in the very best of hands as he continues his recovery from a skiing accident in 2013. the seven times formula 1 world champion suffered serious head injuries from the accident and has not been seen in public since. his family will today launch a new app to celebrate his achievements. before we go some good news for british tennis coming out of australia. katie boulter and cameron norrie have beaten serena williams and frances tiafoe in the mixed doubles to give great britain victory over the us at the hopman cup. you can find more on that and all the football on the bbc sport website. goodbye for the moment. thank you very much indeed. it's being seen as a major milestone in space exploration. early this morning, china successfully landed a robotic spacecraft on the far side
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of the moon where no human or robot has ever ventured before. the probe is carrying instruments to analyse the unexplored region's geology and has already sent back its first images. here to tell us more is our science editor. has admitted in is this mission? it is a difficult task which they have pulled off because the far side of the moon is rougher on the side we see from earth and so trying to land quite a fragile craft on it without damaging the likes of whatever is a real achievement. because it is on the far side it is not a direct radiocommunication with earth or the very cleverly placed a second spacecraft in orbit around the moon to act as a relay so in one project, you have got to bury significant achievements. able to get down onto the ground which no one has done before on this part of
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the main and also, with this interesting design involving a second spacecraft to act as a really. the calling it the magpie bridge. it is a big step for them and infact bridge. it is a big step for them and in fact the americans and the russians, for their efforts, and not managed to touch down on the far side before. what we know what it is going to do when it is their what kind of information it is looking for? they are looking at the geology of the surface and what it is made of. interestingly this particular area they have landed on is a very deep hollow. it is called an impact basin so there is a possibility that the surface rocks were rejected when whatever hit the moon and created the whole underground so maybe they will be able to see material from below the crust of the moon so that will be a very interesting and significant discovery if that is possible. in the coming hours and days we expect them to drive a
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little rover off the land and that will explore the area around with the spacecraft has touchdown and that will analyse those rocks on the surface. it is all part of a very methodical chinese programme to understand the moon with an eye on whether you can then use the moon in future. what kind of resources are we talking about? the most interesting and immediate one is what ice. nasa and other space agencies confirmed there was what ice on the moon. if you could identify it and use it you be able to sustain a base on the moon and is ready talk in the chinese media of a robotic base on the moon. speculation about the man based on the moon in a decade ahead, that is clearly a n the moon in a decade ahead, that is clearly an omission of theirs and if you're able to get that this what ice maybe you could launch missions from the moon to mars and then
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beyond to very significantly, they are looking at the minerals on the moon. i interviewed a senior chinese space scientist the years ago and this was something he brought up in our interview. the possibility of extracting valuable herald on the moon and bring in the back to earth to use your. very exotic proposal, sounds like science fiction but clearly it is in their mind the possibility. fascinating. becky. breathalyser test that can revolutionise cancer diagnosis is being revolutionise in the uk. side is hope that will lead to a simpler cheaper method of spotting the disease earlier but rebecca fitzgerald from cancer research uk said the tests are an early stage but the initial results are
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positive. one of the problems of diagnosing cancer early is yet to make the test as easy as possible because of the people are lots of divorce the hospital checkups. if your symptoms are quite subtle before you have evidence that the test has to be something ideally that you can do right at the gp surgery in a non—invasive simple way and breathalyser is so simple and potentially fits the bill really well. simply breathe into a mask for ten minutes and collects all of those thousands of chemicals in the breath for analysis. it seems a strange thing that you can carry them markers and the breath but if you think about it, or example diabetes when the sugar doubles are very high if it's not taciturn on the breath. you can have an off a lot of chemicals that travel and the blood and into the lungs sledger can ca ptu re blood and into the lungs sledger can capture those you can detect signals by cancer cells are growing abnormally, metabolising abnormally that you have a different signal or
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pattern of chemicals on the breath. we are excited and interested to learn whether you get different patterns of those chemicals for different sorts of cancer and that is even before the cancer has started to give you symptoms, you may not know there is anything wrong at all the business people at risk. people not with symptoms of cancer other stage. there's been a lot of interest in developing blood tests, some people have needle will we discuss to be a simple and convenient as possible and breath would be a revolution, especially that could be a test that could detect any kind of cancer of the signals were specific enough. what we're doing now include bridge is launching a new trial so we want to see we can pick up those signals, c had sensitive the technology is a see whether we can detect different signals from different cancers that this is a export trial to see that better work. —— exploratory trial.
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today was a dramatic shift in washington, dc. democrats will take over the control of the house of representatives following the victories in the mid—term elections. partial shutdown of the government enters its 13 day with no end in sight. are corresponded has been defined out what is going on. nearly two weeks into the partial us the right shutdown in here is the scene in washington, dc. iconic one immense are closed and some federal workers are home about a pay cheque. democrats are taking control of the house of representatives, the president is warning that the government not reopen until get money for his border wall. they could be a long time or it could be quickly. could be a long time. it is too important a subject to walk away from. president trump has demanded $5 billion to build up the ball along the us border with mexico. ——
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i wall. to underline how important is get the money he held a meeting. afterwards democrats said they are going to reintroduce hills to reopen the government. there tried to call the government. there tried to call the president's bluff. we are asking the president's bluff. we are asking the president open up government. we are giving him a republican pat to do that. why would he not do that? congresswomen nancy pelosi has little incentive to make a deal with the president especially after he made this declaration last month.” am proud to shut down the government for border security. they are now the faces of divided government in washington. their relationship is key to ending this government shutdown and whether anything is achieved ahead of the 2020 presidential election. gentle lady from california nancy blew the. nancy blows it was first ever been
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speaker of the house of representatives into thousand seven and she is a highly experienced political operator. nancy pelosi was the first—ever female speaker of the house of representatives back in 2007, and she's a highly experienced political operator who learned machine politics at her father's knee when he was mayor of baltimore. well connected in democratic circles, she even met presidentjohn f kennedy at an early age. though she wasn't elected to congress until the age of a7, this prolific fundraiser has deep roots on capitol hill. chanting. she just saw off a leadership challenge from democrats eager for a new generation. the question now is — who blinks first over the government shutdown, and which side feels they have most to lose by prolonging it? laura trevelyan, bbc news, washington. here figures show streaming services and digital downloads counties 70% of revenue for businesses. and associations that spending on music, video and games is up but sales of physical products have fallen. i
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spoke to a video games expert told me there is still a large market for physical copies of games, despite the growing trend in digital only gaming. video games are my big things of the —— the thing that stood out is that games to ten mile and half the revenue of all entertainment uk, more than music and video comeback for the first time. 51.2% of revenue was video games. where we talk about video games. where we talk about video games for those uninitiated, or can spectrum a separate but? it includes all sorts of things, games on pc, console, maybe an xbox or playstation audience even play on your phone. digital has a big role there as well, gives us the largest percentage coming from digital out of all of them. i think it was more than three quarters across three but in games 80.1% from digital. we are seeing a shift away from games to
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get ina seeing a shift away from games to get in a little box that you open an slot into a machine, we're talking about something you can download? yes but interestingly physical work done the least board games in 2017 to 2018 so there was a bigger drop in music and video, probably because of spotted by a netflix sum—mac games only without a few percent and 2017 physical went up because of the release of the net tenders which. people who play games are still buying physical products although not nearly as much of getting things digitally. bottle at this tell the gaming industry who are looking to make money about strategies they need to employ? it is interesting because these figures released tracks as well and you can look at music and video, the biggest selling items actually sold more physical so the chart toppers that people bought on dvd and brought on cds, probably because they wanted them as guests or we wanted to keep them, but in
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games it is hard to tell because the only try to get physical lucy that games like call of duty and beef bus did really well. —— fifa. but other games do well to. epic games made a profit of 3 billion dollars last year so there is a huge amount of money that we cannot see where it comes from. in a moment we will have the business news but first headlines. china says it has successfully landed a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon, the first ever such attempt at landing. police have arrested two people in manchester on suspicion of helping migrants cross the english channel into the uk illegally. and the north korean ambassador to italy has gone missing according to south korea's spy agency. volumes and conformed reports that he has sought
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asylu m conformed reports that he has sought asylum from an identified western countries. i'm maryam moshiri in the business news. a tale of two christmas's for retailer next. it's reported a sharp rise in online sales over the christmas period, while trading at its stores declined. apple has rattled investors with news that its sales have been slowing, blaming economic weakness in china. apple's share price sank more than 7% in after hours trade, extending its more than 28% slide since november. uk firms are being squeezed by labour shortages, rising prices and a slowdown in sales. more companies than ever before are finding it hard to recruit staff according to the british chambers of commerce. the nightmare before christmas that many were predicting didn't happen for next. the retailer, often seen as a bellweatherfor the high street, has reported a sharp rise
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online sales over the christmas period, while trading at its stores declined. the retailer said strong sales during the three weeks prior to christmas and the october half term holiday had made up for a "disappointing" november. in total, full price sales at the retailer were up 1.5% over the period. let's talk to maureen hinton, group retail research director, global data. thank you forjoining us. what does best and the next figures tell us about the health of the uk high street in the run—up to that gruesome as this period? —— crucial christmas period. nexus one of the more resilient retailers, it is managing the shift on mine really well and that is what is happening but i think it will be taking sales from competitors as well cause it has got such a well—managed on my business and it has not been doing
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the kind of discounting that other retailers have sucked its profits, although they are down slightly, are still very good results. so it in a way you're saying the appetite for spending is there among consumers but you have to know how to tap into it next knows how to do that? yes, it next knows how to do that? yes, it is doing quite well. it is offering other brands as well as its own, it has a subscription service the debt deliveries burberry and drives loyalties with stand out from its competitors in that way. delegate will be a mixed performance across the holy retail business over the next new week. of course, we have out issues with a source, super drive, hmv. —— asos. it is tough out there. yes, even next whistling that it was tough out there but if they
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are slashing prices the problem and how of what other properties that we're probably going to see a lot of profits down when a report of next month. and that was a problem for john lewis as well to a large degree, the probability was hit by people buying products but they were discounted? yes, john lewis has done well on fashion because it has now introduced its own brands so does not have to price match across other sectors, price matching hits its profits. bank is much forjoining us. growth in the uk's construction sector without a three—month low in december according to the index compiled by ihs market. this was despite the fast is rise in civil engineering businesses. your orders the pressure business work like shops and offices are behind this.
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and ministry deserving cause and for hmv before christmas, a debate was marred about the future of the entertainment industry. as you've been hearing new data today show that 32 million cds were sold in 2018, that is almost 100 million fewer than into thousand eight at ‘s. the growth of migratory is beginning to plateau with a small rise according to the british industry. and two new female members have been appointed as external members of the bank of england's financial industry. the chair of uk banking standard board and another woman who used to run virgin money have been appointed to the 13 member panel. will address a number of senior woman at the bank of england is up was that the market. marks and
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spencer is an next above up but the london market is suffering as apple's warning about products have had burberry should the runner was about. you can now unleash a anger on someone else's car, a place in amsterdam allows destruction therapy. i think it is good to smash all the cars, thinking about my anger.
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i love working with cars, never really tall one upright like this so it isa really tall one upright like this so it is a good opportunity to actually break one. we are a consulting firm and with the other positions of people everyday. good way of getting rid of our anger. do you normally expressed anger in a violent, destructive way? not really. usually i'm pretty cool and collected. actually to be completely honest it kind of scares me. now it is cars, next time it can be something else at mac i do believe car smashing is at mac i do believe car smashing is a great way to have some anger releases editing on the street or in ina releases editing on the street or in in a legal way. you could releases editing on the street or in in a legalway. you could in releases editing on the street or in in a legal way. you could in a scrap ya rd in a legal way. you could in a scrap yard but it's illegal. it is different for a group of friends or a workgroup for example, they could dojust one time but it's still kind of tricky because they might like it
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only might want to go and express theiranger in this only might want to go and express their anger in this way. then you are actually giving yourself the message that this is ok instead of learning other productive ways of coming assault down and regulating your motion, of being mindful of what is happening, or taking a break your actually breaking things. it's harder than expected but it is more satisfying than i collected. '5 —— expected. more satisfying than i collected. '5 -- expected. in a moment we will have be whether at first, let's look at some of the most striking images of the day. new before and after satellite
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photographs have been released showing the extent of the damage caused to the volcano anak krakatoa when it erupted last month. the tsunami it caused killed more than 400 people in indonesia shortly before christmas. this picture was taken before the disaster. this was taken a week after, and shows a small bay has formed where the volcano has completely cracked open. it has lost around two thirds of its mass much of which is assumed to have slipped into the sea in the colossal landslide that produced the tsunami. in italy criminals used mechanical diggers like giant tin openers to force their way into an armoured van. the vehicle was carrying pensions from bari to nearby matera. the thieves made off with two point three million dollars in cash. the guards in the van were unharmed. nothing to expect that with the weather and moment. we have got a
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lot of cloud across the uk, a better rain is here and there's, you would be hard pushed to fight that. most of us have got rather grey skies like this weather watcher photo coming in from scarborough. high pressure is the dominant weather pattern at the moment and beneath this area of high pressure things are very stagnant so it is not really changing very much, it is not moving and that is why we have a lot of cloud at the moment and that god is not going to really move very much at all. we have got their sunshine doors used in scotland and a bit of sunshine towards the east of ingot of the west. as a general rule of thumb if you have gotten harder sledger window now you will properly have that i dreaded the afternoon. their sunshine towards eastern scotland and serve east of england and south—west up to temper justice into about six celsius or getting less cold in northern ireland the west of scotland. tempered as here but it myself this. through tonight we're just chasing the cloud around ruby again. there
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bea the cloud around ruby again. there be a few breaks will get the breaks in the cloud and alternately cold. there will be a frost bursting tomorrow morning but will you keep the cloud temperatures was deep above reason, perhaps to a three degrees. bible six in northern ireland and the west of scotland. this is friday, some patchy mist or bob across central and southern areas. there will be some sunshine here and there but for most it will be on the milder cardia site once again and again fairly chilly from most, less cold in northern ireland of the west of scotland. going into the weekend the theory of high pressure still with us. it changes lately, and dress the bit further south and that allows a weather system to just move its way into the west of scotland. it will not bring much in the way of rain but it will still be fairly clouded with northwest. buzzword some breaks in the cloud again, especially towards eastern parts of the uk during saturday but is way to get some
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sunshine stock item which is maybe just a little bit higher than the next day or so, temperatures about five to 8 degrees than by sunday i discovered the fairly similar. some early—morning frost we have got some clear spells but otherwise, it's going to be mostly cloudy, mostly dry, some sunshine at times, dig it was both central and eastern areas. next week starts fairly quiet but things are slow changing of the week those on. these are the main stories: china
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makes history with the landing of a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the mean. apple investors are panicked by a £4 billion profit warning. the tech giant says the core of the problem is china's slowing economy. a sharp rise in online sales for next over christmas, but in—store trading has declined. two people are arrested on suspicion of trafficking people across the english channel. a new cancer diagnosis method is being trialled in the uk. and manchester city take on liverpool tonight in one of the biggest games of the premier league so far. good morning.
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china has made history by successfully landing a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon. the chang'e—4 spacecraft touched down early this morning in the unexplored south pole—aitken basin — making it the first probe to land on the hemisphere of the moon that always faces away from earth. it has already sent back its first pictures from the surface. the unmanned probe is carrying instruments that will explore the region's geology, and carry out biological experiments. 0ur correspondentjohn sudworth is in beijing. commenced landing, the control room says, and then comes the extraordinary site, the first close—up images of the far side of the moon ever recorded. after a few more tense moments, chang'e—4 safely touches down inside the moon's
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largest and deepest crater. translation: del that it's all gone according to plan, this scientist tells chinese state tv. although the far side of the moon always faces away from earth, orbiting spacecraft have photographed its surface, but no attempt has been made to land on it until now. this animation shows how the probe's thrusters were fired to slow it. before its censors guide it gently to the surface. a surface far more rugged and obstacle strewn than the moon's near side. another challenge has included the need for a relay satellite to carry radio signals from the far side back to earth. the moon has already sunk below the smoggy beijing skyline so
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there is unfortunately no sign tonight —— met no chance for people tonight —— met no chance for people to gaze at it in wonder. the mission was accompanied by an almost com plete was accompanied by an almost complete news blackout, giving you a sense of the propaganda role in china's space ambitions. china plans to follow this mission with another that will bring mineral samples back to earth. eventually, there is a reported plan for a lunar base and capable of supporting humans. translation: if our lunar exploration is a success it will improve china's capability and technology. i do not think our exploration will stop. it will go further and deeper and we will invest more. for now, chang'e-4's
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loot explorer will begin examining the surface of its landing spot. the mean's deepest crater is expected to offer insights into the formation of our solar system. but beyond this, china has just signalled that it is a space power to be taken seriously. i have been speaking about this to the deputy executive director of the royal astronomical society. he says it is exciting to be able to see the other side of the moon. despite the media blackout and the complete lack of anticipation in the chinese media, to see that first picture of the far side of the moon, the bits you simply cannot see from earth, it is exciting. in concrete terms, why is exciting. in concrete terms, why is this area of the moon in —— of such special interest? stimac it is
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very different. you would not be able to say that about many planets and moons but it is true. if you look at the mean in the night sky ecb dark splodges and the seas, the results of big plaques. 0n the other side of the mean decreased is much thicker —— the moon's surface is much thicker. there has always been a big difference between the two sides. the chinese have been reasonably secretive about their mission. what would you expect them to be looking at and hoping for them to explore? the mission includes a land and a rover to presumably explore the surrounding area in more detail. you would expect them to look at the surface of the rocks. they will also attempt a radio astronomy experiment because if you try to detect signals
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from the distant universe, it is a good place to do it on the far side of the moon because you do not have signals from the earth interfering. as far as signals from the earth interfering. as farasi signals from the earth interfering. as far as i can see, they are going on to do more of this, planning a sample return mission in the near future as well. it is interesting watching the mission to develop because in some ways china has been late to the space race, but now in some ways they seem to be throwing a lot at it. they are. they have been a commercial player in space for a long time. as well as the us and russia they are the only other country to have put astronauts into space. my guess is they will be following up on their stated goal of sending astronauts to the moon as well, maybe ten or 15 years away. i would not necessarily say that other agencies should feel threatened. it is quite a collaborative business and the europeans and britons do
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very well from the european space agency and we send robots across the whole solar system to look at planets. hopefully it will remain a collaborative effort. this afternoon as china makes history by that landing on the far side of the moon, our science editor ta kes side of the moon, our science editor takes your questions on what this means for the future of space exploration. send us your questions. apple has shocked investors after warning economic weakness in china would damage its sales. the company, one of the world's most valuable, said its earnings for the last three months of 2018 would be about four billion pounds less than expected. it said it had not expected the ‘magnitude' of the economic slowdown in china. let's speak to someone from aberdeen
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asset management. how significant is this profit warning? can you give us some context? i think there are a couple of issues. there is an apple specific issue and the macroeconomic issue. the apple specific issue, and the power of the brand in china. what we have been seeing is that apple sales have been weaker because they are local players. 80% of the market is local producers. they tell that there are the names that eve ryo ne that there are the names that everyone knows. they have been upgrading their technology very fast and they have things like the triple camera and gadget features and they are ahead of apple. the china consumer loves technology, having
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new models and from that respect, i can see the competitive edge for apple waning. i also think in china, the models of apple that are bought are older and cheaper models. when you compare those to the newer and flashier once they are not as attractive as they have been in the past. that is one aspect. the other isi past. that is one aspect. the other is i think everyone knows that in china that there is a single day of sales. when we look at our channel checks, flagship models or promotional activity on local phones, it has been quite aggressive. so there is probably an element of that mixing as well. on a final point, a sentiment towards us —based products. it is probably a bit weaker in china now. so i think there is an apple element to this and then the second element when it comes down to the macro economics.
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the guidance for many of the chinese retailers or e—commerce companies has been shifting slightly lower in terms of what they expect in the fourth quarter. but they are still expecting a decent level of sales. so it is not like consumer demand has been wiped out in china. it has been driven by trade but i think quite a lot of the fears that are being talked about may be slightly premature in terms of what we might see from china in 2019. say the chinese economy slowing down is all relative, you say. in that case, given that apple have pointed to thatis given that apple have pointed to that is one issue, do you think they have got some more strategic issues they need to worry about? as an en investor, we think... apple always used to be the shining tech brand
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and he didn't mind paying that premium because it was a higher quality product. but perhaps that in dalit advantage, especially in the china context, is starting to move away —— but perhaps that advantage, especially in the china context, is starting to move away. perhaps apple do not have the right quality of product for that market. it might be an issue going forward but we will have to wait and see. and the whole issue of aggressive pricing and dealt with that some people have attributed to apple, do you think that for consumers in other parts of the world, here or in the us, we might start to see the price range with apple become a bit wider and there be some cheaper products on there be some cheaper products on the market? mr but that is what you have seen recently. —— the market? mr but that is what you have seen recently. -- that is what you have seen recently, it is
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something that they are addressing and something that we will have to wait and see in terms of whether the strategy pulls through. and on the chinese economy generally, we have seen this slowdown but growth in china is still at an enviable growth rate compared to many western european countries, for example. but i'll be going to see british companies, for example, having to rethink the way they relate to china? china has been slowing for the last few years. their government policy to move towards a more quality consumption orientated growth story, and perhaps that assumption is being challenged at the moment. consumers do worry about... there is a strong correlation between the sentiment of a bargain and chinese consumption growth. there is a lot to do with trade. i think successful or less
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disruptive conclusions to the stand—off we are seeing would be good for consumers because it would raise the sentiment level. in terms of supporting growth, china does have levers that it can pull in terms of supporting economic growth but that does go against the policy they have been trying to roll out over the last few years. but china's government will do what they need for the next time, whether short—term pain for long—term gain. but we are not overly concerned about a hard landing but we are not overly concerned abouta hard landing in china, buti think it is a fair expectation that growth will be a bit softer but compared to the rest of the world, there is still significant demand in china. when we look at analyst expectations for many of the retail companies, you are still looking at
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growth in 20%. next reported a rise in sales over the crucial christmas period thanks toa the crucial christmas period thanks to a big boost from online, but shop sales fell again. the chief executive said the uk consumer is not ina executive said the uk consumer is not in a bad place. earlier i spoke to the ceo of a retail marketing agency. i asked to the ceo of a retail marketing agency. iasked her whether the to the ceo of a retail marketing agency. i asked her whether the talk of the death of the high street is premature. there is a lot of hysteria around the christmas period about how few people are in shops but lots of us left it until the last minute. because christmas was ona last minute. because christmas was on a tuesday it gave us a last weekend to shop and the figures from john lewis and necks are showing that it john lewis and necks are showing thatitis john lewis and necks are showing
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that it is the last two weeks that made a difference. but they are saying that a lot of the sales were online. yes, their mix of sales is changing. this will be a huge story for many retailers this christmas. i think the interesting thing about nexfs think the interesting thing about next‘s results is that they are at full sales, so sales will be strong. 0nline sales are a bit more expensive to deliver. good news that we are hearing some positive stories from the high street but i think we will have a very chequered picture overall, with some real winners but quite big losers, too. we are expecting more results to come. we have a sense of who is doing well and who isn't. people who suffered through last year and made profit warnings will have had a tricky christmas. if you have been out as a shopper and seen a lot of discounting, i think you can see it.
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the area that has struggled is gifting for people outside immediate family and friends. companies that rely a lot on that, like debenhams, we will see their results tomorrow. those who were struggling anyway i think we'll have had a tough christmas but we will still see one or two winners. what do we know about the ongoing strategy into 2019 of some of these retailers, given perhaps the increasing focus of online? most of them are looking again at what their high—street footprint needs be for the future. next have made quite a few relationships with the restaurant and third parties to make their shops more interesting, and lots of other retailers will be following suit and just working out how many stores they need on the high street because whilst their online sales are good, the retail proposition on the high street is quite a big player in that because you are likely to go and have a look in stores at goods and may be go home
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and order them online. so it is about what the shops of the feature on the high street look like. china says it has successfully landed a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the mean, the first ever such attempt and landing. —— far side of the moon. apple, one of the world's most valuable companies issues a £4 billion profits warning. the tech giant blames chinese "economic deceleration" for its problems. police have arrested two people in manchester on suspicion of helping migrants cross the english channel into the uk illegally. sport now. we are talking about, quite simply, the biggest game of the season so far. tonight, manchester city face liverpool and the result could go a long way to deciding who lifts the premier league
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trophy at the end of the season. ahead of the match, jurgen klopp has called city the ‘best team in the world' while pep guardiola knows this is a big opportunity to get right back in the hunt. let's hearfrom them both. it's a really strong football team with an outstanding manager, and thatis with an outstanding manager, and that is how it is. before you play them, you never know. we have to be brave and full of desire. like in all the other games, we have to be that but with the knowledge that our opponent is, for me, still the best team in the world. that's how it is. it's a big opportunity for us. the focus is the same. everybody asking me in the last days ago what is going to happen if you lose. everybody counts on us losing. but we're going to try
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to make our game, to win, to be there and fight as far as possible. 0ur chance to fight for the premier league. craig bellamy has temporarily stepped down from his role as cardiff city under—18s coach following the club's decision to investigate a bullying claim against him. the investigation follows reports of a complaint about the former wales striker‘s alleged treatment of a young player, who has since left the club. bellamy denies the allegations. england have announced their elite player squad which will make up the world's first ever full—time women's by world's first ever full—time women's rugby 15 side. contracts have been handed out in 835 women squad. stars like katy maclean will lean —— lead the squad. they play dublin in ireland soon. before we go some good news for british tennis coming out of australian katie boulter and cameron norrie have beaten serena williams and frances tiafoe in the
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mixed doubles to give great britain victory over the us at the hopman cup. you can find more on that and all the football on the bbc sport website. more from me at 1:30pm. a british man and an iranian national have been arrested in manchester in relation to helping migrants cross the english channel in boats. a major incident is how the home secretary, sajid javid, has described the increase in numbers of those crossing the english channel in small boats. he went to dover to see the work being done by the border force and was taken on board one of its patrol boats. though in the last 48 hours, there have been no more reports of migrant crossings. most of those attempting the journey from france are aiming at the 200 or so miles of kent coastline. patrolling this is a hugejob. mrjavid has recalled two
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more border force boats from the mediterranean where they've been assisting, and now wants the royal navy tojoin in. in a statement, the ministry of defence confirmed it's ready to help out. one source is quoted as saying that the offshore patrol vessel hms mersey is available and ready to be deployed in the channel. but is this a crisis orjust a drop in the ocean? in the last two months of 2018, 239 people reached the uk by boat. but every three and a half days, the same number arrive using other means like hiding in lorries. and in other european countries, the totals are far higher anyway — germany is receiving roughly 540 asylum seekers every day. meanwhile in manchester, two people, an iranian aged 33, and a british man, aged 24, have been arrested by the national crime agency on suspicion of arranging the illegal movement of migrants across the english channel. ben ando, bbc news.
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uk manufacturers are facing the biggest worker shortage in 30 years because of uncertainty over brexit, according to the chambers of commerce. firms are being squeezed by rising prices and a slowdown in sales. four out of five manufacturers are struggling to find the right workers. a man found guilty of killing a woman ina a man found guilty of killing a woman in a speed boat crash has been told he can appeal against his conviction even though he is still on the run. jack shepherd was jailed for six years in his absence for the manslaughter during a date on the thames in 2015. the victim's parents will meet the home secretary to discuss efforts to trace jack
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shepherd. military grade equipment deployed at gatwick to stop drains disrupting flights has been withdrawn. —— to stop drains. the army was called in after sightings in december. the ministry of defence said the armed forces were ready to assist if they we re forces were ready to assist if they were needed again. a senior north korean diplomat in italy is reportedly seeking asylum in a third country. south korea's spy agency has confirmed thatjo song—gil, the north's deputy ambassador rome, has disappeared. mrjo is reported to be the son or son in law of high—ranking officials in the north. high profile defections are rare as the consequences for their family still living in north korea are thought to be severe. as you have said, jo song—gil has
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disappeared, according to to the spy agency. he has not been heard from since late november. it comes amid reports from a seoul based newspaper which said thatjo song—gil had been seeking asylum, had asked for protection from the italian authorities and may be willing to defect. when it comes to defectors, they are... high—profile defections are rare and the consequences for family members in north korea can be severe. that is because north korea ta kes a severe. that is because north korea takes a very dim view of these defections. in fact, state media has in the past accused south korea and the united states of orchestrating these defections to undermine the government. so when it comes to any family government. so when it comes to any fa m ily left government. so when it comes to any family left in north korea, it can be... some defectors have told us that theirfamilies be... some defectors have told us that their families were rounded up and taken to prison. so it can be
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quite risky. we have heard from a former defector, the last high—profile defector, he was the deputy ambassador in london and he left in 2016, and he told us thatjo song—gil had told south korean —— might he told south korean television thatjo song—gil was the son and son—in—law of high—ranking officials and may have intelligence on the north korean leader's nuclear plans and he was making delbert responsible for making sure that luxury goods went from italy to north korea. a breathalyser test that can revolutionise cancer diagnosis is being tested in the uk. scientists hope it will lead to a simpler, cheaper method of spotting the disease early. this is head of
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research at pancreatic cancer uk. this is in its early stages but could be significant. really significant. early detection is so important for anyone with cancer but particularly pancreatic cancer because it is diagnosed so late so one infour because it is diagnosed so late so one in four people... and i think theissue one in four people... and i think the issue as well is it is diagnosed later, 60% of people are diagnosed in stages three and four so far too late to get any kind of useful treatment that will really prolong their life let alone cure them, and it's also really... pancreatic cancer is a quick and quick to kill cancer is a quick and quick to kill cancer form and a lot of people simply will not survive without getting the early detection. so why is it so difficult to detect? muster back the symptoms are really subtle, -- the symptoms are really subtle, indigestion, back pain, things that seem innocuous and would not be
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presented to the gp or maybe misdiagnosed. little hallmarks, indicators of early detection that go undiagnosed, and therefore they are go undiagnosed, and therefore they a re left go undiagnosed, and therefore they are left and a really aggressive cancer form is allowed to progress for a long time, meaning that it can no longer be effectively treated. so the idea of a test where essentially you blow into a breathalyser, it could be a really good way to diagnose this. yes. this would enable... these are very early stages but it could potentially mean that gps could use this as well as other forms of tests in combination and it could allow them to indicate whether someone is either... made the —— maybe has pancreatic cancer and they could get the diagnosis
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earlier so all the people who could benefit greatly from early diagnosis could have surgery or chemotherapy and things like that so much earlier. so it would be really great to be able to enable those gps and give them the tools to attack and fight against a really aggressive, horrible form of cancer. it is very early so we don't quite know how this would be used but do you think it is the kind of thing that could be done routinely, even, for people going to be gp for something else? while you are seeing the gp for something, you use this preventatively? 0r something, you use this preventatively? or would it only be used when someone had symptoms? potentially... it would be for clinicians to work at what would be the best form. it would probably be a combination. symptoms could be flagged to gps and they would be able to have a tool with which to actually use something. so symptoms
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don't make the innocuous ones as i mentioned could be just don't make the innocuous ones as i mentioned could bejust a simple test. along with a lot of the cancer charities, you will be able to monitor this and hopefully have some positive outcomes. let's get a look at the weather. cloudy skies across a lot of the country but one area seeing some sunshine is east anglia. also some sunshine is east anglia. also some sunshine after a really cold start in aberdeenshire. in other parts you are lucky to see any sunshine. most places will be cloudy and rather grey. dry, mind you, hardly any wind out there to stir things up, and temperatures will struggle. a bit milderfor temperatures will struggle. a bit milder for the temperatures will struggle. a bit milderfor the north west temperatures will struggle. a bit milder for the north west of scotla nd milder for the north west of scotland and for northern ireland, that atlantic influence they're keeping the cloud through the night.
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we are likely to find the cloud thinning and breaking in some areas, leading to a more widespread frost overnight. it could be down to —4 or -5. a bit of sunshine for certain parts of the uk. further south rather cloudy but with high pressure around it is still dry and the wind will be light. you are watching bbc newsroom life. china makes history by successfully landing a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon. the touch down of the un—crewed probe is being seen as a major milestone in space exploration. a £4 billion profit warning from apple has panicked investors. the tech giant says it's been caught off—guard by china's slowing economy. next has reported a sharp rise
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in online sales over the christmas period, but says trading at its stores declined. the retailer expects an annual profit of £723 millon , that's 4 million less than its previous forecast. two people are arrested in manchester on suspicion of helping migrants cross the channel into the uk illegally. a new breathalyser test, which scientists say could revolutionise cancer diagnosis, is being trialled in the uk. it's being seen as a major milestone in space exploration. early this morning, china successfully landed a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon — where no human or robot has ever ventured before. the probe is carrying instruments to analyse the region's geology and has already sent back its first images. earlier i spoke to the astronomer mark thompson, who said it was very exciting to see the first images from this unexplored region of the moon. it's wonderful to see notjust
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another moon lander but also a lander which has gone to the far side of the men and it's a region which nobody other than astronauts has seen. we could not see from earth will be able to get images from this new probe is really exciting. how significant is it what's found? why do we want to know? the lunar surface on the far side of the moon is pockmarked with small tiny crators so it tells us the surface has not been refreshed through lava flow so it's a very old surface. we will learn more about the history and geology of the moon so there's a lot. there are also exciting aspects to the mission which will bring back good science. we said in the introduction biological experiments will be undertaken,
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think we are taking seeds with them, tell us what you know about some of the things they are attempting to do? the details have been hard to come by but the expectation or belief is that there are potato seeds and some silkworm eggs on board on this tiny biosphere which has been created for the lander in an attempt to see how life can exist and develop in an alien space world. by using biosphere technology it will give us more of a clue as to how humans may be able to survive in space in the coming years. what does this mission tell us about chinese ambitions in space? it's an interesting one, it's unusual, in the world of science things seem to be very open. communication between scientists is generally very open and collaborative but recently it's been interesting that china have been very cagey about this mission. it makes you wonder if they are trying to jostle for position a little bit amongst the international and certainly i had a hunch
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the american agency might be feeling just a little bit edgy the next people to walk on the men could be chinese and that may start, it could kick off another space race. as china makes history by landing on the far side of the moon... 0ur science editor david shukman takes your questions on what this means for the future of space exploration. later today there'll be a dramatic shift in washington dc, and yet more of the same. specifically, democrats will take over control of the house of representatives following their victories in last yea r‘s mid—term elections. and a partial government shutdown enters its 13th day, with no end in sight. let's speak to our correspondent laura trevelyan, who's on capitol hill in washington for us. let's talk first of all about the
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democrats taking control of the house of representatives. yes, well, nancy pelosi who made history by being the first woman ever to be elected speaker of the house of representatives in 2007, now has a reprieve of that role, she will again, a great political survivor, be sworn in as political speaker of the house. democrats will control the house. democrats will control the house of representatives but not the house of representatives but not the senate and of course not the presidency, so welcome to the error of divided government in washington, dc. the first order of business is reset and —— era. this will be the most diverse muslims, native americans, african—americans, and record 102 women elected to the house of representatives say they will be a big change in how america's congress looks. given the change there with the democrats
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taking over control, how difficult will it be to make things for the president? democrats now have the power to initiate legislation and the power of oversight, via the various committees that they will control. they already signalling they want to investigate everything from the controversial policy of families being separated at the border, to whether or not there was money—laundering in the trump organisation. but today democrats will attempt to reopen the government, largely a symbolic attempt, they will introduce bills that would reopen the shutdown bits of the government but without funding for the president's beloved border war with mexico, we already know the senate won't take up these bills unless there is money for the wall because he willjust be direct. so we are back at an impasse over the shutdown, on friday lawmakers are invited again to the white house in an attempt to resolve the shutdown, now in its 13th day. the shutdowns is not unusual as we've
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seen with other presidents, but it's peculiar with us with bricks, the people at museums and seeing the no one manning them —— us brits. what are the impact like over there? it's are the impact like over there? it's a partial shutdown so the key agencies like defence, health and human services are still running, but everything from the department of the interior, which covers the national park service, the agriculture department, even the inland revenue service, we are about to enter tax season in the state and already there is talks of precious tax refunds being delayed because the irs is not being funded. 800,000 federal workers are affected, 250,000 have been furloughed, the rest are working without pay and there is a question whether some government contractors will get the backpay when the shutdown is over. as this goes on, the inconvenience is mounting, here in washington the iconic one immense are closed. the
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beloved national zoo is closed. there are issues in the national park with rubbish not collected, it piling up, so there is pressure building to resolve this. the question is who blinks first, the president or democrats who now control the house of representatives? you will continue monitoring this i know, think you, laura. the trial of 11 people accused of being involved in the murder of the journalist, jamal khashoggi has begun in a court in saudi arabia. the prosecutor has asked for the death sentence for five of them. 0ur middle east regional editor, alanjohnston, explained more more about te trial things are moving quickly and already the trial is under way.‘ suspects but we don't know more than that. we don't know exactly what the charges are, we don't know the names
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of those who have been charged but the prosecution has asked for the death penalty for five of them. we also know that he caught has asked the turkish authorities to provide evidence that they may have collected on this case. we know that the turks, of course, ask for these accused to be extradited to turkey and tried there, but it became very quickly obvious that the saudis weren't going to go down that route. so we have this extraordinary trial beginning to unfold today in riyadh. saudi arabia came under a huge amount of pressure on this issue. you mentioned they moved fast but some people said they moved fast because they found some people who conveniently they are putting on trial and it may not actually be related to what happened. the whole thing has been colossally damaging for saudi arabia, and the sheer shocking circumstances of the liquidation ofjamal khashoggi in the kingdom's consulate in istanbul,
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then the botched cover—up. first, the saudis insisted that he had left the consulate quite well, safely, and they were worried about his whereabouts. then we were told he died in a fist fight. eventually, the whole story came out but not the whole story because we still don't know the whereabouts of his remains, shockingly. this has led to extraordinary criticism and scrutiny of saudi arabia from some of its closest western allies, the likes of britain and america, very powerful figures in the american senate condemning the crown prince personally, the suspicion that he was somehow involved. important to say the saudis have insisted that the crown prince was in no way involved and that this was the work of rogue agents who were acting without authority.
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a study has found that electricity use per person in the uk has fallen again, and is now at its lowest level since the mid 1980s. the analysis of government statistics by the online journal carbon brief says the reduction is largely down to energy efficient appliances and lighting. joanne wade, chief executive of the association for the conservation of energy, told me consumer awarness of energy efficieny has been on the rise for years. i hadn't seen these particular figures before but they are not a surprise to me. for a decade or more, energy efficiency has been quietly doing its thing in the background and delivering savings on bills for confuses, savings and carbon, and it's good now to see it getting the attention it deserves. some people described it as the cinderella of the whole energy discussion because it is small gestures o n discussion because it is small gestures on a small—scale, but by a lot of people, that makes it a big deal. exactly and i think people often think, surely there's no point in me doing my little bit but look
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at what this report shows us. everybody getting a better fridge, installing new light bulbs like little things they don't notice but it added up to a huge contribution to change. in terms of that contribution, how much can we say has been reduced as a community of effect of this? i think you can say energy efficiency has delivered more carbon reduction than almost anything else. when you look at the electricity reductions, there is more electricity avoided than there is electricity generated by renewable so it's one of the biggest good repeaters. we tend to think of it as light bulbs, hoovers and fridges. but of course that is the homeowner level. but this is happening in industry as well, ten seems to how they doing their bit? the doing lots, there is lots of new technology and industry, industry has a reason for doing this, it means productiveness and it's a good idea. but there's always more to do, there's a potential for 25—30% idea. but there's always more to do, there's a potentialfor 25—30% more that would make sense. how would we do that? i would we encourage people
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to do that? we need more attention from government, little nudges and incentives to say to people, if you're improving your home, think about putting energy efficiency in that as well to it might cost a little extra to start with but it will pay for itself, you will be more cosy, happy and it's worth it. that's the carrot i guess, is there a stick for industry? you said the government needs to do more, do you mean legislation or encouragement?‘ mixture. the electricity savings we thought were a result of note relations. they meant all buttocks had efficient fixing" they had to be more efficient. we have a target for meant to reduce, about to see that more widespread as well. we need to do this and if everyone does it together, it works. it's quite fair together, it works. it's quite fair to say let's get on and do it. time for a look at our headlines. china says it has successfully
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landed a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon, the first ever such attempt and landing. apple, one of the world's most valuable companies issues a £4 billion profit warning, blaming chinese economic deceleration for it problems. and police have arrested two people in manchester on suspicion of helping migrants crossed the english channel illegally. strictly‘s aj pritchard and his brother curtis have been talking about the incident over christmas when they were attacked in a nightclub in cheshire. the professional dancers were left battered and bruised, with curtis needing emergency surgery on his knee following the incident in nantwich at the weekend. aj was partnered with paralympian lauren steadman for strictly come dancing 2018 and reached the semifinal. he and his brother curtis were on bbc breakfast and described what happened the night they were attacked. we were literally ten minutes down the road from our house.
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we went out for a night out and curtis was violently pushed, and then we were beaten up by eight people. and, as you can see with his leg, he was needing emergency surgery straightaway — which he has had done, thankfully, and thank you to the nhs for that. but the thing is, it was senseless violence, unprovoked, and just... there's not much more to say, which is the sad thing. because you feel safe in your hometown and then, suddenly, this happens. yeah, it's very upsetting, to be honest. and, curtis, just take us through how you felt on that night. because we understand — and aj will tell us in a moment — that you were feeling pretty protective of your brother, weren't you? well, it was a fantastic night out to start with. it was sort of my new year's eve night out because i was going back to ireland for dancing with the stars, to start work on the 1st. so we thought we'd go out, myself and aj, have some fun. and we were having a great night, the atmosphere
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was absolutely fantastic. and then as the night went on, we were just having a good time and then on the dance floor, all of a sudden, itjust broke out into what happened. thank god we were together. it would have been a very different situation if we weren't together, that's for sure. yeah. no, i would like to say, actually, though, thank you for getting me out of the situation, aj, because it would have been a lot worse if he wasn't there to have got me out of the situation. oh, my goodness. just tell us now — you're both clearly very shaken up and also injured. firstly, curtis, you can't now go and do yourjob, is that right? well, i should be in ireland training now for the first live show this sunday on the 6th, but i can't dance at the moment. i've had the operation, it went fantastic, so thank you to the nhs for being so quick and so proactive with everything. i start physio today and i should be walking on my leg within three weeks. and 4—5 weeks, i should be dancing again. that's in a perfect world. fingers crossed, perfect world. touch wood. yes. figures show streaming services
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and digital downloads now account for more than 70 % of revenues for uk music and video industries. the entertainment retailers association says spending on music, video and games is up — but sales of physical products have fallen. i spoke to the video games expert jordan erica webber who told me there is still a large market for physical copies of games, despite a growing trend in digital only gaming. for me, video games is my big thing so the thing that stood out was that games took in more than half the revenue of all entertainment in the uk, so more than music and video combined for the first time. 51.3% of revenue was for video games. and when we talk about video games, for those uninitiated, what kind of spectrum of stuff are we talking about? it includes all sorts, games you play on your pc, or on a console and maybe an xbox or playstation, or games you play
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on your phone even. and digital has a big role as well there. games have the largest percentage of the revenue from digital out of all of them. more than three quarters across all three, but in games, 80.1% came from digital. so we are seeing a shift away from games you get in a box you open and slot into your machine and we're talking about something you download. yes, although interestingly, physical went down the least for games from 2017/2018, so there was a bigger drop in music and video probably because of spotify and netflix and things. games went down only a few percent as far as physical is concerned and, in 2017, physical went up we think because of the release of nintendo switch. people who play games still are buying physical products, although not as much as getting things digitally. what will this tell us and the gaming industry, who are looking to make money in 2019, about the way they need to move and the strategies they need to employ? it's really interesting
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because these figures, they released charts as well. and in music and video, the biggest—selling items sold more in physical. so the chart toppers, people bought on dvd and cd, probably because they wanted them as gifts or to keep. but in games, it is hard to tell because the only charts we get are physical. so games like call of duty and fifa did well in physical sales, people are still buying them in the shops, but you have huge games you can only get digitally like fortnite that everyone is talking about, which brought in an enormous amount of money in 2018. epic games, the creator, made a profit of $3 billion last year so there is a huge amount of money that we cannot see where it is coming from. january often sees people wanting to expore healthier life—styles — and for some this year that might include cutting out meat and animal products.
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so over the next few days we're going to be looking at the pros and cons of giving up meat; for our health and on the environment. 0ur correspondentjohn maguire has been talking to one family who have always been vegans. 14—year—old emily is a keen cook. right, do you want to cut that up and i'll peel the potatoes? with her mum jenny they're making shepherds pie, but with one main difference, the mince is meat free. before, when you were vegetarian, there were curries and stuff, do you know what i mean, there wasn't cookbooks and these different cultures you can learn from. emily is the third generation of her family not to eat meat. jenny says bringing her up as a vegan was a conscious and considered decision. i don't think we have had any problems with health in relation to veganism, because we read up on nutrition beforehand, before we thought about having emily, so we knew what we were doing. emily finds sticking to her diet relatively easy, and she's supported by her friends.
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they are kind of curious to see what it tastes like. yes, and what do you find their response is a lot of the time? they are normally surprised, because they think it is going to be completely different, but sometimes it is the same as what they are eating. there are a range of choices every day. we try to do as much as we can with fruit. home is one thing. at emily's school in the scottish borders, there are options for vegetarians and vegans. here we have legal shortbread and some muffins... and across scotland there is a major review under way to ensure school meals are healthy. we want to make sure that the meals that are provided in schools are nutritionally balanced, that there is options for people, and that we are supporting pupils to make informed choices. at a long—established vegan cafe in edinburgh, i meet a dietician to discuss how good food is linked to good health. so, when we are removing something, we need to think about if i am reducing the meat from my diet, what other protein can i get
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from non—meat sources? we need to make sure that any change we make has to be kept up, so there isn't a huge amount of benefit to making a change for a day or a week. that is something that we can't keep up. the real health benefits are going to come from something that we can keep for the long—term, rather than the short term. so, from the cafe to the kitchen, the golden rule is, whatever your diet, make sure it's achievable, durable and, above all, healthy. that's making me hungry! nearly lunchtime. ever fancied unleashing your anger on someone else's car? you can in amsterdam where a scrap yard is allowing people to experiment with what it calls destruction therapy. anna holligan went to try it out. the anger of being in trafficjams
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over and over again. i think it is good to smash the cars, thinking about that. i love working with cars, and everybody tearing them apart “ never — — never really —— never really thought one apart like this. it's a good opportunity to see what it is like to actually break one. basically, we are a consulting firm and we deal with the frustrations of people every day. it is good way of getting rid of our anger. and do you normally express your anger in a kind of violent, destructive way? no, not really. usually, lam pretty cool and collected. well, actually, to be completely honest, it kind of scares me. now it is cars, next time, it can be something else.
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i do believe car smash is a great way to have some anger release, instead of doing it on the streets in a way where it is illegal, you can do it in the scrap yard in a legal way. it is different with friends or a workgroup for example, does thatjust one time, but it is still kind of tricky because they might like it and then they might want to go and express their anger in this way, and then you are actually giving yourself the message that this is ok, instead of learning other productive ways, for example to calm yourself down, to regulate your emotions, to be mindful of what is happening, to take a break when you are actually breaking things. it's harder than expected, but it's more satisfying than i expected.
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so i think that is a good battle. let's look at some of the most striking images of the day. new before—and—after satellite photographs have been released showing the extent of the damage caused to the volcano anak krakatoa when it erupted last month. the tsunami it caused killed more than 400 people in indonesia shortly before christmas. this picture was taken before the disaster. this was taken a week after, and shows a small bay has formed where the volcano has completely cracked open. it has lost around two thirds of its mass — much of which is assumed to have slipped into the sea in the colossal landslide that produced the tsunami. in italy, criminals used mechanical diggers like giant tin openers to force their way
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into an armoured van. the vehicle was carrying pensions from bari to nearby matera. the thieves made off with $2.3 million in cash. the guards in the van were unharmed. ina in a moment, the one o'clock news and we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. but first, let's look at the weather prospects. hello there. last night, the temperatures were just above freezing but in aberdeenshire, tempers got to 10.5 degrees below freezing, the coldest this winter. at least we have some sunshine, one of the few parts of the sunshine that has enjoyed some today. we've seen really cold air though across your elsewhere into central and used in parks, diving down on strong winds and there is still more snow to come. no snow here across the uk, high pressure dominates our weather.
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within the area of high pressure, we still have pockets of cold air and how low the tablatures get overnight depends of how much cloud there will be. we have seen lots of that for most of the country today, quite a cold day as well, temperatures don't have far to fall overnight. we should tend to see the cloud thinning and breaking more than as wales, the midlands and southern england, and as wallasey tablet is dropping away, we find mist and fog forming as well. a cold night across the uk, ten because 90—4 —5, first across north—east scotland, not as cold as last night, with highest averages across scotland and northern ireland, where it stays cloudy and into friday as well. cloud thinning elsewhere, if you are stuck to be fog in central and southern england, it will feel quite cold. 0utside southern england, it will feel quite cold. outside of that, sunshine and for other parts of the england and wales, telogen 3—4d, with the highest averages in western scotland and northern ireland. another chilly
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night on friday into saturday morning, a frost in a places, mist and fog slow to clear on saturday, the weather is slow—moving at the moment. winds are light which is not helping stir things up, there are signs of change though coming into the north west, with a band of cloud and light rain and drizzle. that comes on the weather front, sliding in across the northern half of the uk before stopping across southern areas and keeping the cloud going here during the second half of the weekend. a slight change of air mass means more sun sent across scotland and perhaps northern ireland for a while, perhaps another england too but further south, we still have the misty may be foggy air and cloud around, but sunshine around scotland, temperatures up to around 7 degrees, maybe nine or ten for the south. a major milestone in space exploration china lands a spacecraft on the far side of the moon. the change 4 probe has transmitted never before seen images of this part of the moon and marks a major step in china's quest
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to become a leading power in space exploration. we will be assessing the significance of this new view of the lunar landscape. also this lunchtime... the retailer next reports a sharp rise in online sales for the christmas period, but trading at its shops declined. tech giant apple rattles its investors with a warning that that sales are slowing — its share price drops sharply in response by at least 7%. the trial begins in saudi arabia of the people allegedly involved in the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi. and why our electricity use is at its lowest levels since the 1980s.
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