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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 18, 2019 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: the duke of edinburgh is recovering at sandringham after being involved in a car crash. he was said to be shaken but unhurt. we'll be live at sandringham with the latest. patients complain of delays in getting painkillers and anti—depressants, as pharmacists warn of a shortage of medicines. a new streaming record. the tv and movie firm, netflix, signs up another 9 million users injust three months. that takes its total to 140 million customers around the world. it's good night to british hopes at the australian open, but yohonna konta says players‘ health is being put in danger after her defeat in melbourne came after 3am in the morning. and it is a cold start to friday. frosty too. —10 in parts of scotland. while most start dry, there could be sleet and snow later. i will have the details here on
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brea kfast. good morning. it's friday, the 18th ofjanuary. our top story: the duke of edinburgh is back at the queen's sandringham estate after he escaped injury in a car crash yesterday afternoon. the duke, who's 97, was driving near the grounds of the estate in norfolk when his land rover collided with another vehicle. he's said to have been left shaken. our correspondent helena lee is in sandringham for us this morning. good morning to you. just tell us what we know this morning. well, we know the duke of edinburgh is recovering not far from where we are at the sandringham estate after that accident yesterday, which took place just before 3pm in the afternoon. now we know the duke of edinburgh was driving himself in his land rover. he was pulling out of a private driveway just a rover. he was pulling out of a private drivewayjust a bit rover. he was pulling out of a private driveway just a bit further down from where we are standing on to the busy a149, the main route to the norfolk coast, and a car was
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coming along that stretch of road and that is where the accident happened. now, if you look at that picture of the aftermath of the crash, it really is incredible that the duke of edinburgh came away com pletely the duke of edinburgh came away completely uninjured. you can see his land rover on its side, the driver's side closest to the pavement. we spoke with an eyewitness, nick cobb, who was driving past the crash after it happened. the range rover was on its side, on the driver's side. there was quite a bit of broken glass and plastic on the road and that is why we had to go down the centre of the road. the duke of edinburgh was, as a matter of routine, norfolk police says, breathalysed, as was the driver of the other vehicle. both came back as negative. the driver of the other car had to be taken to hospital, as well as their passenger, but they have now been discharged. for the moment, thank
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you. pharmacists say that they are struggling to obtain some medicines, including common treatments for depression and high blood—pressure and are paying vastly increased prices. the royal pharmaceutical society describes the shortages as massive. they say stockpiling for brexit appears to be a significant factor. here's more from our health correspondent catherine burns. this is partly a question of supply and demand. when supply goes down, demand goes up and prices can increase too. when this happens to vital medicines, the government agrees to pay a premium for them. the list of these temporary prices is published every month, and the bbc has analysed that data over the last three years. in england, there's been a sixfold increase in the number of medicines on the monthly list. in january 2015, there were 12 on it. the numbers started to climb in 2017, when it peaked at over 90. at the end of last year, there was a surge from 45 to 80. another worry is that many of these
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drugs are very common, everything from anti—inflammatories and epilepsy drugs, to blood pressure medication and antidepressants. for patients, obviously it's concerning if the medicine isn't available, and certainly, we'd advise patients to order the medicines in advance if they they can do, so in case there are any problems, it gives the pharmacist more time to deal with it. there are many possible factors explaining this, from an increased global demand to problems with raw materials. the national pharmacy association says brexit appears to be a significant factor, because of what it calls "unconscious stockpiling" — everyone along the chain holding onto extra medicines in case of a no—deal brexit. the department of health and social care says more than 2 million items are successfully dispensed in england every day. it is an interesting issue that could be affecting you. if it is,
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get in touch. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. and you can tweet about today's stories using the hashtag #bbcbrea kfast or follow us for the latest from the programme. let us know. perhaps you have experienced a shortage in the medicine you usually get from the pharmacist. let's move on to the rest of the day's news. theresa may has been meeting party leaders and senior mps at downing street as she tries to break the brexit deadlock at westminster. to give you a sense of both sides of the argument, the daily telegraph this morning reports that a group of ministers warned the prime minister they would resign if there was a no deal brexit. the guardian reports that jeremy corbyn could face up to a dozen resignations from the labour front bench if the party backs a second referendum. there is at least some clarity over the timetable of events. theresa may has until next monday to set out and publish her new brexit plan to parliament. mps will then debate and vote on this motion on tuesday 29th january.
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but the clock is ticking down to the 29th of march, the day the uk formally exits the european union. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster for us this morning. good morning, iain. it has been quite a turbulence i think it is fairto quite a turbulence i think it is fair to say. now it almost feels like parliament is hunkering down. theresa may is having a series of meeting. we are waiting for the drips and drabs of info to come out. that's right. you can't please all people all the time and yet those people all the time and yet those people emerging from meetings with theresa may said they were constructive talks, she was in listening mode. it is impossible for her to keep them all happy. she will have to choose. 0n the one hand people are up prepared to come out of the european union without a deal on wto terms and they say they were pleased with the meeting yesterday morning. 0thers pleased with the meeting yesterday morning. others are pushing the idea of staying close to eu rules and coming out and they say they were
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happy as well. and others said they we re happy as well. and others said they were pressing her to rule out no deal. so she is in listening mode at the moment. activity mode will be far more important. ge is under a lot of pressure. true to say, some ministers will walk, they will leave office unless she is prepared finally and ultimately to rule out no deal. the way she would do this isa no deal. the way she would do this is a mechanism devised by a conservative mp, but if she doesn't, with a deal at the end of february than at that stage effectively parliament would take control and try to extend article 50, the formal process of leaving the european union, delaying departure from the eu. if she is not prepared to go along with it, she will definitely face government resignations and equally stories around labour as well. there is pressure onjeremy corbyn to back her on another referendum, but pressure also from rank and file not to do so because they say that will alienate leave constituencies. so for both party
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leaders there are no easy answers. thank you so much for going through that. iain watson for us. a senior north korea negotiator has arrived in washington intensifying speculation of a second summit between kim jong—un and president trump. it's believed that kim yong—chol could visit the white house today with a message for mr trump. the two nations have been at a stalemate since lastjune, when their first meeting in singapore yielded few results, particularly over the denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. the tv and film streaming service netflix have signed up another 9 million subscribers injust three months — a record. that's according to their latest financial results out overnight. ben's been diving into the numbers the rise and rise of netflix, i mean, pretty significant, isn't it? yes, it tells us so much how viewing habits have changed. the numbers we throw around when we talk about netflix and rivals amazon video are staggering. how much money they are
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making and how much they are able to spend on content. if you look at these figures, netflix saying it will spend £10 billion on content over the coming year. it is a staggering amount of money. if you compare that to the bbc, with the licence fee, they can spend about £2 billion on content, so it blows it out of the water in terms of what it is able to put on its platform. but what you don't stand out in the figures is how long people are watching and what they are watching. remember, this is a platform that is not subject to having schedules that have to put things on peak or non— time, it can put it all on the service and people can choose what they watch and what they don't want to watch. it is clever how it does it, it has algorithms and computer models that will promote certain things when you log on that's different to someone else. so they are using that data and technology very well. and with a budget of the scale they have, they can spend a lot of money on content. what is
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interesting is when you look at the state of the market, who is paying for what, netflix has raised how much money it is charging for its service in the united states, and thatis service in the united states, and that is because it is in massive amounts of debt. spending a lot of money on content trying to sign us up money on content trying to sign us up to the service, but it is doing that at a cost and what they say is they might have to raise the prices to pay for the content on the service. still fairly young, isn't it, so the business model, so to be in doubt, it is ok. it is to sign up to get that stuff, but hopefully it will pay it back. thank you very much. now, if there was ever a photo that the catchphrase "we're going to need a bigger boat" was made for, i think its this one. divers in hawaii got the chance to swim with their very own jaws. this huge great white shark is nearly six metres long and weighs in at an estimated 2.5 tons. it is believed to be a 50—year—old female called deep blue. she's one of the largest sharks ever recorded and this is only the third
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ever sighting of her. and they went diving right next to her. i mean, yes. why would you do that? it also defies the whole theory of sharks eating humans. well, they don't eat humans all the time. is it safe because it is 50? i don't know if they are less hungry when they are old and they get used... i don't know. i am staggered that the diver could swim next. we will have a shark expert on to ask if they get less hungry. animals, as they get older, maybe they are slow and less ferocious. if you look at the size of the shark and the human next to it, it is a snack. that is a snack for her. whether she is old and has lost her appetite. she is already fed. it is an amuse bouche for her. yes. laughter. the latest
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match has ever at the australian 0pen, match has ever at the australian open, it had johanna konta, it started after midnight for the first time. it finished australian time at 3:15am. if anyone has done nightshift, when you dip the most it is around three in the morning. why? local tv schedules, they want the big matches through the evening, and others get pushed back and you have to wait your turn. and unlike wimbledon, restricted by the neighbours and the residents, they don't have that problem in melbourne. they want to get them finished on the day so they don't disrupt future schedules, yeah. so, british hopes at the australian open are over, with yohanna konta knocked out by garbine muguruza in the second round in melbourne. the match that didn't finish until after 3:00am in the morning in australia, and konta said it wasn't good for players health to play in the wee hours. she says it's dangerous.
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eddiejones has named his squad for the six nations. england will be without their captain dylan hartley for the start of the campaign. "i'm not retiring." 45—year—old jo pavey says she wants to compete at next year's 0lympic games. she'll bejoining us on the sofa later this morning. look forward to that. and ronnie 0'sullivan is through to his 14th masters semi—final after beating wales's ryan day at alexandra palace. the rocket is looking to win his eight masters title. more in their papers in a moment. thank you very much, see you in a moment. now a lot of you will be scraping frost off your cars this morning as the weather turns colder. did you see matt's number on the headline? minus ten. very cold in places. this was the scene in newcastle yesterday as the first wintry showers started to fall. with yellow weather warnings out for snow across the country today, here's matt with the forecast. good morning. good morning, yes,
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newcastle looks great. first snowfall of the season for many of us, this is whitley bay, snow on the beach as well, snow in northern scotland, this is where we saw clear skies through the night to add to the chill, —10 in some parts of aberdeenshire. widely frosty in the uk. just notice, to throw in the contrast, the isles of scilly, positively balmy, eight degrees, and some western areas, northern ireland, south—west england and wales, frost free at the moment, blue colours on the chart indicating subzero temperatures. showers in the night means icy conditions for eastern coastal counties. rain, sleet and snow along the east, rain at lower levels as we go through the day. northern and eastern areas will be dry with the best of the sunshine in north—east scotland, lovely,
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crisp winter day with parts of the grampians around one degree throughout. cloudy in the west, more ofa throughout. cloudy in the west, more of a breeze, showers for the western isles, dumfries and galloway, northern ireland will brighten up. rain in northern england and the pennines turning to sleet and snow over high ground. rain for wales later. patches of rain for the south—west, the odd heavy bursts and rumble of thunder can't be ruled out. that will push north and eastwards. most of you will see rain. 0ver high ground, sleet and snow just about wherever. temperatures tonight not as low as last night. frost for eastern areas, subzero in parts of northern scotland. as we go into the weekend, bright to start north—west in the country, lots of loud for the uk, mist over the hills. across parts of central—southern england most likely to see rain come and go through the day with a moderate burst as well. quite chilly for eastern areas given the lack of sunshine. in the west, a
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little bit mother, temperatures seven to 10 degrees. into sunday, clear skies for eastern areas, frost here, whether funding to western scotla nd here, whether funding to western scotland and northern ireland on sunday, bringing rain at times, snow over high ground as it works south and eastwards, much of england and wales will be dry with showers in the south—west, but a better day for sunshine across the eastern half of the country on sunday. and temperatures higher than the next couple of days, five to seven degrees, closer to where we should be for the time of year. we have atla ntic be for the time of year. we have atlantic air pushing in along with monday and tuesday, mild air trying to get close to us. the second half of the week, notice we will drag in east or north—easterly wind, so it could be a week stay in cold, it could be a week stay in cold, it could get colder and colder towards the end of the week to increase your chance of sleet and snow. i will keep you updated. it is a week of thick socks. it is indeed. let's take a look at today's papers, and the duke of edinburgh's car accident dominates most
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of the front pages. "how did he walk away?" asks the headline in the daily mail and shows a picture of prince philip's badly damaged land rover. we heard from an eyewitness who drove on the road after the accident saying it was the driver side closest to the road, the side that prince philip would have been on. but he has walked away unhurt. the daily telegraph also carries a picture of aftermath of the crash scene, and says the duke was "quite distraught" when he was pulled from the car. the paper also has a story on brexit. it says theresa may will face mass cabinet resignations ian was going through that. her
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ministers do not want no deal. the mirror also leads on prince philip's crash. and finally, the guardian is one of the few papers not to carry the duke of edinburgh on its front page. instead it says jeremy corbyn could face up to a dozen frontbench resignations if the party backs a second resignation. we haven't seen to some of the business pages. this news tells us about the state of retail around the country. this is a shopping centre that has 21 shop locations, 1a of which are empty. management have put it upfor which are empty. management have put it up for sale for £1. you can get a shopping centre for a pound and it is described as a development opportunity. but it suggests the
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difficulty that retailers are facing after tesco pulled out of the site, leaving problems for town and the shopping centre. 0n leaving problems for town and the shopping centre. on that same theme in the guardian this morning, a town in sicily is selling its houses for a single euro. and that is because many people left to move to the local big—city. however if you want one of these houses you must commit to refurbishing it within three yea rs. to refurbishing it within three years. so it could cost you around 15,000 euros to do so. nevertheless, if you get your hand on a house for a euro. not too bad. but it does come with a pricetag. do you fancy bouts? does it have to be a certain standard? bouts? does it have to be a certain standard ? could bouts? does it have to be a certain standard? could it be diy renovation? -- do you fancy the
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house? i could put up a shelf. it would stay up at least one although you could not put any mugs on it. seagull droppings at the australian open, another problem that. the match was going to be moved to an outside court that there was so much seagull mess that it was going to ta ke seagull mess that it was going to take 15 minutes to clean up. here, in uk time, it was a great time to follow the match can you imagine being a spectator at three in the morning? it would not help the players either. and not so much a spy players either. and not so much a spy at the leicester training camp but spiderman. somebodyjust as
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spiderman jumped out of the bushes to surprise the leicester manager. it turned out that it was their star striker. he was wearing the spiderman soup as a joke. do they work out who it was? the striker. jamie vardy. though, good. you would not want a strange person just wandering around in a superhero outfits. has everybody seen the story about the most favoured colour of car? have you seen the story already? it is kind of a business story. are we talking in the last year. that is why i have seen it. how about you, mike? it rings a bell about a christmas quiz. charlie, just tell us. what do you think is
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the most favoured colour of car that people buy in the last year?|j the most favoured colour of car that people buy in the last year? i say black. that is wrong. you can have a second guess. i want a christmas quiz with that and that! don't tell me that. —— with that answer. quiz with that and that! don't tell me that. -- with that answer. read? great. obviously, the colour grey. that is just a statistic, i do not know why. my goodness. that quiz went well, didn't it? we will have the weather a little later. the duke of edinburgh is back at the queen's sandringham estate after he escaped injury in a car crash yesterday. the palace has confirmed he was uninjured in the incident. let's speak to the sunday times royal correspondent, roya nikkhah, who is outside buckingham palace for us this morning: good morning to you and thank you
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for your time. kenway, festival, when you first saw those images of the crash itself what did you think? i was thinking, honestly, they do not call him the iron duke to nothing. i cannot believe he walked away from that collision unscathed. the guidance we are getting from the palace last night is that the duke was quite shocked and shaken oprah and much unscathed and the doctors at sandringham will be keeping a close eye on him and let's hope that he is ok. a huge relief for him and the other people involved ina in a crash. there were two women and now, we have learned, a baby in the back seat. a number of things will be occurring to people. one is that nobody appears injured including in
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the car prince philip and the other car as well. but there will be questions now about whether the duke of edinburgh should have been driving at his age on a public road. here's someone who has always been determined to drive himself. we see that a public occasions in the past, haven't we? that is right. is fiercely independent in all things. but the queen and all other members of the royal family do like to drive themselves when they do not read away professional engagement because i guess it is the one last piece of independence that they have. as you say, however, at the age of 9071 independence that they have. as you say, however, at the age of 907! am sure there will be questions asked by the public and internally, as to whether prince philip should continue to drive himself on public roads. i have no doubt he will continue to drive himself around sandringham estate but should he be out on the roads in public? possibly he is not as sharp as he was. it
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sounds as if, from the original reports we heard overnight, that he said when he was pulled out from the car that he was dazzled by the sons that have been a factor as well. and if we go back to the incident itself, we can see some pictures now. inevitably, people are interested for many reasons. they are worried about his welfare but i think that the royal family will be under some pressure to come up with information about how he is and exactly what happened. there will be scrutiny on this, now, and possibly that will not be quite welcome. that is right. there are will be scrutiny. i expect we may get an update on his condition today. in these situations we do not get an enormous amount of information from the palace because it is deemed as an off—limits area, his health. a
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lot of focus will switch to the two women involved in the incident. there has already been speculation today in some newspapers about whether or not the duke of edinburgh may be investigated, was he driving with due care? all of those questions will be debated today. and there will be scrutiny. i think the first thing people will look to the palin for is for confirmation about whether or not the duke. driving on public roads. —— look to the palace for confirmation. we will keep you updated on any developments through the morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollens. there has been a significant
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increase on the number of people attacked on the london underground. they include around 95 offences including weapons. a conservative group have called on the mayor to pay for improved policing but he says he is doing everything within its power to tackle crime but they desperately need more money that only can be provided by the government. a woman who was killed in a hit and run in brixton has been named. 24—year—old celia ines betrouni was struck on brixton hill, in the early hours of saturday morning. emergency services were unable to save her and she died at the scene. a 27—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. east surrey hospital has been rated as "outstanding" by inspectors. the hospital, in redhill, becomes one of only nine in england to be given the highest rating by the care quality commission. the surrey and sussex healthcare nhs trust, which runs the hospital, is now rated "outstanding"
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for the quality of its services, its caring and being well—led — and is rated "good" for being safe and effective. i think it is really clear to see that the trust has embraced the quality improvement programme. and worked hard to ensure that alongside this quality of improvement programme, patients are at the centre of everything that they do. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning in king's cross — two lanes are closed on the euston road eastbound at the junction with york way. there are also two lanes closed on gray's inn road northbound into the kings cross one way system, all due to burst water main repairs. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. is a cold start out
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there this morning with temperatures below zero so we have a widespread frost. high cloud leading to hazy sunshine this morning but gradually that hazy sunshine will disappear and turn increasingly cloudy through the day as the cloud moves in from the day as the cloud moves in from the west. it will stay cold and temperatures today between five and seven celsius. it will stay dry and into the evening we will see this band of rain pushed through. it could turn wintry particularly over higher ground you may see a flurry on lower levels as well. there will bea on lower levels as well. there will be a chilly night but not as cold as last night. temperatures remaining above zero. into the weekend for saturday, predominantly cloudy day with outbreaks of rain but staying cold as well. temperatures in single figures. eventually the cloud will start to move away on sunday so more in the way of sunshine. that if you look at the temperature it is staying cold and will do as we head into next week. it does feel very cold out there at the moment. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up: as theresa may tries to find a way out of the brexit deadlock, we'll ask a former government advisor what we can expect before the 29th of march deadline. at 40, jo pavey was the oldest woman to win gold at the european championships. she'll tell us why she has her sights on a 6th olympic games at the age of 46. viewers of the bbc one drama call the midwife were moved by last week's dramatic abortion storyline. jennifer kirby, who plays nurse valerie dyer, will be here to tell us how that story is far from over. good morning.
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here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the duke of edinburgh is said to be shaken but uninjured after being involved in a car crash yesterday afternoon. prince philip, who will be 98 this year, was driving his land rover near the queen's sandringham estate. our correspondent keith doyle is outside buckingham palace for us this morning. just take us through what has been said at this stage. yes, good morning from buckingham palace, still very much in the dark at this time of the morning. the last official information we had from buckingham palace was yesterday evening three hours after that crash near sandringham evening three hours after that crash nearsandringham in evening three hours after that crash near sandringham in norfolk. the palace confirmed that it was the duke of edinburgh involved in that, and that he was driving. of course we have seen the pictures of his land rover on its side looking like a very serious crash indeed. buckingham palace has said the duke of edinburgh wasn't injured. he was seen by a doctor as a precaution but he was uninjured and they have been
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very firm about that. we know to other people in another vehicle were treated for minor injuries in hospital. they have now since being released from hospital —— two other people. and we know that the duke of edinburgh spent the night and is this morning at the sandringham estate with the queen. of course they haven't been here in london since before christmas. they spent the christmas period in sandringham and are not due back here in buckingham palace until early next month at the earliest. we are hearing that the official line on his condition a little more from the royal spokespeople, at the same time there are a number of stories emerging from some of the papers from eyewitnesses about the sequence of events. yes, i mean, witnesses have said that they saw that he was very shocked, he was shaken, that he was in the car saying that his legs... that he needed to move his
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legs... that he needed to move his legs. witnesses said that the vehicle was on its side and had to be removed out of one of the windows. he was very shaken. none of this has come officially from buckingham palace. they havejust released a very short statement, which is the official version of events which is the official version of eve nts fro m which is the official version of events from them. officials have said what happened there. and the fa ct said what happened there. and the fact the duke of edinburgh, at 97, is very lucky to not be seriously injured after that crash. for the moment, thank you. pharmacists say they are struggling to obtain some medicines including common treatments for depression and high blood pressure and are paying vastly increased prices. the royal pharmaceutical society describes the shortages as massive. they say stockpiling for brexit appears to be a significant factor. the department of health insists the vast majority of drugs are not in short supply. staff shortages and growing waiting lists could threaten the long term plan for the nhs in england, according to a new report. last week, the government outlined how it would spend the extra £20 billion pledged for
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the health service by 2023. the national audit office warns there are issues that need to be addressed, to ensure the service remains financially sustainable. the department of health said it was working hard to put the nhs on a viable footing. a senior north korea negotiator has arrived in washington intensifying speculation of a second summit between kim jong—un and president trump. it's believed that kim yong—chol could visit the white house today with a message for mr trump. the two nations have been at a stalemate since lastjune, when their first meeting in singapore yielded few results, particularly over the denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. new research appears to have settled a long—running debate over the age of the rings of saturn. sceintists have confirmed the planet's iconic rings are very young, no more than 100 million years old, and may have been formed during a time when dinosaurs still roamed on earth. the insight comes from the final measurements acquired by nasa's cassini probe, just before it drove itself to destruction in saturn's atmosphere in 2017.
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i could look at those pictures for a long time. 100 million years. mere babies. it is when you talk space—time. babies. it is when you talk space-time. talking of time, 12:30am in the morning. not the latest finish ever, 2008, involving lleyton hewitt, finishing at a:3aam in the morning. it needs a little bit of context because people might be thinking, if a match goes on, if men have a five—hour game, it could start at 90 and finish in the early hours. this didn't even start until after midnight —— it could start at 9pm. jo konta ended up playing her match on margaret court arena. it did go to three sets. her match
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didn't start until after midnight for the first time. this is the later start to a match. haven't they got many ports? they have, but you don't always want to be pushed out to the outer courts —— courts? don't always want to be pushed out to the outer courts -- courts? did you see how many were in the audience? i know, many were asleep. they thought about switching it to number three, but as i mentioned 20 minutes ago there was a lot of seagull mess to clean up. there are more than three courts. yes, i wasn't talking about all of the courts. that was one of the reasons it was on margaret court arena and that was why it started so late. it was on margaret court arena and that was why it started so latem things like this happen, they are professionals, i know, but you can imagine people being put off. you don't know when you are going to start, because you are waiting for matches to finish. all this means it's good night to british hopes at this year's australian open before the third round has started. all eight have gone. konta's match started 12:30am, the latest start ever at melbourne park. garbine muguruza took the first set 6—4, but konta battled back to take
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the second on tie break. but the two—time grand slam champion broke in konta's final service game to win the decider. imean, i i mean, i think ideally both of us probably would have wanted to plate earlier. this is no—one's ideal schedule to play in the wee hours of the morning. but again, we don't make the schedule, unfortunately, and we both dealt with the same challenge. overnight, roger federer progressed to the third round with a straight‘s set win over american taylor fritz. england's rugby union head coach eddiejones says he's picked the strongest squad of his time in charge for the six nations opener against ireland next month. dylan hartley the co—captain is missing through injury alongside former captain chris robshaw. butjones says there is strength in depth wit‘i‘i'ifihissquad'to'chattengg we are very clear where our best players are but we want competition
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in the squad, you know, we want blokes to play for blokes desperate to play for england, and to do that we want competition. so in some cases we have deliberately created competition to ensure that we get the best out of the players. because to be the best team in the world, which we need to be to beat ireland, we need players at their absolute best, we need them chomping at the bit, and to be chomping at the bit you need to be hungry and to be hungry you need competition. the former manchester united managerjose mourinho has spoken publicly for the first time since his sacking last month. he told be—in sports that he still belongs at the top level of management, and responded to questions about his man management after reportedly falling out with several of his players. the balance has to be created in the relations between the players and the manager. the manager is there to coach them, the manager is not there to keep the discipline at any cost. the structure must be made, the
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structure must be there to protect the manager and for the players to feel that everything is in place and they are not going to arrive into a situation where they feel more powerful than they use to be. jose mourinho appears to be appearing for the latest set of star trek. i agree with what you are saying. yeah? someone has to be in charge, it is the manager. you would bea charge, it is the manager. you would be a good manager. if i agree with jose mourinho, he hasjust been booted out of man united, i don't know if i am the kind of manager... ashley cole looks set for a return to english football. the former england left back ashley cole is in talks to join he's left la galaxy in november last year and would link up with his former chelsea and england team—mate frank lampard talking of still going strong...
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britain'sjo pavey has said she's targetting a record—equalling sixth olympics at the age of 46. she was the oldest woman to win a european championship gold medal when she won the 10,000 metres in 2014. she was 40 and had given birth less than a year earlier. now she says she's targetting a place on the gb team at the tokyo olympics next year, which would equal tessa sanderson's six olympic track and field appearances. and after 8:00pm this morning we'll havejo pavey on the sofa to chat about her plans for tokyo 2020. do we know the oldest ever olympic competitor? i will look it up. sanderson has the record so far for appearances. ronnie o'sullivan is through to his 14th masters semi—final. the rocket beat wales's ryan day by six frames to three at alexandra
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palace. next he'll face china's ding hun—hui who beat belgium's luca brecel. basketball fans in london were treated to a stunning finish in the nba's annual visit to the uk, with the washington wizards scoring in the last second of the match to beat the new york knicks. and finally, yesterday we showed you marcelo bielsa's incredible press conference defending himself against so called spygate, but have a look at this from leicester's training session. it's spiderman. well, not quite. who else but jamie vardy dressed as the superhero to strike fear into his manager and team mates. it seems it was all a joke around the spying theme. vardy then joined his team mates in full costume to carry on with training. can we see it again? we will see it later on. the players didn't seem to react at all. as if it didn't happen. he comes out... laughter. i love his enthusiasm. maybe the players were on the joke. i can send you the theme song. i know the theme song from childhood. thank you. see you later. looking forward to it. from today, ticket reselling website viagogo must publish the names and addresses
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of touts who sell more than 100 tickets a year via the site to consumers. the company said it has met the deadline set by the competition watchdog and is now compliant. claire turnham set up the group victim of viagogo after being overcharged for concert tickets she bought from the company. she joins us now from our oxford newsroom. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. you must be quite pleased. you have worked very hard to make sure that people are not going to end up in the situation you ended up in. that's right. that's why i do it. i wouldn't want anyone to go through it. it is a really distressing experience. tell us what happened to you. i was buying ed sheeran tickets for my family as a surprise at the beginning of 2017. i believed what i saw on the website, which was that i was buying the last four tickets. the price i saw was £263, but the amount i was charged
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was £1421 and that was taken without my consent. my goodness, how was it justified you are charged that? the prices simply were not displayed, nothing was advertised as per ticket, no fees were shown and they we re ticket, no fees were shown and they were £350 added on top of the tickets that i bought. it was really upsetting at the time, but it's a very familiar story. at the beginning there wasjust very familiar story. at the beginning there was just one person, one story. now there are thousands. we have heard the same stories every day. i understand ed sheeran and his tea m day. i understand ed sheeran and his team collaborated with you to try to prevent this from happening again. what happened ? prevent this from happening again. what happened? yes. the whole team are what happened? yes. the whole team a re really what happened? yes. the whole team are really anti their tickets being on the secondary site of viagogo because they want fans to come in at the prices he sets, which is face value, which are very reasonable
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prices. and so the tickets that were listed were sold in breach of their own terms and conditions. so ed's tea m own terms and conditions. so ed's team invited me on to and we supported his fans who bought the tickets and help them not only to come in on face value, but also get their money back. and we were really successful. we saw thousands of people. amazingly we have nearly £1 million back in refunds. and as well is that success, we are also seeing very few tickets listed for his shows this year. it's not going to stop people trying it on, though, is it? there are touts out there who are bulk buying, some companies which are doing that, but it's a step towards it. what would be your advice to anyone who wants to get who hasn't been able to get it directly once they go on sale, what should they be doing? avoid viagogo like the plague, even now. stick to the official site. go to whoever the artists are. go to their official
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sites and see where they suggested by the tickets from. some artists will suggest an authorised reseller. it is best to take their advice. do your research. if anyone has looked on the viagogo site this morning they are showing that some tickets are prohibited for sale. i have seen ramstein, mark knopfler, edinburgh tattooed and ed sheeran tickets saving prohibited for resale and yet they are here all being sold. thank you for talking to us. i know you feel very strongly about viagogo. we have had a statement from the company as well. it said further to the agreement we reach with the competition and markets authority, we have met the deadline and we are now compliant. all tickets on viagogo are valid. it is perfectly legal to resell etiquette or give it to someone else if you want to. as claire has said, be careful when you are buying a look at the small
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print, because that is where the charges come in and mislead people, whichever site you use. we know it is getting cold. this is on the north sea coast in north—east england yesterday afternoon. blizzard conditions they are as the winds whipped in heavy snow. and this is aberdeenshire as we entered the afternoon. a layer of snow with clear skies overnight. to just drop to —11. most of us starting friday frosty with the exception being a degrees in some parts of cornwall. you can see the green thereon the map. blue colour elsewhere describes the frost. a sunny start and we have cloudy with outbreaks of rain. that hill snow affects parts of wales, to perhaps
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four centimetres. outbreaks of rain and south—west england developing. many areas will stay dry. across western scotland, rain into western isles. the rain will clear away from northern ireland and rain turning to snow in the pennines and peak district. there will be rain, outbreaks of rain towards wales and into the afternoon. temperatures higher than elsewhere. reaching about seven, to old celsius. tonight will be a messy mix of rain and sleet and hill snow. it will be scattered and not everyone will see that it will be a cold night. not as bad as last night, temperatures a few degrees above reasoning. it will bea few degrees above reasoning. it will be a chilly start to tomorrow, the best chance of morning brightness, lots of cloud around, misty over the hills uk wide. showers to the east
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of northern ireland and outbreaks of rain will come and go across the day across much of england. the odd moderate burst and you would not be surprised to see a little sleet and snow mixed in. temperatures today will hire but still cold for many. on sunday there is a greater chance of frost it into sunday with it went to get trained to push and once again bringing outbreaks of rain scotland, northern ireland, particularly during the morning. cloud spreads to eastern scotland and down into western parts of england and wales. rain and tools no possible but a bright day through central and eastern england on sunday compared with saturday. temperature uk wide where they should be, five, eight degrees. don't get too used to it. atlantic winds to start next week but notice how they switch around into a north—easterly direction. a cold direction at this time of year and to go with that cold wind developing, the increasing risk of sleet and snow. we have been warned.
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thank you very much. we're about half—way through january — about the time those new year resolutions start to fade. but what if your new year's resolution was to start a business? ben's here to tell us more. a p pa re ntly apparently this is the time when people want to start a new venture. that is the feeling, that you return after their new year. new year, new start and think of how fed up you are are working with somebody else. and this is apparently the time of year that it is done. we spoke about this at the start of january and so many people got in touch with us to tell us that that is exactly what they did in january. tell us that that is exactly what they did injanuary. companies house, the place where you register new business, they tell as they had a record number of new people coming in and starting a business. so many got in touch with us to tell is what they learn from doing that and some of the reasons that they started their own business. including paul smith who told us why he launched his walking tour business this time last year.
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where we are at the moment is the country park... i would do the same company since i left school. and i was made redundant. this time last yeari was made redundant. this time last year i set up my business. bay take guided walking tours. to be able to do that is a great opportunity. no regrets at all. i have enjoyed it. it has been one of the best moves i have made. i love being out in the hills. getting out and about and walking every day with clients is a great thing to do. so that is paul's story. is 12 months into this new business and says things are going well. for others it has been about expanding their business. richard slater told us he took the plunge this month and expanded his on—line travel business to open a high street shop. over the last few years i rain my
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business from home but i wanted to get back on to the high street as i believe there is a future in the high street. the hardest part has been to find the right premises in the right location with the unit suitable to transform. sorted out things at the brochure showers and window displays. got friends and collea g u es window displays. got friends and colleagues and it was a fast process. the response from the comments on the feedback have been fabulous and really made me feel positive. that is good. that sound but the success story. interestingly icy in your statistics that they break it down geographically. where are the most start—ups happening. yet. and that is fascinating to be making the most new business start
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in london that they'd don't. they begin in birmingham. there was a 5% rise in business are starting up. i find this number absolutely staggering. 646,000 new businesses began last year. and this is why we often talk about small and medium—sized firms being the back bone of our economy. it is easy to hear from big business and they are quite vocal on issues like brexit the state of the economy. at 646,000 new businesses started up last year and they really are the backbone of the economy. what is driving this? many people simply don't want to work for someone else and they want to be their own boss. maybe they don't like working 9—to—5. maybe it is born from necessity. there have been a lot of redundancies, so people may have been laid off and thought that they will go it alone. many people are managing to turn what began as a hobby, perhaps a
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sidejob while they what began as a hobby, perhaps a side job while they were working elsewhere, they now have the resources to change that into a business that pays them a salary. in the next hour we will talk about that, how to turn a hobby or an interest on the side into a full—timejob. interest on the side into a full-time job. think very much. in the space of four years two fires have devastated the world renowned glasgow school of art. as the investigation into the cause of the last blaze which gutted the iconic mackintosh building continues, our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon has been finding out how virtual reality technology makes it possible to walk round the mack's famous studios once again. it was a building that was distinctive and defining to glasgow. just over six months ago, the mackintosh hoarding at the glasgow school of at was engulfed in fire for a second time. now shrouded in scaffolding, this is what remains. you can see part of it from here and
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it is much more extensive than last time. a large part of the internal structure is gone. these pictures taken shortly after the second fire show the extent of the damage. images of the world—renowned building, nowjust a hollowed out shell. the investigation into what caused the fire is still ongoing. within the next few weeks the hope is to start scooping out the debris from the bowels of what remains of the mack soap experts can start sifting through it and salvage what they can. this was a charles rennie mackintosh masterpiece. curves and angles, shadow and light. the distinctive wooden panelling, wooding furniture, unique is the work of at in the working at school. now a chance to experience the least pa rt now a chance to experience the least part of it, if not in the real world, the virtual one instead. part of it, if not in the real world, the virtual one insteadlj part of it, if not in the real world, the virtual one instead. i am ina studio world, the virtual one instead. i am in a studio at the mack.|j
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world, the virtual one instead. i am in a studio at the mack. i know with does not exist any more but through this headset it is like i am damp. this is a 3—dimensional rendering of one of the studios. and the plaster cast it contained. this virtual augmented reality was created using film, archive images and scans. augmented reality was created using film, archive images and scansm is amazing what you can do with technology. especially because of what happened. what kind of reaction have they had? it is poignant. people from archives were some of the first people to see it and they we re the first people to see it and they were moved to tears because they we re were moved to tears because they were seeing a studio space in the building but did not exist any longer. some have been critical of the way the institution handled the aftermath of the fire. the new temperature of the school said that medication could have been better. looking forward, she wants a rebuilt
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building to stay faithful to the original and for the community to play a part. we feel we have a duty and responsibility for educational purposes but also for the world, for glasgow on for the world, to bring that building back. and this is the building that was designed to be here and this is the building that will stay. determined that the mackintosh building will one day ta ke mackintosh building will one day take its place on the glasgow skyline again. it would be good to see the building restored to its previous magnificence. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. there's been a significant increase in the number of violent attacks on the london underground. violent crime on london's tube network has increased by more than 43% in the last three years, figures have shown. british transport police data showed there were 1,980 reported incidents between november 2015 and october 2016, compared with 2,838 between november 2017 and september last year. the mayor's office says he is "doing
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everything within his power to tackle crime but the met desperately need more money which only the government can provide. a woman who was killed in a hit and run in brixton has been named. 24—year—old celia ines betrouni was struck on brixton hill, in the early hours of saturday morning. emergency services were unable to save her and she died at the scene. a 27—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. east surrey hospital has been rated as "outstanding" by inspectors. the hospital, in redhill, becomes one of only nine in england to be given the highest rating by the care quality commission. the surrey and sussex healthcare nhs trust, which runs the hospital, is now rated "outstanding" for the quality of its services, its caring and being well—led — and is rated "good" for being safe and effective. i think it is really clear to see that the trust has embraced the quality improvement programme. and worked hard to ensure that alongside this quality of improvement programme, patients are at the centre of
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everything that they do. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning there on the tubes this morning is disruption on south—e services there is disruption on south—eastern services between heather green and lewisham at the moment because of the signalling problem. on the roads, in kings cross — two lanes are closed on the euston road eastbound at the junction with york way. there are also two lanes closed on gray's inn road northbound into the kings cross one way system, all due to burst water main repairs. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a cold start out there this morning with temperatures below zero so we have a widespread frost. high cloud leading to hazy sunshine this morning but gradually that hazy sunshine will disappear and turn increasingly cloudy through the day as the cloud moves in from the west. it will stay cold and temperatures today between five and
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seven celsius. it will stay dry and into the evening we will see this band of rain pushed through. it could turn wintry particularly over higher ground you may see a flurry on lower levels as well. it will be a chilly night but not as cold as last night. temperatures remaining above zero. into the weekend for saturday, predominantly cloudy day with outbreaks of rain but staying cold as well. temperatures in single figures. eventually the cloud will start to move away on sunday so more in the way of sunshine. but if you look at the temperature it is staying cold and will do as we head into next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga
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munchetty. our headlines today: shaken but unhurt — the duke of edinburgh walks away from a car crash near sandringham. eyewitnesses say his land rover overturned during the collision. patients complain of delays in getting painkillers and anti—depressants, as pharmacists warn of a shortage of medicines. a new streaming record. the tv and movie firm, netflix, signs up another 9 million users injust three months. that takes its total to 140 million customers around the world. it's good night to british hopes at the australian open. butjohanna konta says players' health is being put in danger after her defeat in melbourne came after 3:00am in the morning. and will she run into the history books? jo pavey tells us why she's aiming for a record—breaking 6th olympics. and in the weather we hit —11 in
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north—east scotland, widely frosty start to your friday. some of you could see some sleet and snow later as well. i will have all of your details here later on breakfast. good morning. it's friday, the 18th ofjanuary. our top story: the duke of edinburgh is back at the queen's sandringham estate after he escaped injury in a car crash yesterday afternoon. the duke, who's 97, was driving near the grounds of the estate in norfolk when his land rover collided with another vehicle. he's said to have been left shaken. our correspondent helena lee is in sandringham for us this morning. helena, good morning. i can see that there is class on the roadside. what more do we know what happened? we know the duke of edinburgh spent the night not far from where we are on the sandringham estate. what appears to have happened, naga, yesterday, just before 3pm yesterday afternoon,
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the duke of edinburgh was driving his land rover himself, that's not unusual, he is seen quite often driving around the state. he came out of a private driveway onto the main road behind us here, the a149. it isa main road behind us here, the a149. it is a busy main route to the norfolk coast. that is when a car coming along the road who was in collision with that, and if you look at the picture of the aftermath of the crash, you can see the duke of edinburgh's land rover flipped the crash, you can see the duke of edinburgh's land roverflipped onto its side, the driver's site closest to the road, and the windscreen smashed. now, we spoke to one man, a driver, nick cobb, who saw the accident soon after. the range rover was on its side, on the driver's side. there was quite a bit of broken glass and plastic on the road and that is why we had to go down the centre of the road. just want to show you some of the glass, some of what is left from the crash yesterday. parts or shattered
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glass to the side of the road and a bit of the wing mirror which we believe came from the duke of edinburgh's land rover. the two occu pa nts of edinburgh's land rover. the two occupants of the other car that he was ina occupants of the other car that he was in a collision with were taken to hospital suffering minor injuries, but discharged soon after. this morning, a huge amount of relief for the duke of edinburgh. incredible that he was completely uninjured, buckingham palace said, after that accident here in norfolk. helena, thanks very much for taking us through the latest. pharmacists say that they are struggling to obtain some medicines, including common treatments for depression and high blood—pressure, and are paying vastly increased prices. the royal pharmaceutical society describes the shortages as massive. they say stockpiling for brexit appears to be a significant factor. here's more from our health correspondent catherine burns. this is partly a question of supply and demand. when supply goes down, demand goes up and prices can increase too. when this happens to vital medicines, the government agrees to pay a premium for them.
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the list of these temporary prices is published every month, and the bbc has analysed that data over the last three years. in england, there's been a sixfold increase in the number of medicines on the monthly list. in january 2015, there were 12 on it. the numbers started to climb in 2017, when it peaked at over 90. at the end of last year, there was a surge from 45 to 80. another worry is that many of these drugs are very common, everything from anti—inflammatories and epilepsy drugs, to blood pressure medication and antidepressants. for patients, obviously it's concerning if the medicine isn't available, and certainly, we'd advise patients to order the medicines in advance if they they can do, so in case there are any problems, it gives the pharmacist more time to deal with it. there are many possible factors explaining this, from an increased global demand to problems with raw materials. the national pharmacy association says brexit appears to be a significant factor, because of what it calls
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"unconscious stockpiling" — everyone along the chain holding onto extra medicines in case of a no—deal brexit. the department of health and social care says more than 2 million items are successfully dispensed in england every day. catherine burns, bbc news. if you are affected by this, maybe you have experienced the shortages and problems getting hold of the medicines. please get in touch. let us know in the usual way. e—mail, twitter, anything you like. staff shortages and growing waiting lists could threaten the long term plan for the nhs in england, according to a new report. last week, the government outlined how it would spend the extra £20 billion pledged for the health service by 2023. the national audit office warns there are issues that need to be addressed to ensure the service remains financially sustainable. the department of health said it was working hard to put the nhs on a viable footing. well, there is a number of things
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that need to be balanced, and that includes getting the money right for organisations that have deficits, ensuring there is sufficient workforce in place, and also that people are not waiting an excessive amount of time for treatment. until those three things are in balance, the sustainability isn't being delivered. a senior north korea negotiator has arrived in washington intensifying speculation of a second summit between kim jong—un and president trump. it's believed that kim yong—chol could visit the white house today with a message for mr trump. the two nations have been at a stalemate since lastjune, when their first meeting in singapore yielded few results, particularly over the denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. thousands of people have been demonstrating in the streets of the sudanese capital khartoum, demanding the resignation of president omar al—bashir. yesterday, a young doctor and teenage boy were shot dead, and activists say nine other demonstrators were wounded. the united nations high commissioner for human rights has criticised the authorities' response to the protests which began over rising goods prices.
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temperatures in eastern australia overnight hit record highs of 39.9 degrees celcius in the town of noona in new south wales. the severe heatwave has now continued into its fifth day and is the worst the country's seen since 1939. even zoo animals needed to cool off in the sweltering temperatures, with forecasters warning the heatwave is yet to reach its peak. very uncomfortable. i hope people are staying safe. now, if there was ever a photo that the catchphrase "we're going to need a bigger boat" was made for, i think its this one. take a look. take a moment to look at the dimensions. divers in hawaii got the chance to swim with their very own jaws. this huge great white shark
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is nearly six metres long and weighs in at an estimated 2.5 tons. it is believed to be a 50—year—old female called deep blue. she's one of the largest sharks ever recorded and this is only the third ever sighting of her. i suppose you can understand if you are an diverand i suppose you can understand if you are an diver and that is your thing you would want to do that, but not many people would. so you think that wasn't organised, it was chance? the third sighting this year. presumably you have the option of swimming away from the shark or doing that and i think most people would not do that. there you go. that is why they do what they do. i agree. thank you for joining us. the prime minister has been holding talks with other political parties to try to break the deadlock over brexit. so who has she been talking to? the dup has been through number ten's big black door. it wants the eu to agree radical changes to the northern ireland backstop, which is kind of a safety net, a way of avoiding a hard border if the deal has not been agreed.
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the prime minister has also been sounding—out the brexiteer wing of her party. some of them say if the uk can't agree a better deal with the eu then it's best to leave with no deal. a number of labour mps have been talking to the government, despitejeremy corbyn insisting he won't meet the prime minister unless she takes no deal off the table. the stakes are high. theresa may is trying to balance different factions in her party and cabinet. if she gets it wrong, she risks ministers resigning. joining us now is mo hussein, who was the chief press officer for number ten under david cameron. good morning to you. good morning. you are no longer there but you must have an interest in what is going on now and observing this. yes. theresa may is in downing street hosting these mps, what's that going to be like in terms of tension in the room, how she conducts meetings, how open she is going to be to ideas
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after having very firm deadlines, you know, sticking to her guns? yes, imean, given you know, sticking to her guns? yes, i mean, given the resounding defeat of the prime minister's plan in the commons, this will be very much listening mode and trying to get other people's ideas and see what could work going forward. almost trying to bind people in. a lot of self inflicted focus has been this has been the prime minister's brexit deal but it affects every person in this country, so sharing ideas and working out where is the maths, anything will have to get through parliament, so where is the common ground? it makes me think as i mentioned those red lines and you say she is in listening mode, how goodis say she is in listening mode, how good is she at being in listening mode, how good is she at listening? i think she's good listening and the point is that, to avoid an no deal, there will have to be ideal. mps voted to trigger article 50 so we
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are leaving at the end of march. it is in everyone's interest to try to get a deal on the table and she listened certainly when her plan was voted against quite heavily. so that, coupled with the fact that she has the confidence of the house, i think gives her a bit of space and cover to say it, this doesn't work, you don't like this. rather than saying what you are against, tell us what you are for and what can be made to work. and crucially what can be negotiated with the eu. made to work. and crucially what can be negotiated with the sum made to work. and crucially what can be negotiated with the eu. it is interesting you say she's a good listener because it flies in the face of what i have heard from people who have worked with her which is a tick boxes have determined yes, but the listening part, have you been in the room where she has... where you have seen outside of her and it has worked? that she has not only listened, but reacted ? that she has not only listened, but reacted? a that she has not only listened, but reacted ? a crucial that she has not only listened, but reacted? a crucial part is that cynics might say this is a pr operation. we have heard people walking out of downing street saying
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this is what has happened and we told them lots of things and they listened. the crucial part is clearly that is just sitting in a room. what happens next as to whether or not you react to something and do something different is the big question. i completely agree. the test is what goes beyond the conversation, what does she come back with two that house of commons on monday —— what she come back with to the house of commons on monday? the ship has sailed on being entrenched on previously held positions and we might see red lines becoming slightly pinker because the appetite in the house of commons isn't there. the key thing is what commands a majority, not what one person wants. so i think she is someone who will listen, who will consider the options and work out what is the thing that will get through. and also what is realistic? the realistic thing is interesting
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but i want to ask you, calling them pink wines or red lines, that's one thing, the unfortunate thing is some of these choices are quite stark, there is no end between, so the issue of no deal for example, will you or not rule out the no deal? there is no grey area. these people have gone into see her and have said that we demand that first. will you do it or not? there is not much grey. there isn't but there is a process which is just saying, ruling out no deal, doesn't mean much by itself. you have to take action to do it. the way to do it is to have a deal. otherwise we would leave at the end of march without a deal. so that's what it is incumbent on all mps to get around the table and to work out what is the best way of avoiding that situation. i think the time for words, political grandstanding is over. the people wa nt grandstanding is over. the people want action. businesses i talked to wa nt to want action. businesses i talked to want to see a resolution. people
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across the country want to see a resolution to this. so being around the table is up big part of this which makes the labour's position battling because all of the other leaders and political parties get around the table, some want a second referendum, some want no deal... the leader of the labour party is on an election campaign speech, not in westminster getting around the table. there is no election. there isa table. there is no election. there is a national crisis. she could use it to her advantage if labour doesn't come to the table. on monday she has the opportunity to stand in the house and say, i spoke to eve ryo ne the house and say, i spoke to everyone who wants to talk to me but you don't want to talk to me. it works to her advantage. yes, and her red or pink lines, whatever you want to call it because she has the opposition, well, a few members talking to her offering that point of view. i think that is right. that is why in some ways orjeremy corbyn is why in some ways orjeremy corbyn is doing has helped her because she can then say that and there is the leadership from labour coming from
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the backbenches, not the frontbench, but. she is at the same time dealing with a lot of division in her own party, still threats of mass resignations as well. yes, there is a waiting game being played on both sides of the house here. so decisions will be coming down the track where you've already seen different views on customs union from different parts of the cabinet. is it completely ruled out, is it just the starting point? so there will have to be a decision about which way the prime minister ends up pivoting. but that's why these talks are crucial, because, a, you have to be in the room and, b, who is speaking with her and which factions do they represent? and pleasing that together, which is the way forward? all dzemaili it's about working in the national interest, not narrow, party political interest, that's what matters to people. mo, thank you for your insights, mo hussein,
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who has worked inside number ten for david cameron. those meetings will be happening over the weekend. now a lot of you will be scraping frost off your cars this morning as the weather turns colder. this was the scene in newcastle yesterday as the first wintry showers started to fall. with yellow weather warnings out for snow across the country today, i understand that were not expecting any more snow? a little bit but mainly over the hills, not to the extent we saw yesterday but we are into a spell of weather now we're it will stay on the calder side of things for the foreseeable future. not as cold as it was this morning. this was aberdeenshire yesterday. the skies cleared through the night. -11 the skies cleared through the night. —11 here through the night and not a great deal behind that. —9 at the moment in braemar. notice sticking out, eight degrees here and similar temperatures on the coast of south—west wales and not quite as mild in northern ireland. these
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greens on the chart are buoyed the frost because they have cloud and quick spreading outbreaks of rain. snow we over the hills, good cover of the welsh mountains today, returning to rain later on and that will edge eastwards. any sunshine towards the east of england will be hazy at times. loose ghost was north—east of scotland. a crisp winter ‘s day but staying cold throughout. is picking up in the west is patchy rain pushes through western scotland, easing the way but as the rain pushes in it hits the pennines and it could be a covering of snow the rain there. rain coming in growing across the west. eastern parts of england will have hazy sunshine and stay distantly chilly. into tonight there will be a case of outbreaks of rain and sleet anthill slow moving eastwards erratically. clear skies in northern scotland well down into minus figures in some
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parts of the highlands. or mostjust about frost free tonight. it will be about frost free tonight. it will be a close run thing. a cold start to your weekend that much more cloud around tomorrow morning. misty in the hills as well, england and wales prone to showers and the odd moderate burst as well. much of scotla nd moderate burst as well. much of scotland will be dry and this is where we will see the brightest of saturday weather. and temperatures on the chilly side but not as cold as the values of today. the frost will return over saturday night into sunday across eastern parts and is whether front moves in for sunday. after a bright day in scotland on whether front moves in for sunday. after a br cloud y in scotland on saturday, cloud spreads'outbreak'of hills saturday, cloud spreads'out‘orecrk'of hills as; well. 5 saturday, cloud spreads'out‘orecrk'of hills ai; well. rancour saturday, cloud spreads'out‘orecrk'of hills ais;si well. rancour at rain, hills and was well. rancour at - :.=. . cc , ireland rain, hills and was well. rancour at - e1: a— s ireland as home in northern ireland as well. much of and wales home in northern ireland as well. much of- and wales will be to be brighter on sunday. still dry to be brighter on sunday, still some cloud in the west but sunny spells in the east end temperatures got wherever you are close to where they should be for this time of year. with that whether front we will see wind coming in off the atla ntic will see wind coming in off the atlantic that will continue into the start of next week to never really
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warming up. warm areas out there and it has not come close because as we go through the second half of the week we start to drag north—easterly wind in the offer cold european continent. said the main theme for next week is staying cold. it looks like it will get colder as we see easterly wind develop later in the week and with that an increasing chance of sleet and snow. difficult at the moment to pinpoint where the heavy bursts of snow will be but it isa heavy bursts of snow will be but it is a forecast to watch. is definitely one to watch you just may not like what you are watching. or indeed, how we watch it. you may wa nt to or indeed, how we watch it. you may want to hunker down and watch some tv but tv is changing. you have some new figures out? good morning. tv and movie streaming service netflix signed up another 9 million paying customers over the last three months, taking its total to 139 million. the firm says it's on track to spend £10 billion on content this year,
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in a bid to sign up even more new users. but it's more than £6 billion in debt and has just raised prices in the us to pay for it, with analysts expecting price rises here too. from today, ticket reselling website viagogo must publish the names and addresses of touts who sell more than 100 tickets a year via the site, to consumers. the company — last of the four main reselling sites to comply with the rules — says it's "now compliant". the move is designed to cut fraud and reduce sky high prices often charged by ticket touts for popular events. and grey has become the country's favourite car colour according to the society of motor manufacturers and traders. it's knocked black off the top spot — but orange and beige saw significant increases of 37% and 28% respectively.
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iam not i am not saying we don't like orange but we have plenty of orange around here but who has an orange car?! i cannot picture an orange car. snarski and hutch. that is rather niche. i thought it was red with a white stripe? dark orange. soap i would love to see an orange car. white stripe? dark orange. soap i would love to see an orange canm would love to see an orange canm would make you happy. if you saw an orange car parked outside your home, you would be happy. so ijust searched the internet for orange ca rs searched the internet for orange cars and all that came up was a giant orange fruit with wheels. .. not my cup of tea. if you are a passenger on northern rail you are likely
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to have faced delays, disruption and ticket price hikes as well as nearly two years of strikes. tomorrow, marks the 45th day of action by the rmt union. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been finding out what impact the action has had on rail users and businesses. we are setting off with the mad ramblers. mad by name and by nature. we are the mad walkers. the train strike? are you mad about that as well? yes. it has been somewhat inconvenient. we have had trouble getting out to go hiking on saturdays. because the trains don't run? saturdays. because the trains don't ru n ? exactly. saturdays. because the trains don't run? exactly. we can't get there. the group is half as big as it used to be. it has been that way since strikes began last september.” to be. it has been that way since strikes began last september. ijust wa nt strikes began last september. ijust want them to be over. this train station is usually full of weekend
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walkers but is empty today. only those who can drive have made it our. walk into the brisk air of the district and the rail strikes are not just district and the rail strikes are notjust some district and the rail strikes are not just some distant district and the rail strikes are notjust some distant city centre inconvenient. the impact is far—reaching. inconvenient. the impact is far-reaching. trainer, not a passenger one, obviously. we have worked around it an awful lot with car sharer and whatnot worked around it an awful lot with car sharer and what not but it is not ideal. we are still rambling on, as it were. they are able to ramble on. but business in the area is limping on. it has had a bad effect on us. thousands of pounds bad. we get a lot of hen nights and stag nights. they stop of have a couple of beers and then get on the train
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again. we have missed that this autumn. a lot of local business is suffering because of the lack of people on saturday. but strikes have been going on for almost two years now. this is the post at the centre of the strike. unions wish to protect safety critical guards. northern says this post needs modernising. we will still have a driver on each service and a second member of staff on each service in the future. what we are looking to do is change how we are looking to do is change how we use them northern say more than half the journeys in the country operate under this system. they believe... the union does not believe it. they say it is about having cost. they
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wa nt say it is about having cost. they want a de— staffed railway. they do not want guards on services. they do not want guards on services. they do not want guards on services. they do not want stuff on stations. talks have stalled. strikes will continue until at least the end of the month. northern applied to the government to have the cost of the strikes reimbursed. these businesses have no hope of recouping what they have lost. like commuters theyjust hope it ends soon. like commuters theyjust hope it ends soon. we are amazed byjo pavey. at 40, jo pavey was the oldest woman to win gold at the european championships. she is now looking at other records. she is now looking at other records. she wants to go to an sixth consecutive olympic games and then she will be 46. we will talk all about it with her. you would think at 45 you may be relinquishing more of your sporting challenges that she says she is still up for it. a determined woman. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news,
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i'm victoria hollins. there's been a significant increase in the number of violent attacks on london underground. there were more than 2,800 reported incidents between november 2017 and september last year, according to the figures from the british transport police. it's a rise of 43 percent on two years previously. the mayor's office says sadiq khan is doing everything within his power to tackle crime but the met desperately need more money which only the government can provide." a woman who was killed in a hit and run in brixton has been named. 24—year—old celia ines betrouni was struck on brixton hill, in the early hours of saturday morning. emergency services were unable to save her and she died at the scene. a 27—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. east surrey hospital has been rated as "outstanding" by inspectors. the hospital, in redhill, becomes one of only nine in england to be given the highest rating
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by the care quality commission. the surrey and sussex healthcare nhs trust, which runs the hospital, is now rated "outstanding" in a number of areas — and is rated "good" for being safe and effective. i think it is really clear to see that the trust has embraced the quality improvement programme. and worked hard to ensure that alongside this quality of improvement programme, patients are at the centre of everything that they do. let's take a look at the travel situation now... there's a good service on the tubes this morning turning to the trains — there's disruption on southeastern services between hither green and lewisham. that's because of a signalling problem. and a signalling problem. in kings cross two lanes are closed and in kings cross two lanes are closed eastbound at the junction with york way because of burst water
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main repairs. two lanes closed northbound into the king's cross 1—way system. quite busy. good morning. it's a cold start out there this morning with temperatures below zero so we have a widespread frost. high cloud leading to hazy sunshine this morning but gradually that hazy sunshine will disappear and turn increasingly cloudy through the day as the cloud moves in from the west. it will stay cold and temperatures today between five and seven celsius. it will stay dry and into the evening we will see this band of rain pushing through. it could turn wintry particularly over higher ground, but you may see a flurry on lower levels as well. it will be a chilly night but not as cold as last night. temperatures remaining above zero. into the weekend for saturday, predominantly cloudy day with outbreaks of rain but staying cold as well. temperatures in single figures. eventually the cloud will start to move away on sunday so more in the way of sunshine.
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but if you look at the temperature it is staying cold and will do as we head into next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the duke of edinburgh is said to be shaken but uninjured after being involved in a car crash yesterday afternoon. prince philip, who is 97, was driving his land rover near the queen's sandringham estate. our correspondent keith doyle is outside buckingham palace for us this morning. tell us what more do we know this morning? yes, good morning from buckingham palace. the last official
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information we got from buckingham palace was yesterday evening some three hours after that crashed in norfolk. buckingham palace confirmed that the duke of edinburgh was in the vehicle and indeed that he was driving. of course we have seen the pictures of the land rover on its side, looking like a very serious accident indeed. but what buckingham palace have told us is that the duke of edinburgh was uninjured. they say that he was seen by a doctor as a precaution, but was uninjured and they have been very clear on that. we know two other people in another vehicle were treated for minor injuries at a hospital in kings lynn but they have since been released. the duke of edinburgh spend the night at the sandringham estate. the queen is there also. they haven't beenin queen is there also. they haven't been in london since before christmas. they have been at sandringham for the christmas period and they are not expected back here at buckingham palace until well into february. thank you. earlier we
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spoke with the sunday times royal correspondent to ask whether he would continue to drive on public roads following the crash. they like to drive themselves when they don't go to professional engagements because it is the one last bit of independence they have in a life thatis independence they have in a life that is so controlled by police protection officers. but at the age of 907i protection officers. but at the age of 907! am sure questions will be asked by the public and internally, they would have started in the royal they would have startedinthe logic! family as they would haye storiedclothe logic! family as to whether prince philip should continue to drive himself on public roads. pharmacists say they are struggling to obtain some medicines including common treatments for depression and high blood pressure and are paying vastly increased prices. the royal pharmaceutical society describes the shortages as massive. they say stockpiling for brexit appears to be a significant factor. the department of health insists the vast majority of drugs are not in short supply. staff shortages and growing waiting lists could threaten the long term plan for the nhs in england, according to a new report. last week, the government outlined how it would spend the extra £20 billion pledged for
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the health service by 2023. the national audit office warns there are issues that need to be addressed to ensure the service remains financially sustainable. the department of health said it was working hard to put the nhs on a viable footing. a senior north korea negotiator has arrived in washington intensifying speculation of a second summit between kim jong—un and president trump. it's believed that kim yong—chol could visit the white house today with a message for mr trump. the two nations have been at a stalemate since lastjune, when their first meeting in singapore yielded few results, particularly over the denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. new research appears to have settled a long—running debate over the age of the rings of saturn. sceintists have confirmed the planet's iconic rings are very young, no more than 100 million years old, and may have been formed during a time when dinosaurs still roamed on earth. the insight comes from the final measurements acquired by nasa's cassini probe just before it drove itself to destruction in saturn's atmosphere in 2017. japanese officials are trying
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to work out whether they were paid a visit by the street artist banksy without even realising it. the graffiti has been found at a monorail station in tokyo and is similar to a famous banksy painting "umbrella rat". it's not clear when it was painted but officials said they had known about it for a long time. they only realised it could be a banksy after being contacted by residents. it's sprayed on a door, which has now been removed and placed in storage to prevent any damage to it. it defeats the point of it, doesn't it, really? officials say they're still trying to verify whether it really is a banksy. the joy of them is that they pop up in unexpected places. but then the lack ofjoy is taking it away because now they are worth so much.
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also true. mike is here right now. coming up on the programme, matt will have the weather for you. take us through, tennis is a curious sport sometimes, one that is played at ridiculous times of day sometimes. at the australian open, melbourne, where there are no residents to think about, like they do at wimbledon, when they finish at 10pm in the evening, but not at the australian open. they want the big matches in the evening so the others are pushed back. for the first time ever, a match started after midnight australian time and it involved jo konta, whose it is dangerous, bad for the players' health, she finished after 3am in the morning. the crucial point in the match, when you are fighting, at 2:50am, your body clock, whatever you have been doing... is the same for both players. roger federer says the alternative would be to move to the outside court to plate at 11pm, but
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who wants to do that without the atmosphere? they thought about moving the match to court number three but there were too many bird droppings to clean up. so it had to wait until the main show court was available after midnight. so she is out. all this means it's good night to british hopes at this year's australian open before the third round has started. konta's match started at 12:30am, the latest start ever at melbourne park. garbine muguruza took the first set 6—4, but konta battled back to take the second on tie break. but the two time grand slam champion broke in konta's final service game to win the decider. i mean, i think ideally both of us probably would have wanted to play earlier. this is no—one's ideal schedule to play in the wee hours of the morning. but again, we don't make the schedule, unfortunately, and we both dealt with the same challenge.
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eageiiifgeyegéz‘ézfleéh‘f cuigccc round with? e’s’creighc‘s’sie‘c 31713??? = the six—time and defending champion is chasing a hat—trick of wins at the australian open. he has spoken, the former special one, former manchester united managerjose mourinho has spoken publicly for the first time since his sacking last month. he told be—in sports that he still belongs at the top level of management, and responded to questions about his man management after reportedly falling out with several of his players. the balance has to be created in the relations between the players and the manager. the manager is there to coach them, the manager is not there to keep the discipline at any cost. the structure must be made, the structure must be there to protect the manager and for the players to feel that everything is in place, and they are not going to arrive into a situation where they feel more powerful than they used to be. jose mourinho also hoping that there
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will be another remake of star trek, beam him up to the top of the game again, maybe! ronnie o'sullivan is through to his 14th masters semi—final. the rocket beat wales' ryan day by six frames to three at alexandra palace. next he'll face china's ding hun—hui, who beat belgium's luca brecel. yesterday we showed you marcelo bielsa's incredible press conference, defending himself against so called spygate, but have a look at this from leicester's training session. it's spiderman. well, not quite. who else but jamie vardy dressed as the superhero to strike fear into his manager and team mates. the rest of the players didn't look surprised at all. it seems it was all a joke around the spying theme. vardy then joined his team mates in full costume to carry
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on with training. what i love about this is that when you are going to play a prank, do it with gusto, and he did it brilliantly and that is the kind of way... the excitement. he put everything into it. do you call it a bib? does he have a bib on over the spiderman suit? oh, training bib, yes. he has put on the suit and then he has put on the bib on top. good for him. he was obviously allowed onto the training ground of that. here he isjumping out. unless it is a harness with a gopro? there i a yes, it is a gas so, a apsfiklfin—‘f—i—ac—i‘k—ifi vest, you cans sec 9 apsfi'tch—‘f—i—ri‘k—ifi vest, you are right. it ens sec n aesfi'tlyc—‘f—i—ac—i'k—ifi vest, you are right. it is training vest, you are right. it is a training vest. well done, jamie vardy. we always enjoy stories about people who do the impossible. that
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is coming up now. jo pavey said she was thinking about going for another olympics, which would be amazing. i was looking at the oldest ever olympians, which is fascinating. the old est olympians, which is fascinating. the oldest man was john olympians, which is fascinating. the oldest man wasjohn popley who competed in engraving and painting, and they had town planning at the olympics! what about the modern era? 1912, the running deer shooting category, oscar swan of sweden. and merlin ottey at the 2004 olympic games, 44. ithinkjo merlin ottey at the 2004 olympic games, 44. i thinkjo pavey will be the oldest ever track and field olympian. she has had a fantastic career. such an inspirational role model and i can't wait to meet her. let's see more about her career. and pavey is ahead. at. determination on jo
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pavey. - is at. determination on jo pavey. is to is to catch her. and delighted to sayjo is here. good morning. good morning. i feel almost in gracious talking about your age, but that's why you're here. it is extraordinary. you are
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45 right now. if you get to the olympics, you will be 46.” 45 right now. if you get to the olympics, you will be 46. i don't mind talking about my age. i enjoy the banter. ithink mind talking about my age. i enjoy the banter. i think age mind talking about my age. i enjoy the banter. ithink age is experience, that is howl the banter. ithink age is experience, that is how i like to look at it. i absolutely love running and that is what keeps me going. six olympic games. i mean, you have done five, why do you need a sixth? ijust love running, i love everything that running brings really and i think one of the motivations for me is i love the fa ct motivations for me is i love the fact that he gives us good quality family time. i go out with my kids and they go on their bikes and we go to the forest and the canal and the coastal path and we have great fun together. and i think it is excellent to show your kids it is fun to be active and then the part of it, the enjoyment, the byproduct is anything i achieve. and the thought of having the honour of representing the country would be amazing. a couple of things spring to mind. we talked about tennis today. in some sports experience, age, can have a bearing on... in
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athletics, it is pure speed. ultimately, it is pure speed. so how are you feeling relative to how you use to feel? i think the thing is i still go down the track. with experience, i know what kind i need to hit. i try my best to hit the times. and i enjoy the thrill of hitting the target in training. of course i have to listen to my body. i have to be flexible with my training and think about what i am doing. but it is fun to push the boundaries and i think i am not in my prime any more but i still think it could be a realistic target. of course i am not complacent. i know that it course i am not complacent. i know thatitis course i am not complacent. i know that it is a tough ask and there are really talented girls in the uk who are running really well and you have to get a place on the team. ijust think it is something i would love to try and do. and whether or not i achieve it i will be enjoy the journey of trying. what is the timeline, when do you need to get those times and how realistic is it?
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we are all behind you. it would be amazing. ideally it is a two-year process because of course you have to perform well at the olympic trials which is next year. the qualifying time window opens this year. so anytime you might achieve counts as far as a qualifying time. so ideally i would love to try to achieve a qualifying time this summer. so that would take me forward to one step in the right direction. of course, like i said, it isa direction. of course, like i said, it is a big ask, but i want to give it is a big ask, but i want to give itiam up it is a big ask, but i want to give it i am up for it. you need to find some lucky charm, because a lot of your olympics have been beset with injury as well, looking at the history of all of this, you must be mindful of that as well? yes, definitely, you wouldn't call it luck, you have to make sensible decisions, but you can't get injured at the wrong time, definitely, and then when you feel and legal you have to make sensible decisions, think about doing crosstraining running, you know, then hopefully when it matters you can produce the track sessions and pick for the
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trials and the championships to get into it. when you won gold at the european championships, you can see here, what is the medal target, what's in your mind? realistically, ijust want what's in your mind? realistically, i just want to what's in your mind? realistically, ijust want to try what's in your mind? realistically, i just want to try to what's in your mind? realistically, ijust want to try to get in the team. and if i did achieve that i would just give my absolute best. of course i am probably at this stage where my fastest times are long behind me, but i think it is still realistic. if i was lucky enough to be selected i would put everything into it to perform the best that i could because you feel such an honour to represent your country and walking out into the stadium... would medal be realistic?” walking out into the stadium... would medal be realistic? i think people who know a lot about athletics would think that getting a medal is probably something that would be a very tough ask but i think you should never say no to anything. you should always think thatis anything. you should always think that is what you are trying to do when you are not. -- when uihlein up. for the mere mortals, when you are not. -- when uihlein up. forthe mere mortals, i imagine
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people thinking, if you are aiming to go for that, there is hope for all of us, you know, people who haven't taken all of us, you know, people who haven't ta ken up all of us, you know, people who haven't taken up the sport. there is emphasis of women in sport not doing things, have you had a reaction from people? i love the fact that i can goa people? i love the fact that i can go a long and meet other runners at big events and we are all the same, we are busy parents with busy lives tojuggle with work we are busy parents with busy lives to juggle with work and everything andl to juggle with work and everything and i think finding a way around that and also setting yourself a goal, you know, new year, january, people have goals, i think if you set a goal it gives you something to aim for, a reason to get out the door and enjoy it and go for it and set yourself a target. it would be amazing to equal test sanderson's six olympic games. i hope it happens. good luck. thank you very much. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. it is getting rather nifty out
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there. along with this cold snap we have had some beautiful views. the colour of the sky has been stunning. we saw red in london outside buckingham palace. and intense deep blue. this guy is lovely as well and just have a look at glasgow. that is stunning. alongside it, we understand the particularly in scotla nd understand the particularly in scotland there are some very low temperatures. there definitely art. and that comes after what was for some of you yesterday, the first proper day of snow. temperatures overnight down to —11 in parts of scotland. check out the isles of scilly. nine degrees here. and across other parts. frost free at the moment because these areas marred with green has been in britain lived at the end of the night because i whether front of skin. some sleet and snow there, and particularly the welsh hills where
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we could see a few centimetres of snow this morning easing of into the afternoon getting much of england and scotland had a driver i start that it some high cloud there on the shots are from glasgow oneself it. blue skies throughout the day and the north—east of scotland and for some temperatures are made of one or two degrees to. a little sleet over southern orkneys. outbreaks of rain spread and the pennines could see snow start to develop. eastern england stays dry with hazy sunshine and in the west there are further outbreaks of rain with the odd rumble of thunder. my old but a bit on the breezy side. into tonight, outbreaks of rain, sleet and hill snow, a bit of hit and miss across the uk. the northern half of scotland, pleaded the sky away from the coast we will see a widespread sharp frost but many of us will start tomorrow frost free. the best
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of the sunshine in parts of north—west scotland. some showers in northern ireland but england and wales will stay cloudy with occasional rain, dry moments and some will avoid the showers altogether. it will be rain rather than fleet of snow. as we go into saturday night, some eastern areas will see a frost but we start to dragon air of the atlantic and this whether front pushes its way through. sofa sunday after a bright day, outbreaks of rain filled with a hill snow. outbreaks of rain in northern ireland. england and wales predominantly dry until late in the day when we see showers in the north and west of the lease more sunshine in the eastern parts of the country. temperatures five, seven degrees and we continue that into the start of next week. wind of the atlantic that the real mild air is held at bay on east, north—easterly winds developing. it will stay cold next week potentially reaching even
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colder temperatures as we enter the second half of the week and with that increasing risk of sleet and snow. we will keep you updated on the exact details. if it is too cold for you, but her down to australia where last night was the warmest night on record in australia. parts of new south wales did not see temperatures dropped below 36 degrees. i think i prefer the frost. it is tricky, isn't it? that is a night—time temperature. imagine trying to sleep in that! eyesore -11 on your chart early this morning and that gave me the heebie—jeebies. but it must be very unpleasant in those temperatures at the time is seven 49. about a quarter of us are estimated to have a so—called "side hustle" — a hobby or sideline which earns you money on top of a dayjob. we have been talking about people
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starting businesses and howjanuary isa starting businesses and howjanuary is a great time to do that. and maybe those business ideas come from something you have been doing on the side that you would like to turn into a side that you would like to turn intoa mainjob. side that you would like to turn into a mainjob. you want to side that you would like to turn into a main job. you want to turn your passion or hobby into a full—timejob. more your passion or hobby into a full—time job. more and your passion or hobby into a full—timejob. more and more people are managing to do that. can and our interests be turned into paid work? yes, that's according to figures from henley business school. they found that more and more people are choosing to take on extra work. those aged between 25 and 34 are most likely to be involved with a side hustle. half of them were started in the last two years. my my name is rear. i am a housing officer and my side hustle is dj in. i became a dj about two years ago now. it was something i had put off
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for the longest time and finally i did the bullet and thought i would ta ke did the bullet and thought i would take the leap. my role as a senior housing officer, being able to juggle housing officer, being able to juggle so many things at once and have great people skills has helped me when it comes to dj in an building my confidence. it is nice to be able to go and support people in the areas where they cannot help themselves and then going into dj ing and providing another form themselves and then going into dj ing and providing anotherform of happiness and joy for people as well. emma gannon, author, podcaster and blogger. she's written a book on this. i was surprised. one in four people have a side hustle. is it really that common? by 2030 apparently half of all uk workers will have a side hustle. and that matches up with the number of people who do not like theirjobs. there is a high dissatisfaction levels so i think people are looking outside of that for inspiration. and how often does
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the sidejob become for inspiration. and how often does the side job become the main thing? i suppose we all have the dream, that there is something we're really interested in the trying to make that pay the mortgage is a different thing to do the point of a side hustle is that it is not an idea of quitting yourjob. it is a low-risk idea. you started on the side, it may not work that you are getting more out of it than just finances anyway. and that is great. you learn new skills and become more employable. you have more fun in your life. were the main motivators? i touched on the fact that we may not want to work 9—to—5 any longer. what else is there? it is important to talk about the fact that there is a lot of insecurity in the job market at the moment and some people are forced into this situation. i would hate to glamorise this as being amazing with no negatives. it isa being amazing with no negatives. it is a lifestyle choice for some people and in my book it is about
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celebrating that and many people have said thank you for making mainstream. that yes, it is two sides of the coin. is this something just for young people? the figures suggest it is predominantly young people doing this. perhaps our commitment or family. is that the young person ‘s commitment or family. is that the young person 's game?” commitment or family. is that the young person 's game? i don't think so. perhaps it has a millennial ledge to it that i have seen from research on the response to my book that this sort of 50 to 60—year—old bracket. people who have retired from full—timejob bracket. people who have retired from full—time job that they don't wa nt to from full—time job that they don't want to stop and do nothing. they still have ideas and they want to learn new things. it is exciting that they can start something new and fresh and it is never too late to start and change your career. that is the message. and if you are passionate appeals less like work. does it raise other questions? the first thing that jumps does it raise other questions? the first thing thatjumps out does it raise other questions? the first thing that jumps out at does it raise other questions? the first thing thatjumps out at me is income revenue, tax, that sort of stuff that might put you of. the idea of security has
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changed. i would fill an secure in a full—timejob. i have had to lead to jobs in the past because they folded. magazines don't exist any more. without my side hustle, that was my lifeline. multiple income streams and being able to do different things, that feels more circuitous it. and you must have come across some extraordinary exa m ples of different come across some extraordinary examples of different things. such as the one we just saw, a dj slash housing officer. sometimes there is a nurse who is also a children's author or a chef who was also a pod cast at. something about editing things and making them whole. i there is a link between that cooking. a pilot who is a and cooking. a pilot who is a cinematographer, i thought that was random and, yeah, many different people doing different things. if
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you ask anyone at a dinner party, i think everyone has something on the side theyjust don't tell you. everyone has an idea to whether or not they can be a business is a different thing. thank you so much, mr we may talk about orange cars in the next half—hour because hundreds of you have sent me photos of orange ca rs. you have sent me photos of orange cars. it is the dukes of hazard, not star ski and hutch. it is an important difference. we will explain this in the next half—hour. at least i know what an orange car looks like. i'm just saying... at least i know what an orange car looks like. i'mjust saying... there isa looks like. i'mjust saying... there is a new survey saying that the most popular new cars are colour now is grey but orange is on the rise. more and more orange cars. it is a happy colour for a car. the weather is cold today, i don't know if you have been outside yet. map will have the
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details for as. check out glasgow this morning. it looks rather magnificent although temperatures in some parts of scotland a —9, —10 degrees. we will get more on that coming up with the headlines after eight. see you shortly. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. there's been a significant increase in the number of violent attacks on london underground. there were more than 2,800 reported incidents between november 2017 and september last year, according to the figures from the british transport police. it's a rise of 43 percent on two years previously. the mayor's office says sadiq khan is doing everything within his power to tackle crime but the met desperately need more money which only the government can provide." a woman who was killed in a hit and run in brixton has been named. 24—year—old celia ines betrouni was struck on brixton hill, in the early hours of saturday morning. emergency services were unable to save her and she died at the scene.
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a 27—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. east surrey hospital has been rated as "outstanding" by inspectors. the hospital, in redhill, becomes one of only nine in england to be given the highest rating by the care quality commission. the surrey and sussex healthcare nhs trust, which runs the hospital, is now rated "outstanding" in a number of areas — and is rated "good" for being safe and effective. i think it is really clear to see that the trust has embraced the quality improvement programme. and worked hard to ensure that alongside this quality of improvement programme, patients are at the centre of everything that they do. let's take a look at the travel situation now... there's a good service on the tubes this morning turning to the trains — there's disruption on southeastern services between hither green and lewisham. that's because of a signalling problem. and in kings cross two lanes
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are closed eastbound at the junction with york way because of burst water main repairs. two lanes closed northbound into the king's cross 1—way system. quite busy. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a cold start out there this morning with temperatures below zero so we have a widespread frost. high cloud leading to hazy sunshine this morning but gradually that hazy sunshine will disappear and turn increasingly cloudy through the day as the cloud moves in from the west. it will stay cold and temperatures today between five and seven celsius. it will stay dry and into the evening we will see this band of rain pushing through. it could turn wintry particularly over higher ground, but you may see a flurry on lower levels as well. it will be a chilly night but not as cold as last night. temperatures remaining above zero. into the weekend for saturday,
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predominantly cloudy day with outbreaks of rain but staying cold as well. temperatures in single figures. eventually the cloud will start to move away on sunday so more in the way of sunshine. but if you look at the temperature it is staying cold and will do as we head into next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. shaken but unhurt: the duke of edinburgh walks away from a car crash near sandringham. eyewitnesses say his land rover overturned during the collision. patients complain of delays in getting painkillers and anti—depressants as pharmacists warn of a shortage of medicines. a new streaming record.
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the tv and movie firm netflix signs up another 9 million users injust three months. that takes its total to 140 million customers around the world. it's goodnight to british hopes at the australian open. butjohanna konta says players health is being put in danger after her defeat in melbourne came after three in the morning. and as ‘call the midwife' delivers a dramatic opening to its new series, we'll speak to one of its stars. and it is a frosty start to friday after temperatures last night dropped to —11 in parts of scotland but the rain, sleet and heals no moving in from the west. details and a weekend forecast coming up. it's friday the 18th january. good morning. our top story. the duke of edinburgh is back at the queen's sandringham estate after he escaped injury in a car crash yesterday afternoon. the duke, who's 97, was driving near the grounds of the estate in norfolk
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when his land rover collided with another vehicle. he's said to have been left "shaken". our correspondent helena lee is in sandringham for us this morning. good morning. we can see behind you, the dawn is breaking and i'm assuming the glass from part of the accident yesterday is there. that is right, the duke of edinburgh has been recovering overnight after that accident not farfrom been recovering overnight after that accident not far from where we are at the sandringham estate. the accident happened just before 3pm yesterday. the duke of edinburgh was driving himself in his land rover, and what we think happened was that he pulled out of a private driveway, tried to cross over a main road, the a149, one of the main routes towards the norfolk coast, and a car was coming along the road and that is when they were in collision with each other. if you look at the
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picture of the aftermath of the crash, incredible that the duke of edinburgh came away from that com pletely edinburgh came away from that completely un—injured. you can see the land rover flipped completely un—injured. you can see the land roverflipped on its side to the side of the road, the driver's side, places towards the pavement. eyewitnesses described stealing the duke of edinburgh after the crash looking very shocked indeed, and one of them, nick, was driving soon after, close to the crash. the range rover was on its side on the driver's side, so it would have been his side to the pavement, as it were and there was quite a bit of broken glass and broken glass in the road so we had to drive down the centre of the road. you can see to drive down the centre of the road. you can see some to drive down the centre of the road. you can see some of the broken glass, just to the side of the road, and a bit of the wing mirror as well which we believe has come from the duke of edinburgh's land rover. the two other occupants of the car he was in collision with, the driver and her passenger, were taken to hospital and treated for minor
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injuries but discharged soon after, but incredible that the duke of edinburgh walked away from that crash completely uninjured. edinburgh walked away from that crash completely uninjuredm edinburgh walked away from that crash completely uninjured. it is rather remarkable, isn't it? thank you forjoining us. helena lee, there. pharmacists say that they are struggling to obtain some medicines, including common treatments for depression and high blood—pressure and are paying "vastly increased" prices. the royal pharmaceutical society describes the shortages as massive. they say stockpiling for brexit appears to be a significant factor. here's more from our health correspondent catherine burns. this is partly a question of supply and demand. when supply goes down, demand goes up and prices can increase, too. when this happens to vital medicines, the government agrees to pay a premium for them. the list of these temporary prices is published every month, and the bbc has analysed that data over the last three years. in england, there's been a sixfold increase in the number of medicines on the monthly list. in january 2015, there were 12 on it. the numbers started to climb in 2017, when it peaked at over 90. at the end of last year,
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there was a surge from 45 to 80. another worry is that many of these drugs are very common, everything from anti—inflammatories and epilepsy drugs to blood pressure medication and antidepressants. for patients, obviously it's concerning if the medicine isn't available, and certainly, we'd advise patients to order the medicines in advance if they can do, so in case there are any problems, it gives the pharmacist more time to deal with it. there are many possible factors explaining this, from an increased global demand to problems with raw materials. the national pharmacy association says brexit appears to be a significant factor, because of what it calls "unconscious stockpiling" — everyone along the chain holding onto extra medicines in case of a no—deal brexit. the department of health and social care says 2 million prescription items are successfully dispensed in england every day. catherine burns, bbc news. lots of you have been in touch about
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your experiences, peter says he's a pharmacist who owns a pharmacy in bristol and the shortages are having a significant impact on his business, trying to source medicine ata business, trying to source medicine at a massively inflated prices. we will try to talk more about this later. keep your comments coming in. and tomorrow we will talk to a pharmacist about what is happening. six minutes past eight now. theresa may will again spend the day meeting senior politicians as she tries to break the brexit deadlock at westminster. mps rejected the prime minister's deal by 230 votes, making it very clear what they don't want but, as yet there is no sign of what would win the support of parliament. there is at least some clarity over the timetable of events. on monday, the government will set out the next steps in the brexit process. mps will then debate and vote on this on tuesday 29th january. but the clock is ticking down to the 29th march, the day the uk formally exits the european union.
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our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster for us this morning. there's a sort of fascination, isn't there, looking at the list of people who have gone through the doors of number ten, there is a slight feeling of, "next!" like the doctor's waiting room, the prime minister or one of her associates will see you now but what do you think is being led - the process think is being led from the process yellow i'm not sure what is because yellow i'm not sure what is being - actually, to be honest, being led, actually, to be honest, that you icf’c’ all being led, actually, to be honest, that you iff’ci all of except that you can't please all of the people all of the time. it looks as the prime the people all of the time. it looks as - the prime minister ms: 2 to do m7 7 to do that at the moment, people who were not in listing people who were not in who want to leave the with no at on with no at z on world ith no - at§ it! trade onjmofldltadejmanisafloo they say they are it! trade onjmofldltadejmanisafloo the i say they are it! trade onjmofldltadejmanisafloo the prime |ey are it! trade onjmofldltadejmanisafloo the prime minister's 5155-411; mi 51:5 5&351755 she was listening time, she was listening to them. people - want it to be a bit more people who want it to be a bit more like norway, close to eu rules, but outside and they say they were not
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given the time of day until recently and now she's listening. labour politicians have gone in there, despite whatjeremy corbyn said, people like yvette cooper and hilary benn, quite seniorfigures people like yvette cooper and hilary benn, quite senior figures and they say they have been pressing the case for not leaving without a deal. soon, listening has to turn into activity and we are not sure what will happen when the prime minister decides that. i think that downing street is thinking this, they seem to be listening to people who want a watered—down brexit, like norway, commit toa watered—down brexit, like norway, commit to a no deal, perhaps have another referendum, then she can put some pressure on eurosceptics, long—standing leaf campaigners in their own party and the dup, to deal, she can come back to this argument that unless her deal or a revised version of it is backed, they will get no brexit at all. they will be hoping the penny begins to drop with some of of the long—standing brexiteers but it's something like her deal, otherwise, control may shift to other people in parliament who want to frustrate the process. but publicly at least, she
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is listening to all points of view before reaching a conclusion and some people are trying to influence, of course, by saying unless she goes their way, one way or the other, they would be prepared to resign from the government. she's under a lot of pressure but so far we have not seen any white smoke or which way she is going tojump. not seen any white smoke or which way she is going to jump. thank you for joining way she is going to jump. thank you forjoining us. staff shortages and growing waiting lists could threaten the long term plan for the nhs in england, according to a new report. last week, the government outlined how it would spend the extra £20 billion pledged for the health service by 2023. the national audit office warns there are issues that need to be addressed to ensure the service remains financially sustainable. the department of health said it was working hard to put the nhs on a viable footing. a senior north korea negotiator has arrived in washington intensifying speculation of a second summit between kim jong—un and president trump. it's believed that kim yong—chol could visit the white house today with a message for mr trump. the two nations have been at a stalemate since lastjune, when their first meeting
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in singapore yielded few results, particularly over the denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. temperatures in eastern australia overnight hit record highs of 39.9 degrees celsius, in the town of noona in new south wales. the severe heatwave has now continued into its fifth day and is the worst the country's seen since 1939. even zoo animals needed to cool off in the sweltering temperatures, with forecasters warning the heatwave is yet to reach its peak. in fact, matt was talking about the overnight temperatures of 36 degrees which seems unbearable. but here is a picture which might keep you out of the water. you will get the idea when you see the picture. divers in hawaii got the chance to swim with their very own jaws. it measured six metres. why would you do that? i can only imagine it would be a magical if very
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frightening experience. it weighs an estimated two and half tonnes. it is believed to be a 50—year—old female who has been named deep blue, one of the largest sharks ever recorded and this is only the third sighting of her, so when you ask why would you swim alongside her, the third sighting of a 50—year—old shout, it is amazing experience, if you survive. can we see the opening picture again? the first one, looking on, it feels like a caption competition. what is the sharp thinking? smile, you're on camera! it isa thinking? smile, you're on camera! it is a bit like you are thinking, what is it thinking? like, hello! wow. a pretty creepy hello. their time is 8:11am. lots of interest in the weather and matt will bring us up the weather and matt will bring us up to date because the temperatures are very up to date because the temperatures are very low, you probably know that, details coming up. we've picked up the papers this morning
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because one story is dominating the front pages and you can see that the times has the picture of the car that the duke of edinburgh was driving, the land rover, which crashed into another vehicle and rolled onto its side. the picture is very much telling the story. a miracle escape is how the daily telegraph reports it. it was in daylight yesterday and you can see the vehicle itself on its side, and prince philip was driving, so you will understand he was this side of the car and we are told he had to climb out on the passenger side. understandably, lots of headlines as the pictures are dramatic. that is the pictures are dramatic. that is the front page of the daily mirror. their son has taken a look after speaking to an eyewitness, saying that prince philip was in agony when he was pulled from the car, in the report. and the daily mail simply asks the question, how did he walk away? now we can talk to royal
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historian kate williams who is outside buckingham palace. it is remarkable, 97 years old, in a car that rolls over and walks away and he is shaken, we have been told, by the palace. what do you make of it? yes, it is remarkable. we understand prince philip did not wait for paramedics and went back to sandringham and spoke to the doctor there. he obviously had an escape and so did the people in the other car, we understand there were two women in the other car and a baby and there may be —— the baby was miraculously unhurt, and one of the ladies has a suspected broken arm, i believe and the other one hurt her knee. it seems as though it could have been much worse. one of the eyewitnesses said that the press that the other car had smoke coming out of it so they try to get the baby out quickly, that is his account. it seems as though it was quite a severe crash and the pictures look quite bad. that no one is seriously injured is a great release i think and certainly for
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prince philip, we understand he is very shocked and some distress as well. this is why i think we are seeing quite a lot of press comment and social media, should we still be driving at 97? it is interesting, these comments will be brought up and they are brought up regardless of whether you are a 97—year—old duke orany of whether you are a 97—year—old duke or any 97—year—old person living in the uk driving. what do you make of how the palace has reacted so far? there was another party involved. this statement we had was very short and simple, focusing on the duke of edinburgh. yes, and initially, we did not understand much about the other party at all and we did not know there was a baby in a car. we believed initially that everyone was fine and then more details came out. i think buckingham palace, it took a couple of hours for the statement to come out, local news saw the crash but it took a couple of hours for it to come out that it was the duke of edinburgh. i think buckingham palace was caught slightly unawares. they
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simply did not expect this to happen so it was a very quick statement because they knew the world's media would cover this, it has been covered all over the world and some of the details, particularly about the other party, i think we will get more coming out today, exactly what happened and why the collision happened, we think prince philip was coming out of a small road on to this a road, which i understand it's quite busy, apparently, there is going to be some meeting in norfolk road safety, talking about making it a slower speed limit so it is obviously quite a busy road as well. the question is, what exactly happened between the two cars but it seems as though, certainly, he flipped over, the other car was quite badly damaged and that is quite badly damaged and that is quite a severe occurrence. of course, we have not seen the duke of edinburgh for some time, really, we know he has retired from public life, so to speak at public events and the most recent appearance was at the wedding of princess you
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jenny. i suppose we are being told he is ok at least, because speculation continues. —— princess eugenie. we have not seen the duke, we did not see him on christmas day and we were told he was celebrating privately, we have not seen him travelling or much at the queen's side at all and there's always all kinds of speculation. certainly, a lot of us knew he was still driving around the sandringham estate and at bell moral but i don't think we realised he was driving on public roads. —— the bell moral estate. he came out of this pretty much unscathed. according to the eyewitness, he pretty much had to come out of one of the windows or a sunroof. i mean, it is very physically demanding. prince philip isa man physically demanding. prince philip is a man who does not accept the ageing process, ithink. he believes himself to be a younger man, he is so fit and active and loves getting around. it will be very tough for him if he has to give up driving because he very much wants to
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continue living every moment. i think that would be quite a painful moment for him but it may have to be the case. kate, good to talk to you. thank you forjoining us. kate williams, the royal historian. 8:16am. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. we are being warned about cold conditions across much of the uk. tell us about the big picture. i will, cold start, frosty friday for many, this was the scene in the north—east of scotland yesterday but snow on the ground and clear skies overnight, it is like a fridge, and we got to —11 in parts of aberdeenshire. in the last hour, still not far off in braemar, but quite widely across scotland and england, temperatures in sub zero, i see down the eastern coasts but the isles of scilly, still 9 degrees and frost free across other parts of south—west england, wales and northern ireland. this area is marked in green because the cloud has pushed in with outbreaks of rain which is turning to sleet and snow over the hills and this morning
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could give a covering of snow over the welsh mountains, 2—4 centimetres possible. rain for many and a rumble of thunder in the south—west. further east, high cloud making the sunshine hazy, blue skies even into the afternoon, moving across the north—east of scotland but temperatures only one or 2 degrees for inland areas, clouding over in the west and south, a few showers turning to sleet and snow in the southern uplands, improving picture in northern ireland in the second half of the day that his reign pushes into north—west england into the pennines and peak district, a brief covering of snow possible. much of eastern england will be dry with hazy sunshine possible. chile in the east, milder in the west, up to nine or ten but outbreaks of rain across parts of wales and south—west england. tonight, a messy weather picture, scattered amounts of rain, sleet, hail snow, picture, scattered amounts of rain, sleet, hailsnow, pushing north and east. nothing really amounting to too much, but the odd heavy burst possible around southern counties, where temperatures will stay at five or six. elsewhere, not where temperatures will stay at five orsix. elsewhere, not as where temperatures will stay at five or six. elsewhere, not as cold as last night, the greatest chance of a
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frost in parts of northern england and scotland but even here, not as low as last night. frost free to start saturday, cloudy and england, wales and northern ireland, any lengthy burst of sunshine will mean you are one of the lucky ones. showery rain across lots of england and wales in particular. scotland best favoured for the sunshine, especially further north but a change into sunday. to get us there, saturday night into sunday, frost free when winds are lightest but a weather front pushing its way in, so a cloudy day for scotland and northern ireland was outbreaks of rain and sleet and snow on the highlands and grampian is, turning sonny towards the north and west later. england and wales, still a bit cloudy and western areas with a few showers later in the day. central and eastern parts a brighter day compared with saturday. wherever you are, temperatures where they should be for the time of year, 5—8. as we finish sunday and going to the new week, the air comes off the atlantic, mild air waiting new week, the air comes off the atlantic, mild airwaiting in new week, the air comes off the atlantic, mild air waiting in the wings but never quite makes it because we are starting to see
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develop potential east, north—east wind during the second half of next week so it's never really warms up. it stays cold and if the easterly wind develops as it is showing signs it will do, it will get even colder still in the second half of the week with an increased chance of sleet and snow. still uncertain as to where the snow will fall but we will keep you updated. back to you. i'm going to say two things, you said still uncertainty about where the snow will fall, charlie said, "on the ground!" there's always one! that's enough of me getting charlie into trouble. it was so funny!m was a private comet, i think the rules are being rewritten on air, you know the rules, some things you don't want to share. she is a rule breaker! a rare moment of wit from you, it was really good. also, you know the yellow bit that tried to come over our way, why did it get pushed away? it looked so promising.
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the low pressure we have sinks further south so it drags on easterly wind and that is more dominant so it holds the mile air away and we bring air from europe instead of the atlantic. we have had moments of genius today, ben asking what an orange car looks like and charlie telling us the snow falls on the ground. it is all going brilliantly. it is friday! my weather prediction is it will take at least two weather —— weather forecasts before matt forgives me. i'm just putting that out there so we will be going into next week now. if you are a passenger on northern rail you are likely to have faced delays, disruption and ticket price hikes as well as nearly two years of strikes. tomorrow marks the 45th day of action by the rmt union. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been finding out what impact the action has had on rail users and businesses. morning! morning. we are setting off with the mad ramblers. mad by name and by nature. yes, we are the mad walkers. the manchester and district 20s and 30s ramblers group.
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the train strike? yes. are you mad about that as well? yes, it has been somewhat inconvenient. we have had real trouble getting out to go hiking on saturdays. because the trains don't run? precisely. we can't get there. the group is half as big as it used to be. it has been that way since northern's saturday strikes began last september. ijust want them to be over. edale train station, usually full of weekend walkers, is empty today. only those who drive have made it out. walk up into the brisk air of the peak district and the rail strikes are notjust some distant city centre inconvenience. train there, not a passenger one, obviously. obviously. where do you normally start, ollie? manchester piccadilly, or picket—dilly. picket—dilly? yeah. we have worked around it an awful lot with car shares and what have you, but it is not ideal. we are rambling on, as it were.
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it has had a really bad effect on us. how bad? thousands of pounds bad. we get a lot of ale trails, hen nights and stag nights, all doing the ale trail. they stop off at each village, have a couple of beers and then get on the train and go on again. we have missed all that this autumn. a lot of local businesses like the cafes and fish and chips are suffering because of the lack of people coming on the train on saturdays. but this strike dates back much further than last autumn. these pickets have been going on for almost two years now.
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