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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 22, 2019 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

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v - . . . it's11am and these are the main stories this morning: which disappeared last'nig h‘fiwefi the english channel. it that the aircraft but we are a search if a searc itf z, ”if" ' ' ' a see sea. fr“; ”if" , , , mps put forward proposals to change theresa may's brexit deal, whether to hold another referendum on its final plan. the number of people in work in the uk has reached a record high. é campaign. lééfi [if eéflé fifi? of disabled people a crime is backed by mps after more than 220,000 people sign a petition. and police hunt for a builder
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who drove a digger through a newly built hotel in liverpool, leaving a trail of devastation. gondstnomingwmwxwwf , ,,- fears are growing far’anargenfine; which has disappeared on a flight between france and cardiff. cardiff city say they're concerned that 28—year—old emiliano sala, whom they'd signed from the fench club nantes, was on a flight which went missing off alderney in the channel islands last night. searches resumed this morning for the piper malibu aircraft, which lost contact with aircraft control at over 2000 feet. let's go to our reporter in
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guernsey. tell us the latest on the search. ok, the latest, as you heard from captain david barker, is that there are only of vessels out searching for this aircraft at the moment. the s searching for this aircraft at the moment. the 5 search plane is out of the helicopter has just gone over oui’ the helicopter has just gone over our shoulder towards alderney, where the plane is believed to have come down, have alljoined the search now. the reports came in around 20 past eight yesterday, when the aircraft lost contact with radar. according to captain david parker, the harbour master of guernsey, he is not sure whether this means exactly the plane has crashed. there was no distress call. it was simply lost from radar and communications. it is possible that the aircraft has diverted somewhere else. but we are continuing a search if in the
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unfortunate event it has actually ditched into the sea. how worrying is this? it has been more than 12 hours since you heard anything from this plane. the weather conditions are better now but the sea water is not very warm. i am imagining that people in a light aircraft would not be wearing warm clothing. and so it is concerning because if they are in the water, their chances of survival are diminishing all the time. the search will continue today around the lighthouse, the lifeboat will be searching alongside a french coastguard helicopter and the channel islands are search and rescue aircraft and alongside the alderney lifeboat and the guernsey lifeboat as well. as we heard from the harbour master and the head of channel islands a search, the conditions are not as bad as they we re conditions are not as bad as they were last night but they are
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incredibly cold and the water is especially cold. it is a worrying time for those looking for possibly emiliano sala. how wide is the search area and have they given any indication as to how long the search might go on? they have not given any indication as to how long the search may go on. it started at around nine o'clock yesterday when the air search will report —— deployed. the area they have to search is very large. with the amount of helicopters and lifeboats that are in the area, they are managing to cover quite a large area but at the moment, it is very unclear how long it is going to go on for. we are told we will get an update from the guernsey coast guard at around 2:30pm. conditions, obviously, it looks very calm where you are now. tell us a bit more about the latest on the conditions around the search area. while comic additions last
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night, the waves were around one and a half metres tall, it was very tough for any vessels on the ground tough for any vessels on the ground to search around that area. that is why the —— they called off the search last night. there is good visibility from the air search. according to people i have heard from in research, they are having a lot of trouble finding anyone in life jackets, any debrief, they are hoping to get some kind of evidence $0011. hoping to get some kind of evidence soon. thank you for updating us with the latest live from guernsey. theresa may is currently meeting her cabinet, as mps step up their efforts to influence the brexit process ahead of a vote on a modified version of her brexit withdrawal plan next tuesday.?a number of amendments have been put forward, including an official labour party amendment which says mps should be able to vote on options such as the party's preferred outcome of a closer relationship with europe, with a
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permanent customs union. it also asks mps to decide whether they should hold a further referendum on whatever brexit plan is approved by the house of commons. an amendment from labour politician yvette cooper aimed at preventing a no deal brexit has the backing of remainer conservative mps. it directs the prime minister to seek a deadline extension if a brexit deal is not agreed by 26 february. yesterday, the prime minister told the commons she was focused on securing concessions from the eu on the plan to avoid a hard irish border. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith, is at westminster this morning. there are so many different efforts going on there, norman, to differing ends, some of them seem to overlap quite a lot. although lots of groups are putting forward different things, are you getting a sense of any consensus by reading between the
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lines on what is emerging? there are a couple of top lines, i guess, we get amongst the blizzard of amendments being put down. 0ne get amongst the blizzard of amendments being put down. one very obviously is the labour amendment with the possibility that there could be a vote in the commons if it was passed that could trigger a referendum. there are conflicting views about that. there are some people who think it is a major step forward , people who think it is a major step forward, others think it is a tiny little tiptoe designed to keep the labour party together and at the same time, there is a sort of cross— party same time, there is a sort of cross—party move to try and delay brexit to the end of the year, being promoted by yvette cooper. meanwhile, there are the threats we hear potential ministerial resignations if theresa may seeks to thwart efforts to take no deal off the table. amber rudd this morning pressing the prime minister to have a free vote. interesting listening to claire perry going into cabinet this morning, seeking to play down the possibility that theresa may
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could yet face resignations if she tries to rule out no deal. could yet face resignations if she tries to rule out no deallj could yet face resignations if she tries to rule out no deal. i think what we have to do is get together right across the house and right across the party and there is a venn diagram and in the middle is the magic numberof diagram and in the middle is the magic number of 326. anyone in that house who wants to avoid no deal as passionately as i do, wants to deliver brexit as much as i do and wa nt deliver brexit as much as i do and want to avoid a peoples referendum, which i think would be another extension of all of these really tough conversations, needs to come together and support the deal. realistically of those main proposals, the labour amendment, chances of getting through, probably limited because it is a jeremy corbyn amendment, so the tory party will probably vote against it. interesting to see whether yvette cooper manages to build a majority for her proposal because she has already got some heavyweight cross— party already got some heavyweight cross—party opinion behind it. key will be whether labour comes in
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behind it and jeremy corbyn has repeatedly said he wants to rule out ano repeatedly said he wants to rule out a no deal. this would seem to be a vehicle. what we did actually do? this is one of its supporters, former conservative cabinet minister nicky morgan, explaining. former conservative cabinet minister nicky morgan, explaininglj former conservative cabinet minister nicky morgan, explaining. i am working on a cross—party basis to put in place legislation to say if the gunmen could not get an agreement through the house of commons —— the government. we are suggesting until the end of 2019 and thatis suggesting until the end of 2019 and that is to give the government time to get an agreement, which most of us to get an agreement, which most of us would like to see or at least to put in place a proper agreement to put in place a proper agreement to put in place a proper agreement to put in —— deal with a no deal situation. the country is not ready to leave without a deal at the end of march. that is the yvette cooper amendment. what of thejeremy corbyn proposal and the ends that a possible second referendum was to mark do you think this is a big step byjeremy corbyn orjust a little
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tiptoe? i think it is a welcome step forward that i appreciate many colleagues in parliament want to make sure that we have exhausted every other option before we get to that stage, i think we will have that stage, i think we will have that discussion, it is clear the prime ministers not prepared to move her red lines and that would communal, be what is required to get to that stage. once we have exhausted that, i thinkjeremy will understand the vast majority of labour members and voters want to see as supporting a public vote on this. isn't it too late to be faffing around with maybe having an option and a think about it question mark you need to bite the bullet and back a second referendum if you are going to build up any momentum for it? my view is really will need to move it? my view is really will need to iti ove very it? my view is really will need to move very quickly towards having a referendum on this. i don't see there is anyway through this. when confronted with deadlock in parliament with a deal in front of us parliament with a deal in front of us which is far worse than the one we have now, it is only right that goes back to the people so they can decide how they want to proceed and lam decide how they want to proceed and i am confident that is where the
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labour party will finally get to. what has led to that confidence? jeremy corbyn has been extraordinary cautious when he has spoken about it. it is known he has a long—standing eurosceptic political background. his fear seems to be if he were to embrace a second referendum, you would risk losing seats like yours which are prominent leave supporting labour seats in the north. we must seek to do what is in the best interests of the committees we serve. my committee one piece of by leaving the european union on these terms. ijust can't in all conscience support that. labour is the party of working people and it will be in front —— upfront about that. what do you say to people in your sunderland constituency who may be say to you, look, we voted to leave, you are meant to represent us. leave, you are meant to represent us. i fully recognise that over six
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t percent of those who voted in and referendum in 2016 voted to leave andl referendum in 2016 voted to leave and i am having these conversations with my constituents all the time. we have a responsibility to be honest about the challenges before is. i don't think people will ultimately be angry if asked to decide on how they want to proceed. to those who voted leave and still feel it is the right choice, they will have that opportunity, but i am speaking to growing numbers of people who are worried and they want to have their chance to have a say oi'i to have their chance to have a say ona to have their chance to have a say on a decision that will shape the future of our country for such a long time. brexit is not going to be finished next week or at the end of march. it is going to last for at least the next decade and i think a lot of voters want us to focus on other issues like child poverty and tackling low pay. we cannot do that if we are in this impasse over brexit. thank you for your time. an interesting article in the daily telegraph this morning from the former tory leader william hague who again says he thinks a second referendum would be a disaster but
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interestingly, he now says with the deadlock in parliament and theresa may struggling to find a way forward , may struggling to find a way forward, it is to quote him highly likely. thank you very much. we will keep you updated on all the latest developments. we have some breaking out when i can use to bring you. a massive fine for mastercard from the commission. it is basically because mastercard has been found guilty of stopping shops from shopping around for better conditions offered by banks in other member states. i am going to show you an image that actually the eu commission have put out to explain what was going on. they are saying that shops were prevented from getting lower fees available in other countries. it is effectively about freedom of movement relief or shops to choose where they would process transactions. so you have got the
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shopping country and then it could potentially operate its transactions through a different country if it was going to get preferable terms there but the way mastercard was operating was to force shops to actually process those transactions through their own country, which could have been more expensive and for that, now mastercard, could have been more expensive and forthat, now mastercard, has could have been more expensive and for that, now mastercard, has been fined this, as i say, very high fine, 570 million euros. the background of this is that before december 2015, interchange fees vary considerably from one country to the nextin considerably from one country to the next in economic area. retailers in highfield country is could not benefit from lower fees offered by a
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bank in another member state. as a result of how mastercard were operating. it is, well, more than a big slap on the wrist for mastercard, this very large fine from the european commission. the number of people in work has reached a record high of 32.5 million, according to the office of national stastics. from september to november 2018 last year, we hear that 75.8% of people aged 16 to 64 were in paid work. that is the highest employment rate since records began in 1971. i think it is another excellent set of numbers, record—breaking employment in the country. we have more people in work than ever before and interestingly of the jobs that have been created in the last 12
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months, they have almost entirely be in full—time roles. you are also seeing wages at pace of inflation for the tenth month in a row and the fastest rate of a decade. all of this dance to the responsible pro—business policies followed by the conservative government. —— all of this thanks to. i'm joined now by our economics correpsondent, andrew verity, to find out more about the statistics. it is the same rosy pictures we have had for years. most months you see this fact that the number of people in employment have grown to a new record level, it is now 32.5 million people in work. a record number of people in work. a record number of people in full—time roles. but the question has been, while the workforce has been growing, and unemployment has been coming down, it is just unemployment has been coming down, it isjust 4%, unemployment has been coming down, it is just 4%, while that has been happening, people have not been really getting better off. if you look at the wages data that has come
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out, it shows what looks like a healthy pay rise but then you take into account inflation, it is more like 1%. that is good by the standards of recent years. over the last eight years we have had a squeeze on standards. but if you look at how it used to be before the financial crash, it is not very good in terms of real wage growth. 1% real wage growth takes us to around £484 per week. if you compare that with where we were in 2014, it is still a big improvement. but it is still a big improvement. but it is still about £20 less, the average wage, per week, than it was way back in 2007 and once upon a time, we would have said, it is great that unemployment is low but how can in each particularjob we are not getting better off? what about job vacancies? they are ata what about job vacancies? they are at a record. you have to be a little bit careful with the job vacancy numbers when comparing them with ten
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01’ numbers when comparing them with ten or 20 years ago because a lot of the jobs out there, they are advertised online, thejobs come jobs out there, they are advertised online, the jobs come and jobs out there, they are advertised online, thejobs come and go in a way they did not use too. nevertheless, a very tight labour market, as economists call it. the number ofjobs market, as economists call it. the number of jobs available for market, as economists call it. the number ofjobs available for people to do our very high. and unemployment is low. 0n to do our very high. and unemployment is low. on most economic theories, that should mean that workers have greater bargaining power, it is less easy for an employer to say, you want a pay rise? we will let you go. it is more likely to be higher pay rises and the theory is therefore a rises edge and companies charge higher prices to cover their costs. the bank of england will be looking carefully to see if that is the case. but until now, that fear has proved totally unjustified. we have not had that and wages have grown but not in an inflationary way. do you know the sectors those job vacancies are in? they are all over, essentially. we
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are not necessarily talking about part—time work or zero—hours contracts. we are talking about full—time roles being generated. no sign of brexit induced uncertainty putting employers off but baring mind, the decisions to hire people in september, october, november, which is what we are looking at here, were taken back in the summer. this does not necessarily mean employers are shrugging off for the brexit related uncertainty we have seen brexit related uncertainty we have seenin brexit related uncertainty we have seen in the last few weeks. the headlines on bbc news: cardiff city football club say there is genuine concern that their new signing, emiliano sala, was on a light aircraft that disappeared last night over the english channel. theresa may will meet her cabinet today as mps put forward alternative brexit plans, including a labour amendment giving parliament the option to vote on another referendum on its final proposal. the number of people in work in the uk has reached a record high. and in sport, as we havejust been
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hearing, a dark day for cardiff city. we will have more for reports as it emerges that their striker emiliano sala was on a flight that went missing over the enlist channel last night. two days after beating roger federer, stefanos tsitsipas has done it again. he is into the semifinals of the australian open. and the two—time wimbledon champion petra kvitova has won in the women's singles. i will be back with all of the stories just after half past 11. let's return to the fears growing for an argentine footballer and the pilot of a plane which has disappeared on a flight between france and cardiff. cardiff city say they're concerned that 28 year old emiliano sala, whom they'd signed from the fench club nantes,
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was on a flight which went missing off the channel islands last night. guernsey police said "no trace" of the missing aircraft had been found. searches resumed this morning for the piper malibu aircraft which lost contact with aircraft control at over 2000 feet. let's now go to our reporter paul heaney, who is outside cardiff city's stadium. it is just it isjust a it is just a case of watching and waiting at the moment but how are people reacting there? yes, reports but no confirmation as yet this morning that emily and rossello was one of two people on that plane which was expected to leave france yesterday evening —— emiliano sala. it lost contact at around half past eight yesterday evening. cardiff city today obviously voicing serious concern that the player they had only just concern that the player they had onlyjust signed concern that the player they had only just signed on concern that the player they had onlyjust signed on saturday for a clu b onlyjust signed on saturday for a club record fee was on board. they are concerned. there are no
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confirmed reports at the moment but we understand from weather forecast is that conditions were not out of the ordinary when the plane took off from france last night. but after it lost co nta ct from france last night. but after it lost contact on a search and rescue operation was launched and the weather did deteriorate. that operation has resumed early this morning. guernsey police as you say saying that there are several aircraft and a lifeboat involved in that search today but as yet, no plane has been found. we are just hearing that the french aviation authority and french police are confirming that emiliano sala was on that flight. air traffic controllers looking for that plane that has disappeared after travelling from france to cardiff. that is just confirmed, that france is civilised —— aviation authority concerning
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emiliano sala was on board that plane that has gone missing, went missing just after eight o'clock last night, disappeared off the radar and there is of course that search under way now for any sign of it. tell us more about the man, the player. the 28-year-old argentine striker playing very well in france are possibly top league at the moment. the perfect playerfor cardiff. there was a great deal of anticipation from the club. they we re anticipation from the club. they were really looking forward to him joining up with the club in south wales this week to try and boost their survival hopes in the premier league. as you say, perhaps their worst fears confirmed now if that is the case. people will be trying not tojump to the case. people will be trying not to jump to conclusions this morning but perhaps fearing the worst and it also appears to be the case. there will be a great sadness here at the
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clu b will be a great sadness here at the club but also throughout the tens of thousands of fans in cardiff that their dream striker really who was due tojoin the their dream striker really who was due to join the club this week appears to have been on board this flight appears to have been on board this flight which the search and rescue effort for is still ongoing, we understand. just to confirm, there is confirmation that emiliano sala was on board that small passenger plane that has gone missing on its way from france to cardiff. the civil aviation authority saying he was on the plane. no sign of it. and the search continues for any sign of that plane that has gone missing. easyjet says the disruption caused by drone sightings at gatwick airport last month, cost it £15 million. it paid out £10 million in customer welfare costs and said it had lost £5 million of revenues due to flight cancellations. easyjet said the incident affected around 82,000 customers and led to more than 400 flights being cancelled. football superstar cristiano ronaldo has cut a deal with a court in madrid over tax evasion charges, accepting an 18.8 million euro fine.
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a huge media presence met the player outside the court, after a judge refused his request to appear by video or to enter the building by car to avoid the spotlight. the deal, agreed in advance, includes a 23—month jail sentence, but in spain, convicts do not usually do time for sentences under two years. some of the ceremonial guardians of the tower of london, the beefeaters, will go on strike for the first time in more than half a century today, in a dispute over pensions. he industrial action comes after a new proposal for changes to their pension schemes was rejected by the gmb union. historic royal palaces say they do not expect the strike to have a significant impact on operations. with me now is our news correspondent kathryn stanczyszyn, who's at the tower of london. tell us more about this dispute.
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well, as you say, the first time in 55 years that beefeaters and other staff of their like have been on strike, showing the strength of feeling really over this issue. you can see there is a picket line outside the tower of london. there isa similarline outside the tower of london. there is a similar line outside hampton court palace. no doubt been using some of the many tourists that will be visiting these very popular attractions today. why are they doing this? it is a row over pensions. they were balloted last november after historic royal palaces said they wanted to change the final salary pension scheme. for some people, the gmb union say that they were promised that would not happen. the company was privatised in the 19905 and they were told they would keep that final pension scheme. now it appears that is not the case and that is why they have gone on strike. they balloted and the significant result was to walk out. it was meant to happen a little earlier this month but talks were ongoing and we know that last week
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there was a revised offer but it was not good enough. hence today's action. hrp say that they are making the5e action. hrp say that they are making these changes because it was fairer for the entire workforce. they are going to put more money into other people5 pen5ions, they also say the 0ffaly back with last week was very generous and that they won't change their minds. neverthele55, generous and that they won't change their minds. nevertheless, these picket line5 their minds. nevertheless, these picket lines will be in place until 4pm today and these gmb members say they will keep going. they are so distinctive, the beefeaters, tourists love to take photos of them. we all know what they look like. don't really know much about them, the role and how you become one. fill u5 them, the role and how you become one. fill us in on some of the detail. well, of course, they are extremely emblematic at the tourist attraction, very famous tourist attractions. they are the ceremonial guardians of her maje5tie5 palaces.
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we are talking hampton court, kensington and the tower of london. they are in trust for the next monarch basically. but the company managing them has —— it is then the staff have the issuer. 0ut managing them has —— it is then the staff have the issuer. out of the staff, may be around six or seven beefeaters, but many other staff are involved. as you can see, they are not in the uniforms on the picket line today. but they are as i say very iconic images, so quite a lot of interest in this. they are beefeaters behind you, out of uniform? i don't think she heard me. are they? sorry, i struggle to hear you. ijust got it. yes, there are some beefeaters on both of these
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picket lines but as i say, there is a lot of other staff involved as well. we are talking about people that helped run ticket offices and people involved in the maintenance of these buildings. thank you very much. now some astonishing pictures from merseyside where police are appealing for information after a builder drover a mini digger throught the doors of a brand new travelodge in liverpool yesterday evening. 0nlookers shouted at the driver to stop as the machine mounted the hotel steps, sending debris flying as it crashed through the doors. it's been reported that the driver was involved in a pay dispute with contractors. one man was treated for eye irritation from exposure to diesel, but none else was injured. now it's time for a look at the weather. we have got a real wintry feel to
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the weather at the moment. quite a few showers making their way in, giving us some snow. that is the scene from this morning just outside huddersfield. a lot of the snow falling over higher ground but even down to lower levels with heavier showers, you are likely to see some snow falling across parts of wales, the midlands, northwestern englund and epping to scotland and northern ireland. those showers making their some sunny ireland. those showers making their some sunny spells in between. through this evening, as temperatures fall away quite sharply, there is the risk of ice. those wintry showers continuing in northern ireland, north—west england, wales and the midlands. temperatures getting down to around -10 temperatures getting down to around —10 minus five celsius. a cold, frosty, potentially start to the day on wednesday. a dry day in prospect. some sunshine around as well. equally some wintry showers continuing. hello, this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines — fears grow for new cardiff city footballer, emiliano sala, and a pilot who were on a light aircraft which disappeared last night over the english channel. it is possible that the aircraft has diverted somewhere else, but we are continuing a search if in the unfortunate event it has actually ditched into the sea. mp5 put forward rival proposals they hope will change the outcome of brexit, ahead of another vote on theresa may's deal next week. the number of people in work in the uk has reached a record high. a campaign led by katie price — to make the online abuse of disabled people a crime — is backed by mp5 after more than 220,000 people sign a petition. and police hunt for a builder who drove a digger through a
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newly built hotel in liverpool, leaving a trail of devastation. time for the sport news now. we start with the breaking news this morning where reports have emerged that cardiff city's new striker emiliano sala was on board a light aircraft that went missing across the english channel last night. he was travelling from ligue 1 side nantes, due to train with his new club today. our sports news correspondent david 0rnsteinjoins me now. lots of news has come in from the french aviation authority, from various celsius, and various details have been confirmed, and some have not. —— devious details have been confirmed.
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our sports news correspondent david 0rnsteinjoins me now. this is such a tragic story. what has been confirmed ? this is such a tragic story. what has been confirmed? potentially very sad news coming from cardiff city, from nantes, and reports on in the coming from france, the french civil aviation authority have confirmed that emiliano sala was on board this aircraft with one another individual, who of course we believe to be the pilot. this was a piper malibu, a single engine aircraft, and departed nantes for cardiff at serve last night. it was travelling around 5000 feet when it contacted the jersey air—traffic control, requesting to descend. the jersey coastguard received an alert from the air traffic control at 20.23, so thatis the air traffic control at 20.23, so that is the time at which was pretty
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much lost, around 15 kilometres north of guernsey in the channel islands. it's disappeared from the radar near a lighthouse which is infamous among mariners, the site of many shipwrecks. we have had some information from the coastguard telling us about searches that have been going on involving aircraft, helicopters, lifeboats as well. and also from the met office saying that the weather at the time was not particularly concerning. so we are missing some details at the moment and is very concerning. eddie tragic indeed. he had just signed, and is very concerning. eddie tragic indeed. he hadjust signed, he and is very concerning. eddie tragic indeed. he had just signed, he was certainly a very exciting prospect for cardiff city and was due to sign today. yes, £50 million, a club record transfer. he had played at ba rd ot record transfer. he had played at bardot and then nantes, one of the top scorers and then nantes, one of
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the top scorers in france this season. his most recent tweet was saying goodbye to his team—mates at nantes. we await details but it seems to be very tragic. it does. thank you forjoining us. it seems that men's tennis has a new star in greece's stefanos tsitsipas. he followed up his win over roger federer by beating spain's roberto bautista agut in four sets at the australian open, to reach his first grand slam semi—final. tsitsipas is the youngest player to reach the last four in a grand slam since novak djokovic 12 years ago. i knew that the win against federer was important and played a huge role in my image and who i am. but i knew the biggest challenge was the match today, i can prove myself once again. and two—time wimbledon champion petra kvitova ended home hopes in the women's singles, as she beat ashleigh barty 6—1 6—4. she next plays unseeded
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american danielle collins in herfirst grand slam semi—final since being stabbed in a knife attack in 2016. that's all the sport for now. there's a new warning about the impact of climate change in one of the areas worst affected by global warming — the sahel — a region of africa that covers the gateways into the sahara desert. the international committee of the red cross believes that a changing climate, combined with islamic extremism and tribal conflict, is creating an explosive combination there. and it's a problem that could lead to more migration to the shores of europe, creating another humanitarian catastrophe. 0ur chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, travelled to mali. she begins in the town of menaka, rarely visited byjournalists, to see how climate change is impacting on daily life. the sahel, locked in a long war to hold back the desert. it is losing.
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and now, a new enemy. climate change threatening the world's most vulnerable lands. mali fights on many fronts. un forces are on the ground here. the world's most dangerous peacekeeping mission. often under attack by extremist groups including al qaeda and islamic state. this 63—year—old farmer has seen it all. a country of extremes now lurches from drought to floods. last summer there was more rain than anyone can remember. all his crops were washed away. his home, flooded with water. a mud home full of cracks after an explosion nearby. so what is the biggest enemy now? the conflict or the climate? translation: the conflict and the climate.
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everything is a problem here. mali has all the problems. and some families don't even have anything to eat. and for him, ten children to feed. life lived on the very edge. every generation more fragile than the last. these boys forced to join armed groups. now the centre provides a refuge. translation: my family fled the violence. i stayed behind to take care of our animals but there was no rain then. nothing for them to eat. the animals died one after the other. i had no choice but to join a group with guns. the desert has always dominated life here. people have learned to live with that. but the power of climate change is changing everything and making it much worse.
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poverty, extremism and the conflict over land and water, the need just to survive. today, a call for help from the desert in mali. tuareg musicians belt out a welcome to a visiting delegation. the president of the icrc here to focus on this fight. it has not been on our radar screen. 0ur natural genetics say we look at arms, armed actors, conflict, perhaps under development but we did not look at the natural environment. now we see that climate change is changing weather patterns and livelihoods of people and is leading to conflict amongst communities. so much has been lost. this is the grand mosque of timbuktu. the fabled city in the sand.
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centuries ago, a city of gold. a cultural capital. seven years ago, islamist fighters smashed many of its shrines. and this magnificent mud mosque is still imperilled. translation: this mosque was built in an arid area. it was not built to drain so much water. now there is more and more rain and wind threatening the site. so much to do. almost all malians live off this land. livestock as well. as temperatures rise, resources shrink and conflict grows as time runs out in this largely forgotten corner of our world. tech companies should use their own software to identify people at risk of suicide, block them from seeing harmful content, and offer help and advice.
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that call comes from the government's suicide prevention minister who says social media companies are exposing users, especially children, to graphic material about self harm. angus crawford reports. each year, more than 5,000 people take their own lives across the uk. among them, more than 200 children. though the total number of suicides is falling, some groups remain especially at risk. today, the government is setting out what it calls its first ever suicide prevention work plan. it aims to better understand the underlying causes of suicide, examine the effects of debt and gambling, focus on the role of social media. there's growing concern about harmful online content. powerful algorithms promote adverts or suggest new friends, but can also lead users to increasingly graphic content
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about self—harm and suicide. the government wants tech companies to alter their software. if there's evidence that some users are accessing material, which is about self—harm and how they can damage themselves, they have the ability of push them in a different direction, they can push them in a direction of support, they can push them to where they can actually seek help. but forcing tech companies to change won't be easy. after all, those same algorithms also drive profits. angus crawford, bbc news. and if you've been affected by anything you've heard in that story, you can get in touch with the bbc actionline — bbc.co.uk/actionline — or you can call 08000 934 999. lines are open 24 hours a day and free of charge. after a week of turmoil in zimbabwe, president emmerson
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mnangagwa has cut short a foreign trip and returned home. zimbabwe has seen days of violent protests over rising fuel prices — which ministers say have been used by opponents of the government to cause unrest. 0ur correspondent andrew harding is in zimbabwe. he was not going to back down, he said, we need to take tough measures, unpopular measures to fix the economy. what i think was most surprised and interesting was how tough he was on his own security forces. these are the men in the military, the police, that staged
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the coup that brought emmerson mnangagwa to power a year ago. he said that if they were going to use force, that would be a betrayal of the new zimbabwe. some are speculating that there are concerns behind the scenes of plots against the president, that perhaps a new coolers in the offing. but there's no sign of that, but it is an indication of the unpredictable nature of politics right now. —— a new coup. and the president was taking a bit risk threatening the security forces so publicly. in a moment, we'll have all the business news, but first, the headlines on bbc news. cardiff city football club say there is genuine concern that their new signing, emiliano sala, was on a light aircraft that disappeared last night over the english channel. a search is under way for the plane the channel. theresa may will meet her cabinet today as mp5 put forward alternative brexit plans, including a labour amendment giving parliament the option to vote on another referendum on its final proposal. mp5 have backed a campaign led by katie price to make the online abuse of disabled people a crime.
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—— a specific crime. in the business news — the drone chaos at gatwick airport before christmas cost easyjet around £15m. it paid out £10m in "customer welfare costs" and said it had lost £5m of revenues due to flight cancellations. the incident affected around 82,000 customers and led to more than 400 flights being cancelled. the unemployment rate fell to 4% between september and november, according to the latest official figures. the office for national statistics says the number of people in work reached a record high of 32.5 million. more on this in a moment. dixons carphone has reported a fall in mobile phone sales over the christmas trading period, as fewer people signed up to two—year contracts. the electrical goods retailer said sales of mobiles were down 7% in the three months to january. hello.
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the number of people in work in the uk has reached a record high of 32.54 million, according to the latest figures from the office of national statistics. the number of people out of work remained flat between september and november, with 1.37 million looking for work, despite the number of job vacancies at their joint highest level since 2001. average earnings excluding bonuses rose by 3.3% in the year to november, as wage rises continued to outpace inflation. we can talk to janet mui, global economist, at cazenove capital. this suggests there is no hesitation in hiring that we might have been led to believe that happen given the uncertainty of brexit, but funds are not being put off taking on new staff, have the? the latest report continues to suggest a surprisingly
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healthy job market in continues to suggest a surprisingly healthyjob market in the uk despite brexit uncertainty and slower growth in 2018. i think there are three main reasons for this, firstly, the firm's input is labour and capital. some of brexit uncertainty i think companies are mostly held back their investment over the last two years. i have had to retain our ad workers, which supports the job gains in the uk. secondly, ithink which supports the job gains in the uk. secondly, i think despite slower growth, there is an impact on the job market, so we're probably not seeing that impact yet. and thirdly, the reduction in migrants is probably having an impact as well. let's talk about earnings as well, because for a long time, we were very used to the fact that our earnings were not going up anywhere near as quickly as prizes in the shops, so in real terms, we were feeling worse off. that has now reversed entirely, hasn't it? yeah,
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on the real earnings front, it has actually reached 1.2%. that is because the headline uk inflation has fallen from the peak of 3.1% to 2.196. has fallen from the peak of 3.1% to 2.1%. and as you can see, wages are now at the highest in a decade, 3.3%, so in reality, i think that should ease the income squeeze that households have experienced over the past year. so i think that is definitely good news that should support household consumption. having said that, i think that is brexit uncertainty which will continue to have an impact on uk consumers. uk house prices has an effect on how consumers spend, and is seeing slower growth there as well. so a combination of factors,
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but you are right, the easing of income squeeze will be helpful.m isa income squeeze will be helpful.m is a funny concept, and we have a graphic and look at to the difference, why you can say that the end of their comedy gap is now opening up between what we are earning on average and what we have to spend on things like prices and inflation. if we have more money and our pockets as a result, are we likely to go and spend it? because even though we feel a bit better off, all of the uncertainty might mean that we do not put our hands on our pockets. and that will not be good for business. yes, that is true. you can see it in consumer surveys. they have a question asking about consumer intention particularly on big—ticket items such as cars and furniture. there we can see that consumer confidence on the spending intentions are rather pessimistic despite more money in the pocket. so definitely the brexit uncertainty is having an impact.
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good to talk to, thanks very much. that's all the business news. 0nline abuse of people with disabilities should be made a criminal offence, according to a new report by mp5. it follows a petition started by the television personality katie price, who has a disabled son. jon donnison reports. katie price's petition, submitted in 2017, attracted more than 220,000 signatures from people who agreed that the laws on online abuse of disabled people were not fit for purpose. it called for such abuse to be made a specific criminal offence, and fora be made a specific criminal offence, and for a register of offenders to be created. now a report from the petitions committee, made up from cross— party petitions committee, made up from cross—party mp5, has backed katie price's coal for the law to be changed. it isn't good enough, as we found, to simply say that what is
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illegal off—line is illegal online. we found that disabled people were often let down by the system when they tried to report abuse. and we recommend that in future, targeting someone because recommend that in future, targeting someone because of their disability should be put on a par with somebody because of their race. the committee, which took evidence from google, twitter and facebook, says self—regulation of social media has failed disabled people, and says too many have been driven of social media whilst their abusers had remained unchecked. here are some of the tweets harvey price has received.. this is a tweet addressed to katie — "i've got some sweets for harvey here, i hope he chokes on them. another — "why does harvey price look like a member of the ira?" and here is a tweet from a now suspended twitter account created just to post memes and abuse aimed at harvey.
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let's talk now to andie gbedemah from dimensions, a learning disability and autism support charity. thank you forjoining us. you have been involved in giving evidence to this committee yourself. tell us more about what you have seen of what some people are on the receiving end of online.|j what some people are on the receiving end of online. i gave evidence on behalf of my organisation, dimensions, who support adults with learning disabilities. and a lot of people we re disabilities. and a lot of people were telling us that they felt massively excluded from the digital spacejust massively excluded from the digital space just because it is an unsafe space just because it is an unsafe space for them on at the account of the abuse they received. people are particularly worried about grooming, we spoke to people who have had money taken from them and been exploited, they have had people perceived up inappropriate relationships with them. and ——
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proceeded inappropriate relationships. 0ne gentleman told me that he uses online dating platforms, and on several occasions when he has revealed that he has an a learning disability on these platforms, he has immediately received horrible abuse. under existing legislation, anybody who is doing something which is a hate crime can be prosecuted. so could be prosecuted over some of this stuff, and actually, if disability is an aggravating factor, can get a stronger sentence. so why the push for a specific crime unless? there are several problems with legislation at the moment. it is quite fragmented across online and off—line spaces, which makes it hard for people to understand their rights. there is also a different legislative scheme for disability as opposed to some other strands of hate crime, such as race and religion. that led campaigners to feel that there is a hierarchy of hate and a lack of hierarchy between
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disability and other types of hate crime. and finally, the perceived vulnerability of a disabled victim will very often be the focus of how a crime is investigated, prosecuted, and then sentence. without much consideration of whether that perpetrator is hostile and acting prejudicially towards the victim. that leaves victims of that sort of trying to let the hate element has easily been acknowledged. he said that a lot of the disabled people you know feel excluded from social media because of what they can be on the receiving end of. —— you said. an actress, who is disabled and has appeared in an advertising campaign, said that she is shocked at the amount of abuse she received online because she had not actually been subjected to that in the real world. do you think people are more likely to face this sort of thing online than the real world, and if so, why?
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i think that the rta is that people with disabilities experience hostility both online and off—line, and one of the really important recommendations on the report is understanding the relationship between online and off—line. so we know that people with learning disabilities can find it very difficult to form relationships and friendships, there is a lot of stigma against them in the off—line world, which perhaps leads them to explore the online world, trying to find those friendships there, where there is still a lot of hostility, and they can encounter a lot of problems. so mps have come up with various recommendations, they want the government and social media companies to directly consult disabled people on digital strategy and hate crime law. they also said is important to look at the experience that disabled people having reporting trends and giving evidence because they are too often not taken seriously because people dealing with them to not understand
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disability. they also want a proportionate representation of disabled people in government advertising. to those kind of dart how far do the school in dealing with the issues you are talking about? they are all very important. we have to have a process of tackling the stigma that disabled people experience. when they report crime, it is really that disabled people are taken seriously. last year, dimensions ran a training programme training over 1000 police officers in sally training officers around this sort of thing, which has been very important in helping them understand the experience of victims. but fundamentally, we need a change in legislation, and the government has asked the law commission to look at hate crime legislation over the coming year, and really hope these recommendations from the committee today will feed into that. andie gbedemah, and for coming in. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather forecast.
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store has been falling across mainly northern and western parts of the uk this morning. —— snow. snow has been following around the glasgow area, around the pennines, greater manchester, through the hills of wales at the moment as well. so even down to lower levels, there is some snow. the majority of the edgy militants low over the higher ground, —— accumulating snow. showers moving gradually slipped through the rest of today. some sunshine ahead of that other sunshine ahead of that other sunshine developing behind those shall assess the middle east. a chilly day, maximum temperatures get up chilly day, maximum temperatures get up to about six celsius. through this evening's rush—hour, showers will continue. most of the snow following the higher ground, but there could be a covering down to
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lower levels. that could cause some problems around the central belt, western scotland, northern ireland. moving into parts of yorkshire, the midlands, east anglia and the south—east of england, and those heavier showers, there will even be some snow falling down to low levels. that will coincide with the evening rush hour across central and eastern parts, so with that, the risk of some nice. wintry conditions to come, if you're travelling through this evening, icy stretches and some snow in places as well. through the rest of the night, those showers will continue for a time. clear skies for many others, temperatures falling away quite sharply, and the risk of ice continuing as we go through the night and into wednesday morning. the blue yeah, quite a widespread frosts developing, temperatures down to minus five celsius or even lower in some rural areas. wednesday morning starting off on a frosty and
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i see not, showers through northern ireland, wales, and eastern areas of england. for many tomorrow, a drier day, bright with some sunshine, and maximum temperatures around three to five celsius. thursday, some sunny spells again, but pretty chilly. friday, less cold air moving in from the atlantic which will bring a lot of cloud, perhaps some rain. temper just starting to reach about nine or 10 celsius by the end of the week. watch out for the rest of today if you're travelling with those wintry showers. you're watching bbc newsroom live.
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these are today's main stories: fears grow for new cardiff city footballer, emiliano sala, and a pilot who were on a light aircraft, which disappeared last night over the english channel. it is possible that the aircraft has diverted somewhere else, but we are continuing a search if in the unfortunate event it has actually ditched into the sea. mps put forward rival proposals they hope will change the outcome of brexit, ahead of another vote on theresa may's deal next week. the number of people in work in the uk has reached a record high. a campaign led by katie price to make the online abuse of disabled people a crime is backed by mps after more than 220,000 people sign a petition. and police hunt for a builder who drove a digger through a newly built hotel in liverpool, leaving a trail of devastation. good morning.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. we are expecting an update shortly from the guernsey coast guard on the search for an argentine footballer and his pilot after their plane disappeared on a flight between france and cardiff. cardiff city say they're concerned that 28—year—old emiliano sala, whom they'd signed from the french club nantes, was on a flight which went missing off the channel islands last night. guernsey police said no trace of the missing aircraft had been found. searches resumed this morning for the piper malibu aircraft, which lost contact with aircraft control at over 2,000 feet. 0ur reporterjohn fernandez is in guernsey now with the latest.
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what is the latest? at the moment, a number of search vessels are out searching the area around this point, known for its strong current. there are a number of shipwrecks in the area. it is quite a dangerous area for boats. 0ut searching the area for boats. 0ut searching the area at the moment are the air search, the plain comedy helicopter and the alderley lifeboat alongside the guernsey at the moment, they are not sure where about this plane may have gone down. the harbour master says there is every chance the plane may not
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have crashed. there was no distress call, it was simply lost from radar and communications. it is possible that the aircraft has diverted somewhere else. we are continuing a search within the unfortunate event it has ditched into the sea. how worrying as this, it is more than 12 hours since you have heard anything from this plane? the weather conditions are better now but the sea water is not very warm. iam now but the sea water is not very warm. i am imagining that people in a light aircraft would not be wearing particularly warm clothing and so it is concerning because if they are in the water, then their chances of survival are diminishing all the time. now, the plane lost contact with radar at around 20 past eight last night, off the north of alderley. the search to start last night that
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the conditions on the sea around the area we re the conditions on the sea around the area were quite high, the waves were around a metre and a half tall. boats were in a bit of trouble having any kind of visibility. the air search vessel which we have just seen air search vessel which we have just seen going back to guernsey airport to refuel has had a bit more success with visibility but they say so far according to their chief officer john fitzgerald, they have not been able to see anything so far. we are expecting an update from the coast guard? tell us what you are waiting for. yes, i for. yes, lam for. yes, i am going to be going straight after this at 12:30pm to get an update from the coastguard. we are not sure what he is going to say but he was clear earlier that as much as the search area is very large, they are struggling to find any debris, any kinds of signs. they are just waiting on this update at the moment. we will you back to you for
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any updates later. thank you very much. theresa may is currently meeting her cabinet, as mp5 step up their efforts to influence the brexit process ahead of a vote on a modified version of her brexit withdrawal plan next tuesday. a number of amendments have been put forward, including an official labour party amendment, which says mps should be able to vote on options such as the party's preferred outcome of a closer relationship with europe, with a permanent customs union. it also asks mps to decide whether they should hold a further referendum on whatever brexit plan is approved by the house of commons. an amendment from labour politician yvette cooper aimed at preventing a no deal brexit has the backing of remainer conservative mps. it directs the prime minister to seek a deadline extension if a brexit deal is not agreed by 26 february. yesterday, the prime minister told the commons she was focused on securing concessions from the eu on the plan to avoid a hard irish border. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith, is at westminster this morning. norman, just talk us through the
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process. there are lots of amendments, including interestingly one officially from the labour party. will they all get voted on? what is the process? is there any indication which one is kind of galvanising most support? the truth is we don't know because at the end of the date will be up to the speaker to decide which amendments he is going to take. what is true is we have a blizzard of amendments piling in now, just one day after theresa may came back with a sort of plan a revisit, she said she was going to go back to brussels and trying to get them to give ground on the backstop. the two most interesting amendments, one is a cross— party interesting amendments, one is a cross—party move which seeks to get theresa may to shell brexit day until the end of the year and the
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other is the labour party amendment. the reason that is getting interest is not because it will get passed, it is almost certainly not going to, but what it tells us about whether labour is gradually, slowly, slowly, slowly, moving towards backing another referendum because it suggests that the labour party would be ok if there was a vote in parliament and look at the option of having another referendum. some in the people's vote campaign think this is much ado about nothing. something it is a very significant move. 0ne something it is a very significant move. one of those who thinksjeremy corbyn is now moving towards backing another referendum is the labour mp bridget philipson. i think it is a welcome step in the right direction. it is not take us to exactly where i want to be but it is part of the process that will get us to that point. i think it is right that we argue the labour case for what we want to see but ijust
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the basis of theresa may is statement yesterday and everything that has gone before, i cannot imagine that we are going to see a significant reopening of the options that are available. she is unwilling to budge on her red lines, in which case, i think our position then inexorably takes us to supporting a public vote. just as some in labour are hoping jeremy corbyn is inching towards backing another referendum, some are hoping the opposite funnels. hoping the opposite 0ne backing another referendum, some are hoping the opposite one of those is with me now. does this indicate another step in jeremy corbyn with me now. does this indicate another step injeremy corbyn slow step in again a people sold?|j another step injeremy corbyn slow step in again a people sold? i would not go that far. it is broadly of —— reflective of the decision made by the labour party conference. it is not really making a huge number of commitments at this stage. for those people who do of course support another bite of the cherry, they
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will think that this opens up the doorto will think that this opens up the door to allow them to get a second referendum. but we have seen jeremy corbyn over the summer it seems gradually being led by some of the seniorfigures in his shadow cabinet to start talking about the referendum, now we have a motion explicitly stating it as an option. it is the direction of travel that seems to be towards another referendum. there has certainly been a lot of noise around the second round for random. people are looking for anyway out of the mess we are in at the moment. and this is an option they don't want to lose. but for me, ifi they don't want to lose. but for me, if i look at the options of a second referendum, whatever it is called, and what that actually offers, i think that there are a lot of people pinning an awful author hopes on setting that is not guaranteed, there is no definite outcome from this and there is a huge process to go through before you even get to that stage. if jeremy corbyn did
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back another referendum, where would that leave people like you? back another referendum, where would that leave people like you ?m back another referendum, where would that leave people like you? it is not something i could support. i don't think it reflects the campaign that we went out on in 2017 where we did say that we respected the outcome of the referendum and certainly not — — outcome of the referendum and certainly not —— what i have been saying to my constituents, that i do wa nt saying to my constituents, that i do want to see the best possible deal, one that does not do great damage to my constituency and my constituents. i think that we would need to think very, very carefully and that is why a wanted to explain things to my members. are you a loan voice in the party? how many labour mps would take a party? how many labour mps would takea similar party? how many labour mps would take a similar position?” party? how many labour mps would take a similar position? i think there are a number of my colleagues who share my view. that number is growing. i think as soon as you put your head above the parapet, which i happy to have done unintentionally, more people are contacting me uncertainly saying they share my view. thank you very much for your time.
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conflicting pressures onjeremy corbyn still over this brexit issue, and another referendum. the global credit—card giant mastercard has been fined 570 million euros by the european union. the company was said to hinder competition with banks offering cheaper payment fees. the competition comissioner said mastercard prevented merchants from shopping around for better conditions offered by banks — conditions offered by banks, which in turn raised the cost of card payments for both consumers and retailers. 0nline abuse of people with disabilities should be made a criminal offence, according to a new report by mps. it follows a petition started by the television personality katie price, who has a disabled son. jon donnison reports. katie price, whose16—year—old son, harvey, has a disability, says he's suffered a shocking level of abuse online. her petition, which was submitted in 2017, attracted more than 220,000 signatures from people who agreed that the laws on online abuse of disabled people were not fit for purpose. it called for such abuse to be made
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a specific criminal offence, and for a register of offenders to be created. now, a report from the petitions committee, which is made up of cross—party mps, has backed katie price's call for the law to be changed. it isn't good enough, as we found, to simply say that what is illegal off—line is illegal online. we found that disabled people were often let down by the system when they tried to report abuse, and we recommend that, in future, targeting someone because of their disability should be put on a par with targeting someone because of their race. the committee, which took evidence from google, twitter and facebook, says self—regulation of social media has failed disabled people, and says too many have been driven off social media, while their abusers have remained unchecked. jon donnison, bbc news. easyjet says the disruption
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caused by drone sightings at gatwick airport last month, cost it 15 million pounds. (00v) the airline paid out 10 million pounds in "customer the airline paid out 10 million pounds in "customer welfare costs" and lost 5 million pounds of revenues due to flight cancellations. easyjet said the incident affected around 82,000 customers and led to more than 400 flights being cancelled. (pres) the portuguese footballer, cristiano ronaldo, has received the portuguese footballer, cristiano ronaldo, has received a fine and suspended jail term for tax fraud in spain. a huge media presence met the player outside the court, after a judge refused his request to appear by video or to enter the building by car to avoid the spotlight. ronaldo, who now plays forjuventus in italy, will have to pay 16 a nd asbalf. millionfpoundsasepa el to settle his case, but is not expected to spend any time in prison. more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two.
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the headlines on bbc news: a search is underway in the english channel for a missing plane carrying cardiff city's newest signing, emiliano sala. theresa may is meeting her cabinet today as mp5 put forward alternative brexit plans. the number of people in work in the uk has reached a record high. as we have been hearing all morning, cardiff city stadium have genuine concerns over the whereabouts of their new striker emiliano sala, who is reported to be among the passengers on board a plane which has gone missing in the channel
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islands. there is flash photography coming up in the next set of pictures. he signed for cardiff for around £50 million on saturday. he was due to start his new career at the premier league club from today. helicopter and lifeboat crews have joined the search for the plane which disappeared last night. the french aviation authority say he was on board the plane. cardiff airport confirmed that a flight was due in but gave no further details. huddersfield town is new manager says he was presented, excuse me, he was presented to the media this morning. the new man says he is his own man. i have to do it my way and david did it his way. we should not compare us because it is not possible. the most important thing now is the club makes me proud and it is one of the reasons i signed
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here. men's tennis has a new star in stefa nos here. men's tennis has a new star in stefanos tsitsipas. he followed up his win over roger federer with another win in four sets at the australian open to reach his first grand slam semifinal. he is the youngest player to reach the last fourin youngest player to reach the last four ina youngest player to reach the last four in a grand slam since novak djokovic 12 years ago.” four in a grand slam since novak djokovic 12 years ago. i knew that win against roger federer was important and it played a huge role in my image and who i am. but i knew that the biggest challenge was today's match. i can prove myself once again. it is the former champion rafael next —— rafa nadal next. he thrashed tiafoe in straight sets. petra kvitova has reached the semifinals. that is all the sport for now.
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let's get more on our main news, the search for the aircraft of argentine striker emiliano sala. let's cross to our reporter paul heaney, who is outside cardiff city's stadium. we are expecting an update from the coast guard in the next ten minutes or so. tell us more about the been there. this player was signed under great excitement for the club. there was a real sense of anticipation that emiliano sala was going to be the club record signing and really make a difference. it was with great concern the club announced that they had a genuine concern that he was on board that aircraft and those concerns have been borne out
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obviously in the last hour or so with the aviation authority confirming he was one of two people on board that aircraft which was due to land in cardiff last night. we understand that conditions were not out of the ordinary in france last night when it took off but it appears to have lost contact with air traffic control at around half past eight yesterday evening. after that, a search and rescue mission was launched. but it was called off around 2am this morning because of poor weather conditions. that search resumed at eight this morning. and is ongoing. guernsey police say despite their best efforts, they have not yet found the plane. a real sense of sadness from the club and the fans today about what should have been a really exciting week for the fans and the club has now turned toa the fans and the club has now turned to a very sad day indeed. with me now is keith morgan, chair of the cardiff city supporters trust. thank
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you forjoining us. your reaction first of all to this news. one of great shock, really. really tragic news that a young, talented person appears to have lost his life, at such a young age. this was a real chance for cardiff to sign someone who was very highly rated, a club record transfer record.” who was very highly rated, a club record transfer record. i think the fans are recognising what is important. i have been a football fan all of my life. i have been a cardiff city fan all of my life. but for someone to lose their life is more important than football. you make a good point. this is a personal tragedy, notjust make a good point. this is a personal tragedy, not just about football. what have the fans been telling you so far today?” football. what have the fans been telling you so far today? i first heard the news at around nine o'clock and already i have had contact from fellow fans within the
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wider football community, expressing their sympathies and coming forward to say football is important in all of our lives but it is not that important, it just reinforces of our lives but it is not that important, itjust reinforces that message. we saw an outpouring of emotion with tragedy associated with leicester football club, not that long ago, and a massive response from fans in cardiff in that scenario. do you expect something similar now, even though none of the fa ns similar now, even though none of the fans will have seen him play for cardiff? that is the difficulty. although he has signed as a cardiff player, he has never played for cardiff city and tragically never willem nel. and it will be a very difficult one for the club —— never will now. all we can do at the moment is express our sympathies. when it is confirmed, i hope still that it when it is confirmed, i hope still thatitis when it is confirmed, i hope still that it is not confirmed, his death, and about our sympathies go with his family, his former playing colleagues and as a trust, we will
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be contacting the football club to see if there is anything we can do to assist them in managing the grief. thank you very much for your time this afternoon. i think keith summed it up rather appropriately. some things are bigger than football. there is interest in this because of the high—profile nature of one of the two people involved in that missing plane, clearly, the thoughts here, both the fans and the club, are with the other people affected here. we are expecting an update at around 12:30pm. a court has ruled that a man with dual uk and us nationality accused of spying in russia must remain in custody while he awaits trial. paul whelan a former marine appeared in court in moscow on tuesday to appeal against a decision to deny him bail.
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he was detained in the city last month and russian security officials say that he was "caught spying". mr whelan's lawyer has been speaking to the bbc — and said he hopes to prove his clients innocence. translation: the evidence they are investigating now is not convincing proof of guilt. they have not shown us the main part of the evidence. but i think judging main part of the evidence. but i thinkjudging by usual proceedings, he was under surveillance before he was detained. i know he was here in spring 2018, so probably the surveillance began then. the fsb will have to reveal the results of that, it's phone taps, any computer material, and we will demand voice recognition checks or signs of editing. the number of people in work is at its highest level since records began in 1971 . a further one hundred and forty one thousand found jobs between september to november, double the number economists were expecting . figures from the office of national statistics also show the unemployment rate was at its lowest since 1975. average earnings increased by 3 point 3 per cent — that's the biggest rise in more than ten years .
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i think we have another excellent set of numbers. record—breaking employment in the country. we have more people in work than ever before. and interestingly, of the jobs that have been created in the last 20 months, almost entirely they have been full—time roles. we are also seeing wages up with inflation for the tenth month in a row. wages going at their fastest rate in a decade. all of this thanks to the responsible policies followed by the conservative government. our economics correspondent gave me more detail earlier about the record high unemployment. i have been watching these figures, every month they come out and most of those months, you see this fact that the number of people in employment has grown to a new record level. 20, nine —— a re cord new record level. 20, nine —— a record number of people in full—time roles. 44 million people in
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full—time roles. the question has been, while the workforce has been growing and unemployment has been coming down, it isjust 4%, the lowest in about 44 years, while that has been happening, people have not really been getting better. if you look at the wages data that has come out, it shows what looks like a healthy pay rise, but then you take into account inflation, it is more like 1% and that is good by the standards of recent years. we have had a squeeze on living standards over the last eight years where real wages have shrunk. but if you compare it to how it used to be before the financial crash, it is not very good in terms of real wage growth. it takes us to about £494 per week, the average wage. if you compare that with where we were in 2014, it is still a improvement. compare that with where we were in 2014, it is stilla improvement. it is still about £20 less, the average wage, per week, than is still about £20 less, the average wage, perweek, than it is still about £20 less, the average wage, per week, than it was way back in 2007 and once upon a time we would have said, it is great that unemployment is falling, but why are
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we not better off? what about job vacancies? they are at a record. i think it was around 830,000 job vacancies. you have to be a little bit careful with the job vacancy numbers when comparing them with ten or 20 years ago because a lot of the jobs out there are advertised online, the jobs come and go in a way they did not use too. nevertheless, it is a very tightly the packet —— labour market. the numberof the packet —— labour market. the number ofjobs the packet —— labour market. the number of jobs available for the packet —— labour market. the number ofjobs available for people to do ourvery number ofjobs available for people to do our very high and any climate is low. on most economic theories, that should mean that workers have greater bargaining power. it is less easy for an employer to say, ok, you wa nt easy for an employer to say, ok, you want a pay rise, we will let you go. the theory is that therefore pay rises start to edge and employers then have to pay higher charges in order to cover their costs. the bank of england will be looking carefully to see if that is the case. if we
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are going to getting to any wage spiral. up to now, that theory has proved unjustified. we have not had that. do you know the sectors those job vacancies are in? they are all over, essentially. what is remarkable is we are not necessarily talking about part—time work or zero—hours contracts or anything like that, we are talking about full—time roles being generated. no sign of brexit induced uncertainty. but there in mind, the decisions to hire people in october, november, which is what we are looking at, we re which is what we are looking at, were ta ken which is what we are looking at, were taken back in the summer. this does not necessarily mean that employers are shrugging off all the brexit related uncertainty we have seen brexit related uncertainty we have seenin brexit related uncertainty we have seen in the last few weeks. now some astonishing pictures from merseyside where police are appealing for information after a builder drover a mini digger throught the doors of a brand new travelodge in liverpool yesterday evening. 0nlookers shouted at the driver to stop as the machine mounted the hotel steps, sending debris flying as it crashed through the doors. it's been reported that the driver was involved in a pay dispute with contractors. 7 , fl ,. e-.. ,,
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{315 iii-41:13 geuég iggggp’g: before the driyemasseeq one man was treatedfcrreye- but none else was injured. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. good morning. it has been a cold start of the day. we have had the risk of some ice patches through the morning as well. rain affecting the south—east of england and that is clearing away swiftly. for many of us, sunny clearing away swiftly. for many of us, sunny spells and wintry showers. showers focused this morning across western areas. by this afternoon, drifting towards the east. much of the snow will be on higher ground. but they will certainly be some snow on lower levels which could cause some issues this afternoon across eastern areas of england.
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temperatures about three to 6 degrees today and overnight, we will continue with wintry showers across northern ireland, northway, the cheshire area and into the midlands. pretty cold for many of us tonight. during wednesday, dry and bright for many with sunshine but another chilly day. goodbye. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines — a search is underway in the english channel after a plane carrying cardiff city football club's new signing, emiliano sala, went missing last night. it is possible that the aircraft has diverted somewhere else, but we are continuing a search if in the unfortunate event it has actually ditched into the sea. theresa may has met with her cabinet this morning, as mp5 put forward rival proposals they hope will change the outcome of brexit the number of people in work in the uk has reached a record high.
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a campaign led by katie price — to make the online abuse of disabled people a crime — is backed by mps after more than 220,000 people sign a petition. and police hunt for a builder who drove a digger through a newly—built hotel in liverpool, leaving a trail of devastation. world leaders and top ce05 are meeting in davos in switzerland today, to discuss the economy, trade, and brexit. the duke of cambridge and sir david attenborough are both expected to speak at the summit which is taking place at the congress centre. our business correspondent sally bundock is in davos. a bit of stardust there with david
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attenborough and prince william. absolutely, there is a lot of excitement here this year about the fa ct excitement here this year about the fact that both of them are going to be here. and so much so, i was talking yesterday with the founding father of this event from the world economic forum. he was saying he has actually had to change the location for the event where prince william will be interviewing sir david attenborough, because there is so much interest from delegates here. and the issue of climate change, the issue of extreme weather events, how they are impacting the global economy, and also individual economies, is very much on the radar this year. it is something that is being talked about here in davos for many years by non—governmental organisations, environment and boasts, those kind of people. —— environmentalists. this year, it is
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bankers and government ministers who are also seemingly getting on board, because all the extreme weather events experienced in the last couple of years, we are beginning to realise that the issue of climate change is a real one and impacting the developing world. what are they looking to come out of this? sorry, i missed the beginning of your question, can you repeat that? what else should we be looking for to come out of davos this year? there are come out of davos this year? there a re lots of come out of davos this year? there are lots of issues being discussed, but i thought it was very interesting, just talking to south africa's ministerfor interesting, just talking to south africa's minister for trade and industry, rob davies. hejust came out of a meeting, a bilateral meeting, with our international trade secretary liam fox, and basically said to me, we talked about the trade relationship between south africa and the united kingdom, but that will look like when the uk
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leads the european union. and we are ready to form a new trade relationship. so it is those bilateral meetings that are really important and critical here, and the one—on—one conversations, the private conversations. today, the other big keynote speaker to take a lot of attention and will grab headlines around the world is the president of brazil. he is here for the very first time, he has only just been inaugurated as the president of brazil, and he is a very controversial character, he has been described as the tramp of brazil. it's quite interesting that he is here, here is the keynote speaker as well, given the fact that many described him as a climate change denier. thank you very much, sally. let's get more on the online abuse of people with disabilities should be made a criminal offence, according to a new report by mps. it follows a petition started by the television personality katie price, who has a disabled son.
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here are some of the tweets harvey price has received. this is a tweet addressed to katie — "i've got some sweets for harvey here, "i hope he chokes on them." another — "why does harvey price look "like a member of the ira?" and here is a tweet from a now—suspended twitter account created just to post memes and abuse aimed at harvey. let's talk now to accessibility rights blogger, dermot devlin. thank you forjoining us, dermot. have you been subjected to online abuse? i have in the past, not too dissimilar extent as a lot of other people including higher the price. —— not to a similar extent. everyone is going to experience it at some
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time of another. when i have, it has been quite dramatic. tell us about the impact on you, the sort of things you have had and how it makes you feel. i have had it from both sides, some people, at the 2012 olympics, the feel—good factor in the uk, people with disabilities we re the uk, people with disabilities were empowered. but over the years, that perception has changed. with the introduction of things like universal credit, you become a scapegoat in society. so i have been targeted online, we have been told lazy, we have been called scroungers. it is horrible. mps are
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talking about potentially making online abuse of disabled people a specific offence. obviously it requires people who are receiving abuse to actually reported. would you ever report something? how would you ever report something? how would you deal with something that comes to you? would you like to see some of the prosecuted as a result of something set that is particularly vile? not have somebody had just made one or two comments. you would just tell them to stop it. but a repeat offender that keeps coming back, whether it is attacking the disability community or people in the lgbt community, then yes, that
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should lead to prosecution. there is only so much these social media websites can do, because they can close down an account but that is nothing to stop them setting up an account somewhere nothing to stop them setting up an account somewhere else. so it should lead to prosecution. what would you say to the sort of people that are putting this stuff across to people, and the impact they are having? there might be somebody watching now is perhaps —— has perhaps sent a message to somebody online. if you could say something directly to them, what would you say?” could say something directly to them, what would you say? i don't like to go on to those sort of people. i do not know what is going on and there are all lives that they feel they have to lash out. but when you have people like myself who have a disability, or some other minority, in society, we are not
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just a number on the screen, we are real individuals. there are people like myself who have been caught up, igoona like myself who have been caught up, i go on a website about promoting people with disability, empowering them and getting them, but that actually stopped me for a long time because i was too scared to go online in case i would be attacked again. and with other people, that could be the case, they might meet these people in real life. it has led to some people with disabilities sadly taking their own lives because they feel that society is against them. thank you very much for
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joining us. the american singer, chris brown, has been arrested in paris on suspicion of rape, according to french police. the grammy award—winning artist has sold over 100 million records. in 2009, brown pleaded guilty to assault after physically attacking his then girlfriend, the pop superstar rihanna. it's now one month since many us government agencies were forced to shut down in the long running dispute between the white house and congress over funding for a border wall with mexico. it has left up to 800,000 federal employees unpaid. some in essential roles are still turning up for work — and many of them have filed for unemployment benefit. local programmes have sprouted up around the country to support the struggling work force. aleem maqbool reports from boston, massachusetts on some of those being affected. from an airport in boston, they are trying to tell washington they are suffering. right now, our nation is being held hostage by our president.
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air traffic controllers and airport security officers are among hundreds of thousands who have gone unpaid. it started when donald trump demanded approval for billions of dollars for his border wall, and the democrats refused. nobody is by june. today, we are here to send a very simple message to washington. open our government and pay our people for the work they do. not pa rt people for the work they do. not part of the west is one of the many federal prisons, where officers are working without pay. —— not far to the west. some of them voted for donald trump, but the shutdown does not discriminate. we have some people who will see the border will issue like the president, but some who see it differently, but what we all have in common as we are all pawns in this game, our livelihood being used in a political game of chicken. it is going to cave first?
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we all feel like that. and the effects are being felt beyond workers not getting their salaries. 0ther workers not getting their salaries. other businesses have come to a halt because of the shutdown, too. molly is worried that her government assisted rent will not be paid and she will soon be evicted because of the political deadlock.” she will soon be evicted because of the political deadlock. i am very upset with all of them, on all political spectrum is. it is tit—for—tat, and enough is enough, you guys have a home, you have security, you are worth millions of dollars. we have hard—working americans here that are doing the right thing, and you guys are doing tit—for—tat. people's lives are in jeopardy. and molly is worried it will mean higher 86—year—old father, who lives here, will also become a victim of an increasingly far—reaching crisis. some of the ceremonial guardians of the tower of london, the beefeaters, will go on strike for the first time in more than half a century today, in a dispute over pensions.
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the industrial action comes after a new proposal for changes to their pension schemes was rejected by the gmb union. historic royal palaces say they do not expect the strike to have a significant impact on operations. a little earlier, our reporter kathryn stanczyszyn was at the picket line. the first time in 55 years that beefeaters and other staff of their like have been on strike, showing the strength of feeling really over this issue. you can see there is a picket line outside the tower of london. there is a similar line outside hampton court palace. no doubt bemusing some of the many tourists that will be visiting these very popular attractions today. why are they doing this? it is a row over pensions. they were balloted last november palaces said they wanted to change the final salary pension scheme. for some people, the gmb union say,
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they were promised that would not happen. the company was privatised in the 19905 and they were told they would keep that final pension scheme. now it appears that is not the case, and that is why they have gone on strike. they balloted, and the significant result was to walk out. it was meant to happen a little earlier this month but talks were ongoing and we know that last week there was a revised offer, but it was not good enough. hence today's action. hrp say that they are making these changes because it was fairer for the entire workforce. they are going to put more money into other people's pensions, they also say the offer they came back with last week was very generous and that they won't change their minds. nevertheless, these picket lines will be in place until 4pm today and these gmb members say they will keep going. they are so distinctive, the beefeaters, tourists love to take photos of them. we all know what they look like. don't really know much about them, the role and how you become one.
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fill us in on some of the detail. well, of course, they are extremely emblematic at the tourist attractions, very famous tourist attractions. they are the ceremonial guardians of her majesty's palaces. we are talking hampton court, kensington and the tower of london. they are in trust for the next monarch, basically. but historic royal palaces manages them, and it is them the staff have the issue with. out of the staff, maybe around six or seven beefeaters, but many other staff are involved. as you can see, they are not in the uniforms on the picket line today. but they are, as i say,
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very iconic images, so quite a lot of interest in this. they are beefeaters behind you, out of uniform? i don't think she heard me. are they? sorry, i struggled to hear you. ijust got it. yes, there are some beefeaters on both of these picket lines, but as i say, there is a lot of other staff involved as well. we are talking about people that help run ticket offices and people involved in the maintenance of these buildings. france and germany have signed a new treaty aimed at breathing new life into their place at the centre of the european union. here are the pictures of chancellor angela merkel and president emmanuel macron signing this deal, seen as a pledge of friendship. the document seeks to build on a treaty between their predecessors konrad ardenauer and charles de gaulle in 1963, which marked the reconciliation of the second world war enemies. chancellor merkel set out the need for closer ties between the neighbours.
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translation: on the other hand, in all of our countries, populism and nationalism are rising, getting strongerfor nationalism are rising, getting stronger for the first time, a country is actually reading the european union, the united kingdom. worldwide multilateralism is under pressure, be it in climate issues, be it in world trade, be it in the a cce pta nce be it in world trade, be it in the acceptance of international institutions, all the way to the a cce pta nce institutions, all the way to the acceptance of the united nations. 74 yea rs, acceptance of the united nations. 74 years, a human life, after the end of the second world war, what seemed to be solid, what seemed to be a matter of course, is being put into question again. so what we need is a new foundation for our cooperation in the european union. the headlines on bbc news — a search is underway in the english channel for a missing plane carrying cardiff city's newest
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signing, emiliano sala. theresa may has met her cabinet today, as mp5 put forward amendments they hope will alter the prime minister's brexit plans. and the number of people in work in the uk has reached a record high. there's a new warning about the impact of climate change in one of the areas worst affected by global warming — the sahel — a region of africa that covers the gateways into the sahara desert. the international committee of the red cross believes that a changing climate, combined with islamic extremism and tribal conflict is creating an explosive combination there. and it's a problem that could lead to more migration to the shores of europe, creating another humanitarian catastrophe. 0ur chief international correspondent, lyse doucet travelled to mali. she begins in the town of menaka, rarely visited byjournalists, to see how climate change is impacting on daily life there. the sahel, locked in a long war to hold back the desert.
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it is losing. and now, a new enemy. climate change, threatening the world's most vulnerable lands. mali fights on many fronts. un forces are on the ground here. the world's most dangerous peacekeeping mission. often under attack by extremist groups including al qaeda and islamic state. this 63—year—old farmer has seen it all. a country of extremes now lurches from drought to floods. last summer there was more rain than anyone can remember. all his crops were washed away. his home, flooded with water. a mud home full of cracks after an explosion nearby. so what is the biggest enemy now? the conflict or the climate?
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translation: the conflict and the climate. everything is a problem here. mali has all the problems. and some families don't even have anything to eat. and for him, ten children to feed. life lived on the very edge. every generation more fragile than the last. these boys forced to join armed groups. now the centre provides a refuge. translation: my family fled the violence. i stayed behind to take care of our animals but there was no rain then. nothing for them to eat. the animals died one after the other. i had no choice but to join a group with guns. the desert has always dominated life here. people have learned to live with that.
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but the power of climate change is changing everything and making it much worse. poverty, extremism and the conflict over land and water, the need just to survive. today, a call for help from the desert in mali. tuareg musicians belt out a big welcome to a visiting delegation. the president of the icrc here to focus on this fight. it has not been on our radar screen. 0ur natural genetics say we look at arms, armed actors, conflict, perhaps under development but we did not look at the natural environment. now we see that climate change is changing weather patterns and livelihoods of people and is leading to conflict amongst communities. so much has been lost.
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this is the grand mosque of timbuktu. the fabled city in the sand. centuries ago, a city of gold. a cultural capital. seven years ago, islamist fighters smashed many of its shrines. and this magnificent mud mosque is still imperilled. translation: this mosque was built in an arid area. it was not built to drain so much water. now there is more and more rain and wind threatening the site. so much to do. almost all malians live off this land. livestock as well. as temperatures rise, resources shrink and conflict grows as time runs out in this largely forgotten corner of our world. the fact that british police don't routinely carry guns
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is something which sets them apart from many of their overseas counterparts. but of course, forces do have specially trained teams who can carry firearms in exceptional situations. now a new museum has opened dedicated to the history of armed policing, and it aims to showjust how highly skilled those officers are. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw went to take a look. should you open fire or should you wait? this sixth form student is getting to feel what it's like to make that decision. though this isn't real life, it's a scenario, and no—one will be killed, whatever he decides to do. ok, so you can see, where that laser is, is where your round's going to fall, when you pull the trigger, 0k? yeah. so hold the weapon down here, like this. finger off the trigger and then... this is the centrepiece of the museum of armed policing, designed to show us the realities of being a firearms officer, though all the guns used here are replica weapons.
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for these teenagers from 0undle school in northamptonshire, it was a lesson they'd never had before. it was a lot more stressful than i thought it would be, even in a simulation — the decision—making was really difficult, actually. yeah, itjust makes you realise how unpredictable every situation is, and how steady— headed these officers have to be. it's about using your mouth and talking them out of it, rather than actually shooting them. some people might say this museum glamorises armed policing, but there's a serious underlying message about the impact of gun and knife crime and the lengths police have to go to protect themselves and the public. in the 19305, this is what an armed response vehicle look like. this dramatised footage can be seen at the museum. so, do you want to try this on? yes, sir. i'm going to put this over your head. all very different from the hi—tech equipment used now. i don't think it glamorises
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armed policing at all. i think it clearly explains the difficulties of armed policing. i think you'll see from the reaction from young people, that, actually, they're nervous. what we're actually trying to do is highlight how dangerous the role is, and how important those split—second decisions are, that can have life—changing consequences for people. we're very careful not to sort of say, well, we get everything right and we're perfect. this is a museum that accurately reflects what actually goes on in real life. the most significant changes to armed policing came after the mass shooting at hungerford in 1987. 16 people were killed when gunman michael ryan went on the rampage. the victims are remembered here, along with some of those who died after being shot by police. a reminder that although it may be fun on the shooting range, it's not a game outside. danny shaw, bbc news, at the museum of armed policing. he's known as the indiana jones of the art world,
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uncovering a treasure trove of stolen objects, from roman mosaics and bronze sculptures to paintings by old masters. now arthur brand has struck again, tracking down priceless religious relics in an unlikely location. andy beatt reports. not your usual man with a van. the dutch art historian turned supersleuth with his latest heavyweight discoveries — two stone carving depicting christian icons and thought to be at least 1,000 years old. these are two evangelists, and these two were stolen in 2004 and i have no idea how they got them away because they weigh 150 kilos each, and then they disappeared. world heritage. it's the end of a long search for the artworks, snatched from a church in northern spain. a tip—off in 2010 took this detective to britain, and now nearly a decade later, to the carvings themselves.
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bought unwittingly by an aristocratic family who were horrified to discover what they thought were garden statues were, in fact, ancient religious artefacts. the guys who stole these wanted to sell it for a couple of millions or whatever, but they have soon found out that you cannot sell these, so to make at least a little bit of money, they sold them as garden ornaments. there is so much criminality in the art world, forgeries, but also stealing from museums, churches, and my job is to trace them back. and sometimes, we get lucky. he needs all the luck he can muster. art crime is thought to be the world's third biggest black market, beaten only by the illicit trade in drugs and guns. 0ne second, my fingers are under it. the stone reliefs have now been handed to the spanish embassy in london. they're expected to return home within weeks.
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andy beatt, bbc news. in a moment, it's time for the one o'clock news, but first, it's time for a look at the weather. nicole continues, many others enjoying some decent sunshine today, but many spots of ulster since wintry showers. —— the cold continues. here is an image from north yorkshire earlier today. further wintry showers to come, and tonight and tomorrow, and the story remains chilly. these late specs you can see is losing cause of the uk, marking out showers getting fed across as currently. more across eastern england through the evening, and other night, some fading into the north wales, perhaps a cross towards the midlands, a few more for northern ireland and the north and
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west of scotland. a cold night, temperatures down to —6 in some rural spots, and like this morning, widespread ice will be a consideration forfirst widespread ice will be a consideration for first thing on wednesday. however, there will be a lot of sunshine through the day. we keep the north—westerly wind, quite a light wind, but that flow will just mean showers getting into northern and western regions predominantly. western scotland, northern ireland, perhaps not wales, and possibly a few running and off the north sea coasts into east anglia and kent. some areas could get stuck with trees and fog, for example, parts of central scotland, —— freezing fog. another cold night ta kes —— freezing fog. another cold night takes us into thursday, a fine day again with a loss of sunshine for the majority. but notice a change towards the north—east by the end of the day, some thicker cloud, perhaps some snow, but some rain and higher
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temperatures. that marks a change in the end of the week, albeit a brief one. anyone from full sweep across the uk and figures into this atmosphere of our sector. it will bring us some milder conditions for friday. could be quite a gloomy day with some patchy rain around, but temperatures will this closer to average values. just a brief whims of something milder, the cold will return to the weekend, and likely to be some strong north—westerly winds for a time. mps opposed to theresa may's eu withdrawal deal put forward
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their rival plans for brexit. they include labour saying mps should be able to vote on whether or not there should be a second referendum. we'll bring you all the latest from our correspondents in westminster. also this lunchtime: fears for the premier league striker emiliano sala, who was on a light aircraft which is missing over the channel islands. violent protests over high fuel prices in zimbabwe forces the president to break off from a foreign trip. reality tv star katie price's son was trolled online for his disabilities. now mps back her campaign to make such online abuse a crime. and 75 years after witnessing a world war two plane crash,
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