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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 21, 2019 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling at westminster where theresa may will today set out how she hopes to break the brexit deadlock. six days after her plan was rejected by mps, it's expected she'll suggest changes to the plan to avoid a hard irish border, but some brexiteers in her own party are sceptical. most likely is no deal. the second most likely is a re—done deal. third is delay and fourth, a long way behind, is not leaving at all. millions of eu citizens living in the uk can apply for settled status from today. it allows them to continue living and working here after brexit. and in today's other news: china reports its slowest growth rate for nearly three decades. domestic abuse victims are to be given better protection, as the government publishes a new landmark legislation. police continue to question
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a car bombing in londonderry. and this morning, sky watchers as the "super blood wolf moon" turned red. to find a way to breaki= she'll make a statement to mps this afternoon following talks yesterday with her cabinet. it's thought the prime minister will try to persuade tory brexiteers and democratic unionist mps to back her by promising to find a solution around the northern ireland backstop, an insurance policy designed to avoid the return of check points
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on the border in ireland. in the past hour, the prime minister of new zealand, who's due to meet theresa may in downing street tonight, has told us that a no—deal brexit would, in her words, be "very, very difficult especially for small businesses" in the uk. speaking to the victoria derbyshire programme jacinda ardern restated her belief that new zealand would be ready to do a free trade deal as soon as the uk leaves the eu, but also expressed her concerns. it would impact on just about everybody, business in particular, particularly small businesses. and whilst absolutely the decision over whether to leave or remain is a matter for the people, i will be very open that a no—deal scenario would be very, very difficult, but i sense that everyone is of that view. let's just remind ourselves exaclty what the so—called backstop is all about. after brexit, the two parts
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of ireland could be in different customs and regulatory regimes meaning goods may need to be checked at the border. neither the uk, eu or the irish government want that, so the backstop is a saftety net that only comes in to play should the uk and the eu fail to reach a trade deal once britain leaves the eu. all parties agree that a backstop is needed to maintain cross—border cooperation and protect the good friday peace agreement. and, ss it stands, the backstop means northern ireland would stay aligned to some rules of the eu single market, but only if another solution cannot be found by the end of the transition period in december 2020. our assistant political editor norman smith is with me now. wasn't today supposed to be the day we got a plan b? if you are waiting for plan b, it's probably like waiting for godot. nothing much is happening. i think all we will get from the prime minister today is
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broadly a restatement of planning with not much more. certainly there is not much evidence of new thinking on her part and her view seems to be that there is not much é on her part and her view seems to be that there is not much i’iié of that there is not much chance of getting any f" that there is not much chance of getting any *" agreement. getting any cross—party agreement. we know are still getting any cross—party agreement. we kno she are still eze getting any cross—party agreement. we kno she hasire still eze that she not - to that: on not - to that: on not - article 50 is going is - going to customs union, so there is on customs union, so there is limited prospects of any progress there, added to which i think she's fea rful there, added to which i think she's fearful it would ignite an eruption in her party if she were to try to push this through on the back of opposition votes, so she is reverting to what looks broadly like plan a reverting to what looks broadly like planaand reverting to what looks broadly like plan a and the hope is that if she can get some sort of reassurances on the backstop, that will be enough to get the dup and the e r g on—board, but, i mean, so far, we have not had any sign of what this magical new variation on the backstop is going to be because, let's remember, the
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british government has been arguing about this for nigh on two years and they have been unable to find a magical key that unlocks the process , magical key that unlocks the process, software we are magical key that unlocks the process, software we are seems magical key that unlocks the process, software we are seems to magical key that unlocks the process, software we are seems to me is in the field of exhortations, appeals to loyalty and that is pretty much what we got from the international development secretary, penny mordants, when she left on this morning. i think what everyone needs to do is do what brexiteers and remainers in the country are doing, which is that they all know that they have to honour the result and we're going to leave the eu, we have to deliver brexit and i'd like us to leave with a deal and if we want to leave with a deal, it's the prime minister's deal. we've got to make that as best we can and parliament needs to come together and support it. i think the bulk of people in parliament want to leave with a deal and that's what we need to get down and do. thank you. the other thing which number ten seems to be clinging to is the idea that maybe the likes of jacob rees mogg are beginning to soften because they are alarmed at the forces
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beginning to marshal in parliament to either delay brexit or maybe even push for a second referendum, so government seized on remarks by him at the weekend where he said, well, if the eu were bit more flexible on the backstop, maybe we could look at mrs may's deal again. i have to say, this morning, when he appeared on lbc, it didn't sound to me like he was softening at all and when he was asked how would you categorise how things are now going to work out, he was pretty clear that he thought no deal was the most likely outcome. most likely is no deal. the second most likely is a re—done deal. third is delay and fourth, a long way behind, is not leaving at all. and a people's vote, as it's so—called. i think loser's vote... it doesn't even come out of the paddock. doesn't even go round the parade ring. it's got remarkably little support. it would be very divisive in the labour party. most conservatives don't want it. so, jacob rees mogg's view is no
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deal rather than the pm's deal is the most likely outcome and then we had an extraordinary intervention to date from richard harrington. this is the man who basically has to meet with business to try to pave the way, prepare them, get organised for no deal. this morning, he could not have been more dismissive about the prospect of no deal, saying it would bea prospect of no deal, saying it would be a disaster, saying that the idea of post—brexit trade deals were a sham and warning potentially of the closure of prominent manufacturers. i'm not afraid of no drugs etc, but i'm afraid of jaguar closing, mini closing, the life sciences industry closing and all the other things because we'd have no agreement that represents the way these businesses are integrated today. this is irresponsibility, nick, and we've got to stop it and the prime minister, who i'm a great supporter of, should say this is the time for members of parliament to do what they were elected for and the vast majority of them reject this no deal nonsense and that's what we should do. so, that was an extraordinary
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comment, as you say they're from the business secretary and yet it is being left mps who are mobilising in varying groups to try to put forward alternatives, including, obviously, ruling out no deal via various amendments. what is interesting and probably helps theresa may is there doesn't seem any agreement among her opponents, so what we are expecting isa opponents, so what we are expecting is a different group also put forward their favoured plan is a different group also put forward theirfavoured plan b, so we will get proposals for people's forward theirfavoured plan b, so we will g proposals ls for people's forward theirfavoured plan b, so we will g proposals for)r people's forward theirfavoured plan b, so we will g proposals for so—called; vote, proposals for so—called citizen's assemblies were there ought to be groups of people mulling over brexit for the next nine months, a gordon brown idea, there are proposals for an indicative vote with a whole lot of different options and we have proposals for parliament to try and seize control of business, to try and push through legislation to actually block no deal. so it seems to me mrs may's opponents are slightly all over the
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place and, at the end of the day, that could be what helps her more than anything else. if opponents cannot get their act together, then, you know, it is the old story, divide and rule. thank you very much, norman. meanwhile, european foreign ministers are meeting in brussels today. brexit isn't on the official agenda but is still at the forefront of ministers‘ minds. romania has just taken over the rotating presidency. theirforeign minister teodor melescanu spoke briefly to reporters before the meeting. it's still premature. first of all, as i said, we have to look at what great britain will decide. from our point of view as the presidency of the council of the european union, we'll try to find solutions which will permit all the member states to have a common position on this. we'll see what will happen. later on today at 2:30pm, we'll be putting your questions to experts on what happens next in terms of theresa may's brexit deal. from today, millions
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of eu citizens living in the uk will be asked to apply for a new legal status, allowing them to stay after brexit. if they don't, they ultimately risk deportation. it costs £65 for adults to register online for "settled status". to be eligible to apply, you have to have lived in the uk continuously for at least the last five years. eu citizens who've been here for less than that can apply for "pre—settled" status, until they're eligible for full settlement rights. the rules do not apply to people from ireland. the government says the system will be easy and straightfoward, but critics are warning that any mistakes could lead to thousands being left without legal status. graham satchell‘s been to meet two families who have made their homes in britain. our daughter helene
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was born 19 weeks ago. it's been quite a change in our lives, but we're really enjoying it. my name is janna reumerman, and i've lived in the uk for eight years. eu citizens and their families will need to apply to the eu settlement scheme continue living in the uk after 31 december 2020. so what do i think about it? i'm not necessarily offended by it or upset by it. i think that, one way or another, people will have to register that they are eu nationals, as there is no longer free movement of people. we'll have to pay for you to stay here. personally, i do feel the country should be able to determine who comes here and who doesn't, and for that to happen you need to register. yeah, i'm not offended by this, at all. if i'm brutally honest, i hope brexit will not happen, and that we don't have to apply for a settled status at all, and just continue with our lives as they are.
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my name is george kontakos. i've been running the olive grove restaurant in cambridge for 10 years, and i've been here 16 years. at this moment, we've put all our plans on hold. we don't know what the future will be. we're just a little bit stressed to see what's going to happen with our settlement status. my name is francesca kontakos. i was born in the united kingdom, and i've been married to george for ten years. i'm fortunate to be british and have been born here. george is not so fortunate, however, and doesn't hold a british citizenship, because being a european was just as good as. but now we're a little bit worried about what the future holds for us and holds for our family. so we need to think of some ideas, some art ideas... what guarantees do we have that a future government mightjust scrap our settled status applications,
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and make us illegal citizens in this country? it makes me feel scared, and anxious, and worried about my future, not just in england, but as a person in the world. it's this insecurity that i feel from my country that is worrying me. because i think that the country that i'm living in, if they don't want my husband here, then there's no place for me here. my husband is my family, my husband is my life, and i will follow him anywhere he goes. and if he's not welcomed in my country, then my country's no longer my country. yet in westminster, theresa may will be back in the commons at 3:30pm talking to mps and the headline, really, remains that mps are united against wanting noel brexit in terms
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of what they do want, it is still unclear and the talks go on. i will be back with more news from westminster a little bit later. now back to carrie. the headlines on bbc news: six days after theresa may's brexit deal was rejected by mps, the prime minister will set out later today how she hopes the brexit deadlock. millions of eu citizens living in the uk can apply for settled status‘ from today. it allows them to continue living and working here after brexit china reports its slowest growth rate for nearly three decades. and in sport: serena williams reaches the australian open quarterfinals at the expense of world number one simona halep and remains on course to equal margaret court's record of 2a grand slam singles titles. it's as you were in the premier league as manchester city are back to within four points of liverpool, after a 3—0 win at bottom side huddersfield. and for the first time in the superbowl era, both championship games go to overtime. the los angeles rams
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make it through to face the new england patriots, who've reached the finale for the third year in a row. i'll be back with more on those stories later. an 18—year—old man has appeared at thames magistrates‘ court charged with the murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie in east london earlier this month. our correspondent, daniela relph, is outside the court. what can you tell as? this was the first court appearance for the 18—year—old. he faced two charges here at thames magistrates‘ court today, one for the murder ofjaden moodie, 14 years old, today, one for the murder ofjaden moodie,14 years old, on the today, one for the murder ofjaden moodie, 14 years old, on the 8th of january this year and a second charge, possession of a bladed weapon ina charge, possession of a bladed weapon in a public place will stop that public place was bickley road
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in leighton where jaden moodie was killed. no details of the actual case were presented in court today. this was just a basic first magistrate hearing, but the accused did answer a number of questions. he confirmed his name, he confirmed his date of birth. he was born in august 2000. he confirmed his address in wembley in north london and he was also asked what his nationality was, to which he replied he was british. he has now been remanded in custody and he will appear again in court on wednesday but this time at the old bailey. thank you. a man who was carrying a machete on board a train in essex has been arrested. police found the 15—inch blade after a stop and search operation on a greater anglia service between colchester and witham on sunday night. a man from london has been arrested on suspicion of two offences and remains in police custody. the government will today publish what it calls a landmark domestic abuse bill which it says will strengthen penalties for perpetrators and
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better protect victims. it means for the first time abusers will be banned from cross—examining their victims in the family court. frankie mccamley reports. sarah, not her real name, survived years of domestic abuse. he would control the finances, so comment on what i spent, how much i spent, ask me why i spent something, so ijust stopped. if i was going out with my friends, he‘d comment on the outfits — it was too short, i looked too fat. but when she had to fight to keep the child she had with him, she had to face her abuser in family court, where he was allowed to cross—examine her. it re—traumatises you. you believe them more than yourself, because they‘re allowed to tell you how to think, and he was allowed to tell me how to think for three years. so, by allowing him to cross—examine me in court for three hours, it took me back to a place i thought i‘d have got away from. the cross—examination by a perpetrator is just one practice the government wants
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to abolish as it launches its draft domestic abuse bill. the proposed legislation would include a new definition of domestic abuse, including economical abuse, by controlling things like finances and preventing someone from going to work, a domestic commissioner, and domestic abuse protection orders putting restrictions on offenders. polygraphs will also be piloted on perpetrators who are a high risk of reoffending, to check they haven‘t broken their conditions of parole. but with no new money backing the proposals, some charities are only cautiously welcoming the bill. what we‘d really like to see is embedded specialist domestic abuse workers in the nhs, better co—ordination between the court systems, so that they‘re speaking to each other and understanding the risk to various family members. we‘d like to see really great training around relationships and sex education, and we want to see a cross—government strategy on perpetrators of abuse which goes even further than what we‘ve heard today. the bill for england
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and wales will now be scrutinised by parliament. it follows new scottish domestic abuse legislation introduced last year focusing on controlling behaviour. a proposed law in northern ireland has been put on hold until stormont assembly reconvenes. police are continuing to question four men in connection with a car bomb attack in londonderry on saturday night. no—one was hurt in the explosion. officers say they believe a dissident republican group, the new ira, was responsible for the blast, but the investigation is ongoing. let‘s speak now to professorjon tonge, who specialises in british and irish politics at the university of liverpool. thank you forjoining us. what is your initial analysis of this incident? the republican dissidents have never actually gone away. the
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official threat level has been severe for more than a decade. she cost of northern ireland has said that the dissidents pro is a severe threat. his counterpart in the irish republic has said similar and have been several hundred is shooting and bombing incident in the last decade and there have been british soldiers, police officers and prison officers killed within a decade, so to put it in context, the level of violence is much, much lower in northern ireland these days, but the dissidents have been an issue that have never been eradicated fully within the region. what about this particular group that police are talking about, the new ira? the new ira is an amalgam, a fairly recent amalgam, of the real ira, the people who killed 29 people at, and also work responsible for the massively baric ‘s killings in 2009. the new ira views them and a number of other
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independent groups within this banner of the new ira. its size is unknown. they have a political help but look who on saturday on their twitter account said that there had been an attack on what they described as a british presidents, the court in derry. they have pockets of support in places like logan and derry, but the bass majority of republicans have moved on. sinn fein were unequivocal in their condemnation of saturday‘s attack. do you think there is any relationship between the attacks that you have just been talking about and the kind of heightened focus on the relationship between the republic of ireland, northern ireland and the border in the light of the whole brexit situation? for republican dissidents, it is not about a hard border or soft border, basically do not want the border anywhere on the island of ireland.
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that said, the focus on the border through brexit has been useful for dissidents because it has focused again the issue upon the partition of ireland, the border and what to do about that border, so it is useful, but dissident violence preceded the rows about brexit and will carry on even if the issue of brexit is resolved. for dissidents, it‘s about removing british rule from northern ireland. brexit provides a useful opportunity for such dissidents. thank you for joining us from liverpool this morning. china has confirmed the birth of the world‘s first gene—edited babies, saying the scientist involved acted alone and broke rules banning the procedure. let‘s find out the latest from our china correspondent stephen mcdonell. it's it‘s not that these babies are just born, they were born at the end of last year, but china has finished the first stage of the investigation into this. that's right, and this
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scientist is in a lot of trouble, it seems, because these investigators have found is not only that he acted alone, that is he set up his team by himself, he got the funding together himself, he got the funding together himself without the support of his university and the like, but that he forged medical review papers, that he deliberately avoided surveillance in order to carry out this research which they have said is unequivocally in breach of the law in china and so he faces very serious punishment, it seems. it‘s quite incredible, though, that he couldn‘t foresee that there would be some sort of ethical problem with this because i think hejust imagined that he‘d created these first gene edited babies and because he said he had done it to make sure that they would not be able to contract hiv that the world would simply say what a fantastic medical breakthrough it was without questioning the problems, the
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ethical problems associated with it and now he‘s being taken away to some secret location and his case is being forwarded to chinese prosecutors and it looks like he‘s probably going to go to jail, it would seem. just fell as an on exactly what the problem is with what he did. well, you know, like all around the world, scientists struggle with this question of mucking around with the fundamental building blocks of human existence. you just have to go back to attempts by the nazis and the like to create superhumans and the debate around whether we should muck around with how people are formed, so you can‘t just go creating babies by changing their dna how you‘d like them, even if it is to produce a good result, thatis if it is to produce a good result, that is that these children can‘t contract hiv. again, i think this scientist thought he would be the first to do it. he seems, though,
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according to these chinese investigators to have deliberately flouted the rules in order to get there first. they said he was doing it in order to ingratiate himself in the public, to make money to become famous, but now it seems all that will be to no avail for him because he does face serious punishment. thank you for that update from beijing. a hughly unusual lunar eclipse has been visible from many parts of the world overnight. although unfortunately cloud obscured the spectacle for many in the uk. it took place because the moon is closer to the art than normal, giving rise to what‘s known as a "super blood wolf moon." katie silver has the details. from jerusalem to los angeles to santiago in chile, moon gazers took to the streets to see a huge red moon. it‘s an unusual set of celestial circumstances that gives rise to this rare phenomenon and which happens over three hours. in
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the first hour, as the moon passes behind the earth, it is gradually swallowed by the planet‘s shadow. then, without the sun illuminating the moon, it appears tinted in hues of red, orange and pink. when you see this brilliant red colour and it actually varies depending on your location, the atmosphere lights up the moon, so what you are seeing with this red colour is the sunrise and sunset of the earth illuminating the moon. afterwards it to bright and shining. it has been given the unusual sounding name of a super blood wolf moon. tonight we have a super blood wolf moon. tonight we have a super itiooi'i blood wolf moon. tonight we have a super moon because blood wolf moon. tonight we have a super moon because it is far and it is close to the eye. it is able from an because it is the january full itiooi'i an because it is the january full moon and the blood moon because it isa lunar moon and the blood moon because it is a lunar eclipse. here, hopes were dashed by a cloudy night but spectators elsewhere were not
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disappointed. it's amazing, as you can see, it is a party atmosphere but everybody is just enjoying the spectacle, as you can see, but beyond that, the science of it. translation: it is something i have never seen before. super interesting. and to learn everything about it in just interesting. and to learn everything about it injust a night and to see an effect so beautiful. for those who missed it, well, sexual reminders because the next total lunar eclipse isn‘t until may 2021. —— set your reminders. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. yes, far too cloudy for many of us overnight to see that super blood wolf moon, but we do have some clear skies down to the south—east of england. that has translated this morning into some sunshine. this is
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from our weather watcher in kent, some blue skies here, a bit of high clouds started to spread its way in. elsewhere, rather cloudy skies with rain moving its way through northern ireland and into the west of scotland. that rain is falling as snow over the higher ground, but increasingly by deceiving, it could come down to lower levels. elsewhere, it will remain dry. the cloud we mentioned will thicken up a little bit and it will feel pretty cold with maximum temperature is around four to 6 degrees. tonight, that cloud and rain and snow will move further south eastwards. snow over the pennines through snowdonia over the pennines through snowdonia over lower levels and could be wintry flurries. also an ice risk across these northern and western areas in particular is that rain moves into the south—east. temperatures are not going to fall quite as local staying about three orli quite as local staying about three or 4 degrees. for the rest of the week, it will remain cold. further wintry showers with sunshine at times, sharp frost overnight but earning less cold by friday. hello this is bbc newsroom live — the headlines at 11.30:
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the prime minister prepares to return to the house of commons. six days after her plan was rejected by mps, theresa may comes back to parliament later today — but brexiteers in her own party are sceptical. most likely is no deal, the second most likely is a redone deal, third is delay, and fourth, a long way behind, is not leaving at all. millions of eu citizens living in the uk can apply for "settled status" from today — it allows them to continue living and working here after brexit. china reports its slowest growth rate for nearly three decades. domestic abuse victims are to be given better protection, as the government publishes new "landmark" legislation. police continue to question four men following a car bombing in londonderry. they believe the attack was carried out by a dissident republican group. and early this morning sky watchers witnessed a rare
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total lunar eclipse — as the ‘super blood wolf moon‘ turned red. sport now withjohn watson. good morning. serena williams is through to the quarter finals at the australian 0pen but it wasn‘t a straightforward start against simona halep the announcer introduced the world number one — serena‘s title for so long — and she, headphones on, mind on other matters, took to the court. but she had to go back because it was her opponent, simona halep, who is actually world number one! she won it in three sets to keep alive her hopes of matching marageret court‘s record of 2a grand slam singles titles. alex zverev had been tipped to win his first slam in melbourne, but that wait goes on as he first lost his cool and then the match to milos raonic. his racquet got the blame for his poorform — he only won one game in the first
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set and smashed his racquet to pieces during the second set, which he also lost 6—1. the third went to a tie—break, raonic won that to wrap it up in straight sets. yeah, made me feel better. i was very angry, so i let my anger out. have you smashed your rackets in the past? have you never watched my matches? you should watch my matches. it "as you were" at the top of the premier league, with manchester city back to within four points of leaders liverpool. leroy sane scored their third goal in a 3—0 win at managerless huddersfield — taking city‘s total to 102 for the season. but look at this — a lifelong huddersfield fan in the crowd was mistaken by a reporter for german coach jan siewert, who‘s tipped to be their new manager. his reply was "no, i‘m martin from wakefield". they need someone!
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maybe martin could do the job. england midfielder dele alli is the latest name on tottenham‘s injury list. he suffered a hamstring injury in their win at fulham. harry winks scored the winner in the last minute of stoppage time to keep them five points behind manchester city. it was a frustrating night to be fair. a lot of moments where we had close calls or they defended really well. it seemed like it would be a difficult night, but the belief we have in the team — we score late goals when we kept believing and today was no different. the semi—professional side auchinleck talbot produced the shock of the weekend in the scottish cup, knocking out ayr united — and their reward is an away tie at hearts in the fifth round. they beat livingston 1—0 — sean clare with the goal. holders celtic will be at home to stjohnstone. the full draw is on the bbc sport website. judd trump thrashed ronnie 0‘sullivan in the final
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of the masters at alexandra palace. it was surprisingly one—sided, trump winning by 10 frames to 4 to take his first major title for eight years — and collect a cheque for £200,000. england‘s netballers are building up to this summer‘s world cup — and they beat australia in the quad series, in a repeat of their historic commonwealth games final victory they didn‘t quite get the winning margin they needed to take the series, which went to australia — england had to win by five goals in london but it finished 52—49. but it was a great recovery really appreciate how hard it is. turn it around in 2a hours,
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and that for me is what we need to do at the world cup. we need to have that in our bank. it was a great turnaround. and we now know who‘ll be playing in this year‘s super bowl on the 3rd of february. new england patriots have made it there for the third time in a row, after beating kansas city chiefs in overtime. and the other game went to overtime as well, the los angeles rams trailed new orleans saints throughout but they levelled just before the end and this 57—yard field goal gave them the win. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. let‘s return to our top story — the brexit discussions in parliament — my colleaguejoanna gosling is at westminster. theresa may will outline her next brexit steps today as she tries in many ways, it sounds like nothing
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has changed because last week we cross— party cross—party talks. may‘s fl: may‘s seems to be all about back all about - back to it is all about going—backie it is all about gaifig—iaaaketa and it is all about goifig—baaketo and trying to get some firbiiéli éfifi trying iii! ee}. ififié to the , the a.-.” ' that would cope, into that would saga into effect position that would come into effect in the event of no 55 55 55 5 position that would come into effect in the event of no § trade deal in the event of no future trade deal between the uk and eu to stop a hard border with northern ireland. so, the talking goes on about how much is shifting is unclear. catherine haddon is from the institute for government — a think—tank working to make government more effective — and shejoins me now. welcome. when you look at what is going on behind us, what do you think? is this parliament at its best or worst? there is so much process going on and so much talking, yet, the overall picture hasn‘t changed, we still don‘t know where we are going. you can argue it both ways, for many people, it is huge frustration that we have seen not of arguments about what mps
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don‘t want to happen, but at the moment, not really any kind of clear picture about what they do want to happen and any sense of a majority coming together to find that. we may see that in the next week or so, but there is a lot of process and procedural issues happening, that could be viewed as gameplaying, it is shedding light on some very parliamentary procedures. 0n the other hand, we have talked for years about majority governments who can bulld oze about majority governments who can bulldoze their way through. at the moment, we are seeing parliament having to work together, we are seeing backbenchers playing a meaningful role at the moment, who can talk about the fact that parliament is having its heyday over this, it isjust parliament is having its heyday over this, it is just that it is not finding the policy solutions that we need to find. backbenchers in many ways trying to wrest control from the government from the various amendments, things they want the house to vote on that would give more power to mps to decide what happens. some of that has been
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described by constitutional experts as constitutionally dangerous, because of where it ends up going in the future. what are your thoughts as you see those manoeuvres? at the moment, it is almost too late. because this has been proposed as a thing that might be able to happen, this idea that backbenchers will be able to table their own legislative work to get through brexit, previously, that was the government that was only able to do that. it really depends on how they use it at also how it is interpreted in the future. none of this would happen we re future. none of this would happen were it not for the fact that this isa were it not for the fact that this is a minority government that is holding itself together through support from another party. if that wasn‘t the case, we wouldn‘t be talking about any of these issues. so it is a minority government, parliament does has this kind of control. but whether or not the particular changes that they want to put through will have the lasting
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effect, it really is partly up to how parliament interprets this and what it does with it in the future. theresa may‘s position is still to be absolutely sticking with her agreement, which seek she says is the best way through, when you have people who don‘t want to be leaving and people who want to leave without and people who want to leave without a deal. do you think she can do it in the end? is difficult to tell. she has got notjust whether or not she goes for the dup and hard brexiteers in her party to think about, it is also about whether or not by doing so, she loses some of her mps on the other side. so she has a very narrow number, as we saw at that confidence motion last week, she has a very narrow number of her majority that is cobbled together from other parties, the dup and her own conservative party, which is close to fracturing on this issue. it really will depend on how she manages it politically, but also whether or not the characters
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involved really want to make a more extensive move away from her position. thank you forjoining us. 0ne position. thank you forjoining us. one of the mps who is trying to find what they may be a majority for an parliament is a frank field, i will speak to him after midday. here‘s hoping to put forward a suggestion that mps vote on a series of options to try to ascertain whether there is a majority for. for instance, a second referendum, in ray style agreement, that is a brexit which would mean much closer alliance with europe in terms of trade and every thing else. —— norway style agreement. obviously, the no deal brexiteers would like to see no deal, so that is potentially something that will give us a sense of where the majority lies in parliament. from today... millions of eu citizens living in the uk will be
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asked to apply for a new legal status, allowing them to stay after brexit. but some migration experts are warning that hundreds of thousands of people could be potentially unaware or unable to register their right to remain in the uk. we are talking to someone who founded a campaign to help the right of eu citizens in the uk. thank you very much forjoining us. you have to apply for settled status, is that right? if i want to secure my legal status in this country, i will have to do that, or make the choice to leave or become british. today is a difficult day for us, because we have to try and get ahead —— our head around the fact that we have two apply to remain your neighbours, colleagues, friends and family. there has to be some way to achieve this, doesn‘t bear? isn‘t it inevitable that filling out some paperwork and formalising a position is the only way for this to be done.
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iam is the only way for this to be done. i am finally to recognise that we need to have a system, but this could be a transparent system that isa could be a transparent system that is a registration. this is not a registration system, it is an application that forces all of us to apply for something we already have, applied to remain in our home. that is the big difference. the government is doing very little to help with that. the government has said that those who have lived continuously in the uk for five yea rs ca n continuously in the uk for five years can apply, and for those who haven‘t had that continuous five yea rs, haven‘t had that continuous five years, they can apply to be allowed the in that position and then can apply for settled status. while that is correct, it doesn‘t change the fa ct is correct, it doesn‘t change the fact that it is an application and an application can be rejected. what we see is the breaking of one of the biggest promises that we would automatically receive the state that secures our rights. an application is not an automatic process, and we need our british friends to recognise this, because it is a difficult day. how can you continue
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to live in a country that tells you that you have to apply if you want to stay in what already is your own home? went the same it be happening with uk citizens were living elsewhere in the eu? that may be the case, because the uk push for us to have such a system. in many eu countries, they already have registration systems in place, where people, all of them, notjust british citizens, have to register. the uk doesn‘t have this system, and thatis the uk doesn‘t have this system, and that is part of the problem. what we are now going to get is a system that gives special id numbers to people like me to eu citizens to put it on people like me to eu citizens to put itona people like me to eu citizens to put it on a special register, and we will be the only ones on such a register. as a historian and also as a german, i have to say that it doesn‘t fully with confidence. a german, i have to say that it doesn't fully with confidence. some who are worried about this situation are warning of a new windrush scandal, where people will be without the legal status that they need. are you concerned about that?
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absolutely, very much so. i expect that to happen. a lot of people do not even know that they have two apply for this new status. think of elderly eu citizens. a while ago, the bbc rugby news about italian workers who were invited to help rebuild britain, those people do not filled —— fit the stereotype that the home office has come up with for this process, someone who is in work and has all the records and plays full stop what about children in care, for example? they may not know they have to apply, and this will only come out when it is too late when people are already illegal. this is i think a new windrush generation in the making. thank you for joining generation in the making. thank you forjoining us. i will be back from more news with westminster later on. a former soldier is suing the ministry of defence after contracting q fever in afghanistan. he claims he failed to receive the neccessary antibiotics from the mod that would have
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protected him against the disease. his condition has since developed into chronic fatigue syndrome leaving him unable to work. earlier i spoke to our legal correspondent clive coleman about the case. just to let people know what q fever is, it‘s a disease that‘s contracted through airborne bacteria, and that airborne bacteria comes from animal excrement. now, private wayne bass was stationed in helmand, his job was really to protect other troops from very heavy taliban fire, and he was constantly having to dive into ditches in an area of farmland, where there were a sheep and goats. and it is there where he believes he contracted q fever. normally, q fever is treated very successfully with antibiotics, but not in all cases. it is rare for it to develop into this chronic fatigue syndrome, which it has in his case. and it has really had a devastating effect on his life and on a bad day, it takes him... but why didn‘t he get the, why didn‘t he get the antibiotics? well, the army were providing antimalarial antibiotics. now, they say that the risk of q fever was very low and that
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in effect, there wasn‘t a case for providing doxycycline, which is an antibiotic which he and his lawyers maintain would have protected him both against malaria and also the contraction of q fever. the army‘s own figures show that between 2008—2011, 200 service personnel a year tested positive for q fever, although only a third of those were systematic. what this case will do, it breaks new legal ground, really, because it is going to test the extent of the army‘s duty to protect against this particular disease. obviously, thejudge will have to make a finding as to whether the army were in breach of that duty. if they were, then there are other cases, similar cases, waiting to come to court. there‘s a bit of me listening to you which wonders why the mod even wants to fight this, because, you know, you‘ve got because, you know, you‘ve got a soldier who‘s suffering chronic fatigue syndrome
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there, wouldn‘t you want to look after him? their case is, as i say, that the risk was very loud, that there were side—effects from doxycycline, and also that the doxycycline might have interfered with the antimalarial antibiotics, which they were giving to troops. so they are indeed... so it‘s actually quite a complex... it is complicated. i think the medical evidence in the case is going to be quite complex, it‘s a five—day trial, it begins today at the central london county court. i imagine that the judge will be reserved until a later date because of the complexity of the medical evidence. in a moment we‘ll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. six days after theresa may‘s brexit deal was rejected by mps , the prime minister will set out later today how she hopes the brexit deadlock. millions of eu citizens living in the uk can apply for ‘settled status‘ from today — it allows them to continue living and working here after brexit. domestic abuse victims are to be given better protection, as the government publishes new ‘landmark‘ legislation. and now for your business news.
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china — the world‘s second largest economy — has announced it slowest growth since 1990. china grew by 6.6% in 2018, according to the official figures published today. it‘s sparked concerns of a wider global slowdown. sports direct founder mike ashley has placed a bid to buy music chain hmv. the music retailer collapsed last month, its second administration in six years, putting 2,200 jobs at risk in 125 stores across the country. small energy suppliers have beaten the so—called big six in a customer satisfaction survey by which? the consumer group asked 8,000 energy users about their provider and issues including value for money, customer service and accurate billing. the top five were small suppliers, with the big six — british gas, edf energy, eon, npower, scottishpower and sse — in the bottom third of the table.
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excuse my news reading, that is in the bottom third! china‘s economy is growing at it‘s slowest rate in almost three decades. in the last few hours the government said the world‘s second biggest economy grew by 6.6% last year. it comes amid a broder global slowdown and a trade war with the united states whose effects are starting to be felt. economic growth of 6.6% for the whole of 2018 was broadly in line with analysts expectations and is the slowest rate of expansion since 1990. but it fits in neatly with the government‘s target of growth of "around 6.5%". over the last decade china‘s growth has slowed as the government tries to more carefully manage the economy. in fact on friday the 2017 growth figure was revised down from 6.9% to 6.8%. the government in beijing is wary
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of too sharp a slowdown and announced a string of measures to try and boost the economy last week. they include tax cuts, infrastructure spending and an $81; billion cash injection to try and maintain consumer spending levels. one of the big reasons consumers are reluctant to spendi is their growing amount of debt, something that‘s been rising steadily over the last few years. so too has the debt held by companies and china‘s collective debt is now almost equal to three times the size of the economy. let‘s speak to jinny yan, chief china economist, icbc standard. let‘s talk about the headline figure, 6.6%. most economies in the world would kill for that figure,
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wouldn‘t they? world would kill for that figure, wouldn't they? absolutely. by the way, we are talking about the second largest economy in the world. everyone is aware that china has been slowing down, and that is not a phenomenon injust this been slowing down, and that is not a phenomenon in just this quarter. obviously, the key here is about confidence. everything is happening altogether, everything we talk about from the global slowdown prospective, we are embracing brexit over here, you‘re it is facing its own challenges. 0n over here, you‘re it is facing its own challenges. on top of that, we have trade friction with the us. —— europe is facing challenges. when you look in china, it is the lack of confidence for both corporate and individual to spend money. confidence for both corporate and individualto spend money. so confidence for both corporate and individual to spend money. so that is the wary looking forward, isn‘t it? we are in a period where growth has slowed, still quite good by most international standards. the wary is what will happen next stop there are so what will happen next stop there are so many factors on that, not least the trade war with the united states. absolutely. we must not forget that even though we are coming up to a deadline for some
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sort of negotiated deal on the 1st of march, that is the deadline, however, this tension with the us will continue to drag. it is clearly what we are seeing here is that china is shifting towards the next year, it is becoming a bigger technology player. so clearly, this friction with the world‘s largest economy will continue, regardless of the short—term negotiations. economy will continue, regardless of the short-term negotiations. why should anybody here care about what is happening in china‘s economy? should anybody here care about what is happening in china's economy?“ you look around yourselves, no longer is china only the factory floor, so not just longer is china only the factory floor, so notjust the toys and shoes that are made in china, but it is actually chinese consumers that are consuming a lot of what both british, european, and global manufacturers are producing. for example, cars, luxury items, even basic goods. we are talking about
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consumer goods as well. this is actually the world‘s biggest consuming nation, so anyone that has any sort of international scope should be worried about china‘s slowdown. great explanation, thank you very much. chief china economist. let‘s have a look at the numbers. the chairman of glaxo is to leave, one into its perception drugs business and one into a health care. just eat, whose boss, is off, too, its shares are down. keep an eye on the exchange rate, when we hearfrom a back later on, the currency will feel that very much. —— when we hear from theresa may later on. that‘s all from me for now. the greek capital, athens, has witnessed some of the worst violence at a demonstration in years. riot police and right—wing activists were involved in clashes outside the greek parliament for several
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hours , leaving twenty—five police officers and an unknown number of demonstrators injured. they were protesting at plans to recognise greece‘s northern neighbour as the republic of north macedonia. nick thorpe has more. feelings run high in greece about the name macedonia. a clear majority of greeks feel the name belongs to them and them alone. while today‘s protest government is committed to pushing through parliament in the coming days. translation: i believe everything is over but we must carry out our duty and be here. translation: i believe this is the last push regarding the national topic of macedonia. i believe the greek people must
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fight the last battle. it's our last hope. this is the reason for their desperation. the prime minister and his party narrowly winning a vote of confidence in parliament last week provoked by the departure of his coalition partner over the macedonian name issue. the parliament has already ratified the agreement. if the greek parliament does so as well it will enter into force and become legally irreversible. its champions say it will benefit not only northern macedonia but the whole of the balkans and will also be good for greece. this protest may be the last chance of opponents of the deal to vent their anger and frustration. nick thorpe, bbc news, athens. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. we have got a lot of cloud at the moment across the uk, but some of us
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have still got some sunshine. let‘s have still got some sunshine. let‘s have a look at the satellite image, you can see this big area of cloud, which has moved in from the atlantic. it is towards the south—east of england that there is still some clear skies. so it is sunshine in the moment in east sussex, just like this picture from our weather watcher. elsewhere, mostly cloudy. we have some rain moving into northern ireland and the west of scotland. that will continue this afternoon, spreading its way further south and east words. there will be some snow in the higher ground of scotland. elsewhere, it will remain a drier, but fairly chilly for many of us. maximum temperature is typically about 4—7 degrees. through this evening and night, the band of rain and hill snow will move eastwards, but the snow will move eastwards, but the snow will move eastwards, but the snow will come down to lower levels as it moves into the pennines and through snowdonia. again, a couple of flurries into lower levels. the rain will move in further south and
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east. as it turns cold, there is the risk of widespread ice tonight, as the temperatures fall close to freezing in the north and west. someone tree showers following behind that, and in the south—east, 2-4d behind that, and in the south—east, 2—4d stop that is because of the cloud and rain, which will clear a way into states. all of us and the influence of the western airstream, that will bring in the showers. wintry showers across the uk, most of the snow will be over high ground. even in low levels, there could be some flurries. some showers will move into eastern england. sunshine in between the showers, and temperatures once again about 3—7 degrees stop these will stay at about this level throughout the week. we will still have someone tree showers, some sunshine in between, sharp frosts over, but turning left cold by friday. plenty of sunshine and dry weather on
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wednesday, just a few showers in northern and western areas, but they will be wintry at times. maximum temperature is about two or three degrees, perhaps as high as seven in the south—west. thursday, similar temperatures, a dry day with some sunshine. by friday, the temperatures will start to come up a little bit, about eight or 9 degrees. it could turn it little bit wet at times on friday and into the weekend. for many of us, it will stay quite chilly through this week. goodbye. you‘re watching bbc newsroom live. i‘m joanna gosling at westminster. the prime minister will outline her next steps to mps this afternoon. as she tries to find a way to break the deadlock in the brexit process, some brexiteers in her own party are sceptical. millions of eu citizens living in the uk can apply for settled status from today. it allows them to continue living and working here after brexit and in today‘s other news:
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the government is planning to change the law to stop people accused of domestic abuse from cross—examining their victims in the family court. a teenager has appeared in court charged with the murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie in east london. and early this morning sky watchers witnessed a rare total lunar eclipse as the "super blood wolf moon" turned red. good afternoon. theresa may will outline her next steps as she tries to find a way to break the brexit deadlock. she‘ll make a statement to mps this afternoon, following talks yesterday with her cabinet. it‘s thought the prime minister
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will try to persuade tory brexiteers and democratic unionist mps to back her by promising to find a solution around the northern ireland backstop. let‘s just remind ourselves exaclty what the so—called backstop is all about. after brexit, the two parts of ireland could be in different customs and regulatory regimes, meaning goods may need to be checked at the border. neither the uk, eu or the irish government want that. so the backstop is a saftety net that only comes in to play should the uk and the eu fail to reach a trade deal once britian leaves the eu. all parties agree that a backstop is needed to maintain cross—border cooperation and protect the good friday peace agreement. and, as it stands, the backstop means northern ireland would stay aligned to some rules of the eu single market, but only if another solution cannot be found by the end of the transition period in december 2020. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is with me now.
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it was supposed to be plan b today, but it sounds remarkably like she‘s carrying on exactly as she was before. i think what we will get is very largely a restatement of what mrs may has said many times before which is she thinks her deal is the most viable and the most likely way of getting some sort of agreement with the eu, albeit, as we know, it was overwhelmingly rejected by the house of commons just a week ago and thinking of many conservatives seems to be that she needs to rework the backstop in some sort of way that can get tory brexiteers and the dup on board and then the hope is you can take that back to brussels and say to the eu, look, you are going to have to move on the backstop, otherwise we‘re not going to be able to get this through. so far, the eu have been pretty clear that they are not for reopening the withdrawal agreement. we had that letterfrom donald tusk and jean—claude juncker
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before the vote in which they pretty much said they would try their best but cannot give a legally binding guarantee. in the meantime, those talks between opposition politicians and mrs may and people like michael gove and david liddington are still going on. downing street are now saying do not give up on them. we would like them to work. in fact, we would like them to work. in fact, we would quite like jeremy would like them to work. in fact, we would quite likejeremy corbyn to join in the talks. i think realistically the likelihood of them providing any sort of breakthrough is pretty limited given that mrs may has ruled out their key demands of delayed to brexit, a customs union and the people‘s vote and you got the sense is listening to some of the sense is listening to some of the people, mps, who are meeting david liddington this morning when they arrived, anna sibley and also sarah woolston sounded pretty sceptical. the cabinet's now got to stand up, especially the sensible people in cabinet, accept the reality of the situation.
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this was the biggest defeat of any government ever last week and it's as if nothing has happened and i'm afraid plan b looksjust like plan a and that's not good enough and it's time now for members of parliament to stand up for the country's interest. that's the thing that motivates us is putting our country before party and before anything else. it's all about the national interest. one more question. sarah can take that. we very much hope so. i think to ignore it a defeat of 230 votes and to continue as if nothing has changed would be a huge mistake and an even greater mistake would be to see us fall out on the 29th of march for which we are totally unprepared without giving the people a final say. so, i wouldn‘t expect much to move today in terms of the government‘s position. that may happen when we get closer to the vote which would be until next tuesday. in the meantime, cabinet ministers have
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basically been rallying round, exulting tory mps to get on board, so exulting tory mps to get on board, so this was penny mordaunt leaving home this morning. i think what everyone needs to do is do what brexiteers and remainers in the country are doing, which is that they all know that they have to honour the result and we're going to leave the eu, we have to deliver brexit and i'd like us to leave with a deal and if we want to leave with a deal, it's the prime minister's deal. we've got to make that as best we can and parliament needs to come together and support it. i think the bulk of people in parliament want to leave with a deal and that's what we need to get down and do. thank you. that‘s what we keep hearing. they wa nt to that‘s what we keep hearing. they want to leave with a deal, they do not want is no deal but it is not clear what they want. various amendments are being put forward. just talk us through that. there are a whole host of amendments will will be put down to mrs may‘s motion which will be voted on next tuesday and basically you‘ve got everything you could think of. there will be an amendment on a so—called people‘s
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vote, an amendment also called citizen‘s assembly, this idea mooted by gordon brown of groups of voters trying to work out what to do next. there will be an indicative vote and motion which would say let‘s look at all the different options and see what mps really like and then there are going to be other proposals rejecting no deal altogether and move to change way parliament runs its affairs in order to try to allow mps to table their own brexit legislation, is basically you‘ve got a heinz 57 variety of different options which points to the fact that there is no agreement between mps and mps opposed to mrs may‘s deal are all over the place. there is no consensus deal are all over the place. there is no consensus among deal are all over the place. there is no consensus among them and actually that may be mrs may‘s strongest card, the fact that her opponents, as of yet, do not have a coherent and collective position. thank you very much, norman. this morning, the prime minister of new zealand, who‘s due to meet theresa may in downing street tonight, has told us that a no—deal brexit
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would, in her words, be very, very difficult especially for small businesses in the uk. speaking to my colleague victoria derbyshire, jacinda ardern restated her belief that new zealand is ready to do a free trade deal as soon as the uk leaves the eu, but there are concerns too. it would impact on just about everybody, business in particular, particularly small businesses. and whilst absolutely the decision over whether to leave or remain is a matter for the people, i will be very open that a no—deal scenario would be very, very difficult, but i sense that everyone is of that view. let me bring in shailish vara, a former northern ireland minister who actually resigned over the backstop because he was not happy the withdrawal agreement would leave the uk in halfway house outside the eu. welcome. what you think should
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happen? i think it's important we have resolution as far as the backstop is concerned because the current position is that it is an ending and that cannot be right because already france has made clear that they will not allow us to leave the backstop unless the french fishermen have access to our coastal waters. pedro sanchez of spain, the prime minister, has said he would wa nt prime minister, has said he would want resolution on spain. we cannot be in want resolution on spain. we cannot beina want resolution on spain. we cannot be in a position where we are caught ina be in a position where we are caught in a backstop from which we cannot leave unless we have met the demands of the eu. that is not the way to negotiate a free trade agreement. was movement could there possibly be on the backstop? ireland has made it absolutely clear that it would not accept any movement on the backstop. we have to remember that this is a two—way negotiation and every time the other side says they are not going to move, that does not say that we have to move and to accommodate them. i'm sorry, but the factor in this is the fact that the good friday agreement has got no ha rd good friday agreement has got no hard border in it and that is why this is such a thorny issue that has
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been there for so long. any talk of making revisions to the good friday agreement is pie in the sky because that would take a huge amount of work, both within northern ireland and all the different groups there, as well as working with ireland, so that really is not a runner, but what they do need to remember is that we are talking about the united kingdom‘s interest here. we are not simply hear about the interests of the eu or ireland and it cannot be right that we would be left in a situation where we cannot unilaterally be. all we want, myself and others who share my view, is the rightful united kingdom to be able to leave the customs union unilaterally or they can put in an end state. out in the uk doodad intact without there being a hard border with northern ireland which then impacts potentially on peace in northern ireland ? then impacts potentially on peace in northern ireland? there is not going to bea northern ireland? there is not going to be a hard border. the prime minister has said she is not putting up minister has said she is not putting up of structures on the border, the taoiseach has said he‘s not putting
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anything on the eu has said that they are not putting anything up. this is being used by other parties for their own objectives. the reality is, and i was the northern ireland minister, and the reality is that there will not be any physical infrastructure put up there. we need to recognise that and we need to see loud and clear we will be putting anything up on the border. and others do, that is for them. how can you say there will be no hard border. if we left and we were not in the customs union, how would there be no hard border? technology can do things. it has been ruled out. i do not understand why, we have online applications which are being done regularly by all kinds of people. we are approaching the deadline for tax purposes where people are submitting their tax returns online. we are talking about physical things being traded across the border. physicaltrade, if you are an exporter in northern ireland, you can inform customs online that he will be exporting excludes
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answers on saturday. you think we are allarguing answers on saturday. you think we are all arguing over something bogus? the recipient in ireland can also go online and say that he or she is receiving those goods. it is possible if there is the political will. shailish vara, thank you very much. that is one of the issues that has been bedevilling the negotiations and it is the aspect now that theresa may says she will be trying to get some reassurance over the backstop position in the withdrawal agreement to try to get the dup on boys and also the brexiteers on board with her withdrawal agreement and if that we re withdrawal agreement and if that were the case, she would potentially, or she is hoping, she will get enough support to get her agreement through but it was voted on as she lost that vote by 230 volts. the consensus in parliament seems to be there is no support for no deal, but we do not know what there is support for. frank field is an mp hoping to shed some light on
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that. you have an amendment that would allow mps to vote on a range of options. explain how your suggestion would work. the prime minister says she is reaching out to mps. this is an opportunity for us to reach out to her, for us to test thatis to reach out to her, for us to test that is a big assumption put forward that is a big assumption put forward that there is no agreement in parliament for anything and therefore an amendment is ready to go down as soon therefore an amendment is ready to go down as soon as therefore an amendment is ready to go down as soon as the prime minister's motion goes down because an amendment cows minister's motion goes down because an amendment cows go down until we have the government motion down which lists practically, if not all, and other people can add if they think it is incomplete, a list of the main options facing the country. soldiers rattle through them if you can for soldiers rattle through them if you canfor us, soldiers rattle through them if you can for us, what are the options that you are looking at? the main lines will be no crashing out, another one will be a norway agreement, another one will be a canada agreement, another would be
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how to make progress on northern ireland and sold the list goes on and if people feel that their particular views are not covered, they will ashley be able to add the amendments and might read today for the prime minister when she takes questions, we have had hundreds upon hundreds upon hundreds of hours of debate. why can't we now, instead of doing another week's debates, go and vote? we will scrutinise all those options and just a moment, but we arejust going to options and just a moment, but we are just going to say goodbye to viewers watching is on bbc two. stay with us on the bbc news channel where we will continue this conversation. for now, goodbye. 0k, sorry about that. not at all. going back to the options that you are talking about, do you have a sense of what there is a majority for in parliament? there seems to be a suggestion by some that there would bea suggestion by some that there would be a majority for a norway stal brexit. we are hearing about people
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saying why we can't have and other says his theresa may has one. one option is to have another referendum. i do not think parliament would want that because we are showing that we are not really very good as a parliamentary syste m really very good as a parliamentary system to adopt a decision of a referendum which parliament doesn't actually approve of in the first place, but it is on the less... hang on, are you saying that the downside of going to the country again is because it makes parliament to look bad? i'm not worried about parliament is looking bad. that's the last thing. i am worried about it being bad and therefore one of the options is a second vote, a people's vote and therefore it is on there. idid people's vote and therefore it is on there. i did not favour it, but it is in the amendments because i think parliament should actually be able to save whether they think this is a way forward or not, just like no deal, just like norway, just like canada, a revised theresa may deal
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in respect northern ireland, they are listed there. what none of us have been able to do is see whether our colleagues together have got a majority view all one, two or three of the options. of course, a second referendum is labour‘s policy, actually, because the policy was let‘s go for a general election and if that doesn‘t work then we will go for a second referendum. well, there was a vote of no—confidence in the government and it fell. is it time now for your party leadership to say it is time to call for a second referendum? it's not, sadly, my party's leadership because they chucked me out of the party. all, of course. i think it is time for all of us to get real. i am moving this amendments because we may get an option which i do not favour. i am worried that brexit will be stolen from us, but if it is, we will get, if we take this amendments, we will know who is doing what in the open
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rather than now people are trying to manoeuvre around to wreak the way the house of commons work so they can get their particular view over. most of that changing of our procedure is about how to defeat brexit. so if you had a magic wand and you could have exactly what you wa nt and you could have exactly what you want in terms of brexit right now, what would it be? it would be the theresa may agreement is going on is a canada agreement, but if i had the magic wand, i wouldn't use it on that, i would use it over the prime minister to say the house, the country does not need another week's debate. we have had a by week upon week upon week. why can't we actually now get down and vote on all these amendments, reach out to you and tell us what we would support. thank you very much. later on today at 2:30pm, we‘ll be putting your questions to experts on what happens next in terms of theresa may‘s brexit deal. from today, millions of eu citizens living in the uk will be asked to apply for a new legal status, allowing them to stay after brexit. if they don‘t they ultimately risk deportation. it costs £65 for adults to register online
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for "settled status". to be eligible to apply, you have to have lived in the uk continuously for at least the last five years. eu citizens who‘ve been here for less than that can apply for "pre—settled" status, until they‘re eligible for full settlement rights. the rules do not apply to people from ireland. the government says the system will be easy and straightfoward, but critics are warning that any mistakes could lead to thousands being left without legal status. graham satchell‘s been to meet two families who have made their homes in britain. our daughter helene was born 19 weeks ago. it‘s been quite a change in our lives, but we‘re really enjoying it. my name isjoanna reumerman, and i‘ve lived in the uk for eight years. eu citizens and their families will need to apply to the eu settlement scheme continue living in the uk after 31 december 2020. so what do i think about it? i‘m not necessarily offended by it or upset by it. i think that, one way or another, people will have to register that they are eu nationals, as there is no longer free movement of people. we'll have to pay for you to stay here. personally, i do feel the country should be able to determine who comes here and who doesn't, and for that to happen
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you need to register. yeah, i'm not offended by this, at all. if i‘m brutally honest, i hope brexit will not happen, and that we don‘t have to apply for a settled status at all, and just continue with our lives as they are. my name is george kontakos. i've been running the olive grove restaurant in cambridge for the past six years, and i've been here 16 years. at this moment, we've put all our plans on hold. we don't know what the future will be. we're just a little bit stressed to see what's going to happen with our settlement status. my name is fancesca kontakos. i was born in the united kingdom, and i‘ve been married to george for ten years. i‘m fortunate to be british and have been born here. george is not so fortunate, however, and doesn‘t hold a british citizenship, because being a european was just as good as. but now we‘re a little bit worried
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about what the future holds for us and holds for our family. so we need to think of some ideas, some art ideas... what guarantees do we have that a future government mightjust scrap our settled status applications, and make us illegal citizens in this country? it makes me feel scared, and anxious, and worried about my future, not just in england, but as a person in the world. it‘s this insecurity that i feel from my country that is worrying me. because i think that the country that i‘m living in, if they don‘t want my husband here, then there‘s no place for me here. my husband is my family, my husband is my life, and i will follow him anywhere he goes. and if he‘s not welcomed in my country, then my country‘s no longer my country. stay with us here in westminster.
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that would be talking in just a little while with the cbi, confederation of british industry, on what exactly they want to see happen to provide assurance for british business. for now, back to the studio. the headlines on bbc news: the prime minister will tell mp‘s how she hopes to break the brexit deadlock in a few hours‘ time. millions of eu citizens living in the uk can apply for settled status from today. it allows them to continue living and working here after brexit. the government is planning to change the law to stop people accused of domestic abuse from cross—examining their victims in the family court. sport now, here‘sjohn watson. good morning. serena williams is through to the quarter finals at the australian 0pen but it wasn‘t a straightforward start against simona halep. the announcer introduced the world number one —
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serena‘s title for so long — and she, headphones on, mind on other matters, took to the court. but she had to go back because it was her opponent, simona halep, who is actually world number one. serena won it in three sets to keep alive her hopes of matching marageret court‘s record of 2a grand slam singles titles. alex zverev had been tipped to win his first slam in melbourne, but that wait goes on as he first lost his cool and then the match to milos raonic. his racquet got the blame for his poorform. he only won one game in the first set and smashed his racquet to pieces during the second set, which he also lost 6—1. the third went to a tie—break, raonic won that to wrap it up in straight sets. yeah, made me feel better. i was very angry, so i let my anger out.
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have you smashed your racquets in the past? have you never watched my matches? you should watch my matches. we‘re expecting a major protest at bolton tonight, ahead of their game against west bromwich albion. fans are unhappy with the way the club is being run. bolton have struggled with financial problems this season and they‘re second from bottom in the championship. england‘s cricketers are preparing for the first test against west indies which starts on wednesday, but their selectors will have had half an eye on the big bash league in australia. jofra archer, who will qualify for england this year, took two wickets for hobart hurricanes as they beat adelaide strikers. he was born in the caribbean but says he wants to play for england. quarterback tom brady has lived up to his reputation as the greatest player in nfl history, making it to an unprecedented ninth super bowl.
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he threw a crucial touchdown pass for the new england patriots in their 37—31 victory over kansas city chiefs. with rex burkhead scoring the winning touchdown in overtime. the patriots are through to the super bowl for the third year in a row. and they‘ll face the los angeles rams, who also needed overtime that 57—yard field goal i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. thanks, john. let‘s return to our top story — the brexit discussions in parliament joanna gosling is at westminster. so far, the most vocal voices are
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here behind the outside parliament whether demonstrators are out in force again on both sides. the brexiteers and remainers all shouting to try to be heard by the politicians who will, of course, be going into that building later did you from theresa may. she will be addressing mps at 3:30pm. when she lost the vote in the commons by 230 votes against withdrawal agreement, the next step was supposed to be coming back today with a plan b, something that would change the dynamic, but as things stand, she is coming back today with the same plan in place and trying to reassure those who are opposed to her deal and unhappy with the backstop element of it, that is the issue relating to the northern ireland border, that she would go back to brussels and try to get some sort of movement on that to try to win the support of some mps for her agreement. let‘s talk about what business wants to happen. with me now isjosh hardie deputy director general of the cbi. what would you like to happen today?
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the really pressing and urgent thing is the vast majority of businesses are completely united. no deal would be dreadfulfor are completely united. no deal would be dreadful for the uk. are completely united. no deal would be dreadfulfor the uk. billions of pounds are being wasted already for contingency planning is, firms are starting to relocate abroad and where it actually happen, the disruption, whether at ports, services, hundreds of broadcasters no longer able to show their programmes across europe, the disruption would be huge and then there is the long—term damage to the uk competitiveness. it has to be avoided. the only way to avoid it is to find a deal and that is where parliament coming, so what business are hoping for and waiting with bated breath is to see does the prime minister offer a genuine olive branch across parliament? where is the majority? what is the type of deal that actually we could get agreement on and negotiate? if it is the prime minister seymore of the same, i‘m going to try harder on the backstop, that will cause real problems for business. what with
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businesslike? i think we‘ve seen previously that 18% of your business is voted for remained at about 80%. are they now accepting it will be leave but with an agreement like a norway style agreement going forward ? norway style agreement going forward? for business, this ceased to be about to leave remain a very long time ago. this became how do we protect and grow the uk economy? how can we have a deal? we don‘t want to be too specific about models, but frictionless trades, regulations or services can survive, access to the skills we need to grow, those kind of principles need to be in place. it is up to parliament now to find what model can get through with those fundamentals, because if not, we will suffer the consequences. doesn‘t love that effectively... i mean, it would mean freedom of movement, membership of the customs union, the sorts of things that people actually voted against when they voted to leave. to take those
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two exa m ples, they voted to leave. to take those two examples, it does not mean freedom of movement. there are lots of ways to have a controlled immigration method. the white paper the government has put out has too higha the government has put out has too high a wage cap, but there are ways of using immigration to support our economy. 0n the customs union, we have been very clear, a customs union can work for business. care we provide a way of delivering frictionless trade and gales with the rest of the world? it looks difficult. that is the option, isn't it? if we cannot get both, we will have two pick one of them. the benefits of a customs union outweigh the trade agreements because we do not need that to get new trade deals. it is no longer up to business, it is now to parliamentarians. thank you very much. we will be here for the rest of the day with plenty more reaction to all the latest development. right now, let‘s have a look at the weather. not quite as cold as it was
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here. yes, you are one of the lucky ones there, seeing sunshine. across much of the uk now, the cloud is starting to pile in. if rusty start this morning. early brightness but then this frontal system is going to make quite a grey afternoon especially the further west you set. chile as well. top temperatures five or six. a tricky as the frontal system sta rts a tricky as the frontal system starts to put in. quite squally winds with heavy rain, some snow across the pennines, also feeding in later on to scotland and northern ireland. behind this system, temperatures will tumble once again but then we have wet surfaces with their on tuesday so i could bejust about anywhere. a mixture of rain, sleet and snow to clear the south—east on tuesday and a wintry showers falling on behind for scotland, northern ireland, across northern ireland estate like england and wales. migrating eastwards. a
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mixture of rain, sleet and snow by the time they get into east anglia and the south—east but definitely a wintry feel to our weather and of course it remains cold. hello this is bbc newsroom live with carrie gracie. the headlines: theresa may returns to parliament this afternoon to try to win support for her brexit plan — but brexiteers in her own party are sceptical. most likely is no deal, the second most likely is a re—done deal, third is delay, and fourth, a long way behind, is not leaving at all. millions of eu citizens living in the uk can apply for ‘settled status‘ from today — it allows them to continue living and working here after brexit. the government is planning to change the law to give domestic abuse victims more protection. a teenager has appeared in court charged with the murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie in east
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london earlier this month. and early this morning, sky watchers witnessed a rare total lunar eclipse, as the super blood wolf moon turned red. let‘s return to our top story — the brexit discussions in parliament — my colleaguejoanna gosling is at westminster. thank you, carry. some of the loudest voices here in westminster are so loudest voices here in westminster are so far today are right behind me outside the houses of parliament, where as ever, there are people on both sides of the debate, but the shouting to have their message heard. they are wanting to get through to the mps who will be yet again in the building behind us later, listening to theresa may as she outlines where she thinks things
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should go from here. to be honest, it doesn‘t sound like she has shifted her position so far, because her withdrawal agreement was voted down by 230 votes in the commons. after that, there was an expectation ofa after that, there was an expectation of a plan b, after that, there was an expectation ofa plan b, but it after that, there was an expectation of a plan b, but it seems like she is sticking with her withdrawal plan and saying that she would like to see what she can do on the backstop, to see whether that can win any more support for higher going forward. with me now are katy balls, deputy political editor of the spectator and seb payne, political leader writer financial times. welcome, both of you. is that a fair assessment? i think once again, we are standing here, and nothing has changed in this process. after that thumping defeat last week, theresa may has been trying to reach out to other parties and find some consensus. but it really looks like an exercise in futility, engagingwiththose talks—a no axe really where she
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engagingwiththose talks—a no axe really - where she is them. it is essentially back to a, j, .!,‘,!!,7, a, 7', , ans, wu , rflj, a, j the old a, j, .!,‘,!!,,, ,, 7', , ,‘,!, ,,-, , rflj, a, j the old plan, to a, j, .!,‘,!!,,, ,, 7', , ,‘,!, ,,-, , rflj, a, j the oand an, to ‘oxmu, ,,,, ,, ,, a, j, .!,‘,!!,,, ,, 7', , ,‘,!, ,,-, , rflj, a, j the oand an, them ‘oxmu, ,,,, ,, ,, a, j, .!,‘,!!,,, ,, 7', , ,‘,!, ,,-, , rflj, a, j theoandan, them ‘oashe ,,,, ,, ,, party and get them onside. but she has to get. mps, so there is no é of opinion is changing. has sign of opinion is changing. has there been a reaching out process? it sounds like everybody doesn‘t like the intransigence, but our position is right, so we won‘t budge. theresa may has been going through the motions on this, as i have lots of mps. everyone can agree it is the time for compromise, but nobody wants to be the one to coppermine is. there are some calculations as to why we expect theresa may to push for concessions on the backstop and get tory votes and the dup. that is prodded because from those chats —— partly because from those chats —— partly because from those chats —— partly because from those chats, she wouldn't have the numbers on the customs union, because corbynism playing ball, the labour leader hasn't wanted to play —— meet with her. because jeremy corbyn. he would probably lose some
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tory votes if you go to a permanent customs union, because it means no free trade deals. the question is a feasible reach. we have various amendments being laid, that is not going to happen until tomorrow, the amendments, the situation with those will become clear. some are saying that some amendments are constitutionally dangerous, because they would concentrate so much power in the hands of mps against the government. there are various problems between the mps. between yvette cooper and dominic grieve. they are putting forward these proposals which will essentially ta ke proposals which will essentially take power away from the government, away from theresa may, and to parliament to allow them to decide what happens next. a lot of brexiteers are sceptical, because they see it as a way of tried to stop brexit. those laying the amendments are saying they are trying to stop a no—deal brexit, because less we forget, the longer
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we go on without a deal, the more likely a no—deal brexit comes. jeremy corbyn has said to theresa may, you have to take a no—deal brexit off the table. nobody knows how that will happen and less durable and to suspend article 50, which i‘m sure she is not willing to. her chief aim which i‘m sure she is not willing to. her chiefaim is which i‘m sure she is not willing to. her chief aim is to win round the brexiteers. they will want to push ahead with brexit and keep no deal on the table. we will see how the commons feels this afternoon when it meets and listens to the prime minister, but there is no basis that these plans will work. the next crucial date is next tuesday when the voting will start again and we will see a theresa may has any plan b, whether these plans will come to any fruition. let's play our favourite game of the moment, where do you think things will go? at the moment, theresa may is pushing for a concession that she has been pushing for some time, and has been pushing for some time, and has made little headway on. in a way, by saying she will look for backstop concessions, she is kicking
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the canada on the road. there are figures that because the defeat was —— defeat was so large, it sends the opposite message to brussels. they don't need to offer concessions, because the only way to route is a soft brexit. it is unlikely that theresa may's plan will work. is her plan be a no deal? not necessarily. if you follow through the consequences of the concessions, you may get the concession. if not, therefore a soft brexit, tried to bridge for no deal, or go for a general election, so that you can get something through the commons. all three are very unappealing to the prime minister. but i wonder if the prime minister. but i wonder if the latter, an early election, is starting to look more likely. what do you think? i think this is increasing all the time. the issue is parliament to arithmetic, and you change that by going to the country. you have to get a lot of conservative mps to vote for the
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election, not many tories want an election, not many tories want an election, because they may not win that. but i think her plan b is her plan a that. but i think her plan b is her plana and that. but i think her plan b is her plan a and her plan c is no deal. the main thing is to repackage radio and make it more appealing. there area and make it more appealing. there are a lot of brexiteers who are looking for a ladder to climb down. they have had their say, but they don‘t want to risk no—deal brexit. i‘m not sure they want all the consequences of this. if she can get something, if you believe, from brussels, but will give them some reassu ra nces brussels, but will give them some reassurances on the backstop, i still think we could end up with theresa may‘s deal eventually passing. the clock is ticking, we will have to keep watching and waiting. thank you forjoining us. this morning the prime minister of new zealand, who we‘ve just seen arriving at downing street to meet theresa may, told the bbc that a no—deal brexit would be "very difficult". butjacinda ardern added that her country was ready to negotiate a free trade agreement with the uk once it had left the eu. here she is, speaking to my colleague victoria derbyshire, about why she‘s in the london,
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and what she thinks of brexit. new zealand which is currently negotiating a free trade agreement with the eu, it is an opportunity for me to stop in london, and obviously a very unsettled period of time, to say our relationship is deep and long, it is notjust economic. but obviously it is an important trading partnerfor us, at the point that the uk is ready to do so we are very keen to enter into a free trade agreement. we are ready and willing and i think you are an excellent attentional future partner for that. why is that important? exports from new zealand to this country, about 3%, 4%, pretty small. for us you are still a significant trading partnerfor us, representing roughly $5 billion worth of trade, that is significant for a small trading nation like ours. and so we would consider it to be a real priority for us. and for the uk in terms of the advantage of an agreement with us, we are a reliable partner, we have negotiated a number of free trade agreements.
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we negotiate high—quality agreements, we are focused on good labour environmental standards, so i think we would be able to create a gold standard for what future free—trade agreements with the uk could look like. presumably, it is more of a priority for your country to get a free trade deal with the eu with their massive market of 500 million? that is obviously still significant for us but for us it is notjust the size, it is the quality of these agreements. our people to people ties are so important. i used to live here for several years. i‘ve got a niece and nephew who were born here. there are 60,000 new zealanders here at any given time. i don‘t underestimate. it is notjust about our economic ties and goods and services, it is the fact this is a relationship that is deep and important to us. you described it as an unsettled time here. that is potentially an understatement. theresa may is having a very difficult time trying to come up with a deal to leave
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the eu that is popular with mps in this country is one prime minister observing another, what do you think of the way she is handling things? the last thing i ever do is dish out advice or commentary on other people‘s politics. it‘s a difficult game. i know from certainly where i am you often don‘t know or don‘t see some of the extra layers behind—the—scenes. she is a woman of remarkable resilience. i have admiration for a number of politicians for what they have to navigate, and this is one of those situations. what i can speak to, is back in new zealand we have a different political situation, we run like germany, i have a government that has a full majority out of three parties, so what i‘m used to is we have constantly been negotiating and forming compromise and dialogue with other parties. do you worry about the prospect of this country leaving
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the eu without a deal? could that impact on new zealand? absolutely. it would impact on just about everybody, business in particular. it would be particularly smaller businesses. whilst, absolutely, the decision over whether to leave or remain is a matterfor the people, i will be very open that a no—deal scenario would be very, very difficult. but i sense that everyone is of that view. 555 that 55 5 that 5555.5. butter. 55 5 that 5555.5. 551 that 5555.5. iti5: uk i—— iti5: - aigitit5“. 551 that 5555.5. iti5 uk i55 iti5 eu. i aigitit5“. 551 that 5555.5. the uk leave the eu, what ter. likely benefits . the new economy exporting to the uk under world trade organisation harris? your goods would become more expensive? i wouldn't make any assumptions before we have any
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ability to move into a negotiation. 0ur ability to move into a negotiation. our goal is to make markets more accessible for new zealand products, by removing the barriers. i wouldn‘t say it‘s a natural by—product. for us, it is about... we are, mentally, i don‘t think the domestic market and producers of food and the uk need to be nervous about greater access for new zealand products, because seasonally, we are, and true. there is a nice synergy, when you‘re in winter, we are in summer. there are benefits between our markets having greater access to one another. for us as well, we like to add particular quality of our products. new zealand lamb, we have a particular lan product that is high ina a particular lan product that is high in a it is been likened to eating fish. we try and create a proposition that can differentiate from product you might already be able to access. for us, it isn‘t simply about increasing that trading relationship, for the benefit of
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british consumers, too, because we are free range, we don‘t like to use hormones. we are environmentally sustainable, and all the better if you are able to access them. the polish foreign minister has been speaking with his irish counterpart about the possibility of time at limiting the backstop for the irish border, as a means of unblocking the negotiations. he. been he in brussels he has in brussels he has i that idea and hunt, and he affairs and jeremy hunt, and he thinks it will be a solution, he thinks it will be a solution, he thinks it will be a solution, he thinks it should be discussed but it may not be feasible if ireland is ready to put forward such a proposal, but i have the impression that it might unlock the he was asked, did they negotiations. he was asked, did they react in a positive way? org negotiations. he was asked, did they react in a positive way? or 5555 it: quickly as an idea? the disappear quickly as an idea? the polish foreign minister says, i discussed the issue in december during my visit, at that time, there was an expectation that parliament
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would expect the deal. now i are in a different side. that is something to watch for. let‘s have a look behind me, because as ever, there are people on both sides of the debate out in force behind me and those they those they the those that a second referendum would say that a second referendum would absolutely go against what people clearly said in the first. there will be much more coverage here throughout the day, ben brown will be here at 1pm with the very latest. theresa may is back in the commons at 3:30pm. have a lovely afternoon. there is breaking news in northern ireland, there is a security alert in londonderry, after reports of a van being hijacked by three masked men. we will keep you updated on that. police are continuing to question four men in connection
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with a car bomb attack in londonderry on saturday night. no—one was hurt in the explosion. officers say they believe a dissident republican group, the new ira, was responsible for the blast, but the investigation is ongoing. let‘s get more on this now from dr mareesa mcglinchey, assistant professor at coventry university and an expert in dissident irish republicanism. thank you forjoining us. can you tell us more about this group? the new ira were formed in 2012, and they came about as an amalgamation between the real ira, independence, and republican action against drugs. they share an ideology with cereal, which is believed to be their political wing. it is difficult to gauge membership, but we know that the first i dash in the canal court
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in newry was attended by approximately 200—300 people. many people will be concerned about the bomb blast on saturday night. what do you think the capabilities of this group are. it is difficult to gauge numbers, but what we do know is that the psn ice into sticks show low level but sustained activity, such as the new ira. we can gauge activity through the ammunition caesar‘s, arrest the seizures, and the number of prisoners that are in the number of prisoners that are in the prisons. we can see sustained activity, but it is occasional rather than higher level. there is no evidence to suggest there is any excavation of a campaign. psni, the police service of northern ireland, let‘s turn to the politics of it, there is a huge focus on the irish border, given the brexit negotiations at the moment. do you think any of this is related? brexit
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will be seen as an opportunity by so—called dissident republicans. it is related in the sense that they have come out and said in some of the groups, such as patron of republican sinn fein, said this is the biggest opportunity they have had since 1916, and the chairperson, davyjordan, in 2017, told the party that it was an opportunity to be seized. brexit has catapulted the issue of the irish border back into the mainstream in a way it hasn‘t beenin the mainstream in a way it hasn‘t been in recent years. republicans such as david jordan have been very prominent in saying that this is an opportunity to promote their campaign and potentially escalated. you are an expert on many dissident groups, can you tell us briefly how the new ira sit together with other groups and whether you see which other groups we should be aware of? the so—called dissident republican constituency is very divided. the new ira came about after a sustained
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calls for republican unity. that is what led to the formation of the organisation. it is the same with the other dissident group in 2610. the wider republican base is divided with no signs of organisations coming together, because there is clear tactical and ideological water between them. the main groups are republican sinn fein, 32 county sovereignty amongst others, they are collected —— connected to the real ira. as well as a significant number of independence was not a survey of the dissident constituency shows that in actualfact, the dissident constituency shows that in actual fact, support for armed actions at present is minimal. thank you forjoining us. an 18 year old man has appeared at thames magistrates court charged with the murder of 1a year old jaden moodie in east london earlier this month. 0ur correspondent, daniela relph, gave us this update from outside the court. this with the first court appearance
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for the 18—year—old. he faced two charges here today, one, the murder ofjaden moodie, charges here today, one, the murder of jaden moodie,14 charges here today, one, the murder ofjaden moodie,14 years old, on the 8th of january this year, and a second charge, possession of a bladed weapon in a public place. that public place was in leyton, where jaden moodie was killed. no details of the actual case represented in court today, this was just a basic magistrate hearing. but the 18—year—old answered a number of question, he confirmed his name and date of birth, he was born in august, 2000. he confirmed an address in wembley in north london, he was also asked his nationality, to which he replied, he was british. he has now been remanded in custody and will appear again he has now been remanded in custody and willappearagain in he has now been remanded in custody and will appear again in court on wednesday, but this time, at the old bailey. a man who was carrying a machete on board a train in essex has been arrested.
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police found the 15 inch blade after a stop and search operation on a greater anglia service between colchester and witham on sunday night. the man arrested is from london and remains in police custody. the government will today publish what it calls a ‘landmark‘ domestic abuse bill which it says will strengthen penalties for perpetrators and better protect victims. it means for the first time abusers will be banned from cross—examining their victims in the family court. frankie mccamley reports. sarah, not her real name, survived years of domestic abuse. he would control the finances, so comment on what i spent, how much i spent, ask me why i spent something, so ijust stopped. if i was going out with my friends, he‘d comment on the outfits — it was too short, i looked too fat. but when she had to fight to keep the child she had with him, she had to face her abuser in family court, where he was allowed to cross—examine her. it re—traumatises you. you believe them more than yourself, because they‘re allowed to tell you how to think,
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and he was allowed to tell me how to think for three years. so, by allowing him to cross—examine me in court for three hours, it took me back to a place i thought i‘d have got away from. the cross—examination by a perpetrator is just one practice the government wants to abolish as it launches its draft domestic abuse bill. the proposed legislation would include a new definition of domestic abuse, including economical abuse, by controlling things like finances and preventing someone from going to work, a domestic commissioner, and domestic abuse protection orders putting restrictions on offenders. polygraphs will also be piloted on perpetrators who are a high risk of reoffending, to check they haven‘t broken their conditions of parole. but with no new money backing the proposals, some charities are only cautiously welcoming the bill. what we‘d really like to see is embedded specialist domestic abuse workers in the nhs, better co—ordination between the court systems, so that they‘re speaking to each other and understanding the risk
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to various family members. we‘d like to see really great training around relationships and sex education, and we want to see a cross—government strategy on perpetrators of abuse which goes even further than what we‘ve heard today. the bill for england and wales will now be scrutinised by parliament. it follows new scottish domestic abuse legislation introduced last year focusing on controlling behaviour. a proposed law in northern ireland has been put on hold until stormont assembly reconvenes. some customers are being charged hundreds of pounds in illegal card fees, a year after surcharges were banned. eelze 1525: 153555, [iii-3; £3115, .,. . .., traders are being warned they could end up in court jonathan gibson reports. call time on card fees.
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£30.50. what‘s the 50 for? card fee. but this mobile drinks company in blackpool is still adding them to the price. i thought those fees had been banned, mate. no, it‘s all on the website, mate. but it‘s now stopped trading. at this chinese takeaway near exeter, paying with a card can also mean paying extra. there is an extra charge. it‘s now scrapped the fees. sylvia is a trading standards officer. if you have to pay more because you are paying by credit card, then you would have to pay if you are paying by cash, then it breaches the rules. there are some exceptions. corporate credit cards aren‘t included in the band, but it‘s clear some traders don‘t know what is. this london chain of letting agents believes it can charge a card fee on some payments, because they are exempt. it's only on rent and bits and pieces like that. but they are not. it‘s now suspended the charges. david cox, who represents letting agents admits there is confusion. every few months, there
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is a new law coming out. agents are missing some, they are just not getting to grips fast enough with the speed of legislative change. concern shared by the wider business community. i think it's understandable that there are going to be some small businesses that just aren't across the details on this. there are a lot of different rules in their that haven't been particularly well explained. but it‘s costing consumers dear. at this second—hand car dealer near birmingham... what did you say the surcharge was? 396. the dealer‘s card surcharge adds more than £140 to the price. hi, mate, i‘m wondering if you can help me... and at the university of hull, some students who paid for their tuition fees with a credit card have been charged £185 more than everyone else. the university says it was a genuine mistake and has refunded thousands of pounds. as for the other businesses features, well their customers, too, could be entitled to a refund.
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as is anyone who‘s paid a card fees since the law changed a year ago. whether that‘s 50p or hundreds of pounds. you can see that story in full on bbc inside out west midlands at 730 tonight on bbc one, and on iplayer. many skywatchers have been up all night to catch a glimpse of what some are calling a "super blood wolf moon" — a total lunar eclipse, where the earth passes precisely between the sun and the moon — turning the moon red. some of those who were lucky enough to avoid the cloud overnight have shared pictures. the south coast of england was a good place to be — this close up comes from eastbourne this amazing time—lapse sequence was taken from gosport in hampshire. but there were glimpses further north too — this from wakefield in west yorkshire.
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this slightly spooky photo was captured in swansea in south wales. and finally in eastern england this misty glimpse through the trees was taken in lincolnshire. in a moment it‘s time for the one o‘clock news with ben brown, but first it‘s time for a look at the weather with susan powell. the chill is set to continue this week, gloomy skies across the uk first thing on monday, one or two areas stuck with some thick fog, too. not everywhere, in the far south—east, there was some decent sunshine. if anything, tomorrow will be the sunshine that winds out. we will get a similarly chilly start to what we have had today. the biggest risk first thing tomorrow will be stretches of ice. so how will this all come about? at the moment, we have a weather system trying to push in from the west, that is causing the cloud to thicken and eventually, it will sweep through a weather front, some rain, and wind that this
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evening. also, some snow in scotland and the pennines. as the weather front pushes its use words, we could see heavy rain, across the south—east of england, it looks a tiny bit milder here, but you can see that behind the front, the temperatures tumble, wet ground will bring some widespread icy stretches first thing on tuesday. a difficult mixture of rain, sleet and snow in the south—east. behind a weather front, in the cold air, it is snow showers for tuesday. into scotland and northern ireland, especially the north—west of england and north wales through the morning, but as the day pans out, the wind could push a few of them further eastwards. in the afternoon, the midlands could see some wintry flurries, east anglia, maybe the south—east. as likely to be wet snow here. further north, a covering possible just about anywhere. we see the showers and another cold there, highs of four or 5 degrees. a cold night will follow, into a cold day
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on wednesday. plenty of frost around this week. the one change will come for friday, when will see something a little milder arriving from the west. it will be temporarily, we will have the colder regime for the weekend. here is wednesday, a lot of sunshine on offer, a few wintry showers. some wintry showers again on the cards for scotland and northern ireland. temperatures struggling at three or 4 degrees. the outlook for thursday is similar, but something a little milder into the west with more cloud and a milder day on friday. brace yourself for more cold come the weekend. the prime minister will tell mps this afternoon how she intends to break the brexit deadlock. it follows the overwhelming rejection of her deal last week. now, some mps are trying to delay brexit and rule out a no deal scenario — others want to leave without a deal. most likely is no deal. the second most likely is a redone deal.
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third is delay. and fourth, a long way behind, is not leaving at all. from today, millions of eu citizens in the uk can apply for settled status, allowing them to live and work here after brexit. government sources say the prime minister has now abandoned attempts to secure a cross—party consensus on brexit — we‘ll have the latest from here and from brussels. and the other main stories this lunchtime:
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