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tv   BBC News at 9  BBC News  January 9, 2019 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines... mps will debate theresa may's brexit plan a month after she cancelled the original vote — labour say they'll table of no confidence in the government if she's defeated, — if she's defeated, but ministers remain bullish. think the prime minister's deal is a good ill for britain, the only alternative is a no brexit which would not deliver on what the british people voted for or no deal, which would cause economic damage. it is because the prime minister's deal delivers for britain that i am confident it will pass. the military is helping police at heathrow airport after sightings of a drone temprarily halted flights yesterday. a 14—year—old boy is stabbed to death in east london after the moped he was riding collided with a car. president trump demands congress pays for his long—promised border wall with mexico in his first televised address from the oval office. every day, customs and border patrol
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agents encounter thousands of illegal immigrants trying to enter oui’ illegal immigrants trying to enter our country. which are out of space to hold them and we have no way to properly return them ekholm to their country. and another nomination for olivia colman, as dark comedy the favourite leads the bafta race, with 12 nominations. tottenham gain a slender advantage over chelsea, after harry kane's var—assisted penalty meant the carabao cup semifinal first leg finished i—o. good morning and welcome to the bbc news at nine. mps will begin debating theresa may's brexit plan today, nearly a month after she postponed the crunch commons vote on her agreement. labour has said it will table
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a motion of no—confidence in the government if she loses the vote next tuesday. the irish backstop — the contingency plan to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland — remains the main sticking point. so, in order to appease the democratic unionist party, the government is expected to unveil proposals to give stormont, which is currently suspended, the power to veto any new eu regulations. we'll speak to our assistant political editor in a moment, but first, a quick look at what we can expect over the coiming days. those five days of debate get under way in the commons this afternoon. that all leads up to the meaningful vote on 15th january. and remember, the uk leaves the eu on 29th march. let's get more on what we can expect over the coming days — our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. good morning to you, norman. in
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terms of the debate, is this a groundhog moment for the house of commons? well, it is hard to see really what has changed since the last time we were on the cusp of this crucial vote. if anything i have to say i think opinion has probably hardened against mrs may's package, albeit no 10 hope they can gradually chip away at the numbers against them by coming forward with against them by coming forward with a series of fresh reassurances over this critical issue over the northern ireland backstop. and today, we will get some new proposals, specifically linked to northern ireland. so, we know that the government is going to suggest that stormont, currently suspended, of course, it has been suspended for two years, but if and when it gets up two years, but if and when it gets up and running, that it should have a veto over any new eu regulations that might be imposed on northern ireland if we went into the backstop. now, no 10 openly
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acknowledged this is not going to be acknowledged this is not going to be a game changer, it is not a silver bullet, it doesn't suddenly mean mrs may is on for victory, but what they seem to him is that it could help to move the dup. the government hopes that if it can get the dup on board, then other tory mps might also come on board, because it would be very ha rd on board, because it would be very hard the conservative rebels to say, never mind what the elected representatives of northern ireland think, we still think the backstop is bad for northern ireland. so they still think the dup ah,. but talking to some of their mps this morning, they were utterly dismissive of this latest proposal. ministers meanwhile are sticking to their line that mrs may's deal is the only deal in town. this was the cabinet office minister david lidington... the parliament next week has to face up the parliament next week has to face up to responsibility and this is for mps up to responsibility and this is for mp5 of all parties. no deal is the
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default legal position in european law and in british law. so if you don't want a no deal except at the end of march — and i think that would be harmful to the prosperity and to the union of the united kingdom — then you have to vote for a deal, because only when a deal is ratified can that come into effect. of course the run—up to the debate could hardly have been much worse with the garment being defeated last night on the eve of the debate, which creates an ominous backdrop for the government because we saw around 20 tory mps rebelling against the government over no deal planning and it was interesting looking at the calibre of those tory mps, this was not rent a rabble, you are talking about very senior former ministers, seven former cabinet ministers, seven former cabinet ministers, voting against the government last night. so the prospects for mrs may look pretty weak. and it was interesting
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listening to the work and pensions secretary amber rudd as she left home this morning, she wasn't sounding, shall we say, overly confident. we're still very committed to making sure that the government's withdrawal agreement gets through. we have got five days of debate now and i hope that collea g u es of debate now and i hope that colleagues will listen carefully and ultimately vote for the deal next week, which is the best wales leaving the european union. are you confident of success next week the the prime minister's deal?” confident of success next week the the prime minister's deal? i think confident is overdoing it but i think we will be able to win arguments over the next few days and i think colleagues who are prevaricating over it will think very carefully about what the alternatives are. i still believe the best outcome is getting the withdrawal agreement through next week. meanwhile what are labour up to? they still have in their back pocket the option of tabling a no confidence vote in the government should mrs may he defeated next week. and this morning, the shadow trade secretary barry gardiner seemed to be keeping that option very much alive. the appropriate
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time to table a motion of no confidence in the government is when the government loses its key legislation and no longer commands a majority in the house of commons. now, i take majority in the house of commons. now, itake nothing majority in the house of commons. now, i take nothing for granted. majority in the house of commons. now, itake nothing for granted. i hope that the vote next week will go against the government, because this is the wrong deal. and there is a further fresh blow to mrs may looming this morning after the same alliance of mps who defeated mrs may last night tabled a motion which will be debated at the very start of today's debate, which, if passed, if accepted by the speaker, would mean that should mrs may's deal go down next tuesday, then she would have to come back within three days, in other words by the end of next week, with an alternative plan, with a plan b. so there would be no time to shuttle back and forward to brussels, no time to drift towards no deal, the
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squeeze would be on mrs may to come up squeeze would be on mrs may to come up with a plan b pronto. norman smith, thank you very much. joining me now from westminster is the conservative mp simon hart. good morning. to you. exactly a month ago, of course, theresa may called off the meaningful vote because she knew she was going to lose it — can you honestly say hand on heart this time around that anything is going to be different? well, i think norman smith's comments were pretty accurate, actually. it doesn't feel like a significant change. the threat of a confidence vote in the prime minister has obviously gone away. but i think even pragmatic people realise this may be difficult to get over the line first time or even second time. but the crucial thing to me about that sort of introduction was the fact that, what are the alternatives? and those people who are yearning for the purist brexit possible face a real
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opportunity next week of losing everything. so i think this emphasis on supporting a deal, even a deal you have got to hold your nose about, is really important, because the alternatives could be pretty bleak. so will you back the prime minister's deal next week, is that your intention? yes, it is. the idea that anyone is going to back it with any enthusiasm, agreeing with every sentence in it is fanciful, of course not, it's full of flaws. the prime minister knows that. but it is at the moment the only thing which will enable us to leave the european union on 29th march and if we dismiss it out of hand next week, we saw yesterday there was already momentum building around blocking the default no deal position. so the idea that we just sit back and drop out on 29th march, which is, as david lidington says, the legal route, i think that was dealt quite a severe blow yesterday. so if we don't support the deal next week, i think there is a real chance we end
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up think there is a real chance we end up almost with nothing at all, having to delay or revoked article 50, which some people will see as the beginning of the end of brexit. that cannot people which over side of this argument you are on, that cannot be a sensible position for us to get ourselves in. but if a deal is not passed, what lies between no brexit and no deal, what is the option that a majority can get behind? i think that is the $64,000 question. there has been talk about a shift in policy which enables some collea g u es a shift in policy which enables some colleagues to get off the hook that they are on. some of my colleagues need just the tiniest excuse to fall in line behind the prime minister, song will probably never fall in. i think the reference to the dup is absolutely crucial in this. if it is assurances about the backdrop to enable people to say, my protest has been her, my concerns have been addressed... that is a possible outcome. but quite apart from the fa ct outcome. but quite apart from the fact that stormont hasn't set for two years this month, the dup
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indicating this morning that they're simply not going to back this deal? well, i talked to a dup member colleague last night very realistically, expecting that this will go as far as one minute to midnight, this will not be resolved until we are really nearly out of time. they are not expecting anything in the next few days, but when it gets absolutely to the deadline, that's when they expect brussels to, as they would put it, hopefully bring first. but all of this is speculation. all of these predictions will probably be proved wrong within the next 24 hours, but thatis wrong within the next 24 hours, but that is how it seems at the moment. i want to talk to you finally if i may, simon hart, about the security situation, which has been in focus over the last few days and your party colleague nick boles revealing that he received a death threat last night after voting against the government — it is something which clearly all right—thinking people will condemn? yes. i was here on
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couege will condemn? yes. i was here on college green the day before yesterday when there was all the aggro around anna soubry, it has got aggro around anna soubry, it has got a bit unpleasant. it is not the first time that has happened. back in the general election in 2017 there was a lot of this stuff going on, fuelled by social media at the time. all mps know that we are in a controversial business and we expect to get a bit of grief from time to time. i think the line between legitimate protest and noisy, passionate complaint by numbers of the public and abuse and intimidation is a fine one. i think they strayed over it on one day, i think death threats, whether it is to mps or anybody else, clearly out of order. but there is to an extent, the law is already there to deal with this sort of stuff. and so... and also it is self—defeating, anybody who things by the way that somehow this is... if i get a death threat today attempting to persuade
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me to do something different, it will probably be unsuccessful challenges not worth trying. joining me from our westminster studios is the conservative mp and senior member of the pro—brexit european research group, mark francois. good morning to you as well. good morning. your party colleague simon hart saying that if theresa may's deal does not go through next week, then those who support the purist form of brexit, in his words, risk losing everything, do you agree with that? no, i don't. remember what we are voting on next tuesday. we're voting on the withdrawal agreement, which is a draft international treaty. and if we were to approve it, which i don't believe we will, we would then be bound for ever in international law. and whatever people think of members of parliament, they can read. and mps, many of them have actually read this
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d raft many of them have actually read this draft treaty in detail and they therefore no that it would leave us half in and half out of the european union, it would leave us still under the authority of the european court ofjustice, and we would still, in certain important areas of law, be a rule ta ke certain important areas of law, be a rule take a. that means we don't leave the european union,which is what 17.4 leave the european union,which is what17.4 million people told us to do. and because of that, members of parliament will vote down the withdrawal agreement because it doesn't honour the referendum and it means we don't leave the european union. and we will do that in a very clear eyed way with a clear conscience. so if i can clear eyed way with a clear conscience. so ifi can put to clear eyed way with a clear conscience. so if i can put to you the same question that i put to simon hart and moment ago, what lies between no brexit and no deal? because based on what happened in parliament yesterday, there simply isn't a majority who support the idea of no deal, either? well, as you said in your package earlier, in fa ct you said in your package earlier, in fact david lidington said, the
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default position in law is that if we don't pass withdrawal agreement next week, which again i believe we won't, then we would leave the european union on 29th march under eu law, under article 50, as he rightly said, and under uk law, under what is called the eu withdrawal actor, which parliament passed last summer. so there will be a drift towards a deal, because there will not be enough people to coalesce around an alternative? well, when you asked simon hart what the deal will there be, he was unable to answer your question. —— what other deal will there be? the deal that we want — because we do wa nt deal that we want — because we do want a deal — is what we call super canada, which is a free—trade deal based on the existing agreement between the eu and canada. so it already exists in the you would take that and modify it slightly, and
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then we could continue to trade with then we could continue to trade with the european union on those terms. but we wouldn't be in the single market, we wouldn't be in the customs union, we wouldn't be subject to the european court of justice, we would be a self—governing country, which is what the british people voted for. that is the way out of this dilemma. mark francois mp, thank you very much for your time. well, later on this evening you can catch up on what unfolds in the house of commons today. we'll be showing highlights of the debate at eight—thirty here on bbc news. the military has been called in to help patrol heathrow airport, after sightings of a drone grounded flights for an hour yesterday evening. police have been carrying out extensive searches around the airport to identify anyone who might have been operating the device. our transport correspondent tom burridge reports. this flight radar website shows how all departures from the airport were suspended. some passengers were left waiting on the runway. so, we all boarded the flight and then we were told that we wouldn't be departing until the police said it was safe.
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they had a police helicopter circling above and the emergency services came onto the runway to see if they could find the drone. departures were suspended for less than an hour and flights continued to take off from the southern runway. unverified videos are circulating on social media. we do not know if the flashing object is a drone, but a bbc cameraman who was at heathrow and works with drones is certain he saw it. i noticed, way up in the sky, about 300 feet up, these lights, green and red, flashing, obviously attached to a craft that was hovering still in the sky there. the traffic had slowed by that point, so it was quite safe to watch this thing, and i watched it for about a minute or so, and it was staying there up in the sky, not moving left or right. heathrow said it suspended all take—offs as a precautionary measure
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and the police are investigating. on twitter, the transport secretary said the military was preparing to deploy the equipment used at gatwick at heathrow, should it prove necessary. it was just before christmas when tens of thousands of passengers were stranded at gatwick and elsewhere. all flights at the airport were suspended across two days. sussex police are still investigating, and no credible arrests have been made. many in aviation have been calling for action to counter the threat of drones for a long time. the headlines on bbc news... mps will debate theresa may's brexit plan a month after she cancelled the original vote. labour say they'll table a vote of no confidence in the government if she's defeated. the military is helping police at heathrow airport after sightings of a drone temporarily halted flights yesterday. and a 14—year—old boy is stabbed to death in east london
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after the moped he was riding collided with a car. here are your sports headlines... spurs have a slender 1—0 advantage heading into the second leg of their carabao cup semifinal with chelsea. harry kane scored the goal from the penalty spot after the use of var. padraig leaver says he's putting his legacy on the line, he's been named europe's captain for the next ryder cup. and the world number one simona halep has lost her first match after three months out through injury. she lost in straight sets to ashleigh barty at the sydney international. i'll be back with more sports in about 20 minutes. a 14—year—old boy has been stabbed to death in east london after the moped he was riding collided with a car. it's believed he was stabbed by three men travelling inside the vehicle. they fled the scene before police arrived.
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jane—frances kelly reports. police cordons block each end of this ordinary street in east london, where a teenager lost his life yesterday evening. people have been shocked by the sheer brutality of the attack. shortly before 6:30pm yesterday evening, police were alerted to a collision between a moped and a car along this road. when they arrived, they found a 14—year—old boy had been stabbed. they believe, following the collision, three men got out of a car, attacked the boy and then drove off. despite the efforts of paramedics, the boy died shortly after 7pm. his next of kin have been informed. forensic teams searched the street, and the homicide and major crime team were informed. no arrests have been made yet. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, tweeted to say... the local mp, stella creasy, tweeted that she was
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devastated to hear the news. last year, the number of killings in london reached their highest level for a decade, with the majority due to knife crime. jane—frances kelly, bbc news. our correspondent greg mckenzie is in waltham forest now with the latest. good morning to you — what are police saying this morning about their investigation of this horrific crime? well, the police are appealing for witnesses this morning. this incident took place last night at 6.30, a 14—year—old boy, one of the youngest to die since september 2017, when a another 14—year—old was shot in forest gate. i've been speaking to locals all morning and they're saying that they're very concerned, they claim there is a moped gang operating in
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this part of london. they claim that in the summer, the schoolkids from local schools were fighting with each other and there were police patrols, those police patrols have since gone and locals are calling for these patrols to come back. as for these patrols to come back. as for this incident, locals have named the boy and i've been told the police told me his family were here at the crime scene last nightjust behind me, if this is the spot where he died, just up there. it is believed the car arrived on this road, there was a collision with the moped, three suspects got out of the carand moped, three suspects got out of the car and stabbed the 14—year—old. one witness has said he saw him being stabbed number of times in his back. the police are simply appealing for witnesses to come forward. and what over reaction has there been from local people? locals say they're shocked and saddened, there was a murder here only two weeks ago, literally five minutes in that direction, a woman was murdered.
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they say teenagers are getting involved in gang crime in this vicinity, and that is a huge problem. they're vicinity, and that is a huge problem. they‘ re blaming vicinity, and that is a huge problem. they're blaming the government, saying there's not enough teenagers to do here. some are questioning why a 14—year—old was riding a moped anyway. you need to be 16 to legally ride a moped. and they're saying they don't know whether he is a local lad, whether he was from this estate here, there is an estate just in front of me. i have been told his name and the police are investigating and we will be speaking to the police later this afternoon. thank you for that update, greg mckenzie, in east london. the uk's second biggest supermarket, sainsbury‘s, has announced a fall in total sales over the festive period. sales in stores which have been open fora yearfell by1.1%, with a slight rise in grocery sales balancing out a biggerfall in general merchandise. the company blamed cautious customer spending and fewer black friday promotions. the results come during the same week aldi, lidl and morrison's
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announced a rise in their profits for christmas and new year. our business presenter dominic o'connelljoins me now. dominic, good morning to you. obviously, a really competitive period, it is interesting to contrast sainsbury‘s results, they're blaming contrast sainsbury‘s results, they‘ re blaming various contrast sainsbury‘s results, they're blaming various factors and yet all the, lidl and morrisons increased their profits so what is going on? most analysts thought that sainsbury‘s would be the weakest of the big four over the christmas period and that has turned out to be true, but not for the reasons they thought. they thought grocery would—be weak and actually they didn't do too bad on grocery, which was up 0.4%. the weakness, as you said earlier, was general merchandise, and that includes argos which sainsbury‘s bought two years ago. argos sales were down 2.3%. it
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is surprisingly sainsbury‘s bought argos to give it a break from the really competitive grocery market, to give them a bit of a fallback. they said that it was because of black friday, there was heavy discounting and they said they did not follow their rivals in discounting so heavily. but i think a lot of retail experts will say, complaining about discounting on black friday is a bit like complaining about cold weather in january. it comes with the territory, and you should have been ready for it. i think there will be a lot of question marks. having said that the shares have not done too badly this morning, not a big adverse reaction to these results. so what does 2019 hold for sainsbury‘s, then, how do they move forward from this? like all the big four supermarkets they have a problem, they have these two very aggressive privately owned german owned discounting supermarkets, and sainsbury‘s problem is that it's big
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selling point has been slightly more upmarket products but people are voting with their feet and going to aldi and lidl so what sainsbury‘s do in response? and we are expecting more figures from other stores out tomorrow. president trump has used a televised address from the oval office to demand the us congress pays for his long—promised border wall with mexico. he said the barrier was needed to stop what he called a "growing humanitarian and security crisis". democrats are refusing to fund the wall, in a dispute that's forced parts of the federal government to close. our correspondent, rajini vaidya nathan our correspondent rajini vaidya nathan reports from washington. my fellow americans... from his desk in the oval office, president trump delivered a rare prime—time address, making a passionate case for a wall. border patrol agents encounter thousands of illegal immigrants trying to enter your country. which
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are out of space to hold them and we have no way to promptly return them back home to their country. for years, donald trump has claimed that building a wall on the border with mexico would prevent drugs and people from being trafficked and reduce the threat of terror. mexico won't pay for it, which is why the president is now asking congress to. but democrats won't agree to the $5 billion price tag as part of budget negotiations. the deadlock has seen the us government partially shut down for more than a fortnight, leaving some 800,000 workers without a pay cheque. as this drags on, the democrats say they are not to blame. the fact is, president trump has chosen to hold hostage critical services for the health and safety and well— being of the american people, and withhold the paycheques of 800,000 innocent workers across the nation. later this week, president trump will take his case for a wall from the oval office to the border with mexico. but while he's working on getting support for his plan, hundreds of thousands of workers
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aren't getting paid, in a government shutdown that shows no sign of ending soon. rajini vaidayanathan, bbc news. the nominations for this year's baftas were announced this morning, with lots of british interest. olivia colman's film the favourite leads the race for this year with 12 nominations. and a star is born, among the four films taking seven nominations each. joining me to discuss all the runners and riders is the entertainmentjournalist caroline frost. caroline, good to have you with us this morning. let's start with best film, really the big one, arguably, ofa film, really the big one, arguably, of a lot, and we're going to look at three of them, including the favourite with olivia colman, but let's start with blachklansman. yes, it is interesting, it did not get any gongs on monday at the golden globes but there is a lot of
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interest in this film around awards season. interest in this film around awards season. it may have started as an early favourite, as they say, if i was a horse critic but increasingly eve ryo ne was a horse critic but increasingly everyone has got their eye on the favourite. a star is born did not get much traction on monday night at the golden globes but it is back in the golden globes but it is back in the running for best film and there isn't the rival of bohemian rhapsody because that has been shunted into best. film category for the baftas. so suddenly there are a few more spaces for these big hitters. just seeing a clip from blachklansman at the moment. and i think we can see something from the favourite in a second. olivia colman, portraying queen anne, a big bounce potentially from the golden globes? 0h, queen anne, a big bounce potentially from the golden globes? oh, yes. the oscar nomination opens on monday so obviously that has been put out the top of the pile for anybody who did not know who olivia colman was in hollywood. everybody in britain already knows all about her, she has mastered the small screen and here she is in one of herfirst big, if
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screen roles and already, awards coming her way and surely more to come. and lots of people will be saying, of course, just as it should be! yes! a star is born, you mentioned, i haven't seen it yet, would you recommend it? it is lovely, it's lady gaga and bradley cooper there a mystery between them is magical. it is sad but uplifting, one of those heart—wrenching films. and career defining performances from both the cooper and lady gaga. and best actor, christian bale as piccini, and bohemian rhapsody and steve coogan as well, interestingly portraying three real—life people. and very different real—life people. i think there is always a hunger for a biopic. but when you get these people who transform works like a unrecognisable, disappearing into the role and certainly that can be said of christian bale. i saw this film last night and you don't see anything, you see tiny glimmers of
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christian bale but hardly any and it really is a storming performance as dick cheney. he is known for these astounding transformations, isn't he? there he is, i mean, amazing! can you secretjim dale?!|j he? there he is, i mean, amazing! can you secret jim dale?! i know it is him yet i cannot see him! —— can you secretjim dale?! is him yet i cannot see him! —— can you secret jim dale?! it is a really powerful script. am loving the fact that steve coogan has been tipped because he missed out at the golden globes will did not even get nominated for best supporting actor in one of his own committed performances. i think we are running out of time so let's get on to best actress, if we can. glenn close, lady gaga olivia colman again in the favourite. golden globes, glenn close and olivia colman got gongs but now they are all competing for one award and, of course, lady gaga will be very sad if she goes home
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empty—handed from awards season. they are all towering performances, so they are all towering performances, so different, it is apples and pears, this is the problem with awards season. anything else you would like to pick out from these nominations? i am so happy that peterjackson's documentary was recognised and i think he will probably win best document tree for that technical and emotional... i mean, what i'm offering! i think it was shown on bbc four last year, about bringing the first world war to life in colour. that was amazing. caroline, thank you very much. in a moment we will have the weather forecast you but first let's hear what victoria derbyshire has got coming up. we have spoken to a woman whose father took his own life. she said she will never get the chance to discover the truth. it was on
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facebook and i could already see what mutual friend had viewed it. it was already out there. we will bring her together in conversation with a so—called paedophile hunter. that is on bbc two, the bbc news channel and online. and it is now time for the weather forecast. temperatures last night fell below freezing. we have also got some cloud out in the west and the east. in the west it is a weather front coming in and introducing patchy, light rain with it. in the east this weather has been dragged in on the northerly brisk wind. some showers will be wintry in the grampians. still the potential for large waves
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in east anglia. in between these two areas there will be some sunshine. if you are in the winter it will feel colder than that. as the weather front crosses scotland and northern ireland into northern england and north wales, the cloud will build. further south it will be cold enough for a touch of frost. bright skies in the south, but the wind will not be so strong tomorrow. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: mps will debate theresa may's brexit plan a month after she cancelled the original vote. labour say they'll table a vote of no confidence in the government if she's defeated but ministers remain bullish. i think the prime minister's deal is a good dealfor britain. the only alternatives are no brexit, which would not deliver on what the people voted for,
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or no deal which would cause economic damage. and it is because the prime minister's deal delivers for britain that i am confident it will pass. the military is helping police at heathrow airport after sightings of a drone temporarily halted flights yesterday. a 14—year—old boy is stabbed to death in east london after the moped he was riding collided with a car. president trump demands congress pays for his long—promised border wall with mexico in his first televised address from the oval office. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. we are beginning with the news app and looking at what is on the most read this. at the moment it is the
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story of the 14—year—old boy who was stabbed after he collided with a car. president trump is number two. then there is the right to repair. it is about a common frustration when an appliance that you have just after the warranty runs out it brea ks after the warranty runs out it breaks down and you cannot repair it and you end up getting rid of it and itjoined a global mountain ofjunk. but in parts of the usa and the eu, citizens will get a right to repair of swords, he says. it is a series of swords, he says. it is a series of proposals from european environment ministers to force manufacturers to make goods that last longer and are easier to mend. iam sure last longer and are easier to mend. i am sure most people would be happy with that. we will look at the most watched at the moment. as the debate on the
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prime minister's eu deal resumes today — with indications that the same opposition to it that existed before christmas remains — there are renewed calls from some for another eu referendum. andrew mithcell is a conservative mp and former secretary of state for international development and was a prominent leave supporter. he spoke to the today programme, on bbc radio 4 earlier, and was asked by mishal hussain whether he would support a motion calling for another referendum. i think that would be the last resort and i think parliament must take control. i didn't support the amendment last night because i thought it fettered the government too much, but i will probably support the amendment today, which would get the government to come back after three days. i am astonished that the prime minister would bring to parliament a dealfrom brussels which she knows she cannot get through and also, apparently, has no plan b. so i would certainly vote for the amendment today. parliament must then take control, we must then see what parliament will support. i am sure the speaker will facilitate parliament, demonstrating both to our constituents and to the commission what parliament is supporting.
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if that doesn't work then we could be driven to a people's vote, but it would be an extremely bad option. a bad option but you said it was a last resort but not unthinkable? it is clearly not unthinkable, but in my view the people have already spoken. the instruction to parliament is to leave and only if parliament was simply incapable of reaching a conclusion on that should we contemplate a people's vote. and if there were a people's vote, i think it is extremely likely that it would be the same as the winchester by—election in 1997, where, if you remember, the conservatives lost by two votes and insisted on a rerun and then they lost by 20,000. i think there will be a very strong feeling in britain that the public have already voted and that they are being asked to vote again and they shouldn't be asked to vote again and they will reinforce the earlier opinion. do you mean there is likely to be a bigger majority for leave? i think it is impossible at this point to say what would happen, clearly, but i think there is a strong argument that the public would say we have already voted on this,
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we are being asked by the politicians to vote again and we will deliver the same result or an even stronger leave result. but assuming that parliament has as you say taken back control and if all other eventualities have been exhausted and the only option left is a people's vote, you would vote for it? well, i don't think we are going to get to that point. i think parliament will take back control and i think once the government has been defeated on this deal and the whipping structure will work much less well and there may be agreement across parliament on how we should proceed without having the need to consult the people again. the ‘people's vote' campaigners have released their preferred route towards having another vote — by amending the motion the government would have to put forward in the event of a defeat on the prime minister's deal next week. lord kerr is the former head of the british diplomatic service and the person who originally drafted article 50. he supports the campaign for another vote. if contrary to what mr mitchell said
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the house of commons is unable to agree on what is the way forward, it seems to me it is likely the best way to solve the deadlock would be to go back to the people. the people this time would be offered not a unicorn, not a this time would be offered not a unicorn, nota pie this time would be offered not a unicorn, not a pie in the sky brexit. there would be an option of the brexit the prime minister has negotiated which, i agree with mr mitchell is likely to fail in the commons, the option of no deal which, in my opinion would be a disaster. we can keep the deal we have and take back the letter and have and take back the letter and have the option of remaining in the european union. those are the three choices for the country. you say it would solve the deadlock. it might
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just produce another deadlock? we would need an extension of the article 50 period in order to have another extension and that might expire. if i were a remainer and my side had lost, we would accept that and we would leave the european union. so it would be decisive in that sense. the important point is that sense. the important point is that this time round it would be informed. we could not have pie in the sky have your cake and eat it options. you would have clearly defined options. the option on the table this week, the option of no deal which the house of commons rejected, or the option of the deal we have, the one margaret thatcher negotiated. that was lord kerr speaking. as mps resume debate on the brexit deal, the police are stepping up security around parliament after some mps were subjected
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to intimidation and harassment. conservative mp anna soubry was shouted at and called a liar and a nazi, leading more than a hundred mps to call on the police to imporove their response. kim leadbeater is the younger sister of mp jo cox, who was murdered in her constituency in west yorkshire in 2016. she spoke to bbc breakfast. i think there has been a series of different incidence of that nature in recent weeks and days, which have been particularly disheartening to watch, and bring back an awful lot of sadness and a sense of dismay for me personally. but i think the thing is what can we do about it? that is what we need to start talking about and that is why having a dialogue is really important. but this has been building upfora really important. but this has been building up for a long time, this is not an isolated incident, this is happening across the political
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spectrum to people on the conservative and labour side, those who voted to leave and those who voted to remain. we need to have conversations around how we can change the atmosphere and the language. we heard a couple of mps talking about the toxicity of this particular debate. then we hear this phrase dialled down. how do we do that? for me there are two main thing. we all have to take some sense of personal responsibility and that has to start with politicians and journalists and with people who have a public position of responsibility. they have to behave responsibly. that will have a knock—on effect on the rest of us, who also have to think about the way we conduct ourselves. we have to ask fundamental questions about the type of country we want to live in and how we want our political discourse to be conducted. we all have a role to be conducted. we all have a role to play in that and we have to have
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a look at people in parliament. i have met a lot of mps in the past two years and there are some i like and some who i do not like and for some their behaviour is not acceptable, and we all need to look at how weak conduct ourselves. social media is a massive part of this. i had a conversation withjoe about six weeks before she was killed and she had suffered a lot of very nasty online abuse. this was across the spectrum. and we had an honest conversation and i said to her, you do not have to do thisjob, you can stop this any time you want, you can stop this any time you want, you can stop this any time you want, you can focus on being a mother and do the other things you have got in your life. but she was so passionate about making a difference and she wa nted about making a difference and she wanted to help people and six weeks later she was dead and two and a half years later i am having christmas day with two children who will never see their mother again. some people will say that is
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scaremongering. those are facts we live with on a daily basis. let's ta ke live with on a daily basis. let's take a quick look at what is on the most watched section of the bbc news app. this popped in a number one a short while ago. an expanding door that fights parcel thebes. it is on display at the ces tech expo in las vegas. it is a big event that happens each year. this expanding door locks away small parcels and it calls the police if larger parcels are stolen from it. that is our technology reporter chris fox having ago technology reporter chris fox having a go with the door and demonstrating how it works. that is number one and thatisit how it works. that is number one and that is it for today's morning briefing. sport now and now a full round up,
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from the bbc sport centre. sadly, there you are. we are definitely here. tottenham will take a slender 1—0 lead into the second leg of their carabao cup semi final with chelsea. var came to spurs' aid at wembley last night. harry kane was initially flagged offside before running clear and being fouled by the chelsea goalkeeper. video replays showed that kane was onside — just. he then stepped up to score from the spot to give tottenham a narrow advantage heading into the second leg at stamford bridge. i am so pleased, we play again one of the best teams in england, of course, and in europe. a team that was built to win titles. they have unbelievable players, i think to win this type of game is an amazing, a huge experience for us. liverpool's mohamed salah
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is the 2018 confederation of african football player of the year — the second consecutive year he's won the award. salah beat liverpool team—mate sadio mane of senegal and pierre—emerick aubameyang to the title. salah was voted the bbc african footballer of the year for the second time in december. new europe ryder cup captain padraig harrington admits it'll be a tough task to retain the cup when they play the usa next year. harrington was a vice—captain when europe won the cup in paris last september. home advantage counts a great deal in the ryder cup, and europe were well beaten the last time they played in the states in 2016. luckily this time around we're going to a links golf course the midwest, late september. so it's as good as we're going to get as an away venue for the european sides.
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if we were heading back to another hazeltine, like, it'sjust so hard to beat the us when it becomes, you know, fast greens, no rough, birdie—fest type golf. wales full—back leigh halfpenny looks likely to miss at least the start of the six nations. halfpenny has already been out for two months after suffering concussion against australia in november. his club scarlets now say he'll not be available for a further three to five weeks. wales kick off their six nations campaign against france on the 1st of february. world number one simona halep's first match for more than three months ended in defeat by australia's ashleigh barty at the sydney international. the romanian was returning to action after a back injury and was beaten in straight sets by the world number 15. halep was runner up at last yea r‘s australian open and is currently without a coach. britain's sam sunderland slipped down a place to sixth in the motorbike category after the second stage
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of the dakar rally in peru. nine time world rally champion sebastien loeb claimed victory in the cars, with his peugeot finishing first in the drive between between pisco and sanjuan de marcona. south african giniel de villiers finished fourth to take over as race leader. one of england's gold medal winners from april's commonwealth games returns to the netball squad for their last test before the world cup later this year. shooterjo harten was a member of the side that beat australia to take the title and after three months out with a knee injury, she's back for the quad series. england will be up against australia, new zealand and south africa. well here's how the news was announced on the england netball twitter feed yesterday. casey neville was selected for the squad. this is for the netball squad series. our reporterjessica has all the details. serena guthrie will
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captain the team of 12. serena guthrie will captain the team of 12. with his side top of the premier league many liverpool fans thinkjurgen klopp is magic. we may have proof. just take a look what happens to xherdan shaqiri after the fa cup defeat to wolves on monday. now you see him, now you don't. no special effects, i can assure you. let's have a look at some of this morning's back pages. this is harry kane celebrating. there is a theme in this morning's
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papers, harry kane all over it. the main story on the back of the mirror is about intimidation and threats. that is all for now. as we've been hearing, mps will begin debating theresa may's brexit plan again this afternoon, nearly a month after she postponed the commons vote on her agreement. there will be five days of discussion on the terms of the uk's withdrawal and future relations with the eu ahead of an expected vote next tuesday. our reality check correspondent chris morris has been looking at the numbers the prime minister needs for her deal to pass through the commons. in downing street they are trying to figure out the numbers in the house of commons to work out if they have any hope of getting this vote passed. amidst all the political
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drama it is the documents that have been negotiated behind closed doors that are at the heart of the debate. we have come into the cabinet room for a reminder of what mps are talking about and eventually voted on. the credibility of the prime minister and her brexit plan are at sta ke. minister and her brexit plan are at stake. first of all, the withdrawal agreement itself, the legally binding document that would take britain out of the eu. it contains the divorce bill the uk would pay, an estimated £39 billion. it sets out basic rights for uk citizens elsewhere in the eu, and eu citizens here in the uk, and the terms of a transition period of at least 21 months after brexit when all the rules would stay the same. most controversial of all is the protocol on ireland and northern ireland, including the backstop plan, and keeping the irish border as open as it is now under all circumstances. the backstop would only come into
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effect at the end of a brexit transition period if a future trade agreement to avoid a hard border has not been achieved. the prime minister has been given additional reassu ra nces minister has been given additional reassurances from the eu that the backstop would only ever be temporary and no one wants it to come into effect. but it still exists in the treaty and there is no juno rattle wait for the uk to get out of it. there is also a non—binding political declaration on the future relationship between the uk in the eu. the wording is so vague that it does not offer any guarantee of any particular outcome. the government is facing an uphill battle to get this vote passed. they will probably have to ask mps to vote more than once, maybe even after more reassurance from brussels. after that if the vote goes through, the withdrawal agreement needs to be turned into uk law. it needs to be given the green light by the european parliament. if all that happens in time, the uk
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will leave the eu on the 29th of march. if the government is defeated, the default position is the uk would still leave but with no deal. or mps could come up with an alternative plan for leaving, a relationship like norway's for example. or we relationship like norway's for example. orwe might relationship like norway's for example. or we might be looking at a new prime minister, another election, or even another referendum, which could mean no brexit at all. no one can say for sure what is likely to happen over the next three months. this street has seen its fair share of drama in the past, but nothing quite like this. the past, but nothing quite like this. joining me now from westminster is the conservative mp and former cabinet minister, damian green. do you think the prime minister believes her deal will be voted through in the commons next week? while we know there does not seem to bea while we know there does not seem to be a majority around the idea of no
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deal, nor is that the majority around an alternative. that is the key point, there is no majority in the house of commons for no deal. there is only one deal on offer. there is only one deal on offer. there is only one deal on offer. there is a logic in saying if you do not want no deal, then vote for the deal. the discussions that have been happening over the past few weeks since the government pulled the vote in december when they thought it would not get through, i suspect there will be more happening between now and the vote itself next tuesday in terms of negotiations between the uk government and the other eu governments. to some extent it may well be a typical european negotiation were suddenly at the last minute some concession that has been announced to be completely unacceptable is made. that will probably involve the backstop, the
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irish border situation, but the details of that we will not know until the last minute. you say some sort of negotiation, but surely a negotiation on the deal before parliament has been done. the indications from other european leaders, leo varadkar among them, they might offer a new form of words, but the substance will not change. indeed, that is what eve ryo ne change. indeed, that is what everyone says. but in europe eve ryo ne everyone says. but in europe everyone says. but in europe everyone says it is a completely rules —based organisation and one of the rules is you cannot run a big government deficit in the eurozone. they have just waved that rule for france because it is in the interest of president macron's government to have that rule waived for a year or two. there are always political decisions that can be made and people will go up to the last minute saying it is impossible, but then if
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people assume the deal is more important than anything else, then what was impossible becomes possible. what is your best hunch on what will happen between now and march? will there be a drift towards no deal? will article 50 be extended? i certainly do not think the government has any intention of drifting towards no deal. i know some people are suspicious of this, but genuinely i think the government does want to have a deal, it does not want no deal, and quite how the commons can make it wishes known is an interesting question because the commons can pass resolutions, but the law as it stands says we leave on march the 29th whether we have got a deal or not. they may need to bea got a deal or not. they may need to be a lot of activity on that front. but the government is in the same place as those of the majority in parliament. thank you very much.
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time for the weather. where you had frost overnight you have woken up this morning with some sunshine. a decent start in hampshire with high—level cloud. cloud thickening across northern ireland and into scotland. maybe a few spots of rain and drizzle in the far north—west. temperatures going up far north—west. temperatures going up to far north—west. temperatures going upto9 far north—west. temperatures going up to 9 degrees. elsewhere brisk, north—easterly wind. tonight milder air across scotland and northern ireland. but temperatures will be above freezing. for wales, the midlands and the south—western part of england, there may well be a frost in the morning. a few bright spells towards northern areas throughout the day. hello, it's wednesday,
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it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. at least eight men have killed themselves in the uk after being caught by so called "paedophile hunters", this programme can reveal. today we talk to the daughter of one of them. the first time she found out her dad was accused of being a paedophile, was when she saw a video of him on facebook being confronted by hunters. because i wasn't thinking... ..and i showed her the video. it was on facebook. i could already see what mutual friends had viewed it, so it was out there, there was nothing i could do. we've brought her together with one of these hunters to talk about the impact such tactics have on the relatives of the accused.
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